Posts Tagged ‘Derrick Rose’

Blogtable: What’s With The Recent Sloppy Play?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: MVP Race | Post-All-Star Sloppy Play | Statue-Worthy Players


> Since returning from the extended All-Star break, scoring is down, shooting is down, and turnovers are up. Did the long break throw players off rhythm? Or are other factors contributing to the recent sloppy play?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comMy hunch is, what we’re seeing is a result of a) the season’s dog days, and b) teams limping along without injured players. Some folks in Chicago believe that Derrick Rose lost “it” over the long break, never got “it” back and somehow got hurt or became more vulnerable over the extended layoff. But the Bulls star can seemingly get hurt tucking his little boy into bed, so there’s no reason to legislate over that. I find it hard to believe that a few extra days off could have, collectively, such a drastic effect.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comI think you’re reaching to blame the extended All-Star break. This is only a small sampling and these are just the vagaries of the long season.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comIt’s just fun with numbers at this point. If we get to the end of the season and the pattern holds, maybe you’ll be on to something. If the same thing happens again a year from now, then it becomes an actual discussion. Now, though, it’s a trend of the moment.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: There’s no scientific data to support a link between the long layoff and the sluggish play, so we only have our assumptions, flawed or not. I suspect the layoff might’ve had something to do with it but also this: Injuries, coupled with a half-dozen teams that waved the white flag and turned their roster over to young and inexperienced players to get a read on their long-term value.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: There are five teams with starting point guards who were thrown into unfamiliar offenses, and Milwaukee and Phoenix are two teams that have seen pretty big drops in efficiency after the break. But I think it’s mostly the long layoff. Offense is generally at its best with one or two days of rest, where players can maintain a rhythm and level of sharpness. We’ve already seen things pick up the last couple of days.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com​There is no way you are getting me to hate on the extended break. We’ll just have see some numbers suffer, because that break felt great. I don’t think the longer break throws off anyone’s rhythm. I think any break from the normal bump and grind of the season, any break of more than 72 hours, automatically causes a potential hiccup for most guys. I can live with that now and going forward. It’s a small price to pay for a few extra days of All-Star breakage.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comThe days off didn’t help for the short term. But this is also the equivalent to the month of August in baseball, when teams are searching for inspiration with the playoffs still many weeks away. The extended break was a new idea, and in future the teams and their players may develop better ideas on how to handle it; but overall this is not a big deal.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogAsk Schuhmann. By that I mean, I haven’t seen the stats, and anyway, if you dropped the stats into my lap I wouldn’t even know what to do with them. Maybe a long break contributed in some way, but I don’t think everyone forgot how to shoot or lost their shape in a couple of weeks. But I do know that historically, this is the time of the season when a bit of ennui creeps in and teams start to look forward just a bit. With the playoffs just around the bend, to me it’s understandable if eyes drift a bit toward what lies ahead.

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 191) Featuring Dennis Schroder

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS – League or peer justice, which one is the right answer for James Harden‘s kick below the belt on LeBron James during the Houston Rockets-Cleveland Cavaliers/MVP showdown Sunday.

The enlightened crowd would obviously go with the NBA reaction, which was to suspend Harden for one game (Tuesday night’s Rockets visit to Philips Arena to face the Atlanta Hawks).

Here at the Hang Time Podcast, we don’t always fall on the right side of enlightenment.

We’d have handled it the old-fashioned way, the way they did in a bygone NBA era where players didn’t hesitate to dole out their own brand of justice when someone felt like they were wronged by someone else. That’s probably why we are not in charge of the NBA’s discipline dispersal, among other things.

It’s probably best that we stick to the discussion of these issues. And these days, there is no shortage of outstanding issues where the NBA is concerned. From the injuries in Chicago to Derrick Rose, Jimmy Butler and Taj Gibson to the ongoing MVP race involving Harden, James, Steph Curry and Russell Westbrook to vetting the title contenders in both the Eastern and Western conferences to our opinions on Kobe Bryant‘s latest cinematic endeavor, we cover it all on Episode 191 of the Hang Time Podcast … featuring Hawks point guard Dennis Schroder.

We go through all of that and then some on Episode 191 of The Hang Time Podcast … 

 

LISTEN HERE:

As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of NBA.com,  Lang Whitaker of NBA.com’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand and the best sound designer/engineer in the business,  Andrew Merriam.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.

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Bulls’ Butler out 3-6 weeks


VIDEO: Jimmy Butler injures elbow

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERSDerrick Rose isn’t the only star the Chicago Bulls will work without for the foreseeable future. All-Star swingman Jimmy Butler will also watch in street clothes for the next 3-6 weeks after an MRI confirmed a Grade 2/3 ulnar ligament sprain and small bone impaction to the left elbow, the Bulls announced this afternoon.

Butler is averaging a team-high 20.2 points, 5.9 rebounds and 3.3 assists. Butler is also one of the league’s elite perimeter defenders, meaning the Bulls lose their best two-way player during what is sure to be a crucial late-season stretch as the Bulls and others jockey for position in the standings.

Rose is out for a month after surgery last week to repair a torn meniscus.

 

Morning shootaround — March 2


VIDEO: Highlights from March 2 of all the action around the NBA

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Harden humbles James, Cavs | Another blow for already bruised Bulls | Blazers’ Lillard back in rhythm | Warriors are true believers after Boston comeback

No. 1: Harden humbles James, Cavs — The real “King James” stood up Sunday. And the crown didn’t fit the head of LeBron James, not on this day and not with James Harden and the Houston Rockets prevailing in an overtime thriller that lived up to every second of the billed MVP battle between the superstars at the center of this epic race. Statement game? Absolutely. Harden said so and our very own Fran Blinebury weaves the tale of the rise of the man who would be (the new) king:

Rough. Tough. Physical. Contentious. Dirty.

“Yeah, it’s like street ball,” said James Harden. “You grew up playing games like that.”

If Harden keeps growing up any faster, they’re going to have to raise the rafters of Toyota Center just so he doesn’t go straight through the roof.

He’s scored more points in a game this season than he did Sunday. Grabbed more rebounds. Dished out more assists. Played more artistically.

But never been more ferocious, more driven.

You’re damn right that 105-103 overtime win means more when it comes against LeBron James and the Cavaliers.

As messages go, this one couldn’t have been delivered more emphatically if it had come wrapped around a brick and tossed through a plate glass window or attached to a flaming arrow.

“M-V-P.”

While there may still be a horse race for the award this season, there’s no doubt which thoroughbred is now galloping ahead of the field.

Less than 72 hours after James stated his case by outscoring Golden State’s Stephen Curry 42-18 in a routine win by the Cavs, Harden provided his response.

James scored more points (37 to Harden’s 33), but took far more shots (35 to 18) to get them. Playing without point guard Kyrie Irving, James controlled the ball like a yo-yo on a string and tried to do too much. Playing without center Dwight Howard, as he’s done for much of the season, Harden simply opened his arms wide to embrace all of the things that had to be done.

“Every time you watch [Harden] play, you’re watching history,” Rockets Hall of Famer Hakeem Olajuwon had said a few hours before the tip. “He’s doing something spectacular. Every night the best defensive player on the other team has to guard him and also the game plan of the other team is how to stop him. And he’s still finding a way to be effective and giving them an opportunity to win every time. So he is definitely the MVP.”

*** (more…)

Morning shootaround — Feb. 28


VIDEO: Recap Friday’s 14 games with the Daily Zap

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Rondo: All is well in Dallas | What’s wrong with the Wizards? | Bulls win, despite losing Gibson | Shorten the schedule?

No. 1: Rondo: All is well in Dallas — After an on-court blowup earlier this week between Dallas coach Rick Carlisle and point guard Rajon Rondo, the Mavericks suspended Rondo for one game. Dallas lost that game without Rondo, against Atlanta, but in the meantime, Rondo says, he and Carlisle have been working to get back on the same page. And as ESPNDallas.com’s Tim McMahon writes, Rondo is now hoping to focus on moving forward and keeping the Mavs in the playoff picture…

“I just got built-up frustration,” said Rondo, who has had a couple of long individual meetings with Carlisle since their blowup. “I take a lot of the blame for what I’ve been doing on the court, but just a little frustrated. The most important thing is communication with Coach. I’ve talked to a lot of the coaches, I’ve talked to a lot of staff members.

“Coach and I, when I first got here, we were talking a lot and watching film after every game. He’s backed off a little bit with the addition of Amar’e [Stoudemire], trying to help get him up to speed. Our communication was great at first. Not that it wasn’t so great, but it’s just that we weren’t communicating enough. That shouldn’t be the case the rest of the season.”

Rondo, a four-time All-Star who arrived in Dallas on Dec. 18 as the featured player in a blockbuster trade with the Boston Celtics, has a reputation for being difficult to coach. He frequently butted heads with Doc Rivers in Boston, but the Celtics won a title and advanced to another NBA Finals during their time together.

“I’ve been in this situation before,” Rondo said, chuckling. “Everyone’s personality is different. The personality and the DNA is different.

“I don’t think this is a problem at all. We lost a game [Wednesday against the Atlanta Hawks], which hurt us seeding-wise, but we have to continue to move forward. I spoke with pretty much everyone in the organization, and everyone is on the same page.”

Rondo declined to discuss how play-calling responsibilities would be handled going forward. Carlisle has handled the vast majority of play-calling, which bothered Rondo, a nine-year veteran known for his basketball intelligence.

Carlisle, who stressed the importance of Rondo to the Mavs after the suspension was announced Wednesday, said he is done discussing the incident with Rondo.

“I know that you guys need to ask him a couple of questions, but I’m done talking about it,” Carlisle said. “Our other players are done talking about it. It’s over. In terms of NBA time, it’s light-years ago.”

***

No. 2: What’s wrong with the Wizards? — The Washington Wizards entered this season expected to not only contend for the Southeast Division title, but the Eastern Conference crown as well. But even with injuries slowing their roll this season, the Wizards are in a tailspin right now, last night losing to the Philadelphia 76ers, Washington’s sixth loss in a row, its longest losing streak in two seasons. As Jorge Castillo writes in the Washington Post, the Wizards’ loss was “code red for a team that just one month ago harbored title aspirations”…

It came on the heels of a team dinner Thursday. All 14 players dined together at a Brazilian steakhouse, which was captured in an Instagram post by Marcin Gortat with the caption “Team dinner…Staying together!”

The off-court camaraderie didn’t remedy their on-court ailments. A night later, they were dreadful in a loss to a team they dismantled by 35 points last month. The loss was the Wizards’ 11th in 13 games and 13th in their past 17 and could leave them in sixth place in the Eastern Conference depending on the Milwaukee Bucks’ fate against the Los Angeles Lakers late Friday night.

“I wouldn’t say rock bottom. It’s a tough stretch,” all-star guard John Wall said. “We’re still above .500, but the main thing is we got to get back to playing the right way. Until we do that, we’re going to keep losing games. The way we’ve been playing, you can lose to anybody in this league.”

Washington entered the night averaging a league-low 15 free throw attempts and shooting 23.3 percent from beyond the three-point line over its past five games. Without Bradley Beal (fibula), Paul Pierce (knee) and Kris Humphries (groin) available, the trend continued.

When the Wizards (33-26) last played in Philadelphia on March 1 of last year, Trevor Ariza, now a member of the Houston Rockets, made eight three-pointers and scored 40 points. On Friday, Washington made just 4 of its 17 three-point attempts (23.5 percent) and scored 39 second-half points.

The Wizards shot a paltry 32.3 percent from the floor and attempted 12 fewer free throws than Philadelphia. The 76ers were held to 35 percent shooting but outscored Washington by 28 points from the three-point arc and free throw line.

“We had some good shots, but we’re not making shots,” Coach Randy Wittman said. “[We’re] not playing with confidence right now. We’re short-cutting everything. To get out of this rut that you’re in, you can’t do that offensively. We have to execute offensively, and we took short cuts, which turned into bad shots. Until we execute, it’s going to stay like this.”

***

No. 3: Bulls win, despite losing Gibson — The Chicago Bulls continue seeing both sides of the coin. Earlier in the day, the Bulls announced that surgery on Derrick Rose had been successful, and they were putting a 4-6 week timetable on his return, which, even on the long end of that schedule, would have Rose back before the end of the regular season. Last night, without Rose, the Bulls beat the surging Timberwolves, 96-89. But taking the bad with the good, the Bulls lost big man Taj Gibson to a sprained ankle. With the Bulls struggling to stay healthy, Joakim Noah has been able to resume his old point-forward role and keep the Bulls above water, as ESPNChicago.com’s Nick Friedell writes

“That part I think is innate,” Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau said of Noah’s passing ability. “He had great vision and decision-making ability. He’s got a very unorthodox game in many ways. But he’s got great vision, and if a guy’s open just a little bit on a cut, he can get it there. So it’s a big plus when you have a big guy that can pass like that.”

For his part, Noah wasn’t biting on how much fun he was having in his old role. He discussed how the Bulls run a read-and-react offense and try to find the open man.

“I enjoy winning,” Noah said. “It was fun to win today. We just got to keep improving.”

Noah’s offensive game has taken a back seat to Pau Gasol‘s throughout the season. Now that Noah is back to feeling like himself as he continues to shake off the lingering effects of offseason knee surgery, it’s going to be interesting to see how his game responds once Gasol and Rose are back on the floor. In the meantime, Noah, like the rest of his teammates, is just hopeful Rose will be back sooner than later.

“It’s tough when your best player is out,” Noah said. “But I think today was positive news. Derrick’s a warrior. He’s going to fight as hard as he can to try his best to come back this year. We just got to keep building and keep getting better until he gets back.”

***

No. 4: Shorten the season? — At the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference in Boston this weekend, at least some part of the conversation has been about the length of the NBA season. The NBA has played an 82-game schedule since 1967-68, but with the recent drumbeat to reduce wear-and-tear on players and reduce the amount of back-to-back games, is it worth considering shortening the season? As Brett Pollakoff writes for NBCSports.com, the recently retired Shane Battier suggests slicing 22 games off the schedule…

“To me, 82 is here because somebody is making a lot of money,” Mike D’Antoni said Friday, as part of a panel discussion at the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference. “Usually that’s the bottom line. They’re making money, it hasn’t been a disaster, and it’s a little more like a marathon, and that’s just the rules. 82 isn’t going anywhere.”

As D’Antoni summed up succinctly, without a large amount of data available to essentially prove that an 82-game schedule significantly puts the league’s players at risk, the financial incentive not to touch that magic number of 82 will remain too strong. And Celtics assistant GM Mike Zarren echoed those remarks.

“It’s not just the number of games, it’s in what time frame,” Zarren said. “So there may be some tweaks that happen soon in the NBA to that. It’s a much more realistic thing than cutting games, because it’s in everyone’s interest to grow the pie, and cutting the number of games cuts ticket sales, which shrinks the pie.”

Those are realistic perspectives, but they’re ones that come from a coach and a member of the front office.

On the player side, Shane Battier came up with a number of games that he believes would be ideal — not only to protect the athletes, but also to make the games that are played much more compelling.

“Personally, I think a 60-game season would be perfect,” Battier said. “Every game matters more. You can’t sleepwalk through a few weeks of the season — it does happen — and then all of a sudden wake up near the All-Star break and turn it on. Fans just want to see the best basketball players in the world at their highest level going head-to-head.

“Every team has a certain number of throwaway games. You just know. You just know you’re not winning tonight. You don’t have it. And then after the game, coach knows it, everybody knows it, coach comes in, says ‘Alright, bring it in guys. We’ll get ‘em tomorrow. 1-2-3 team!'”

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: The Thunder lost the second half of a back-to-back, but not because of Russell Westbrook, who posted his third-straight triple-double … Don’t be surprised if the Knicks make a run at Reggie Jackson this summer … Is Baron Davis mounting a comeback this season? … Catching up with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, who has reinvented himself in retirement as a culture vulture

Unique 2008 draft continues to evolve


VIDEO: GameTime: What’s Next For Chicago?

Derrick Rose, Russell Westbrook and Kevin Love went in the top five, Brook Lopez the top 10, and that makes perfect sense. All were smart picks that at the very least paid a decent return on the investment and in one case, Westbrook to the Thunder, was the direct hit of a prospect with no experience as a point guard becoming a star as a point guard.

But Tim Reynolds was right in his Associated Press story. The 2008 draft has continued to veer toward the strange, most recently with Rose’s knee injury. And that’s beyond the typical perspective of time of some lottery picks going bad (Michael Beasley second to the Heat, Joe Alexander eighth to the Bucks) and later selections building successful careers (several).

Reynolds’ research:

  • Miami’s Mario Chalmers is the only one among the 60 picks on June 26, 2008, inside Madison Square Garden to win a title. He has played in 29 games in June, compared to 28 combined for everyone else in the draft class.
  • Only four first-rounders have even played in the Finals: Courtney Lee when he was with the Magic, Westbrook and Serge Ibaka with the Thunder and Beasley as part of his on-again, off-again (and back-on-again) relationship with the Heat.
  • Rose’s knee problems have become well documented. Lopez was sidelined the better part of two full years with foot issues. Knee problems cost Eric Gordon more than 100 games over two seasons. Danilo Gallinari and his knees. That’s four lottery picks.
  • Only 10 first-round choices have at least 30 starts in 2014-15. Fifteen are averaging double-figures in scoring. Six have not played in the NBA this season, although it is also noted that rate of attrition of 24 in the NBA now is good compared to some other draft classes of the same general time (13 first-rounders from 2006, 18 from 2007 and 22 from 2009).

And there is the uniqueness of the selections that goes beyond the usual hits and misses. With years to go before a final read on 2008, the relatively early storyline is of a draft that has turned out so bottom heavy, with the majority of the best players coming from beyond the lottery and even beyond the first round: Robin Lopez at 15, Roy Hibbert at No. 17, Ryan Anderson at 21, Lee at 22, Ibaka at 24, Nicolas Batum at 25, George Hill at 26, Nikola Pekovic at 31, DeAndre Jordan at 35, and Goran Dragic at 45.

So much for teams putting a premium on size — that’s a lot of starting centers outside the top 14. Nearly seven years later, the NBA world has seen how much Lopez, Hibbert, Ibaka and Jordan in particular can impact on defense alone.

The ultimate analysis is still pending, because a lot of the players have years to go before their careers can be defined. And, yes, because of Rose. How his injury saga turns out will have an impact on how the Class of 2008 is viewed.

Bulls expect Rose back before end of season


VIDEO: Bulls GM Gar Forman discusses the latest on Derrick Rose

HANG TIME BIG CITY — It’s been a whirlwind few days in Chicago, where earlier this week we learned that point guard Derrick Rose had been diagnosed with a meniscus tear in his right knee, the same meniscus he tore in November of 2013, which kept him out for most of last season. The new injury meniscus injury was at least initially feared to require another season-ending surgery for Rose, which would make this Rose’s fourth consecutive season cut hideously short by injury.

But it soon became apparent that Rose’s injury wasn’t as severe as was previously feared. And following the procedure this morning, Bulls GM Gar Forman announced at a press conference that Rose should return in 4-6 weeks, meaning Rose should return before the end of the regular season.

Morning shootaround — Feb. 27


VIDEO: Highlights for games played Feb. 26

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Bulls hoping for quick Rose return | Paul George returns to practice | Earl Lloyd passes away | Buyouts not working out for Clippers | Rip Hamilton retires

No. 1: Bulls hoping for quick Rose return — When it was announced earlier this week that Bulls point guard Derrick Rose would need knee surgery, many jumped to the belief that he would miss the rest of the season and postseason. But in a press conference yesterday, Bulls management was bullish on the belief that Rose could be back by the end of the season, and be ready for the playoffs, following surgery scheduled for today, writes K.C. Johnson in the Chicago Tribune

The procedure, which team physician Brian Cole will perform, is a removal of part or all of the meniscus. This type of procedure typically is used to address subsequent tears of the meniscus that Rose originally tore in November 2013.

In that surgery, which Cole also performed, Rose’s meniscus was repaired or reattached, and he missed the remainder of the 2013-14 season. A meniscectomy typically involves a shorter rehabilitation period.

The Tribune, citing sources, has reported there is considerable optimism that Rose’s second meniscus tear is small. Until the surgery is performed and Cole determines how much of the meniscus needs to be trimmed, it’s unknown what the timetable for Rose’s return is.

The Bulls said general manager Gar Forman will address that issue after the surgery. At the team’s annual charity event Thursday night, a feeling of hopeful optimism emanated from team officials.

“Nothing’s an easy procedure, but our anticipation is that there’s an area that’s going to get taken care of and the hope is that he will (play this season),” executive vice president of basketball operations John Paxson said.

Added Forman: “I don’t want to speculate until (Cole) goes in (Rose’s knee), but we’re certainly hopeful.”

(more…)

Morning shootaround — Feb. 26


VIDEO: Daily Zap for games played Feb. 25

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Garnett talks the talk upon return | Timeline for Rose | Sullinger vows to trim down | Carter-Williams caught off-guard | Kobe: NBA was out to get Lakers

No. 1: Garnett talks the talk upon returnKevin Garnett’s return to Minnesota was a success, in regard to the atmosphere in the Target Center and the result on the scoreboard. And Garnett’s impact on the Wolves went well beyond the five points, eight rebounds and two blocks he tallied in less than 19 minutes. NBA.com’s Steve Aschburner made his own return to the Twin Cities and wrote about the conversations Garnett had (and will continue to have) with his new teammates

“Today it was just so over-the-top. I did not know the city missed me like this. I don’t think you could ever wish or ever think that a city loves you like this, but to see it is reality and I am very appreciative.”

That was the storybook of Garnett’s return.

The playbook? That was all the basketball stuff Garnett participated in and, even more so, didn’t participate in. He logged 18:38 in his first game back, about what coach Flip Saunders has in mind for most nights. Which meant that Garnett sat, and often will sit, on the bench for 29:22, watching this team he’s getting to know on the fly.

It went like that all evening. Whoever sat down next to Garnett got an earful of … you name it. Defensive positioning. Ball-skill fundamentals. Fun with phonics.

“That’s what I do,” Garnett said. “I was just trying to give the guys some insight, if not perception. Show ‘em what I was seeing. Just slow ‘em down a little. Nothing extra or different from what I usually do.”

***

No. 2: Friday could bring surgery and timeline for Rose — The Bulls received brutal news on Tuesday when they learned that Derrick Rose had a torn meniscus in his right knee for the second time in 15 months. But they might not lose Rose for nearly as long this time, and there’s a chance he could return in the postseason. We’ll all know what the timeline is after Rose has surgery, which could come Friday, writes K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune

Thibodeau said surgery hasn’t been scheduled, but sources said while it’s mostly Rose’s decision, it will happen sooner rather than later, likely Friday because of minimal swelling. Team physician Brian Cole, who also repaired Rose’s first torn meniscus in November 2013, will perform the procedure. Rose underwent surgery two days after that injury.

An official timeline for Rose’s return won’t be known until Cole performs the surgery, but multiple sources expressed strong belief that this tear isn’t as significant as the one Rose had in November 2013. Sources added the expectation is that this procedure will remove a small cartilage tear, suggesting a shorter rehabilitation period.

Two other sources said Rose was told after the initial surgery that a future tear was possible, if not likely, and that a second procedure typically involves “cutting” or “snipping” the damage. That generally involves a rehabilitation process of three to eight weeks.

***

No. 3: Sullinger vows to trim downJared Sullinger is out for the season with a stress fracture in his left foot and has averaged just 57 games in his first three years in the league. The foot injury isn’t related to the back issue he dealt with as a rookie, unless you choose to blame his weight for both. Sullinger doesn’t think his weight was a factor, but says he plans on using his time off to get in better shape, as Chris Forsberg of ESPN Boston writes

“Freak accidents happen. I just have to come back better,” Sullinger said.

Pressed on what he hoped to get out of recovery, Sullinger added: “A little bit of everything — change the physique, change the way I look. That’s the biggest thing, I think. I’m tired of looking on camera and just seeing how I look, seeing how I play during extended minutes. Conditioning is going to be a big factor. Conditioning is going to be hard because all I can do is ride the bike. We’re going to find ways, we’re going to find ways to get me in the best shape possible.”

Sullinger had pledged to get in better shape this summer and did report for camp looking trimmer, but appears to have added weight during the season.

“I got in better shape, but there’s another level to it,” Sullinger said. “There’s always another level to everything. I just have to take it to another level. This year I came back in a little bit better shape. Obviously, it wasn’t good enough. Now I just have to get back to the grit and grind, kind of break my body down just to build it back up. I think that’s what I’m going to do this summer.”

***

No. 4: Carter-Williams thought he was part of Sixers’ long-term plan — In his first game with his new team, Michael Carter-Williams got a win against his old team, scoring seven points and dishing out eight assists in the Bucks’ 104-88 victory over the Sixers. Before the game, Carter-Williams said that he thought he was part of the long-term plan in Philly, and that coach Brett Brown might have disagreed with Sam Hinkie‘s decision to trade the Rookie of the Year for the Lakers’ top-five protected pick. Bob Cooney of the Philadelphia Daily News has the story

He was reflective on his time in Philly, and seemed to be still somewhat baffled at what went down with him getting moved to Milwaukee in a three-team trade in which the Sixers ended up with a first-round pick from the Lakers, which is top-five-protected this season, top-three-protected for the next two seasons.

“I think the ultimate thing that it comes down to is coach Brown coaches and Sam [Hinkie] does the moves,” said MCW. “I think that’s what it comes down to and I think that’s the agreement and that’s all I really know. I think that if it was up to coach Brown, I don’t think I would have been moved, to be honest.

“I was pretty up to speed and pretty involved (disbelieving laughs). As far as I heard I was involved in the long-term plan, especially with me, Joel (Embiid) and Nerlens (Noel). It was really us three that was the core group and were told that we we’re going to be (there) for a pretty long time and we really want to build around. I understand that things change and plans change. I guess that Sam and the rest of those guys thought that to move me was the best move. That’s on them and it is what it is.”

***

No. 5: Kobe: NBA was out to get the LakersKobe Bryant certainly isn’t afraid to express his opinion. And you might say that he’s a little bitter about the events of 2011. In an interview/profile in this month’s GQ (Warning: some naughty language within), Bryant tells Chuck Klosterman that the ’11 lockout and subsequent veto of the Chris Paul trade were meant to “restrict the Lakers,” and only the Lakers …

The Lakers are not going to make the playoffs this year, and it seems unlikely that they will challenge for a title next year. So if titles are your only goal, why even play these last two seasons?

I know what Mitch [Kupchak, the Lakers GM] tells me. I know what Jim and Jeanie [Buss, the team owners] tell me. I know that they are hell-bent about having a championship caliber team next season, as am I.

But how could that possibly be done? Doesn’t the league’s financial system dictate certain limitations?

Well, okay: Look at the [2011] lockout. That lockout was made to restrict the Lakers. It was. I don’t care what any other owner says. It was designed to restrict the Lakers and our marketability.

The Lakers specifically, or teams like the Lakers?

There is only one team like the Lakers. Everything that was done with that lockout was to restrict the Lakers’ ability to get players and to create a sense of parity, for the San Antonios of the world and the Sacramentos of the world. But a funny thing happened, coming out of that lockout: Even with those restrictions, the Lakers pulled off a trade [for Chris Paul] that immediately set us up for a championship, a run of championships later, and which saved money. Now, the NBA vetoed that trade. But the Lakers pulled that **** off, and no one would have thought it was even possible. The trade got vetoed, because they’d just staged the whole lockout to restrict the Lakers. Mitch got penalized for being smart. But if we could do that…

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Wesley Matthews came up big in a big game for the Blazers … after which the Spurs’ Tony Parker admitted that he’s strugglingEvan Turner messed around and got a triple-doubleGeorge Karl needs a little patienceRajon Rondo and Rick Carlisle had a second angry exchange after the Mavs’ win on Tuesday … Mitch McGary is a hustler, homey … and the Suns will have new uniforms for Thursday’s game against the Thunder.

ICYMI: Rookie Markel Brown showed us that they may have picked the wrong Net for the dunk contest:


VIDEO: Play of the Day – Markel Brown

Blogtable: Bulls Future Without Derrick Rose

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Cavs And The Trade Deadline | Kevin Garnett’s ReturnBulls Without Derrick Rose



VIDEO: Derrick Rose injury

> Tough blow for the Bulls, with Derrick Rose sidelined again and possibly out for the season. What’s Chicago’s next move? And what does the long term future look like now?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comBetter call Nate. Nate Robinson might be the best the Bulls can do, if they can plug him into the role he filled as Rose’s surrogate in 2012-13. Otherwise, this news is a gut punch to the team and to Chicago fans, and clearly even worse to Rose. If, somehow, some way, this meniscus tear were cleaned out rather than stitched up, the medical experts say Rose could get back in time for the playoffs. That might keep a glimmer of hope alive, though it’s not the way he and his “camp” have done things with the previous two injuries. They favor longer vs. shorter rehabs, and they’re probably thinking about Dwyane Wade’s meniscus-deprived knee issues. Just so they and everyone else knows, going the long route likely will slam shut this roster’s championship window. And frankly, the city is ready to move on from Rose and this Groundhog Day marathon screening.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comCircle the wagons, batten down the hatches, bar the door.  Get down, get gritty, sink your teeth in on defense, roll with Aaron Brooks and don’t feel sorry for yourselves.  In other words, just another ordinary day with Tom Thibodeau.  In the short term, the Bulls will still be a tough out for any playoff opponent, but obviously slip down in the pecking order for the Eastern Conference title.  In the long run, when you lose your franchise player for the third time in four years, it’s probably time to look at a re-boot at the point.  The pressure will be ramped up even more to keep free agent Jimmy Butler next summer.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: There is no next move. At least not this season, because losing Rose is a huge blow and losing him now, immediately after the trade window closed, adds to the hurt. The only thing the Bulls can do is play through it. The good news is, they have before, just not at a championship level. Depending on the matchup(s) and the health of other teams, I could still see Chicago winning a playoff series or two. That’s a tough group with an excellent coach. As for the long term, this is the moment for me that says once and for all the Bulls cannot rely on Rose to get through 82 games and an entire postseason. Hopefully he proves me wrong. But the future has to include finding a starting point guard.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: It won’t be easy for the Bulls to lift their morale off the floor, but that’s the first order of the day. Next, they must find a replacement ASAP and hope he can do for them what Nate Robinson did a few years ago and D.J. Augustin did last year. As for the long-term answer, nobody knows yet because Rose hasn’t gone through recovery. But let’s not try to kid anyone here: The Bulls can no longer resolve around Rose.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: I’m guessing that the next move is signing Nate Robinson for the rest of the season and hoping Rose can make it back for the playoffs. They’ve already taken steps to be less dependent on Rose this season, and there hasn’t been much of a drop-off when he’s been off the floor. But the defense (which hasn’t been up to the Bulls’ standards in the first place) will suffer with a lot of minutes for Robinson or Aaron Brooks, and the offense with suffer from too much Kirk Hinrich, who’s had a rough year. Long-term, they just have to hope for the best, because they’re paying Rose more than $41 million over the next two years, a tough number to work around when you’re not willing to pay the luxury tax.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com​It’s a wicked blow for Rose as well as for the Bulls organization and a passionate fan base that believed Rose would lead them back to a championship level for the first time since the Jordan era. Next up is to get Nate Robinson on the line and give this unit some security and a spark. There isn’t much more you can do in the short-term because you don’t know exactly how Rose will respond from this latest bit of adversity. The long-term future changes dramatically now. The prospects of a Rose-led Bulls team hoisting a Larry O’Brien trophy one day is hard to imagine given the grueling road he’ll have to travel to ever come close to playing at a MVP level again.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comThe team that expected to own the Eastern Conference playoffs can now hope only to remain competitive with the Hawks, Cavaliers, Raptors and Wizards. The Bulls will put up a good fight, will probably fall short of the NBA Finals, and then will go into a summer facing no good options: It’s either continue to build around a star who has been unreliable physically, or else trade their 26 year old league MVP for pennies on the dollar – knowing full well that Rose could suddenly enjoy a long run of good health for his new team. It is an awful predicament with no certainty whatsoever.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogI saw reports last night that depending on the severity of the injury, there’s a chance Rose could return for the postseason. So I suppose first of all, the Bulls should wait exactly how long Rose is out. In the short term — meaning through the end of this season — I think Chicago does what they always do: The soldier on and they grind and they leave it all on the floor. And then they probably lose in the first or second round of the playoffs. Longer term, and it hurts to say this considering all Rose means to the city and the franchise, but at some point I wonder if they consider moving Rose, giving him a fresh start elsewhere and giving themselves a more reliable piece without the injury history.