Posts Tagged ‘Utah Jazz’

Afflalo’s flagrant 2 deserves second look


VIDEO: Arron Afflalo is ejected after his forearm blow to Alec Burks’ head is ruled a flagrant 2 foul

On the one hand, the Nuggets would have had mostly themselves to blame for letting a game get away that they’d led by 22 points in the second quarter.

But on the other, it would have been a tough pill to swallow if it happened in part because Arron Afflalo spent the last 5:55 of the game in the locker room as the result of a questionable video review decision.

Afflalo was slapped with a flagrant 2 technical foul, which comes with a mandatory ejection when he tried to make a play on Utah’s Alec Burks driving to the basket.

Yes, we saw that Burks’ fall to the floor was ugly and potentially dangerous. Yes, we saw that Afflalo swung his right arm and hooked Burks around the head on the take-down.

But we also saw that Burks did a pump fake on his way up and it was that move that caused Afflalo to whiff at his play on the ball and resulted in the head shot.

The official description from the rulebook:

A flagrant foul-penalty (2) is unnecessary and excessive contact committed by a player against an opponent. It is an unsportsmanlike act and the offender is ejected immediately.

Game officials Marc Davis, Leroy Richardson and Curtis Blair took a long time viewing video and consulting with the league’s replay center in Secaucus, N.J. and decided that Afflalo’s action merited the harsh punishment.

The Nuggets eventually hung on for a 103-101 win.

But we’re going to be surprised if this doesn’t get another look from the league office. Because Afflalo was not malicious and was clearly making a play on the ball.

Morning shootaround — Nov. 15


VIDEO: Highlights from Friday’s NBA action

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Duncan tops 25K, joins Kareem | Close doesn’t count for Sixers | The name is Harris. Joe Harris | Burke’s unlikely buzzer-beating accuracy

No. 1: Duncan tops 25K, joins Kareem — Not to detract from Tim Duncan‘s tremendous milestone evening Friday in Los Angeles, but once again the numbers crunchers and the young’uns who chronicle NBA exploits neglected a little bit of history.

When folks noted that Duncan scored the 25,000th point of his Hall of Fame-bound career and joined some elite company in San Antonio’s 93-80 victory over the Lakers, they were accurate without being exactly right. Yes, Duncan boosted himself onto the same level as the legendary Kareem Abdul-Jabbar in reaching 25,000 points, 14,000 rebounds and 2,500 blocks. But it’s not quite true that the two big men are “the only players in NBA history” to surpass those thresholds.

To put that another way: You can’t blame Wilt Chamberlain for the fact that the NBA didn’t track blocks during his career. Or, for that matter, it’s not Elvin Hayes‘ fault that the league only began toting blocks in 1973-74, in his fifth pro season.

Chamberlain absolutely swatted an average of 179 shots annually over his 14 seasons – the Dipper might have rejected that many in a month in his prime – and that’s all it would have taken for him to reach 2,500. With 31,419 points and 23,924 rebounds, Wilt established thresholds that would take Duncan a while longer to reach (even Kareem, with 17,440 boards, never really got close in rebounds despite playing 20 seasons).

As for Hayes, it seems fair to suggest he would have averaged 145 over his first five seasons, considering he averaged 195 over his next eight. That’s all the Rockets and Bullets Hall of Famer would have needed to get to 2,500 blocks, to go with his 27,313 points and 16,279 rebounds.

None of this more-proper perspective, though, should take anything away from the celebration of Duncan’s sustained excellence, as reported by the San Antonio Express-News’ Dan McCarney. Abdul-Jabbar was even in the house at Staples Center to witness it:

“Unbelievable player,” Duncan said of Abdul-Jabbar, who reacted with clear appreciation to several of Duncan’s baskets during the game. “A way better scorer than I ever was at any point. I did see him; it was great to see him. It’s fun to be in a category with someone like that.”
“It means I’ve been playing for a very long time. It’s fun to hear about, but it’s something I’ll look back at later on.”
Even at 38, with his contract set to expire this summer, that still might not be for some time given how well Duncan continues to play. He had 13 points and 11 rebounds in just 25 minutes against the Lakers, his sixth double-double in seven games to push his career total to 803. Duncan entered Friday’s game ranked third in rebounds per game at 11.5, and fifth in total rebounding percentage at 20.3.

“When you play for 48 seasons…no, the guy is unbelievable,” Manu Ginobili said. “He’s going by some legends, but he’s already a legend. He’s one of the best players to ever play. It’s not that I’m surprised. Sometimes we hear 25,000 points and say, ‘Wow,’ but it’s Tim. So it can happen.”
Said Gregg Popovich, “I told Aron Baynes, ‘It’s no big deal. If you shot as much as Tim, you’d have 25,000 too.’ “

***

No. 2: Close doesn’t count for Sixers — There’s no getting around it: 0-9 is 0-9. And if you’re an NBA fan of a certain age, that links the 2014-15 Philadelphia 76ers to the dreadful 1972-73 version, which also started the season winless through its first nine games. Finishing with an all-time worst 9-73, Philadelphia was winless through most of the rest of their games, too.

For a few fleeting moments Friday night in Houston, though, the Sixers looked to be on the verge of a W that didn’t stand for woeful. They led 87-86 with less than 20 seconds left, only to see second-year guard Michael Carter-Williams lose the ball off his leg on a drive to the basket. Rockets star James Harden shoot free for a layup at the other end and a rare Philadelphia game that featured 16 lead changes and 16 ties ended like the other eight before it this fall.

Keith Pompey of the Philadelphia Inquirer had more:

This is the same Sixers team that was outscored by a combined 85 points in their previous two contests against the Dallas Mavericks (53 points on Thursday) and Toronto Raptors (32 on Sunday).
“Obviously, the win is the thing that we didn’t get and what hurts most,” Sixers coach Brett Brown said. “I think [the outcome] is a fantastic reflection of what they can be. It’s a sign of not feeling sorry for ourselves, and them coming back with fight.
“Those are the things you sort of leave the game with.”

***

No. 3:The name is Harris. Joe Harris — Unheralded is one thing, disrespected is something entirely different.

You can be excused if you never heard of Joe Harris before Friday night because the 6-foot-6 swingman from the University of Virginia was a second-rounder in the Draft in June, the 33rd player picked overall, after averaging 12.6 points in four college seasons. He had more than the usual amount of shade thrown on him first by the clamor over the Cleveland Cavaliers’ first pick, No. 1 phenom Andrew Wiggins, and subsequently by LeBron James‘ return to his home market and the Cavs’ trade for All-Star forward Kevin Love.

Harris’ rookie experience took a significant turn Friday in Boston, however, with his contributions to Cleveland’s comeback victory over the Celtics. He scored six points, played 19 minutes and was good for a plus-24 on a night when the other three subs who played – Tristan Thompson (minus-9), Mike Miller (minus-15) and Dion Waiters (minus-14) – all were in the red.

The night started out with some all-too-familiar dismissiveness directed toward Harris:

But by the end, there were raves about Harris afterward from both inside and outside the locker room, as enumerated by Jason Lloyd of the Akron Beacon Journal in his usual postgame countdown:

1. With the way he is progressing and as well as he is playing, Joe Harris will be the starting shooting guard sooner rather than later. Much sooner. As in within a couple of weeks (or less), one source with knowledge of the team’s thinking said. At least one member of the Cavs’ brain trust is already in favor of the switch.

2. It was the rookie second-round pick – not Dion Waiters or Mike Miller – playing the final six minutes of Friday’s tight game. The Cavs closed the night with Kyrie Irving and Harris in the backcourt, Shawn Marion and LeBron James in the frontcourt and Kevin Love at center. That’s a lineup they could use more and more going forward.

3. Harris plays with high energy. He defends, he keeps the ball moving, he cuts hard to the basket. He does everything the Cavs need him to do, including knocking down open shots. He is a great fit with this starting lineup because he doesn’t need the ball, but he’s more than capable of knocking down open shots.

4. “Joe Harris is going to be a big piece for our team,” James said. “He’s going to have his rookie mistakes, we know that, but mistakes can be covered when you play hard. That’s one thing that kid is doing.”

5. According to the Cavs’ stats, he shot 57 percent on corner 3-pointers one year at Virginia. That shot will be available to him all night on this team, just like the huge corner 3 he made in the closing minutes Friday to pull the Cavs within 116-113.

***

No. 4: Burke’s unlikely buzzer-beating accuracy — This season already has produced its early share dramatic, game-winning buzzer beaters (GWBB) that we at Hang Time HQ like to rate according to our Horry Scale. That’s named, fittingly, after the much-journeyed NBA role player who won himself and his teams a total of seven championship rings, building his brand as an amazingly clutch shooter with a flair for postseason dramatics.

We warehouse them over in the All Ball Blog, and the latest one came Friday night from Utah’s Trey Burke, an unlikely source given his 30.7 field-goal percentage prior to the game. Our man Lang Whitaker rated Burke’s GWBB on the Horry Scale, and here’s a glimpse at the Difficulty section. Go check it out in full to see how it ranked in Game Situation, Importance and Celebration:

With 2.3 seconds left on the clock, the Jazz didn’t have to rely on a catch-and-shoot. Two-plus seconds is enough time for at least a dribble, maybe even a pass.

But it looked as if the play wasn’t even drawn up for Burke to get the shot. Burke began in the far corner and set a screen for Gordon Hayward, who already had 33 points on the night. Hayward popped to the top of the key and looked to receive a pass. But Knicks forward Quincy Acy denied the look to Hayward, just as Burke flashed to the ball around the free throw line. Burke caught the ball, dribbled left into the corner, and fired up a fadeaway jumper over J.R. Smith, who was all over Burke and contested the shot well. But Burke cleared just enough space with a step-back move to release the jumper, and he drilled the shot as the buzzer was ringing.

Smith actually defended fine on the play — he went under three separate screens and stuck to Burke on the shot. Burke had to make a perfect play just to clear room for the shot. And Burke played it perfectly.

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: The Pelicans needed those big beaks for all the franchise offensive records they racked up in their blowout of the Timberwolves. … J.J. Redick was scratching his head over both the Clippers’ odd layoff and their recent performances. … Rajon Rondo passed Paul Pierce on the Celtics’ all-time assists list and did it in 644 fewer games. Of course, their job descriptions have been a little different. … Eye-yi-yi: More eye trouble for Spurs’ Kawhi Leonard. He says not to worry. … And you thought it would never end – Houston’s streak of double-digit 3-point field-goal games is over. … Don’t blink: Brandon Jennings played some stalwart defense in Detroit’s overtime victory over OKC.

 

Here we go again (East vs. West)


VIDEO: GameTime: Cavaliers’ growing pains

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – Gordon Hayward‘s game-winning buzzer beater on Wednesday didn’t just drop the super-team Cavs to 1-3, it dropped the Eastern Conference to just 3-14 against the West this season.

In case you haven’t been paying attention, this has been a trend. The West has had a winning record against the East in 14 of the last 15 seasons, with the 2008-09 season being the only exception.

20141106_east-west_history

Two of the East’s three wins (by Brooklyn and Toronto) were against the depleted and road-weary Thunder, who were playing their fourth and fifth games in seven nights in five different cities, with just eight healthy guys by the time the Toronto game ended. The other came when Andrew Wiggins bit on Jimmy Butler‘s pump fake and fouled him with less than a second to go to give the Bulls (who were playing without Derrick Rose and Taj Gibson) a one-point victory in Minnesota.

It’s early, but this is not a good start for the East. The Brooklyn Nets, who lost at home to Minnesota on Wednesday, have the fifth-best record in the conference at 2-2.

Good news, though. TNT’s Thursday double-header is an all-West affair. Spurs-Rockets at 8 p.m. ET and Mavs-Blazers at 10:30.

20141106_east-west

Morning shootaround — Nov. 6


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Nov. 5

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Cavs still searching for answers | Rose, not Bulls, made call to miss games | Might Lakers try to deal for Rondo? | Thunder set to add Smith

No. 1: Cavs search for answers in another loss — The Cleveland Cavaliers began their current four-game road trip with 114-108 win over the rival Chicago Bulls, but since then, it’s been all down hill. On Tuesday came a 101-82 pasting at the hands of the Portland Trail Blazers and last night in Salt Lake City, the Cavs climbed back into a game they trailed the Jazz in all night, only to lose 102-100 on a Gordon Hayward jump shot. Somehow, though, Cavs star LeBron James is trying to find the positives in these tough losses and shared some of them with Northeast Ohio Media Group’s Joe Vardon:

In the Cavaliers’ previous two losses, James was much more passive – abnormally so for him. He articulated after the loss to Portland Tuesday and again before the Utah game Wednesday that he had purposefully played that way in attempt to prove a point to younger Cleveland holdovers from the bad teams which lost tons of games before James returned.

There is a “fine line,” James called it, between playing passively and allowing the team to lose now as a teaching tool, and being the kind of aggressor that can will the Cavaliers to victory. He suggested he was torn on how to play.

James’ better angels won because it would do no one – not him, not first-year coach David Blatt, and not Kyrie Irving and Dion Waiters, the two players James is most trying to reach – any good for the Cavaliers to go on a losing streak with a seemingly disinterested James standing around on the perimeter.

The jelling that needs to take place between now and whenever Cleveland reaches its potential, the breaking of the “bad habits” James identified Tuesday, will probably come faster if he plays at his typically high level.

“We played well, and I was very aggressive,” James said after the loss to Utah. “I got to the line a lot tonight. My body felt it good, it let me know I was in attack mode. I think it put us in a position to win. That’s all you can ask for as a player is to put your team in a position to win at the end of the game. So we got a little bit of clarity, but me, personally, I’ve got to figure out a way to get my teammates involved, too, because it can’t be just a one, two, or three-man show.”

James played better defense. He’s known as a premier defender, but he’s gotten lost at times and merely waved at his man on other occasions this season, while preaching the need for younger player to commit to defense.

James moved his feet against the Jazz, played the passing lanes and nearly had two more steals. The Cavaliers started slowly on defense against Utah, coughing up 59 first-half points, but got back in the game with a more committed effort in the third and fourth quarters.

Still, another flat performance — be it the entire game (as was the case in Portland), or in the middle of it (such as last night in Utah) — is starting to irk many of the Cavs. Chris Haynes of the Northeast Ohio Media Group has more on that angle:

It may only be four games in and yes, their chemistry still needs time to materialize, but there’s no excuse for not showing up. It’s starting to become problematic.

“We should have never been in that position in the first place,” Tristan Thompson told Northeast Ohio Media Group of Hayward’s shot. “Our energy level was terrible the whole game. We didn’t start picking it up until the last eight minutes probably. So we have to live with the results.”

Thompson makes his living off of hard work and doing the little things that helps a team win. For a player of his work ethic, it’s extremely difficult for him to watch this team give a lackadaisical effort.

He’s puzzled, as he can only shake his head in disapproval.

“I can’t put my finger on it but we got to figure it out collectively as a group,” he said. “It can’t just be one or two guys. It has to be all of us collectively as a group, figuring out what it takes to play 48 minutes of hard basketball, playing with some heart, some balls and being ready to fight.”

Blatt tried to defend his team, saying they wanted to attack the Jazz in some pick-and-roll situations and in isolations that often don’t lead to assists. That’s a fair argument but the guys know that’s unacceptable.

“You can’t explain it,” LeBron James said in amazement. “There’s no way you’re going to win a basketball game like that, just having six assists…We just can’t win like that. We have to figure out a way to help each other and not make it so tough.”


VIDEO: LeBron James talks after the Cavs’ road loss in Utah (more…)

Report: Jazz, Burks agree to 4-year extension

HANG TIME BIG CITY — With tonight’s midnight deadline looming for teams and players from the 2011 NBA Draft to agree to contract extensions, another player has reached a long-term deal. According to Yahoo’s Adrian Wojnarowski, the Utah Jazz have reached agreement with shooting guard Alec Burks on a 4-year, $42-million extension.

Burks, a 6-6 shooting guard, is entering his fourth season at just 23 years old. Last season, Burks appeared in 78 games and averaged 14 points per game.

Writes Wojnarowski:

Reachable incentive clauses could push Burks’ deal to $45 million, sources said.

Burks has developed into one of the NBA’s better young shooting guards and is a cornerstone of the franchise’s youthful core.

Burks, a member of the 2011 NBA draft class, and his agent, Andy Miller, had until midnight EST on Friday to negotiate an extension with Utah – or Burks could’ve entered into restricted free agency in 2015.

Burks, 23, is the third young Jazz player, along with Gordon Hayward and Derrick Favors, to reach a four-year extension with the franchise.

The Jazz and power forward Enes Kanter ended extension talks Wednesday, and he’ll enter into restricted free agency in July. Utah can match any offer sheet and retain him.

Blogtable: Down, but on its way up

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Questions for the Cavs | The scoring champ | Utah, Orlando or Sacramento?



VIDEO: The Jazz finally may be on the right track

> Which of these down-on-its-luck franchises strikes you as on the fastest track forward: Utah, Sacramento or Orlando?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: Give me Orlando. They strike me as having the best fit of young pieces – Victor Oladipo, Tobias Harris, Mo Harkless, Nikola Vucevic, Aaron Gordon – to develop together, if they can manage to score enough points along the way. Sacramento should have been better by now, and for every Kings player who intrigues me, there’s another who cancels out the optimism. Utah’s talent is good but a new coach and system suggests a reset of the learning curve.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Can I say Philadelphia?  Even with more bumps and plenty of pain ahead this season, the Sixers are stacking young talent and will get more from the 2015 Draft. But if you’re making me pick from these three, I’ll go with the one that has the best player. That’s the Kings. DeMarcus Cousins, for all the known questions about attitude, could be a franchise-carrying talent. The Jazz and Magic are scoops of vanilla ice cream: filling but hardly exciting.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: I keep wanting to believe in the Kings, to believe in DeMarcus Cousins, to believe in new ownership, new management and coach Mike Malone. But, man, they really make it hard. In Orlando, I do like their young talent, but I’m not sold on Jacque Vaughn at the helm and I think there will be a coaching change at some point. Utah has fully committed to a youth movement and I’m sold on Trey Burke and have high hopes for Dante Exum as a game-changing playmaker. Gordon Hayward has to step it up to an All-Star-caliber level, so we’ll see about that, but there’s other young, emerging talent and more picks in the trove. They got the coach question out of the way and Quin Snyder will breathe some freshness into the program. Maybe this is my West bias coming into play, but I’ll take Utah over Orlando by a smidgen.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comOrlando. For one thing, the Magic are in the East, which gives them an easier path to the back of the playoff pack, even this season despite a lot of youth. For another: Nikola Vucevic, Victor Oladipo, Tobias Harris, Maurice Harkless, Aaron Gordon and Elfrid Payton. That’s a nice foundation built on defense and rebounding. They obviously have a lot of growing to do while relying heavily on two rookies and a second-year player, but that’s a lot of potential for the fast track.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: I’m not very excited about the 2-3 year prospects of any of these teams. The Kings have the best player of the three, but nothing around DeMarcus Cousins (or a clear plan of action) that says they definitely have a shot at making the playoffs in the next three years. The Magic and Jazz both have a decent collection of young talent, including rookie guards – Elfrid Payton and Dante Exum – with high ceilings, but nobody that is definitely a future All-Star. If I have to take one team, I’ll take Orlando, just because they’re in the Eastern Conference, where a playoff spot can be had with a decent amount of talent and good coaching.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: All three of the these teams believe they have the ideal core group in place for lift off. The promise of what could be always rules the day in lottery land. The one place where I believe that there has been a true altering of the DNA for the better is in Utah. The continued stockpiling of versatile, young talent is at a point where the process can be accelerated a bit this season. Trey Burke, Gordon Hayward, Derrick Favors, Enes Kanter, Dante Exum, Alec Burks and even new coach Quin Snyder will operate without the added pressure of playoff expectations, which are not realistic for the Kings or Magic either. The Kings and Magic, however, are still sorting through their talent base to see who does and does not fit. The Jazz already know who and what they have.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: Utah and Orlando are each inching forward, not a slowly as Philadelphia, but at intentionally deliberate paces. But from the ownership down, Sacramento seems like a team that doesn’t want to wait any longer. While Utah and Orlando each have a few nice young pieces, the Kings have players like DeMarcus Cousins and Rudy Gay who are further along than most of the guys in Orlando and Utah. They’ve got a new arena on the way, and there seems to be a real urgency to win and win now.

Morning shootaround — Oct. 14


VIDEO: Daily Zap for games played Oct. 13

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Thibodeau wants more from Noah, Rose | Horford likely to return to lineup this week | Kidd explains Antetokounmpo’s new role | Burke getting better grip on NBA game

No. 1: Thibodeau wants Bulls to play sharper — The Chicago Bulls climbed to .500 in the preseason after last night’s 110-90 win against the Denver Nuggets, but the team’s perfectionist coach, Tom Thibodeau, wasn’t exactly thrilled with the outcome. According to Joe Cowley of the Chicago Sun-Times, Thibodeau is wanting a San Antonio Spurs-like focus from his team as the preseason wears on and he just hasn’t seen that yet from them. As well, Thibodeau thinks stars Derrick Rose and Joakim Noah have a lot more work to do:

There were signs in a 110-90 preseason win over the Denver Nuggets at the United Center on Monday night, but Thibodeau is looking for perfection — and if not perfection, at least a better effort in attempting to achieve it.

That starts with guard Derrick Rose and center Joakim Noah, whom he singled out.

With both players coming off injuries last season, restrictions on their minutes have handcuffed what Thibodeau wants to get done.

‘‘In order for [Rose] to get his timing, he has to play, and he has to work,’’ Thibodeau said. ‘‘Right now, his timing isn’t there. It’s a big adjustment for everyone. Everyone has to get used to what he does on the floor. The only way you can do that is by being out there.

‘‘It depends on the work he puts in when he shakes that rust off. The game is played collectively. There’s a lot of work for him and Jo. I’m concerned about that.’’

It’s not only what he hasn’t been seeing from his core players but what he has observed this preseason from the defending champion San Antonio Spurs. In the two preseason games the Spurs played overseas last week, veteran Tim Duncan played 33 and 35 minutes, while Tony Parker played 35 and 36.

‘‘I’m watching San Antonio, and they’re going after it,’’ Thibodeau said. ‘‘Parker, Duncan, they’re playing huge minutes right off the start. I think it’s a strong message what they’re saying right now. They’re preparing themselves to defend their championship. And so in order to get that way from them, you’re going to have to wrestle it away from them. They’re not just going to give it away. Your mind-set has to be right.’’

Thibodeau wouldn’t come out and say Noah and Rose haven’t had the right mind-set, but he was definitely setting the bar.

‘‘Oh, no, they’re working hard enough,’’ he said. ‘‘It’s getting ready to play in games. You’re going to have timing and conditioning by playing together.’’


VIDEO: The Bulls handle the Nuggets in a preseason rout

(more…)

Blogtable: Second-year leaps

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Sophomore strength | Best new fit | A memorable summer


> Which of these second-year players do you expect to take the biggest leap forward this season: Trey Burke, Tim Hardaway Jr. or Gorgui Dieng? Why?

Gorgui Dieng (David Sherman/NBAE)

Gorgui Dieng (David Sherman/NBAE)

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comGive me Gorgui Dieng. The lively, defensive-minded center from Senegal by way of Louisville was a second-half revelation last season after spending the first four months of 2013-14 buried on Minnesota’s bench. He started 15 games late in the season, averaging 12.2 points, 12.0 rebounds and 1.7 blocks, while turning his plus/minus from minus-14.0 to plus-4.5. Chicago already admits privately that passing on Dieng to take Tony Snell one spot earlier in the 2013 draft was a mistake — he would be a perfect complement to Joakim Noah and replacement for Omer Asik in Tom Thibodeau‘s defense. Timberwolves coach Flip Saunders knows what he has in Dieng, who mitigates the disappointing work so far by same-first-rounder Shabazz Muhammad. So Dieng will get a big minutes boost whether Nikola Pekovic stays healthy or, more likely, not.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Trey Burke is in a good position to make the leap, but I’m not sure he’s good the right passing instincts for a point guard yet. Gorgui Deng will get minutes as Nikola Pekovic’s backup, but the Wolves are a team starting over. So I’ll go with Tim Hardaway Jr., who can do one thing — shoot — very well.  If he gets better on defense, he could push for a spot in the starting lineup. Or he lights it up for Derek Fisher and Phil Jackson as a sixth man.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: I really like Gorgui Dieng and how strong he came on last season, but since he’s playing behind Nikola Pekovic, I’m just not sure he’s necessarily going to get the impact minutes of the other two guys. Tim Hardaway Jr. should be an exciting player in New York, but my money’s on Trey Burke. First off all, he’s got the ball in his hands so he has an opportunity every time down the floor to make something happen. I think the Jazz will have a fun team under Quin Snyder. Also, he’ll be pushed by rookie Dante Exum, and that kind of competition will drive to Burke to really hone his game.

Trey Burke (Melissa Majchrzak/NBAE)

Trey Burke (Melissa Majchrzak/NBAE)

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: All good candidates for forward progress. I’ll go with Dieng because I have been on the bandwagon since he as drafted and, and plus, he followed that up with a very good second half to the rookie season. That momentum could carry over, giving him a chance to play a big role in Minnesota. Burke will definitely have a big role in Utah, but also the most challenging situation of the three because he will be adjusting to the arrival of Dante Exum, who will have the ball in his hands a lot. Burke was smart, mature and made good decisions his first season, so he can contribute in a lot of ways, but  his path is subject to change.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Burke has the biggest opportunity of the three to build on his rookie year. He was handed the keys to the Utah offense as soon as he made his late-November debut last season, and Dante Exum probably won’t take too many point-guard minutes from him this year. Hardaway can be an explosive scorer, but is still in a mix with Iman Shumpert and J.R. Smith on the wing in New York, where it will be especially crowded if Carmelo Anthony plays most of his minutes at the three. Dieng isn’t talked about enough when discussing the young Wolves, but is still playing behind Thaddeus Young and Nikola Pekovic.

Tim Hardaway Jr. (Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE)

Tim Hardaway Jr. (Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE)

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: This is a trick question, right? You stick two Michigan guys in here and think I’m going to ignore my guys. I think Tim Hardaway Jr. has the highest ceiling of the three and the great opportunity in front of him in terms of what role he could potentially play this season. The new system and coach in New York will be an ideal fit for young Hardaway, whose ability to score in bunches and from deep, gives him the edge over two other guys who have a chance to have huge seasons of their own. But Hardaway Jr. is my pick to take flight this year.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: I really like Dieng, and he looked great at Summer League in Vegas. But to me the easier transition path belongs to Burke. After a season of going up against NBA competition at an unfamiliar position, he can build on that experience and move forward. Equally important, the other young Jazz players can take from last year’s rough experience and move forward. And don’t forget Utah has new coach Quin Snyder in place, presumably running some version of the offense used in his previous stops, San Antonio and Atlanta, where point guards Tony Parker and Jeff Teague had plenty of opportunities to flourish.

Aldo Avinante, NBA Philippines: Logically, I think Trey Burke will have the biggest leap because the point guard position has been generally successful the past few years. Burke has all the tools to succeed in his position, although they have the highly touted Dante Exum on their squad, he’s still a raw project compared to Burke. With already one year under his belt, Burke has nowhere to go but up.

Akshay Manwani, NBA India: Tim Hardarway Jr. The New York Knicks guard has potential and was one of the bright sparks from the Knicks’ rough showing last season. Hardaway Jr. has shown that he can create his own shot, shoot on the first touch, moves well without the ball in his hand and can get open while eluding the defense. Then with the changes made by the Knicks, with Phil Jackson and Derek Fisher now around at MSG, Hardaway Jr. will have the right mentoring to help him reach his ceiling.

Davide Chinellato, NBA Italia: I say Gorgui Dieng. He had a very interesting second part of the season, a fantastic World Cup and plays for a rebuilding team in which everybody will get his chance. He’s going to be a double-double machine pretty soon, even coming off the bench behind Pekovic.

Dieng among international guys who have raised their stock in Spain


VIDEO: Kia Rookie: Gorgui Dieng

MADRID – The 2014 FIBA Basketball World Cup is primarily about 288 guys playing with pride for their country, great games and the drama that comes with them. But it’s also a level of competition and exposure that allows players with little or no NBA experience to raise or lower their profile.

Tuesday, the U.S. team faces Slovenia (3 p.m. ET, ESPN), which boasts Suns guard and NBA vet Goran Dragic, who has had little trouble replicating his domestic success in international play.  

But what about the other squads? Here are the three young international players who really raised their stock in the last 10 days, along with five more who helped themselves out…

Bojan Bogdanovic – 25 years old – Croatia

21.2 ppg, 4.2 rpg, 50.0 FG%, 13-for-36 3pt
The older, bigger Bogdanovic was the 31st pick of the 2011 Draft and was acquired by the Brooklyn Nets that night. They waited three years to bring him over, but their patience could pay off, because the 6-foot-7 small forward has improved quite a bit in that time.

There will be an adjustment to the speed, athleticism, and schedule of the NBA, but this guy can score, as evidenced by the 27 points he put up against France on Saturday, being guarded by NBA (or former NBA) guys Nicolas Batum, Evan Fournier and Mickael Gelabale. Bogdanovic won’t exactly fill the void left by Paul Pierce, but he should play right away.

Gorgui Dieng – 24 years old – Senegal

16.0 ppg, 10.7 rpg, 1.5 bpg, 42.0 FG%
With the No. 1 picks in each of the last two drafts, the Timberwolves are looking toward the future. And you have to include the No. 21 pick from 2013 as part of the team’s young and promising core. Dieng’s skill set goes beyond scoring and rebounding; he’s a very smart and willing passer out of the high post.

He averaged 12.2 points, 12.0 rebounds and 1.7 blocks in 15 starts as a rookie last season, and just led Senegal to a surprise trip to the round of 16. Facing Spain (and their NBA frontline) on Saturday, Dieng had his worst game of the tournament, shooting 1-for-9. But his play in Group B made it clear that Flip Saunders will have to find him more playing time this season.

Joffrey Lauvergne – 22 years old – France

10.3 ppg, 4.5 rpg, 53.5 FG%, 3-for-8 3pt
The 6-foot-10 Lauvergne is playing out of position with France, starting at center in the absence of Alexis Ajinca (and ahead of Rudy Gobert). But he’s a solid defender, a willing screener, and has used his quickness to combat the size of opposing centers, playing his best game against Serbia’s Miroslav Raduljica. This is the biggest role he’s had on the national team (which has four NBA players this year), and he leads it in scoring and rebounding.

After breaking out with Partizan in the 2012-13 season, Lauvergne was drafted with the No. 55 pick in 2013 and acquired by the Nuggets. They offered him a small deal this summer, but he chose instead to sign with Khimki in Russia. That deal has an out clause next year.

In group play, Lauvergne had some issues with the size of the Gasol brothers, who he’ll face again in the quarterfinals on Wednesday.

Five more

Aron Baynes – 27 years old – Australia
Baynes isn’t all that young, but he looked like a guy who deserves a bigger role in the NBA than he’s likely to get in San Antonio, where he was the fifth or sixth big on the depth chart last season. It would make sense for another team to grab him and move him up a spot or two, especially since the Spurs already have 14 fully guaranteed contracts on their roster and another guy with a partial guarantee. But Baynes is a restricted free agent.

Matthew Dellavedova – 24 years old – Australia
Dellavedova’s numbers weren’t consistent, but he played a big role on a good team. He’s more of a steady, run-the-offense kind of point guard than a scorer, though he did hit a huge shot over Omer Asik in the closing moments of Australia’s loss to Turkey on Sunday. The Cavs were a pretty good team (plus-3.8 points per 100 possessions) with Dellavedova on the floor last season, and he should continue to have a role on what is now a title contender.

Raul Neto – 22 years old – Brazil
Playing behind Marcelo Huertas, Neto’s role can be limited most nights. But with Huertas not playing his best and Brazil struggling with rival Argentina on Sunday, Neto helped turn the game around with 21 points on an incredible 9-for-10 shooting, scoring multiple times in late-shot-clock, one-on-one situations. Neto, a 2013 second-round pick whose rights are held by the Jazz, has skills, but is only 6-1, which makes it difficult to project him as a clear rotation player in the league.

Emir Preldzic – 27 years old – Turkey
Speaking of making big shots, Preldzic hit the two biggest shots of the tournament, turning a five-point deficit into a one-point victory on Sunday, and putting Turkey in the quarterfinals against Lithuania. The 6-9 forward with skills was drafted five years ago, but is still at an age where NBA teams should keep an eye on him. The Mavs got his rights from Washington in the DeJaun Blair sign-and-trade in July.

Dario Saric – 20 years old – Croatia
Most people were already high on Saric, who the Sixers took with the No. 12 pick in June, even though they knew they couldn’t have him for at least two years. But the World Cup has been a showcase for his size and skills, which will make you wish he was coming to the league sooner.

Morning shootaround — Aug. 13


NEWS OF THE MORNING

Report: Ballmer, Rivers to talk extension | Report: Bledsoe, Monroe likely to ink qualifying deals | Analyst: Sale of Jazz would fetch up to $650 million

No. 1: Report: Ballmer to discuss extension with Rivers — If you somehow missed it yesterday, the biggest NBA story on the planet was the league officially approving the sale of the Los Angeles Clippers to new owner Steve Ballmer, who replaces the disgraced Donald Sterling. Now that Ballmer is in place, one of his first orders of business may be locking up coach Doc Rivers to a contract extension, writes Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports:

In the wake of owner Steve Ballmer gaining governorship control of the Los Angeles Clippers, discussions on a contract extension for Doc Rivers are expected to commence soon, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

Ballmer and Rivers had been eager to forge a long-term partnership, and a California court confirming the authority of Shelly Sterling to sell the franchise on behalf of the Sterling Family Trust has cleared the way to work toward a new deal.

Rivers, 52, the president of basketball operations and head coach, has two years left on his original three-year, $21 million contract. Rivers is already one of the highest-paid executives and coaches in professional sports, and his prominence and pay could grow with the promise of Ballmer’s stewardship of the Clippers.

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