Morning shootaround — Oct. 8

VIDEO: Highlights from games played Oct. 7


Curry responds to Harden’s MVP comments | LeBron not expecting to carry Cavs as much | Bennett’s fresh start in Toronto

No. 1: Curry responds to Harden’s MVP comments — If you think the top names in the NBA aren’t already campaigning for the 2016 Kia MVP, you haven’t been paying attention. Earlier this week, Houston Rockets star James Harden told our Fran Blinebury that he still feels he should have won MVP in 2015 (and not Stephen Curry of the Golden State Warriors). Sacramento Kings star DeMarcus Cousins says the 2016 MVP is ‘mine to grab’. So what does Curry have to say about all this (and Harden’s words in particular)? Not a whole lot, writes Monte Pool of

Steph Curry’s response Wednesday to Harden’s latest comments, which amounted to a vote for James Harden, was an understated mic drop.

“It doesn’t change what happened last year,” Curry, who actually took home the hardware, said after Warriors practice.

Curry didn’t so much as revisit the topic as search for reasons why Harden did.

“I don’t know,” Curry said. “Different guys find different ways of motivating themselves. I’ve never been one to just . . . I’m obviously confident in what I do, and I know he’s confident in what he does. It might come out in a different way.

“I try not to do a lot of talking, especially (regarding) things that have passed. Obviously, you’ve got to motivate yourself and I’m sure he’s motivated this year to do some special things. I’m the same way.”


Ex-Knicks star Gallatin dies at 88

Harry Gallatin #11 of the New York Knicks poses for a mock action portrait in 1950 in New York, New York.

Harry Gallatin averaged a double-double for his career in points and rebounds.

He showed up, played hard and won games. He was Harry “the Horse” Gallatin, the basketball Hall of Famer and original “Iron Man” in the NBA, who died Wednesday morning at his home in Illinois at age 88.

Gallatin was one of the greatest Knicks ever, and played during the dawn of the league in the 1950s. His streak of 610 consecutive games played was a Knicks record that lasted nearly 60 years.

Gallatin was a powerful player at 6-foot-6 who worked in the paint, a seven-time All-Star and two-time All-NBA selection who carved a reputation for toughness and durability. He led the league in total rebounds in 1953-54 and still ranks fourth on the Knicks’ all-time rebounding list at 5,935; his 33-rebound game in ’52-53 remains the highest in club history. He played nine years with the Knicks, who made him a No. 1 draft pick, and one with the Pistons before retiring.

“To play (in New York) was something special,” he said once. “I couldn’t wait to get there and give it all I had, which is the only way I knew how. I appreciated the chance to play at the Garden and play alongside my teammates. Just something special.”

Gallatin was also a notable coach. In his first season on an NBA coach, in 1962 with the St. Louis Hawks, he was named Coach of the Year. The Hawks reached the divisional finals that year, along with the next season, and then Gallatin returned to New York to coach the Knicks. He lasted two seasons before returning to his home state and coaching Southern Illinois at Edwardsville. Showing his versatility, he later became the school’s golf coach.

Gallatin was voted into the Hall of Fame in 1991 and was honored by the Knicks in 2011 during Legends Night. He averaged 11 points and 13.9 rebounds for his career, a double-double, but was most proudest of a singular stat.

“I never missed a practice and I never missed a game,” he said. “Not once. Not in my entire life.”



Hang Time Podcast (Episode 212) Featuring Brett Dawson

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The pipeline is as star-studded as it is long. Anthony Davis, John Wall, DeMarcus Cousins, Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Karl-Anthony Towns, Devin Booker and so many other former Kentucky stars have done their (usually) one-and-done diligence in Lexington under John Calipari and then moved on to the NBA to chase their fortunes and hoop dreams, hoping of course, that they intersect at the corner of championship and max contract.

Mock Calipari’s methods all you want, question his ethics if you will, but there is no disputing his results. When he boasts of changing lives and making millionaires out of the 5-star talents that choose the path through Lexington to get to the NBA, the results have been staggering.  Three No. 1 overall picks (Wall, Davis and Towns) have matriculated through the program, a total of 25 players through his first six seasons have crossed the threshold, and there are no doubt more to come.

Calipari, as he said Kentucky Senator Mitch McConnell told him, is “creating more millionaires than a Wall Street firm.” Calipari, after all, is the only coach to boast five first-round selections in the same Draft (in 2010) and the only coach to have six players taken in a Draft in the modern (two-round) era, and he’s done it twice (in 2012 and 2015).

And when Davis and Kidd-Gilchrist went off the board at No. 1 and No. 2, respectively, in 2012 Calipari became the first coach to pull off that feat.

It’s a mind-boggling run highlighted by the ascension of Davis, the New Orleans Pelicans superstar who is already considered by many to be one of the top five players in the NBA.

Few people can provide the perspective of the UK-NBA pipeline the way Brett Dawson can. After covering the ‘Cats for years, he’s now turning his focus on Davis and the Pelicans for The Advocate in New Orleans. And he joins us on Episode 212 of The Hang Time Podcast to discuss all things UK-Cal-Pelicans and AD, a conversation we had to have as we get ready for next week’s Hang Time Road Trip, Part II (#NBAHangTime)…


As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of,  Lang Whitaker of’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.

VIDEO: Anthony Davis lit up the scene for the New Orleans Pelicans last season … and promises to do more of the same this season and beyond

Blogtable: Is it time for Bulls to trade Rose?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Paul George the PF? | Do you believe Carmelo? | Is it time to deal D-Rose?

VIDEOHow will Derrick Rose’s latest injury affect the Bulls?

> In light of recent events, the emergence of Jimmy Butler and a new coach, should the Bulls begin the to process of seeking a trade for point guard Derrick Rose? Where would you ship Rose or would he stay and why?

Steve Aschburner, At $20 million this season and $21 million next season, given his injury history, I’m not sure there’s a trade market for Rose. Chicago would have to take back so much junk in matching salary, there’d be no likely gain other than excising a possible poor fit next to Butler. And frankly, that’s a lousy reason – for years, the storyline was all about Rose’s need of a “sidekick,” an All Star-capable companion who would lighten his workload and keep defenses more honest. It’s on the two of them to figure out their “alpha dog” issue, especially Rose. But he has enough to do just to get back on, and stay on, the court.

Fran Blinebury, Jimmy Butler got his payday and I’m happy for him. But let’s not confuse his overall talent with a healthy Derrick Rose. The operative word, of course, being healthy. New coach Fred Holberg knows that. It’s not fair to toss in an elbow to the eye at practice and an orbital fracture as further evidence of being injury prone. Rose has said things and is acting out, at least in part, due to his frustration from spending so much time not playing over the last three seasons. Here in early October, it’s time for everyone to take a deep breath and relax. If I’m the Bulls, I don’t want to send Rose anyplace except back out onto the court at the United Center.

Scott Howard-Cooper, This is not the time to trade Derrick Rose. I certainly understand the part about needing dependability at point guard of all positions, and Rose’s knees are not dependable, but this would be selling very low. Dealing from a position of weakness is not the way to go unless it’s a last resort, and this is not. Let him get back on the court, and then everyone can get a better read. Two things to remember, though. The latest setback was a freak injury that could have happened to anyone, not the continuation of a problem. And, good luck solving the Rose dilemma without creating a new one at point guard.

Shaun Powell, I’d give Rose another year to reinvent himself into more of a passing point guard and swallow his pride and learn to yield to Butler and Pau Gasol more often in tight games. If he resisted, I’d explore trades but only if I could get his replacement in return. Otherwise, why bother?

John Schuhmann, First of all, good luck finding a team that’s willing to take on the $41.4 million left on Rose’s contract, given his injury history. His deal will be more palatable after this season, which is when the Bulls should reevaluate. Jimmy Butler is a terrific player, but he’s not James Harden (not yet, at least). Every team needs multiple ball-handlers and Rose still has a key role to play in Fred Hoiberg‘s offense. If things go right, this team could be a legit challenger to the Cavs in the Eastern Conference.

Sekou Smith, The Bulls and Derrick Rose both need to take a step back and see where this season takes them before worrying about a potential split. He’s under contract for two more years and the window to do huge things with a healthy Rose and Butler comprising one of the best backcourts in the league. So much of what comes out of Rose’s mouth these days makes me cringe, so I get why Bulls fans and observers are entertaining thoughts of a future that does not include their once-universally beloved native son. Times change. Circumstances, too. But talent, true superstar talent, is hard to come by. And the Bulls can’t make any premature decisions about Rose and the future based on what’s transpired the first few weeks of the season. No trade!

Ian Thomsen, Why trade him? The Bulls won’t get close to an equal return, especially given Rose’s ongoing history of injuries. This latest event for Rose was a freak accident, so don’t overreact to it. Keep him and see how he performs in Fred Hoiberg’s promising offense.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blog: If I was Chicago, I’d be willing to move Rose, but I just don’t know who you get back who can match what Rose brings. Last year, when he was returning from injuries and fighting other injuries, Rose still averaged almost 18 ppg, which is no small feat. The other issue in trading Rose would be finding a team willing to take on the remaining two years and $40+ million on his contract. But even if Rose is never the again the same player that won the MVP, Derrick Rose is still a marquee name and top talent. And there are a few teams in major markets — Brooklyn, Boston, New York, the Lakers — who probably wouldn’t mind adding another superstar to their mix.

Blogtable: Carmelo a Knick for life?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Paul George the PF? | Do you believe Carmelo? | Is it time to deal D-Rose?

VIDEOCarmelo Anthony chats during training camp

> Carmelo Anthony says if things don’t work out in New York, he wouldn’t ask for a trade. Do you believe him? Where would you trade Carmelo if he and the Knicks can’t get on track?

Steve Aschburner, Believe him? Today yes, tomorrow not so much. Four more years is an eternity, especially for an aging drama king who is out of sync with New York’s current rebuilding initiative. His and the Knicks’ arrows are trending in opposite directions and, at some point, it isn’t going to be pretty. If I needed to trade Anthony, I’d labor mightily to make it Brooklyn, where it wouldn’t disrupt his lifestyle and all the other ancillary stuff that was so important to him when he re-signed. Or Philadelphia, just because.

Fran Blinebury, Actually, I think I do believe him. Anthony has demonstrated that he’s mainly interested in being the big Broadway star with his name getting top billing on on the marquee while taking most of the shots. He can only do that by remaining in New York. Ka-ching!

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comOf course he should be believed! How dare you suggest people ever say something for public consumption and something different behind closed doors. The fair answer is that I believe him at the moment. There is no way for anyone — including Melo — to know what he will be feeling in a year. So much can change. Maybe the team is still losing. Maybe the team is going in a positive direction but with Anthony in a supporting role he does not want. But I believe he wants things to work out in New York. It’s where he wanted to be, twice.

Shaun Powell, He won’t ask for a trade perhaps because Mrs. Melo doesn’t want to live anywhere else, and neither does Carmelo. There are too many external factors (endorsements, visibility, social ramifications) at stake. He wants his identity tied to NYC and if he didn’t, he would’ve signed with the Bulls a few summers ago. From the Knicks standpoint, regarding a trade, I’d never elevate a player above the team. If shipping him makes sense, I’d ship him.

John Schuhmann, Believe him? Yes and no. He fought hard to get to New York and probably wants to give it as much time as he can possibly stand. Still, it’s hard to imagine the Knicks being a very good team anytime soon and Anthony could certainly change his mind in time. If he were to be traded, I’d guess that Chicago and L.A. (Lakers) are the most likely destinations, because his no-trade clause gives him the right to choose exactly where he’d go. Dark-horse pick: The Wizards if they miss out on Kevin Durant next summer.

Sekou Smith, Careful Carmelo. Your words now, when the season is still young enough that the Knicks can dream a little dream about being a playoff contender, could come back to haunt you if things go awry again this season. It doesn’t matter whether I believe him or not, because if things get ugly Carmelo won’t have to ask for a trade. The pressure will be on all sides to do something, either with Carmelo or someone else. As far as trading him, I can think of a team on the other side of the country that could be in desperate need of a player with Melo’s abilities. But I can’t imagine who or what the Lakers would have that the Knicks would want in a trade …

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comI believe the future is unpredictable. Who knows how the Knicks will develop cover the next couple of years? I also believe that Anthony went through a trade demand once before, in Denver, and it was not a happy year for him, so he would probably like to avoid the same predicament as he approaches the back end of his career. Bottom line is that I just don’t see the Knicks trading Anthony – if they did, their next move would be to find another star of his caliber, and good luck there. They know the supply is scarce.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blogWell, he can’t ask for a trade without getting fined, right? At least not publicly? Carmelo may never actually “ask” for a trade, but I suppose he could strongly suggest the Knicks move him, or just straight-up privately ask for a trade. Anyway, this is just semantics. He clearly could see what was on the horizon when he re-signed with the Knicks, so to suggest now that he’s unhappy or surprised by the direction of the team would seem disingenuous. It’s like a time-share presentation: He knew what he was getting into when he signed up. And there’s no easy way out of it now. Go see a show in midtown, have a nice dinner downtown, ride your bike along the West Side … New York is a pretty great pace to live, regardless of how good the Knicks are.

Blogtable: Paul George the power forward?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Paul George the PF? | Do you believe Carmelo? | Is it time to deal D-Rose?

VIDEOPaul George scores 32 vs. Pistons

> Paul George doesn’t seem sold on the move to power forward, but the Pacers sure do. How do you see it working out for PG-13 if he plays PF all season? And what would you suggest to George to help him through the change?

Steve Aschburner, The situation will work itself out for better or for worse, for this reason: You are what you can guard. I first heard that positional philosophy back in the day from Minnesota’s Flip Saunders and it’s true: George will be a “power forward” on those nights when he can defend the other guy’s. Given the number of stretch-4 types in the league nowadays, that’s not so grueling. As for advice, I’d suggest George not watch too many “Hardwood Classics” on NBA TV, where he’d risk being traumatized by seeing PFs such as Karl Malone, Charles Barkley, Kevin McHale, Rasheed Wallace, Buck Williams, Maurice Lucas, Elvin Hayes and other greats who put the “power” in that position before the NBA downsized. 

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comI would suggest that George give it more than one preseason game. I would suggest that virtually every team in the league is using a variety of different big, small and in-between lineups that place an emphasis on versatility. I would suggest that he suck it up and go to work like a big boy.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comDepends how well he plays — and feels. It has a chance to work, and the benefit of the doubt should fall on the side of smart basketball minds with a successful track record thinking it is a positive. If it plays out for a little while and George does well, he will be fine. But since he already has hesitation, if he has a slow start to the regular season and the first few weeks is also filled with a physical pounding against power forwards, especially while defending bigger players, then the problem escalates. Let’s not assume the Pacers will forever force this on George. They want PG to get back to his previous level as much as he does. If the new look is not working, Frank Vogel can always make the switch back.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comWhen players say “I’ll do anything to help the team”, they don’t really mean it. Not 100 percent, anyway. The Pacers are lacking at that position and want to try a new style and he’s resisting. George is looking at it from the defensive end, where he’s giving up height and weight, rather from the offensive end, where he’ll be a matchup nightmare for most. Also, this will be his first full-season since his leg injury and as Larry Bird said, PG doesn’t need to spend his time chasing quicker players. He should give it an honest try (it’s only October!) and understand that the Pacers have his best long-term interests.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comLet’s note that George’s first preseason game at the four was against Anthony Davis and that he’s going to play 80 regular-season games against power forwards not named Anthony Davis. He’s also not going to play all of his minutes at the four. But I would advise him to give it some time and figure out how he can use the move to his advantage. Other power forwards won’t be able to deal with his quickness and stick with him on the perimeter, and he might actually have fun playing offense with the Pacers for the first time in a few years. Still, I’d advise the Pacers to keep an eye out for a better (bigger) fit at the stretch four position, who would allow George to play more or all of his minutes at the three.

Sekou Smith, I didn’t expect for this Paul George-at-power-forward experiment to go off without a few hiccups. George was apprehensive from the start and I suspect he’ll remain so until he gets more comfortable with this new wrinkle. I don’t know that he’ll have to log heavy minutes there all season. For as many advantages as he might exploit playing out of position like that, he’ll be at a disadvantage often enough that coach Frank Vogel will have to make some adjustments as well. I’d suggest he fight through whatever the struggles are and keep it professional. He’s already made clear that he’s not a huge fan of the move, but he’s looking out for the Pacers’ greater good above all else. His sacrifice will go a long way with folks inside of the organization and the fans who fill the seats at Bankers Life Fieldhouse.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comIf he’s concerned with playing against bigger opponents, his best response will be to attack them relentlessly. Force the other team to go small against him. The Pacers tried to play with a traditional 1980s-styled lineup and it carried them only so far. This move to power forward can enable George to be even more aggressive – and successful – if he buys in completely.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blog: If George thinks he’s still a 3, or maybe even a 2, that’s great. But has he seen the NBA the last few years? The NBA is going small, and positions are increasingly inconsequential. From a practical perspective, playing power forward shouldn’t make much of a difference for George, other than perhaps being asked to grab a few more rebounds than if he was on the perimeter. It might actually save his legs a bit on the defensive end, and on offense, if George is matched up against bigger power forwards, he can take them out to the perimeter and beat them off the dribble. Still don’t like the assignment? George can play NBA 2K16 and put himself at the 1 if he wants. But for the Pacers to have their best shot at winning, George may have to be open to playing where the team needs him most.

Morning shootaround — Oct. 7

VIDEO: Highlights from games played Oct. 6


Cousins likes his MVP chances | Whiteside a no-go tonight vs. Magic | Lakers’ youngsters lap up Bryant’s feedback | Booker, Hibbert scuffle in Hawaii

No. 1: Cousins says MVP is his ‘to grab’ this season — Success in the win column has been hard to come by for Sacramento Kings star center DeMarcus Cousins. While he was an All-Star last season, the Kings have never won more than 29 games in any of his five seasons with the team. A roster restocked with veterans and a full season under coach George Karl have given Cousins hope of not just the playoffs, but of the grandest piece of NBA hardware come season’s end. Kevin Ding of Bleacher Report has more:

The topic is the 2015-16 NBA MVP award and whether it could be reachable for DeMarcus Cousins.

“Reachable, man?” Cousins told Bleacher Report, his voice rising high. “It’s mine to grab.”

In five previous NBA seasons, Cousins has never gotten even a single fifth-place vote for MVP, and his vertical isn’t the kind to invoke visions of such a quantum leap over myriad more established superstars.

His approach transcends hard work on the court or powering ahead with a limp in camp despite a “real tender” left heel. Cousins has made a totally fresh commitment to being the best he can be, becoming a constant at the Kings training facility late in the offseason in search of every edge he can get for his team.

And if the professionalism continues, Cousins is right to believe he can be the best.

“It’s going to take a full team effort,” Cousins said. “I’ll try to play at a high level and bring my team along with me.”

New teammate Rajon Rondo floated the same idea during Kings media day, telling reporters: “Not to put any pressure on him, but I expect nothing less but MVP.”

“I don’t trust the rebuilding system in the NBA,” Karl said. “It has failed about 80 percent of the time.”

Kings owner Vivek Ranadive wants to win quickly, too; the franchise moves to a new arena next season.

Most importantly, however, this is what Cousins wants.

He said his new veteran teammates are “incredible.”

“You’ve got guys who know how to play the game, guys that know the game,” Cousins said. “Coming out and building chemistry is even easier. Trying to do that with younger guys? They’re trying to figure out their game and learn how to play.”

Even so, and despite their recent discord, Karl, who reportedly worked to trade Cousins over the summer before the team decided to unite behind the young center, can’t resist criticizing this facet of Cousins that “cheapened the game” and cost the team key possessions last season.

“DeMarcus has got to make a commitment just not to allow frustration to cause a disruption in the game,” Karl said. “I don’t like negative emotion in a game. I think it’s a sign of weakness.”

Karl’s free-flowing offense figures to help Cousins tremendously with spacing on the floor, yet already in camp it has been Cousins often jacking up desperate three-pointers.

In ways big and small, Boogie’s poise and professionalism are going to decide this season in Sacramento.

VIDEO: Take an All-Access look at DeMarcus Cousins at training camp


McDermott thrives in first glimpse of Bulls’ ‘Hoiball’ offense

VIDEO: Butler, McDermott lead Bulls past Bucks

CHICAGO – Already, they call it Hoiball.

OK, maybe that’s not the most descriptive or exciting appellation for the Chicago Bulls’ revamped offense under new head coach Fred Hoiberg. But it’s pretty decent shorthand for an attack with more pace, more reads, less emphasis on halfcourt sets and, from the glimpse offered in their first preseason game Tuesday night at United Center, a whole bunch of 3-point shots.

The Bulls hoisted – Hoistball? – 39 of them in beating Milwaukee, becoming more accurate as the game went on and not at all more shy; Chicago was 3-of-20 from long range in the first half, then 10-of-19. That fueled a second half in which the Bulls scored 68 points. And while they did it with four of the Bucks’ starters idle after halftime, they also did it with five rotation guys of their own not participating.

The big beneficiary was Doug McDermott, the second-year forward from Creighton whose forgettable rookie season was waylaid by knee surgery, blown assignments and a gruff Tom Thibodeau not inclined to force-feed him. McDermott was 0-for-5 at halftime, then went 8-of-14 the rest of the night, hitting five of his last eight 3-pointers.

“It’s a blast,” McDermott said of Hoiball. “Coach Hoiberg makes it a lot of fun for us. It’s just ‘Move the ball real well and be unselfish.’ Coach won’t pull you out of you have a bad shot. He just lets you play your game.”

McDermott had searched for his long ball at the Summer League in Las Vegas, missing 14 of his 16 attempts there in July. His start Tuesday continued that bad trend until he and his teammates snapped him out of it.

“Even though he started off 0-for-whatever,” Jimmy Butler said, “we all told Doug at the half, `Hey Doug, that’s what you do. You put the ball in the basket. Don’t be scared to keep shooting the ball.’ He did just that. You saw the outcome of it.”

Said Hoiberg: “He’s one of those guys, every time he shoots, you think he’s going in. But when he stands right on the line, he’s not as effective as when he’s getting a little momentum going into it. … When he gets that 1-2 rhythm step into his shot, he generally shoots it better.”

For Hoiberg, this debut as the Bulls head coach came 16 years after he made his first appearance as a Chicago player, joining the team in 1999-2000 for what would be four seasons. His most vivid memory back then was being pranked by Bulls veterans, who let the new guys run onto the floor without following. This time, Hoiberg was most noticeable for the amount of time he spent sitting, turning the VIP seats adjacent to the Bulls bench into unobstructed views compared to his predecessor.

He felt the players loosened up and got better giddy-up into their git-along in the second half. The abundance of 3-pointers – more than Chicago shot in all but two of its 82 games last season – might wane once Pau Gasol is back in the post and Derrick Rose is attacking the basket. But there were some elements that the Bulls hope will be constants in Hoiball.

“The spacing that we have, you’ve got shooters everywhere on the floor,” Butler said. “So a lot of driving gaps. A lot of chance for isolation. And then of course, getting up and down in transition. I think it fits everybody’s game, not just mine.”

Morning shootaround — Oct. 6

VIDEO: Highlights from games played Oct. 5


George gets ‘clarification’ on role | Bucks’ Parker to miss preseason opener | Beal seeks to tweak his game | Bulls’ Gasol ages like a fine wine

No. 1: George gets ‘clarification’ on power forward role — Indiana Pacers small forward Paul George wasn’t a fan of moving to the power forward spot when the idea was first breached. He wasn’t a fan of it after scoring 18 points in the Pacers’ first preseason game (a loss to the New Orleans Pelicans). Yet after a talk with the team’s brass, it seems George has reversed field on his feeling on the switch and is more open to it, writes Candace Buckner of the Indianapolis Star:

Paul George drew national attention by making comments about his new role as the Indiana Pacers starting power forward after the first exhibition game. George matched up against New Orleans Pelicans All-Star Anthony Davis – either a welcomed introductory challenge or a complete nightmare depending on your view – and later opined: “I don’t know if I’m cut out for a 4 spot. I don’t know if this is my position.”

Then, George said he would seek input from coach Frank Vogel and team president of basketball operations Larry Bird into how he performed at the position. By Monday afternoon, George had spoken to them and found more interpretation.

“Yeah, we talked about it,” George said after Monday’s practice. “Just going over what was the plan going forward.

“I mean, there was clarification on what we’re (doing) going forward,” George added later. “That’s what it was, just clarification.”

When asked if the “clarification” meant changes to his role, George said: “We’re going to still stick with it, see how it works.”

Then, when quizzed if he’s OK with that, George responded: “I’m a part of this team.”

Though George offered few specifics of this meeting, the “clarification” appears to be more like repetition.

“Nothing we haven’t said in the past,” Vogel responded when asked about the conversation with George. “We’re going to continue to evaluate and get his feedback and what he’s comfortable with and what he’s not comfortable with. We’re not going to put him in a position where he’s not comfortable with his role. We’re just not going to do that. But we’re going to play both small lineups and big lineups, and he understands that.”

However after one preseason game – in fact, a loss in which Davis produced 18 points and eight rebounds without playing through the second half – George felt the matchup did not go well.

“We took it way left field. It’s Game 1 of the preseason, and we’re playing against arguably one of the best, if not the best, power forwards in this league,” George said on Monday. “So it was an adjustment. And (Davis) kicked my (butt). He kicked my (butt) Game 1.”

George and the Pacers will get a more moderate test in Detroit (7:30 p.m., Tuesday) against Ersan Ilyasova (who was 12-of-14 for 34 points in a game against Indiana last season). Ilyasova might be 6-10, 235, 15 pounds heavier than George, but he relies more on a perimeter game. Players such as Ilyasova are the reason the Pacers remain committed to playing with a smaller lineup.

“You can’t make small reactions. It’s going to be a big picture thing, and we’re going to do what’s best to win basketball games,” Vogel said. “Winning is more important than style of play, but this style of play, I think, gives us, this group, the best chance to win basketball games.”

VIDEO: Paul George talks about the discussion he had with the team’s brass


Report: Hornets lose defensive ace Kidd-Gilchrist for 6 months

VIDEO: Michael Kidd-Gilchrist suffers shoulder injury vs. Magic

The Charlotte Hornets will be without the services of starting small forward and defensive stopper Michael Kidd-Gilchrist for the next six months after he undergoes shoulder surgery,  according to a report from Yahoo! Sports’ Adrian Wojnarowski.

Here’s more from Wojnarowski on the injury and Kidd-Gilchrist’s timeline:

Kidd-Gilchrist is expected to miss six months with the injury, which wouldn’t allow for a possible return until the final weeks of the season in April. It leaves little hope that Kidd-Gilchrist can return to the lineup this season.

Kidd-Gilchrist suffered a separated right shoulder in Saturday’s preseason victory over Orlando, and an MRI on Monday in Charlotte revealed the need for surgery.

Kidd-Gilchrist dislocated his right shoulder in the Hornets’ preseason win over Orlando Saturday. After being reevaluated today in Charlotte it was determined that he needs surgery and will miss the potentially the entire season, depending on his rehabilitation process.

His impact on the Hornets is undeniable. Their best perimeter defender, the Hornets were just 5-20 in the games he missed last season and 28-29 in the game he played. Kidd-Gilchrist signed a four-year, $52 million contract extension with the Hornets over the summer.

The Hornets will have to do some shuffling to replace him in the starting lineup. Veteran swingman Nicolas Batum, acquired in a summer trade with Portland, could shift from shooting guard to small forward as a fill in. Batum played small forward for the first sevens seasons of his NBA career with the Trail Blazers.

VIDEO: Hornets coach Steve Clifford discusses Michael Kidd-Gilchrist’s injury