Posts Tagged ‘Lang Whitaker’

Blogtable: Is it time for Bulls to trade Rose?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Paul George the PF? | Do you believe Carmelo? | Is it time to deal D-Rose?

VIDEOHow will Derrick Rose’s latest injury affect the Bulls?

> In light of recent events, the emergence of Jimmy Butler and a new coach, should the Bulls begin the to process of seeking a trade for point guard Derrick Rose? Where would you ship Rose or would he stay and why?

Steve Aschburner, At $20 million this season and $21 million next season, given his injury history, I’m not sure there’s a trade market for Rose. Chicago would have to take back so much junk in matching salary, there’d be no likely gain other than excising a possible poor fit next to Butler. And frankly, that’s a lousy reason – for years, the storyline was all about Rose’s need of a “sidekick,” an All Star-capable companion who would lighten his workload and keep defenses more honest. It’s on the two of them to figure out their “alpha dog” issue, especially Rose. But he has enough to do just to get back on, and stay on, the court.

Fran Blinebury, Jimmy Butler got his payday and I’m happy for him. But let’s not confuse his overall talent with a healthy Derrick Rose. The operative word, of course, being healthy. New coach Fred Holberg knows that. It’s not fair to toss in an elbow to the eye at practice and an orbital fracture as further evidence of being injury prone. Rose has said things and is acting out, at least in part, due to his frustration from spending so much time not playing over the last three seasons. Here in early October, it’s time for everyone to take a deep breath and relax. If I’m the Bulls, I don’t want to send Rose anyplace except back out onto the court at the United Center.

Scott Howard-Cooper, This is not the time to trade Derrick Rose. I certainly understand the part about needing dependability at point guard of all positions, and Rose’s knees are not dependable, but this would be selling very low. Dealing from a position of weakness is not the way to go unless it’s a last resort, and this is not. Let him get back on the court, and then everyone can get a better read. Two things to remember, though. The latest setback was a freak injury that could have happened to anyone, not the continuation of a problem. And, good luck solving the Rose dilemma without creating a new one at point guard.

Shaun Powell, I’d give Rose another year to reinvent himself into more of a passing point guard and swallow his pride and learn to yield to Butler and Pau Gasol more often in tight games. If he resisted, I’d explore trades but only if I could get his replacement in return. Otherwise, why bother?

John Schuhmann, First of all, good luck finding a team that’s willing to take on the $41.4 million left on Rose’s contract, given his injury history. His deal will be more palatable after this season, which is when the Bulls should reevaluate. Jimmy Butler is a terrific player, but he’s not James Harden (not yet, at least). Every team needs multiple ball-handlers and Rose still has a key role to play in Fred Hoiberg‘s offense. If things go right, this team could be a legit challenger to the Cavs in the Eastern Conference.

Sekou Smith, The Bulls and Derrick Rose both need to take a step back and see where this season takes them before worrying about a potential split. He’s under contract for two more years and the window to do huge things with a healthy Rose and Butler comprising one of the best backcourts in the league. So much of what comes out of Rose’s mouth these days makes me cringe, so I get why Bulls fans and observers are entertaining thoughts of a future that does not include their once-universally beloved native son. Times change. Circumstances, too. But talent, true superstar talent, is hard to come by. And the Bulls can’t make any premature decisions about Rose and the future based on what’s transpired the first few weeks of the season. No trade!

Ian Thomsen, Why trade him? The Bulls won’t get close to an equal return, especially given Rose’s ongoing history of injuries. This latest event for Rose was a freak accident, so don’t overreact to it. Keep him and see how he performs in Fred Hoiberg’s promising offense.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blog: If I was Chicago, I’d be willing to move Rose, but I just don’t know who you get back who can match what Rose brings. Last year, when he was returning from injuries and fighting other injuries, Rose still averaged almost 18 ppg, which is no small feat. The other issue in trading Rose would be finding a team willing to take on the remaining two years and $40+ million on his contract. But even if Rose is never the again the same player that won the MVP, Derrick Rose is still a marquee name and top talent. And there are a few teams in major markets — Brooklyn, Boston, New York, the Lakers — who probably wouldn’t mind adding another superstar to their mix.

Blogtable: Carmelo a Knick for life?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Paul George the PF? | Do you believe Carmelo? | Is it time to deal D-Rose?

VIDEOCarmelo Anthony chats during training camp

> Carmelo Anthony says if things don’t work out in New York, he wouldn’t ask for a trade. Do you believe him? Where would you trade Carmelo if he and the Knicks can’t get on track?

Steve Aschburner, Believe him? Today yes, tomorrow not so much. Four more years is an eternity, especially for an aging drama king who is out of sync with New York’s current rebuilding initiative. His and the Knicks’ arrows are trending in opposite directions and, at some point, it isn’t going to be pretty. If I needed to trade Anthony, I’d labor mightily to make it Brooklyn, where it wouldn’t disrupt his lifestyle and all the other ancillary stuff that was so important to him when he re-signed. Or Philadelphia, just because.

Fran Blinebury, Actually, I think I do believe him. Anthony has demonstrated that he’s mainly interested in being the big Broadway star with his name getting top billing on on the marquee while taking most of the shots. He can only do that by remaining in New York. Ka-ching!

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comOf course he should be believed! How dare you suggest people ever say something for public consumption and something different behind closed doors. The fair answer is that I believe him at the moment. There is no way for anyone — including Melo — to know what he will be feeling in a year. So much can change. Maybe the team is still losing. Maybe the team is going in a positive direction but with Anthony in a supporting role he does not want. But I believe he wants things to work out in New York. It’s where he wanted to be, twice.

Shaun Powell, He won’t ask for a trade perhaps because Mrs. Melo doesn’t want to live anywhere else, and neither does Carmelo. There are too many external factors (endorsements, visibility, social ramifications) at stake. He wants his identity tied to NYC and if he didn’t, he would’ve signed with the Bulls a few summers ago. From the Knicks standpoint, regarding a trade, I’d never elevate a player above the team. If shipping him makes sense, I’d ship him.

John Schuhmann, Believe him? Yes and no. He fought hard to get to New York and probably wants to give it as much time as he can possibly stand. Still, it’s hard to imagine the Knicks being a very good team anytime soon and Anthony could certainly change his mind in time. If he were to be traded, I’d guess that Chicago and L.A. (Lakers) are the most likely destinations, because his no-trade clause gives him the right to choose exactly where he’d go. Dark-horse pick: The Wizards if they miss out on Kevin Durant next summer.

Sekou Smith, Careful Carmelo. Your words now, when the season is still young enough that the Knicks can dream a little dream about being a playoff contender, could come back to haunt you if things go awry again this season. It doesn’t matter whether I believe him or not, because if things get ugly Carmelo won’t have to ask for a trade. The pressure will be on all sides to do something, either with Carmelo or someone else. As far as trading him, I can think of a team on the other side of the country that could be in desperate need of a player with Melo’s abilities. But I can’t imagine who or what the Lakers would have that the Knicks would want in a trade …

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comI believe the future is unpredictable. Who knows how the Knicks will develop cover the next couple of years? I also believe that Anthony went through a trade demand once before, in Denver, and it was not a happy year for him, so he would probably like to avoid the same predicament as he approaches the back end of his career. Bottom line is that I just don’t see the Knicks trading Anthony – if they did, their next move would be to find another star of his caliber, and good luck there. They know the supply is scarce.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blogWell, he can’t ask for a trade without getting fined, right? At least not publicly? Carmelo may never actually “ask” for a trade, but I suppose he could strongly suggest the Knicks move him, or just straight-up privately ask for a trade. Anyway, this is just semantics. He clearly could see what was on the horizon when he re-signed with the Knicks, so to suggest now that he’s unhappy or surprised by the direction of the team would seem disingenuous. It’s like a time-share presentation: He knew what he was getting into when he signed up. And there’s no easy way out of it now. Go see a show in midtown, have a nice dinner downtown, ride your bike along the West Side … New York is a pretty great pace to live, regardless of how good the Knicks are.

Blogtable: Paul George the power forward?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Paul George the PF? | Do you believe Carmelo? | Is it time to deal D-Rose?

VIDEOPaul George scores 32 vs. Pistons

> Paul George doesn’t seem sold on the move to power forward, but the Pacers sure do. How do you see it working out for PG-13 if he plays PF all season? And what would you suggest to George to help him through the change?

Steve Aschburner, The situation will work itself out for better or for worse, for this reason: You are what you can guard. I first heard that positional philosophy back in the day from Minnesota’s Flip Saunders and it’s true: George will be a “power forward” on those nights when he can defend the other guy’s. Given the number of stretch-4 types in the league nowadays, that’s not so grueling. As for advice, I’d suggest George not watch too many “Hardwood Classics” on NBA TV, where he’d risk being traumatized by seeing PFs such as Karl Malone, Charles Barkley, Kevin McHale, Rasheed Wallace, Buck Williams, Maurice Lucas, Elvin Hayes and other greats who put the “power” in that position before the NBA downsized. 

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comI would suggest that George give it more than one preseason game. I would suggest that virtually every team in the league is using a variety of different big, small and in-between lineups that place an emphasis on versatility. I would suggest that he suck it up and go to work like a big boy.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comDepends how well he plays — and feels. It has a chance to work, and the benefit of the doubt should fall on the side of smart basketball minds with a successful track record thinking it is a positive. If it plays out for a little while and George does well, he will be fine. But since he already has hesitation, if he has a slow start to the regular season and the first few weeks is also filled with a physical pounding against power forwards, especially while defending bigger players, then the problem escalates. Let’s not assume the Pacers will forever force this on George. They want PG to get back to his previous level as much as he does. If the new look is not working, Frank Vogel can always make the switch back.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comWhen players say “I’ll do anything to help the team”, they don’t really mean it. Not 100 percent, anyway. The Pacers are lacking at that position and want to try a new style and he’s resisting. George is looking at it from the defensive end, where he’s giving up height and weight, rather from the offensive end, where he’ll be a matchup nightmare for most. Also, this will be his first full-season since his leg injury and as Larry Bird said, PG doesn’t need to spend his time chasing quicker players. He should give it an honest try (it’s only October!) and understand that the Pacers have his best long-term interests.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comLet’s note that George’s first preseason game at the four was against Anthony Davis and that he’s going to play 80 regular-season games against power forwards not named Anthony Davis. He’s also not going to play all of his minutes at the four. But I would advise him to give it some time and figure out how he can use the move to his advantage. Other power forwards won’t be able to deal with his quickness and stick with him on the perimeter, and he might actually have fun playing offense with the Pacers for the first time in a few years. Still, I’d advise the Pacers to keep an eye out for a better (bigger) fit at the stretch four position, who would allow George to play more or all of his minutes at the three.

Sekou Smith, I didn’t expect for this Paul George-at-power-forward experiment to go off without a few hiccups. George was apprehensive from the start and I suspect he’ll remain so until he gets more comfortable with this new wrinkle. I don’t know that he’ll have to log heavy minutes there all season. For as many advantages as he might exploit playing out of position like that, he’ll be at a disadvantage often enough that coach Frank Vogel will have to make some adjustments as well. I’d suggest he fight through whatever the struggles are and keep it professional. He’s already made clear that he’s not a huge fan of the move, but he’s looking out for the Pacers’ greater good above all else. His sacrifice will go a long way with folks inside of the organization and the fans who fill the seats at Bankers Life Fieldhouse.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comIf he’s concerned with playing against bigger opponents, his best response will be to attack them relentlessly. Force the other team to go small against him. The Pacers tried to play with a traditional 1980s-styled lineup and it carried them only so far. This move to power forward can enable George to be even more aggressive – and successful – if he buys in completely.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blog: If George thinks he’s still a 3, or maybe even a 2, that’s great. But has he seen the NBA the last few years? The NBA is going small, and positions are increasingly inconsequential. From a practical perspective, playing power forward shouldn’t make much of a difference for George, other than perhaps being asked to grab a few more rebounds than if he was on the perimeter. It might actually save his legs a bit on the defensive end, and on offense, if George is matched up against bigger power forwards, he can take them out to the perimeter and beat them off the dribble. Still don’t like the assignment? George can play NBA 2K16 and put himself at the 1 if he wants. But for the Pacers to have their best shot at winning, George may have to be open to playing where the team needs him most.

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 211) Featuring K.C. Johnson and Marc D’Amico

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — In a city as passionate about its team as Chicago Bulls fans are, and have been for years, it’s becoming increasingly more difficult to make sense of what has become of Derrick Rose. The youngest winner of the NBA’s most coveted individual honor, Rose has found himself at the center of yet another loyalty-splitting situation in the Windy City and beyond.

And it has little to do with his latest injury setback, a broken orbital bone broken in the first training camp practice Tuesday, an injury that required surgery today and will sideline him for two weeks (according to the Bulls). It was Rose’s words a day earlier, during Media Day, that produced mass head scratching. He didn’t speak about winning championships and representing his city, themes that had previously been at the center of any public comments in that setting.

Instead spoke of being focused on free agency two years from now and how he’ll cash in on all of the lucrative contracts being dished out around the league and securing his family’s financial future for generations to come.

It makes sense for a superstar who has played in just 100 regular season games since winning the KIA MVP after the 2010-11 season, due to knee injuries, to take that big picture perspective on things. But it also serves as yet another reason for some to doubt whether Rose is focused on winning at all costs.

We kick off Episode 211 of The Hang Time Podcast talking Rose and all of the associated drama with K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune. Matt D’Amico, Director of digital content and team reporter for the Boston Celtics also joins us to discuss the prospects for Brad Stevens and his crew this season.

You get all of that and more on Episode 211 of The Hang Time Podcast featuring K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune and Marc D’Amico of the Boston Celtics ...


As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of,  Lang Whitaker of’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.

VIDEO: Derrick Rose speaks his mind at Media Day in Chicago. He suffered a broken left orbital bone in the Bulls’ first training camp practice a day later and will be sidelined for two weeks after surgery

Morning Shootaround — Sept. 30

VIDEO: Stephen Curry looks ahead to the upcoming season


Derrick Rose injured…again | Next man up in Cleveland…again | Durant back in action | Bennett back home in Toronto

No. 1: Derrick Rose injured…again Just hours after an unprompted Derrick Rose discussed free agency during Chicago Bulls media day, which brought up a whole range of emotions for Bulls fans, Rose unwittingly became involved in another storyline familiar to Bulls fans. During the first practice under new Bulls coach Fred Hoiberg, Rose caught an accidental elbow and suffered a facial fracture that required surgery. More importantly, it means Rose will be out for time being, although the Bulls are holding out hope he can return for the season opener. For a guy who has battled injuries seemingly non-stop the last few years, it’s yet another tough break, writes K.C. Johnson in the Chicago Tribune

Derrick Rose caught an accidental elbow to his face halfway through Hoiberg’s first session and left for tests that revealed a left orbital fracture. The team said Rose, who turns 27 Sunday, will undergo surgery at Rush University Medical Center on Wednesday. A timetable for his return will be determined after the procedure.

Absences following surgery for orbital fractures have run the gamut recently with players missing anywhere from five to 28 games. Whatever the case, Rose’s injury piles on top of Mike Dunleavy’s back surgery last Friday. Dunleavy’s rehabilitation process could sideline the veteran forward eight to 10 weeks.

Suddenly, 40 percent of Hoiberg’s projected starting lineup will miss most, if not all, of training camp. A source said there is optimism Rose will be ready for the Oct. 27 regular-season opener against LeBron James and the Cavaliers.

And while this setback pales in comparison to the three knee surgeries Rose has endured, it’s yet another mental challenge for a former most valuable player who tried to remind all of his greatness during Monday’s media day.

“I know I’m great,” Rose said then.

Since becoming the youngest MVP in NBA history in 2011, Rose has missed in chronological order — deep breath here — five games each to a sprained toe and strained back; 17 games to groin, ankle and foot issues; the entire 2012-13 season to a torn left ACL; 71 games to a torn right meniscus; eight games to ankle and hamstring issues and 20 games to a second right meniscus tear.

In all, Rose has played in 100 games over the last four seasons.

Suddenly, Jimmy Butler’s boast he can play point guard may not be a far-fetched idea. If Rose does miss any regular-season time, the Bulls have Aaron Brooks, Kirk Hinrich and E’Twaun Moore at the position.

Three players who addressed the media said they didn’t know whose elbow caught Rose.

“Might have been me,” Taj Gibson said. “It’s one of those plays where everybody’s going so hard.”

At least Gibson, who is coming back from offseason left ankle surgery, practiced fully. But with Dunleavy not sure when he’ll return and now the Rose injury, there has been more bad news than good on the Bulls’ injury front.

Whether Rose wears a mask upon his return has yet to be determined. At the very least, he will have to overcome the fear of getting struck in the face again.

With Rose leaving practice early, teammates were left to answer if Rose’s curious and unsolicited comments about his 2017 free agency from Monday were irksome.

“I don’t care what the guy talks about as long as he’s helping us win games,” said Butler, who signed a $92.3 million deal this offseason. “Whatever he’s focused on let him be focused, but I think his objective is to win a championship. I’m pretty sure he talked about that as well — and how he wants to help this team win. Everything else, he is who he is.

“He can talk about unicorns and rainbows for all I care. Just help us win some basketball games.”


No. 2: Next man up in Cleveland…again The Cleveland Cavaliers made it to the NBA Finals despite a seemingly non-stop series of injuries, including season-ending stoppages to All-Stars Kevin Love and Kyrie Irving. Four months later, the Cavs entered training camp heading in the right direction, with everyone healthy or at least nearing full health. And then Iman Shumpert suffered a wrist injury and, as the Cavs announced yesterday, Shumpert will miss the next 12-14 weeks following surgery. As Chris Haynes writes for, the Cavs are relying on the same mantra they have for months: Next man up

This wasn’t the best way to begin Day 1 of training camp.

“It’s ‘next man up’ for our team,” LeBron James said. “It’s a big blow for our team. He’s a guy that we wanted around here long-term, and he still will be around here long-term obviously, but the next man up will be ready to go until he gets back.”

Cavs coach David Blatt echoed those sentiments.

“He will eventually be back and in the meantime, we will follow the same philosophy that we had all last year: Face the adversity, next man up and play the game that we know how and the way that we should,” Blatt said.

With Shumpert sidelined, Griffin said there are no immediate plans to tinker with the roster due to the team’s depth. But he’s keeping his options open.

“We’re going to give people a chance to kind of absorb it from within,” he said “but obviously we’re paying a lot of attention to opportunities that we may be able to improve the group. We’ll just play it by ear.”

J.R. Smith will likely get the starting nod in the backcourt along with Mo Williams at the start of the regular season. The acquisition of Richard Jefferson should also play a key part in stabilizing the rotation.

Griffin said Shumpert worked “incredibly hard” this off-season to come into camp in top shape.

Injuries are something that all 30 NBA teams have to deal with at some point. The Cavs know first-hand that injuries at the wrong time can hinder them from reaching their ultimate goal.

“Injuries will probably be the only thing that can stop us long-term, [but Shump] is a short-term thing,” James said.


No. 3: Durant back in action One day after he turned 27 years old, Kevin Durant went through his first full day of practice with the Oklahoma City Thunder after missing 55 games last season following three foot surgeries. While the team announced Durant was fully cleared to return to action, as Durant explained yesterday, there’s a difference in being cleared to play and being in game shape. But, as Durant told ESPN’s Royce Young, he’s the same player he was before the injury

“I feel great, actually,” Durant said. “It’s really different being out there in a practice setting. I haven’t been there in a while. It’s definitely going to take me some time to really get comfortable out there again.

“I’ve been injured, but I’m healed now. So I try not to think about it. If I’m on the court, I’m OK. So I’m the same player I was.”

Despite the frustrations of last season, Durant enters his ninth NBA season full of the confidence. Asked about how long it’ll take to rediscover his rhythm, the 2014 MVP says his game isn’t back — because it never left.

“The most humble way I can say it is I’ve always got feel,” Durant said. “Every time I step on the court I feel great. I know how to play the game. My body might say a little different, but I always feel like I’m in rhythm. That’s just from me being a skill player and knowing what it takes to go out there and showcase my fundamentals of the game. I always feel like I’m in feel, but my body has to catch up, I guess.”

The one area Durant said may take a bit of time is his conditioning, though he said he felt like he was in already in a good place.

“My conditioning feels great,” Durant said. “I know it’s gonna take some time for me to really get back to feeling great and mid-season form, but I’m on my way.”

Monday’s practice was also the first for new head coach Billy Donovan, who said the focus was working to establish an identity, specifically on the defensive side.

“I think it went well,” Donovan said of his first NBA practice. “Guys were obviously very, very excited, certainly a lot of teaching to do in the first couple hours just to try and get a defensive system and a philosophy, trying to break down and teach. I thought we got a lot in, especially considering it was the first day.”

Said Durant of adjusting to a new coach: “It’s the first day. We’ve still got to figure it out. It’s just the first day. We’re smart players, and we know how to figure things out.”


No. 4: Bennett back home in Toronto The Cleveland Cavaliers made him the first pick of the draft in 2013, but since then Anthony Bennett has struggled to find a home in the NBA. After one season in Cleveland he was traded to Minnesota, and this summer his contract was bought out, making him a free agent. But for Bennett, his latest team is the Toronto Raptors, which is actually home. And as Bennett told CBS’s James Herbert, that’s a good thing

After Bennett walked into the practice court at the Air Canada Centre wearing a Raptors shirt — apparently his new No. 15 jersey wasn’t quite ready, and when he put it on a short while later, there was no name on the back — he called playing in Toronto “the perfect situation for me.” It was “definitely not an easy decision” to leave the Minnesota Timberwolves, but when he got back from the FIBA Americas in Mexico City, his agency and his former team were working on a buyout. Other teams were interested, but he knew where he wanted to be.

“It has been something I’ve been thinking about growing up, watching Vince Carter play,” Bennett said. “And now I’m back here. It’s surreal, but at the same time it’s work. I’m just ready to go all out.”

Playing for the Canadian national team, Bennett had a solid summer. He was perhaps the team’s best player at the Pan-Am Games in Toronto, and he had his moments at the FIBA Americas in Mexico City, too. Unsurprisingly, fellow Canadian Raptor Cory Joseph believes he can build on that.

“I feel like it’s a new beginning here,” Joseph said. “I think he’ll do great for us, for the city, for the country. I think he’ll revive his NBA career.”

While the homecoming angle is nice, Bennett’s redemption story has been written before. He looked in shape and confident at last year’s summer league, where he said he was having fun again after a rookie year filled with adversity. Just like with Team Canada, in Vegas he showed off the athleticism that made him such a great prospect, screaming into the stands to punctuate his dunks. He didn’t play much in his second season, though, and it wasn’t pretty when he did. Bennett missed way too many midrange jumpers and often looked lost on defense. He has a long way to go, and there are proven players in front of him.

As Raptors training camp begins, Bennett will find himself battling Patrick Patterson and Luis Scola at power forward. DeMarre Carroll is also expected to spend some time at the 4, and James Johnson could be in the mix, too. Given Toronto head coach Dwane Casey‘s preference for veterans and his dedication to defense, it seems unlikely Bennett will be a regular part of the rotation.

“This is an opportunity,” Casey said. “This is a good place for him. It’s home. He should feel comfortable. But, all the [playing] time and everything else, he’s going to have to come in and earn it, which I’m sure the other players would be happy to hear.”

For the Raptors, there was little risk in signing Bennett. He’s on a one-year contract for $947,276. Where he was selected doesn’t matter anymore.

“It didn’t work out in a couple places,” Toronto general manager Masai Ujiri said. “I think he’s moved past that. I think the experiences he’s gone through will help him. For us to get a Canadian 22-year-old power forward that is athletic and can play at the minimum? We’ll take it. He’ll have a chance.”


SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Paul Allen says the Blazers have moved on from losing LaMarcus AldridgeBen Gordon went vegetarian and now hopes to make the Golden State Warriors roster … In Denver, Kenneth Faried is the Nuggets’ biggest wild card … The Brooklyn Nets want Brook Lopez to take more of a leadership role

Cavs suffer another injury, Shumpert out several months

ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — Despite losing several rotation players to injury during last season’s postseason, including All-Stars Kevin Love and Kyrie Irving, the Cleveland Cavaliers managed to advance to the NBA Finals and push the Golden State Warriors to six games before losing the series. The thought (or hope) was that this season, once the freak injuries stopped and everyone was healthy, the Cavaliers would be able to contend again.

But the hits just keep on coming.

The Cavaliers announced today that forward Iman Shumpert, who played through a shoulder injury during the Finals, recently suffered a wrist injury and will be out for several months. From the Cavaliers’ release

Cavaliers guard Iman Shumpert recently suffered a ruptured Extensor Carpi Ulnaris sheath in his right wrist. The extent of the injury was confirmed by MRI at Cleveland Clinic Sports Health yesterday by Dr. Thomas Graham and Dr. Richard Parker. Shumpert will have surgery to repair his wrist Wednesday at Cleveland Clinic. His return to play is currently projected to be 12 to 14 weeks.

According to ESPN’s Dave McMenamin, the injury occurred during a training session last week…

While Shumpert isn’t primarily an offensive threat, he is one of Cleveland’s best defensive players, with the versatility to guard several positions. The Cavs signed him to a reported 4-year, $40 million contract this summer.

With Irving still out indefinitely recovering from offseason surgery, perhaps the absence of Shumpert will accelerate contract talks between the Cavs and forward Tristan Thompson, who has yet to report to the team as they discuss a contract extension.

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 210) Featuring Matt D’Agostino

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Comparing players and eras is always a risky proposition, given that everyone comes to the debate with their own perspective.

That’s why we’re extremely careful around here when it comes to connecting the dots between players with similar profiles but wildly different bodies of work. So just because Larry Johnson and Anthony Bennett were No. 1 overall Draft picks (generations apart, mind you) as undersized power forwards from UNLV, does not make them comparable on any level as NBA players.

Phil Jackson compared prized Knicks rookie Kristaps Porzingis to Shawn Bradley, a rather unfair comparison in the eyes of many. Time will tell if Porzingis is ready to assist Carmelo Anthony in the resurrection of the Knicks or if he’ll struggle as a rookie in the same ways that Bennett did in Cleveland.

But it’s another situation that requires time to resolve, time that Bennett will attest few players have in today’s NBA. We talk all of this and much more on Episode 210 of The Hang Time Podcast featuring’s FanDuel guru Matt D’Agostino ...


As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of,  Lang Whitaker of’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.

VIDEO: Will Kristaps Porzingis go the way of Anthony Bennett and struggle in his adjustment to the NBA or be an impact rookie for the New York Knicks this season?

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 209) Rick’s Return



Rick Fox is back in the fold on The Hang Time Podcast, picking up on Episode 209 where he left off months ago, cracking us up while sharing the details of the wild and crazy roller coaster ride that is his life. From Hollywood to Las Vegas to New York and around the globe, Rick has been busy since he last showed up for his job (one of about 226 different jobs) here.

We should clear up a few things now, before you dig in. No, he is not to blame for Serena Williams missing out on the grand slam (he didn’t even make it to her final match at the U.S. Open), that was Drake‘s fault.

Yes, brilliant comedian and actress Amy Schumer is going to need a restraining order to keep Rick a safe distance away from her now that he’s become her unquestioned No. 1 fan.

And yes, these rumors of a musical twist (he’s searching for a stage name but is leaning towards “DJ Trainwreck” … sorry Amy and LeBron James) in his future are legit.

It’s been a while since we’ve had the pleasure of poking fun at the most hilariously entertaining member of our crew.  But it’s good to have him back to share his insights on the sudden passing of Moses Malone, Kobe Bryant‘s readiness for training camp and what that means for the Los Angeles Lakers, his need to learn Spanish (yesterday) for his latest acting gig, rubbing elbows with Oprah, Gayle King and Roger Goodell, his infatuation with live streaming videos on Facebook, introducing his daughter to Nas and so much more.

That’s just a small sampling of what you’ll get on Episode 209 of the Hang Time Podcast: Rick’s Return …


As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of,  Lang Whitaker of’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.

Blogtable: Best offensive rebounder in NBA today?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Were ’83 Sixers most dominant playoff team ever? | NBA’s best offensive rebounder today? | What you remember most about Malone?

VIDEOMoses Malone’s 30-point, 30-rebound game from 1982 vs. Seattle

> Moses Malone is the NBA’s all-time leader in offensive rebounds, but who is the best offensive rebounder in the NBA right now, today?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comWhen Detroit’s Andre Drummond grabbed 440 offensive rebounds in 2013-14, he was the first player with more than 400 in a season in 16 years (Jayson Williams had 443 in 1997-98). Drummond had 33 percent more than the No. 2 man, DeAndre Jordan. Then last season, Drummond grabbed 437, topping runner-up Jordan by 40. So with all due respect to the Clippers center and to wily Zach Randolph in Memphis, the easy answer here is Drummond.

Scott Howard-Cooper, Andre Drummond. More than five per game last season? That’s how to make a big contribution on offense while not having much of an offensive game, or at least a traditional offensive game.

Shaun Powell, After watching him rip through the playoffs last season I’m tempted to nominate Tristan Thompson. He goes for more second helpings than you at Thanksgiving. But the premier offensive rebounder is Andre Drummond, and he’s still learning how to play the game. Imagine what happens when he develops a post move or a mid-range shot. Until then, the offensive glass is what he does very well, better than most.

John Schuhmann, Andre Drummond was the league leader in offensive rebounding percentage last season, but DeAndre Jordan was second while playing for a coach — Doc Rivers — who doesn’t want to sacrifice transition defense for offensive boards. No team allowed a lower percentage of their opponents’ shots in the first six seconds of the shot clock than the Clippers, who ranked 28th in offensive rebounding percentage as a team. With that context, the case could be made that Jordan is the better offensive rebounder among two similarly long and bouncy bigs.

Sekou Smith, Andre Drummond‘s the only player in the league to average more than five offensive rebounds per game last season, so he has to get the nod. But I love watching DeAndre Jordan (4.8 offensive rpg and a league-leading 15 rpg last season) do his work around the rim for the Los Angeles Clippers. He’s huge, like Drummond, and uses every bit of his size and athleticism to his advantage on the boards. He does it with more flair than Drummond and does it in a dominant fashion on a team where he’s never really been featured on that end of the floor.

Ian Thomsen, Andre Drummond dominated during the regular season, but the big man who made you think of offensive rebounding as a weapon last year was Tristan Thompson. As the Cavaliers’ scorers went down during the playoffs, Thompson tirelessly created second-chances while helping to drive his team within reach of the championship.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blogBy all the stats, Detroit’s Andre Drummond is pretty effective, by a pretty healthy margin, with DeAndre Jordan not far off. But fresh in my mind is the work Tristan Thompson did during the NBA Finals. We always hear from coaches that rebounding is mostly about effort over anything else, and I thought Thompson showed that during The Finals.

Blogtable: What will you remember most about Moses Malone?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Were ’83 Sixers most dominant playoff team ever? | NBA’s best offensive rebounder today? | What you remember most about Malone?

VIDEOMoses Malone career retrospective

> The NBA lost one of its all-time greats when Moses Malone died Sunday at age 60. What will you remember most about the “Chairman of the Boards?”

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comI’ll remember Moses as a man of few words, whose comments took on greater import and pithiness because he wasn’t all that talkative. I’ll remember the pools of sweat he left at both ends of every court on which he played – hardest working and most perspiring man in the game at the time. Unfortunately, though, I think I’ll remember how jarring it was to see Malone play for so many teams in his career. Legendary players aren’t supposed to pack their bags that often – even skipping his ABA stops due to that league’s shoddy finances, Malone changed NBA teams eight times. For a while it almost seemed like a Moses-of-the-month club, with Malone spread around the league so everyone could have him for a stint. Guess that makes him both old-school and very modern, as pro athletes go.

Scott Howard-Cooper, Probably the tenacity. It seemed like if there was a rebound anywhere in the area code, he would grab it. Imagine the number of times an opponent got chewed out by their coach for not sealing Malone off the offensive boards. Coaches must have gone hoarse. Moses had good size, but he wasn’t Shaquille O’Neal or Wilt Chamberlain. But when the ball was coming off the rim, it didn’t matter.

Shaun Powell, Moses wasn’t the most eloquent speaker and was rather reluctant to do interviews, but he came up with a few gems. Of course, there was “fo, fo, and fo” and also the quip about “me and four guys from Petersburg” being able to beat up the Celtics in The Finals. He nicknamed his two young boys “Harvard” and “Yale” because that’s where he said they were going to school (neither did). And finally, Moses remarked how he “learned” Hakeem Olajuwon how to play the game and after getting roasted by a young Hakeem regretted that he “learned him too good.”

John Schuhmann, I don’t know if “underrated” is the right word, but looking back at Malone’s career, he clearly doesn’t get mentioned enough as one of the best big men in NBA history. When you look at his shooting numbers (49 percent for his career, only five seasons at 50 percent or better), he obviously wasn’t as efficient as Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Wilt Chamberlain or Shaquille O’Neal. But by rebounding so many of his own misses (and that he shot free throws better than all of those guys), he kind of made up for that. Really, his numbers are right there with Shaq.

Sekou Smith, In addition to this Air Force 1 poster that hung on the bedroom wall when I was a kid, it’s the fact that Moses was a technician. The polish and proficiency of his game, on both ends of the floor, is what will always stick out to me about him. He dominated with what would classify now as an “old school” style that didn’t rely on his physical prowess as much as it did his pure skill and ability to wear you out by beating you to all the sweet spots on the floor. You don’t score and rebound the way he did, at his size, without being an absolute technician. 

Ian Thomsen, I think about how he was underestimated when the ABA folded in 1976. In the ensuing dispersal draft Malone was chosen second by the Blazers (their first pick was Maurice Lucas) and was then unloaded to the Buffalo Braves for a first-round pick (which turned into Rick Robey). The Blazers already had Bill Walton, who would lead them to the 1976-77 championship — but that doesn’t change the fact that they and the Braves undervalued 21-year-old Malone, who was traded again for a pair of first-rounders (Wesley Cox and Micheal Ray Richardson) to the Rockets. Two years later, Malone would be the NBA’s MVP, and in 1981 he would lead the Rockets to the NBA Finals. The misunderstanding of his potential was stunning.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blog I was in middle school in 1988, when my hometown Atlanta Hawks signed a then 32-year-old Moses Malone to team him with Dominique Wilkins and Reggie Theus and give the Hawks, finally, a potent inside-out attack and make them a presumptive Eastern Conference contender. I may have only been a kid, but I knew enough about the NBA to know that these Hawks had a chance to be special, so I mowed lawns all summer and raised $205 and bought a $5 season ticket for that ’88-89 season. By then Moses wasn’t the dominant glass demon he’d been earlier in his career, but he was still effective and still worthwhile. The main thing I remember was how often he seemed to miss short shots intentionally when nobody was near him, and how through this my friends and I learned what it meant to “pad” one’s stats. Many times after games, we would hang around near the locker rooms and ask for autographs. Moses wasn’t the most enthusiastic autograph giver, but he usually made himself available eventually. One night someone asked him if he had any extra shoes he could give away, and without looking up, Moses said, “Ain’t got no shoe contract.” What made this even better was he was starring in a national Nike commercial at the time.