NBPA boosts star power as Knicks’ Anthony elected to union post

TORONTO – Committed in recent years to having the NBA’s biggest names among its union leadership, the National Basketball Players Association furthered that agenda Friday when it elected New York Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony to Knicks’ All-Star forward, to serve on its executive committee.

Anthony joins fellow All-Stars Chris Paul, the NBPA president, as well as vice presidents LeBron James and Steph Curry as NBA players with the highest profiles, the heftiest contracts and the most at stake in straightening out and strengthening a union that didn’t always command the attention of the league’s elite.

Anthony was voted to a three-year term on the nine-member executive committee, replacing Willie Green, who served three years and is no longer active as an NBA player.

NBPA executive director Michele Roberts has been meeting with NBA commissioner Adam Silver well in advance of what most assume will be a re-opening of the collective bargaining agreement between players and owners in July 2017. Either side has until Dec. 15, 2016, to formally request that the 10-year labor deal signed in 2011-12 end after six years.

Roberts even cited the expected negotiations in a statement announcing Anthony’s executive involvement. “He’s passionate, has the respect of the players and I’m sure he will have a strong point of view during the collective bargaining process,” she said.

Several players were encouraged by the turnout and the tone of the meeting at the boutique hotel in downtown Toronto serving as NBPA headquarters. An estimated 65 members participated, with a number of player reps and rank-and-file members on All-Star break traveling to town specifically to attend.

Not pleased with the terms of the CBA it accepted coming out of the 2011-12 lockout and coping with leadership issues resulting from deposed Billy Hunter’s tenure in Roberts’ role, the NBPA has been aggressive in pulling together a stronger, more professional union. “I wouldn’t even say ‘righting the ship,’ ” one NBA veteran who attended Friday’s session told NBA.com. “It’s more like lifting the ship out of the water, putting it together the way it was supposed to be, and placing it back in.”

Said another player: “It’s all about leadership.”

Curry, Andre Iguodala and James Jones were all re-elected to serve additional three-year terms on the executive committee. The other committee members are Steve Blake, Kyle Korver and Anthony Tolliver.

Report: Horford to replace Bosh on East roster

TORONTO — Chris Bosh will miss Sunday’s All-Star Game and, presumably, Saturday’s Foot Locker Three-Point Contest, reports Yahoo’s Adrian Wojnarowski. According to Wojnarowski, Bosh will be replaced on the Eastern Conference roster by Hawks center Al Horford.

USA Today’s Jeff Zillgitt reports that it’s a strained calf that will sideline Bosh on Sunday. Bosh is the second East player to bow out of the game, following the Bulls’ Jimmy Butler, who was replaced by teammate Pau Gasol.

This will be Horford’s fourth All-Star appearance and the Hawks join the Bulls, Heat, Raptors, Thunder, Spurs and Warriors with multiple All-Stars.

Iverson, O’Neal, Johnson among 2016 Hall of Fame finalists


VIDEO: 2016 Hall of Fame finalists announced

From NBA.com staff reports

A legendary NBA center and two of the toughest guards to ever play in the NBA mark the list of 14 basketball standouts selected as 2016 Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame finalists.

Shaquille O’Neal won an MVP in 2000, was a three-time NBA Finals MVP, the Rookie of the Year in 1993 and won four championships in the NBA and is one of the two centers in this year’s class. He played 19 years in the NBA averaging 23.7 points, 10.9 rebounds and 2.3 blocks per game. A 15-time NBA All-Star (1993-98, 2000-07, 2009), O’Neal led the league in field goal percentage for 10 seasons (1994, 1998-2002, 2004-06, 2009) and ranks seventh on the NBA all-time scoring list.

Philadelphia 76ers guard Allen Iverson won the NBA MVP in 2001 and led his team to The Finals that year (where they faced — and lost to — O’Neal’s Los Angeles Lakers) and was one of the most skilled and toughest players in league history. He was an 11-time All-Star and one of the most influential players of his generation, averaging 26.7 points and 6.2 assists per game in 14 seasons.

Former Phoenix Suns guard (and current Sacramento mayor) Kevin Johnson was a three-time All-Star, a key member of the Suns team that made the 1993 Finals and one of the best playmakers of his era. As mayor, he was a major advocate of keeping the Sacramento Kings NBA team in the city when it was at high risk of moving.

The other inductees in this year’s class:

  • Former high school coach Leta Andrews
  • Former college coach Charles “Lefty” Driesell
  • Former NBA referee Darrell Garretson
  • Former high school coach Robert Hughes
  • Current Michigan State coach Tom Izzo
  • Current Notre Dame women’s basketball coach Muffet McGraw
  • Former college coach John McLendon
  • Former college coach Bo Ryan,
  • Former college coach Eddie Sutton
  • Former WNBA star Sheryl Swoopes
  • The 1954-58 Wayland Baptist Univ. women’s basketball team

Current TNT analyst David Aldridge won of the Curt Gowdy Award for print media while ESPN analyst Jay Bilas won the Curt Gowdy Award winner for electronic media. Jim Delaney, the commissioner of the Big Ten, wins the John Bunn Lifetime Achievement Award, the Hall’s highest honor short of enshrinement.

Morning shootaround — Feb. 12


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Feb. 11

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Wall (knee) unsure of All-Star Game status | DeRozan planning to stick with RaptorsNext steps for Hornets after Kidd-Gilchrist’s injuryScott: Irving, Paul more mature as rookies than Russell

No. 1: Wall (knee) unsure if he’ll play in All-Star Game — After last night’s road loss to the Milwaukee Bucks, the Washington Wizards head into the All-Star break in 10th place in the Eastern Conference. They’re three games behind the Charlotte Hornets for that final playoff spot, not too bad considering all the injuries Washington has faced all season. A new injury cropped up last night, though, as All-Star point guard John Wall suffered a bruised knee and is unsure if he’ll play in Sunday’s All-Star Game. The Washington Post‘s Jorge Castillo has more:

Washington Wizards point guard John Wall will travel to Toronto to attend the NBA’s All-Star weekend festivities but is not sure if he will participate in his third all-star game Sunday after bruising his right knee in the first quarter of the Wizards’ 99-92 loss to the Milwaukee Bucks.

“If I can’t move and I need more time then I won’t [play Sunday],” said Wall, who received treatment on the knee at halftime and after the game. “But it’ll be frustrating not to.”

Wall injured the right knee early in the first quarter when he collided with Bucks guard O.J. Mayo while driving to the basket. He stayed on the floor in pain for a few moments, but remained in the game and logged 41 minutes, including the entire second half.

“It’s a deep bruise,” Wall said. “As you can see, it’s swollen. It hurts and I’ll do as much treatment as I can on it.”

Wall, who was limping in the locker room after the game, made just three of the three-pointers and scored 15 points on 5-of-19 shooting overall from the floor.

“I just knew how important this game was, trying to get a game before the break,” Wall said. “It’s an honor to be in the all-star game and have the opportunity to play but I can’t do it if it’s still a problem. My team is too important.”

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Morning shootaround — Dec. 11


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Feb. 10

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Warriors keep chugging along | Kidd-Gilchrist needs MRI on shoulder | Prokhorov, Nets readying GM short-list | Love (shoulder) not expected to miss time

No. 1: Warriors roll into All-Star break at 48-4 — From the start of the season, the Golden State Warriors have been the story to follow. From a 24-0 start to their dazzling offense to the exploits of reigning MVP Stephen Curry, Golden State is dominating opponents and having fun along the way, too. They head into the All-Star break a game ahead of the pace the 1995-96 Chicago Bulls set when they won an NBA-record 72 games. After last night’s win in Phoenix, the players and coaches talked about how that record is firmly in their sights, writes Diamond Leung of the Bay Area News Group:

Klay Thompson described the record the Warriors have as surreal, with them rolling at a record pace without any sign of a championship hangover.

Whatever you want to chalk it up to, people saying it was a fluke, yada, yada, you just want to go out and prove that we’ll be here for a long time,” Thompson said.

Despite uncertainty at head coach with Steve Kerr missing much of the first half of the regular season, the Warriors held steady and dominated the competition. They notched 30-point wins against the Cleveland Cavaliers and San Antonio Spurs after starting the season 24-0 under interim head coach Luke Walton.

“I think that streak sort of gave guys extra motivation through the first quarter of the season,” Kerr said. “And then since that time, we’ve been on a good run.”

Said Stephen Curry: “We handled a lot of challenges pretty well this first half of the season and kept our high level of consistency.”

In garbage time, rookie Kevon Looney got in on the action and managed to bank in the first 3-pointer of his career.

Curry, Draymond Green and Thompson traveled to Toronto, where they will participate in festivities during All-Star weekend and play in Sunday’s game

The rest of the Warriors will get to rest and focus on what the Warriors have to do in the second half.

“Just play with great focus, because when we do that, we’re almost impossible to beat,” Thompson said.

Kerr was among those who could use time to relax. He didn’t feel well following the Warriors’ win against the Houston Rockets the previous night at Oracle Arena, explaining he was dealing with a headache and he appeared uncomfortable during Tuesday’s brief postgame news conference.

“I still have symptoms from everything I’ve been dealing with, so I wish everything was clear and gone away, but it’s not, so at times I have to deal with stuff,” Kerr said.

Kerr will travel to his home in San Diego for the All-Star break after having won all nine of his games on the bench this season. He missed the first 43 and indicated upon his return three weeks ago that his symptoms were manageable following a leave of absence caused by complications from an offseason back surgery.

“I don’t want to go into detail with all this stuff, but there’s a lot to it in terms of my protocol that I’m going through,” Kerr said. The All-Star break will give me a chance to get through some of that, too.”

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Kidd-Gilchrist reinjures right shoulder


VIDEO: Michael Kidd-Gilchrist injures shoulder against Pacers

Michael Kidd-Gilchrist of the Hornets dislocated his right shoulder after hitting the floor Wednesday night in Indiana — the same shoulder that cost him the first 46 games of the season.

There was no immediate word how long Kidd-Gilchrist would be out this time.

He had surgery in October to repair a torn labrum and was expected to miss most or all of the season, only to return Jan. 29. In his first six games back, the small forward known for his defense averaged 13.5 points and seven rebounds in 31 minutes a night while shooting 52.6 percent.

 

Blogtable: Thoughts on future for Knicks?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Thoughts on Knicks? | Jazz playoff-bound? |
Will LaVine or Curry repeat on All-Star Saturday?



VIDEOPhil Jackson talks about the Derek Fisher firing

> What do you make of the Knicks’ decision to change coaches at this point in the season? And will Phil Jackson still be New York’s GM at this time next year?

David Aldridge, TNT analyst: Odd, given that no one outside the Jacksonian Bubble had any notion that the Knicks would be anything close to a playoff contender (and I liked their offseason moves, by the way) unless absolutely everything broke right — which, of course, never happens. I don’t doubt Phil will be thorough in his search for the permanent guy but he needs to be clear that he’s willing to seriously consider someone that’s not of the Triangle Tree. I’m not anti-triangle, but no system is a panacea without difference-making talent; the Knicks have more than last year but not near enough to win consistently. As for Phil … I say he’ll be back. I’d be surprised if he walked away from the team of his beloved Red Holzman with the job not even half-done.

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: That change seemed rather pointless to me, coming when it did. It’s not as if the Knicks were underperforming this season, winning half of their first 44 after going 17-65 last season. No “name” replacement – like, say, Tom Thibodeau – was going to sign on at this stage of any season. And chasing a playoff spot isn’t what New York needs to be about right now. Will Jackson stick for the long-term? He’s way too inscrutable to make any concrete prediction. I say yes, mostly because of Kristaps Porzingis‘ payoff and the options that will open up in the new salary-cap world.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: I’m less surprised than when Phil Jackson hired Derek Fisher in the first place, a guy with no coaching experience taking over in the media capital of the world. This was a pseudo-puppet show with Jackson trying to guide Fisher, but not being fully engaged. If Phil is not going to coach the team — and he’s not — then it’s time he lets go of the insistence on running the triangle and finds a solid coach and gives him the autonomy to run his own program. Having said that, I think he’ll go for another acolyte. Yes, Jackson will still be G.M. at the All-Star break in Charlotte 2017. But if this isn’t a home-run hire, he might be counting down the final months of his stay.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: I was a little surprised only because the team had played well earlier in he season. Even if the Knicks had been going bad lately, I thought the previous success would earn Fisher a little more time to fix the problems. Phil obviously saw something going very wrong, beyond what everyone saw going wrong in the standings. That would be the same Phil who will still be on the job this time next year. I don’t think we’re looking at a run as GM that will span the generations, but I figure at least one more full season. (Says the guy who didn’t think Derek Fisher would be gone.)

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: In a word: Weird. Obviously, it went deeper than wins and (many) losses, because the Knicks weren’t projected to do big things this season. Whether it was Fisher’s incident with Matt Barnes or drama on the coaching staff, Phil Jackson saw something he didn’t like and owner Jim Dolan, who has written big checks to get Don Nelson, Lenny Wilkens and Larry Brown to go away, agreed to flush more millions (it must be nice). Interim coach Kurt Rambis tanked in Minnesota and ditto for Brian Shaw in Denver so I suspect Jackson has someone else in mind.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: I’ll admit that I was surprised. Fisher was Jackson’s guy, he was less than two years into his job, and the Knicks weren’t really underachieving, especially when you consider Carmelo Anthony‘s latest knee issue. Stability is important in this league and the Knicks are now unstable again. Still, I don’t see Jackson leaving anytime in the next year. He seems a little too prideful to flake out after just two full seasons.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: It’s trending, given all of the coaches changes we’ve seen so far. It did catch me a little off guard, what with Fisher’s connections to Phil. But the Knicks’ recent slide coupled with the expectations disconnect and Fisher’s off-the-court issues make it easier to see why Phil felt a change was necessary. I don’t share this view that the Knicks were some playoff lock this season as currently constituted, but they should be performing better than they have recently. And despite rumblings to the contrary, I do think Phil will be on the job this time next year. Something tells me he won’t give up the fight just yet. He believes he can turn it around in New York and he won’t quit before his contract ends.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: It isn’t surprising. Neither Fisher nor Jackson had any experience in their current jobs, which ruined their chances of working together from the start. I don’t think Phil is going anywhere: He’s making too much money, and to run out on the Knicks so quickly would be damning his own reputation. It would suggest that his heart was never really in it, and that would be a terrible thing for him to admit.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogWhat’s ironic to me is that for years now, fans and “experts” have called on the Knicks to hand over basketball operations to someone like Phil Jackson, in an effort to find some stability. And now, not even two years into Jackson’s tenure, the Knicks have once again canned a coach and now find themselves in some kind of flux. Here’s the thing: Heading into this season, nobody expected the Knicks to be any good. They’re clearly better than expectations, but they still aren’t a championship team. And changing coaches midseason won’t do anything to change that. And I think Phil is going to stick around — if nothing else we need more of his tweets.

Blogtable: Are Jazz playoff-bound?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Thoughts on Knicks? | Jazz playoff-bound? |
Will LaVine or Curry repeat on All-Star Saturday?



VIDEOHayward powers Jazz to 7th straight win

> With Rudy Gobert and Derrick Favors back in the lineup, the Jazz are starting to pile up some wins. Is Utah’s four-year playoff drought about to end?

David Aldridge, TNT analyst: As Jeff Weigand said in “The Insider,” most certainly. And I’ll go you one better; I think Utah has a decent shot at getting home court in the first round now, with the injuries to the Clippers (Blake Griffin, Austin Rivers) and Memphis (Marc Gasol). The Jazz have a chance to be real good for a good long while.

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: Utah is good enough to qualify for the playoffs. It all just comes down to the math of nine teams vying for eight spots (with maybe Denver the best of the rest in potentially climbing up). I say yes, the Jazz get in, because part of bouncing back from injuries is getting adjusted again to the roster’s full personnel – though seven in a row suggests a quick re-orientation. Utah ranks high enough both offensively and defensively to justify its spot among the West’s top eight and I think that holds for the next two months.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: It will be a good race for the No. 8 spot with the Trail Blazers, but I’ll give the nod to Utah. The Jazz played strong from the All-Star break to the end of last season and now that they’re healthy again are looking like that rising young team again.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: I can’t give a solid “yes” because the entire group going for the final spot is built on sand, but you’d have to like the Jazz’s chances. I had Quin Snyder among the contenders for Coach of the Year in my preseason predictions that never, ever go wrong. Watch him start to pick up votes if Utah stays in the postseason mix after all the injuries.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: It should end, and I think it will. They really missed Gobert. That doesn’t mean the Jazz are ideally built or that Utah is ready to pull a first-round surprise, though. I’m still not sold on Utah having a potential superstar among the batch of young players on the team, and you can’t routinely win 50-plus games a year without one (or two). This summer, I’d seriously think about trading Gordon Hayward for the right price.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Yes. The Jazz are 14-7 with both Derrick Favors and Rudy Gobert and have a top-three defense since Favors returned from his back injury eight games ago. They look like the team that went 19-10 after the All-Star break last season. Their offense is still going to have some droughts, but Rodney Hood is evolving into a really good player and they can finish a few games over .500 with how well they defend. The Jazz also have an easier remaining schedule than Houston or Portland, and Marc Gasol‘s injury creates some doubt that the Grizzlies (whose schedule gets really tough after the first week in March) can hold on to their spot.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: It’s still a little early for me to be certain that the playoff drought ends for the Jazz this season. There are still things that have to be sorted out by the teams chasing that 8th and final spot. That said, the Jazz certainly have the look of a team ready to give serious chase. Favors and Gobert give them a 1-2 big man punch that could be very valuable down the stretch of this season. They need better point guard play, of course. And maybe they’ll be active at the trade deadline next week and address that issue. But either way, they’re going to be in mix for that playoff spot.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comThe Blazers, who are the other young team racing for the No. 8 spot, are in their first season together after rebuilding on the fly last summer. The Jazz have been investing in this young core for several years, and that teamwork and cohesion should help as the games become more important – even though Utah must play 17 of its those remaining 31 games on the road.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: I know they’re hovering around the No. 8 seed right now, but I don’t think that’s going to continue. To me, Portland has more veteran leadership and is probably better suited to a postseason run. If Dante Exum hadn’t gone down, they might be more firmly in the postseason mix. That said, if they can find an upgrade at point guard at the trade deadline, they might be back in the race.

Blogtable: LaVine or Curry more likely to repeat on All-Star Saturday?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Thoughts on Knicks? | Jazz playoff-bound? |
Will LaVine or Curry repeat on All-Star Saturday?



VIDEORelive the 2015 Sprite Slam Dunk Contest

> Shooter Stephen Curry or dunker Zach LaVine? Who is more likely to defend his title on All-Star Saturday?

David Aldridge, TNT analyst: How can you pick anyone in anything hoop-related right now and not go with Steph? Anyway, I got a Will Barton kind of vibe for the dunk contest in the Great White North.

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comIt’s tempting to bail on this and say “both” because those contests have had lots of repeat winners through the years. But I think LaVine is the guy who defends his crown. It’s a bigger deal to him, given what else the Timberwolves don’t have cooking at this point, and he surely has dunks we haven’t seen. Curry deserves to be the favorite but he’s in a tough, tough field. Bottom line: There’s a big difference in a competition that’s judged – LaVine has a little head start with the judges based on last year’s success – as opposed to one that is pure skill, a hot hand and math.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comI love to watch Zach LaVine and he put on a show last year. But practically everything Steph Curry has done this season has been better, so why not this too? I’m really hoping he tears a page out of the old Larry Bird playbook, walks into the locker room before the event and asks, “So which one of you chumps is going to finish second?”

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Shooter Steph Curry. Because, really, out Anything Steph Curry in front of me right now and I’m on board. Put him in the other contest as well. I can see it now: Dunk Champion Steph Curry. This is not the time to pick against him.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comSince the 3-point contest is absolutely stacked this year, and Curry might not even be the last Warrior standing when it’s all said and one, I’d say LaVine has the best chance. He’s a dunking freak who probably and purposely saved some of his best dunks for this year’s contest.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: LaVine. First of all, there are four dunkers and eight shooters, so the basic odds are with LaVine. And as good a shooter that Curry is, I think LaVine has more of an edge over his competition when it comes to elevation and flair.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: The shooters lined up for Saturday night make up one of the best fields I can remember, so Steph, as great as he is, will certainly have his hands full in that competition. And the way he’s played this season, I’d be a fool to pick against him. But Young Mr. Dunkenstein from Minnesota is a heavy favorite to defend his title. The moment his Timberwolves teammate and Toronto native, Andrew Wiggins, decided not to participate, LaVine had the path to a repeat title cleared. No offense to the other participants, but they’re fighting it out for second place.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: If you’re asking in whom should we trust, then doesn’t the answer have to be Curry? No one in the league finds more joy in these kinds of challenges.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogAs awesome as Steph Curry has been all season, to me dunking is a more replicable feat than shooting, with more room for error. What I mean is, LaVine has a little more wiggle room — he gets to shoot from centimeters away instead of feet. And Curry has to go against seven other contestants, while LaVine has to face three. If one other shooter gets hot, he might reel off a few racks of balls and win the contest. dunkers just have to have a few seconds of great performance. So, I’ll say LaVine is more likely to repeat.

Morning shootaround — Feb. 10


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Feb. 9

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Karl staying in Sacramento after all | Report: Evans done for season | Anthony sticking by Jackson, Knicks

No. 1: Divac keeping Karl around after all — Overnight on Monday, news broke that the Sacramento Kings were preparing to fire coach George Karl sometime before the All-Star break. It seemed a near certainty as national media and local media had similar reports on the goings on. But then yesterday afternoon, the Kings decided to reverse field and keep Karl around. Why the sudden change of heart? Jason Jones of The Sacramento Bee has the explanation:

Instead of firing his coach as had been reportedly imminent, Kings general manager Vlade Divac began discussions with George Karl on Tuesday about how to pull the team out of its slide.

“We are not firing George,” Divac told The Sacramento Bee. “We have to sit down, work together and figure out how to turn this around.”

The Kings (21-31) have lost four consecutive games and eight of nine. They are in 10th place in the Western Conference and end a four-game trip Wednesday against the Philadelphia 76ers in their last game before the All-Star break.

Before this slump, the Kings won a season-best five consecutive games and moved into the West’s eighth and final playoff spot. Entering Tuesday, they were five games behind the eighth-place Utah Jazz.

Tuesday’s conversation between Divac and Karl focused on the Kings’ three-point and transition defenses and overall lack of defensive energy – three areas that have plagued the team all season.

Divac does not believe firing Karl is the solution.

“We have some issues, but it’s not that we can’t win,” Divac said. “This is how we are now. It can be painful to watch. I can only imagine what it’s like for the fans.”

The Kings are giving up a league-high 10.7 three-pointers per game and 14.6 fast-break points per game, 23rd in the league.

Players have been unhappy with many of the defensive schemes and what they see as a lack of adjustments to address the problems.

“We’ve just got to take pride in defense,” guard Rajon Rondo said after Monday’s loss at Cleveland.

Rondo noted the Kings have allowed at least 120 points in five of their past eight losses.

“We’re giving up 30 a quarter a night; we’re giving out career highs, season highs, first of whatever. It’s frustrating,” he said. “We just can’t keep laying down. We’ve got to have some kind of fight and find a way.”

The ease with which opponents score has caused many to question the pride of the players and their commitment to defense.

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