Posts Tagged ‘DeMarcus Cousins’

Beal turns down Olympic invitation

USA Basketball managing director Jerry Colangelo and head coach Mike Krzyzewski will have to keep digging deeper to fill out the roster for the Rio Olympics.

Washington Wizards guard Bradley Beal is the latest to turn down an invitation to play for a gold medal in August, saying he is dedicating the summer to getting in shape for the 2016-17 season.

According to multiple reports, Carmelo Anthony, Jimmy Butler, DeMarcus Cousins, DeMar DeRozan, Kevin Durant, Paul George, Draymond Green, DeAndre Jordan, Kyle Lowry and Klay Thompson have all committed to play and there is hope that Kyrie Irving will join in.

Colangelo is expected to name the 12-man roster sometime next week.

USA Basketball will begin training camp in Las Vegas from July 18-21, followed by a five-game exhibition tour beginning July 22 against Argentina and concluding Aug. 1 versus Nigeria.

Team USA will begin defense of its two consecutive Olympic gold medals on Aug. 6.

USA roster taking shape

HANG TIME, N.J. — Kawhi Leonard became the latest player to withdraw his name from consideration for the U.S. Men’s Senior National Team this summer. Leonard joins a long list — LaMarcus Aldridge, Stephen Curry, Anthony Davis, Andre Drummond, Blake Griffin, James Harden, Damian Lillard, Chris Paul, John Wall and Russell Westbrook — of players from the team’s pool of 31 names who won’t be going to Rio for the 2016 Olympics.

Leonard made his decision official Thursday afternoon with a statement released by the Spurs. Jody Genessey of the Deseret News reports that Gordan Hayward has also declined an invite.

Reports from the AP, ESPN and Yahoo have 10 of the USA’s 12 roster spots taken by the following players …

Point guards: Kyle Lowry (TOR)
Wings: Jimmy Butler (CHI), DeMar DeRozan (TOR), Klay Thompson (GSW)
Forwards: Carmelo Anthony (NYK), Kevin Durant (OKC), Paul George (IND)
Bigs: DeMarcus Cousins (SAC), Draymond Green (GSW), DeAndre Jordan (LAC)

ESPN’s Marc Stein reports that Kyrie Irving and LeBron James have the other two spots if they want them. James indicated Wednesday that he’s likely to say “no,” but has yet to give a definitive answer.

Remaining players in the pool: Harrison Barnes, Bradley Beal, Mike Conley, Kenneth Faried, Rudy Gay, Dwight Howard, Andre Iguodala and Kevin Love. Lowry was not in the pool of players released in January, but was needed with so many point guards unavailable.

The full roster is expected to be announced next week and training camp will open on July 18 in Las Vegas. The U.S. will play five exhibition games at various locations before traveling to Rio for the Olympics, which begin Aug. 6.

If James officially declines, Anthony would be the only player going for his third Olympic gold medal (and fourth Olympic medal overall). Of the 10 names on the list so far, Anthony (2004, 2008, 2012) and Durant (2012) are the only ones with Olympic experience. Cousins, DeRozan and Thompson won gold at the 2014 World Cup in Spain (with Irving), while Butler, George, Green, Jordan and Lowry will be making their debuts for the Senior National Team in international competition.

Morning shootaround — June 17

NEWS OF THE MORNING

LeBron carves up Warriors’ top defenders | Porzingis a fan of Hornacek’s hiring | Cousins drops 20 pounds | Curry’s father-in-law threatened with arrest before Game 6

No. 1: Warriors’ top defenders can’t deliver in Game 6 — In the 2015 Finals, the Golden State Warriors emerged with the championship trophy after six games in large part because of the defense they could throw at Cleveland Cavaliers star LeBron James. Led by the talents of Andre Iguodala, the Warriors found a variety of ways to slow James down and, with the Cavs lacking in depth, the Warriors finished Cleveland off. That hasn’t been the case the last two games in these Finals, though, as James has scored 41 points each time and is having his way with the Warriors’ defense, writes Rusty Simmons of the San Francisco Chronicle:

When the Warriors took the floor Thursday night in Cleveland, it appeared as though Draymond Green was back from suspension and Andre Iguodala was replacing Andrew Bogut in the starting lineup.

Within a couple of minutes of Game 6’s opening tip, however, it was clear that the Warriors didn’t truly have the services of any member of the trio.

It was known before the game that Bogut would miss the rest of the NBA Finals with two bone bruises in his left leg, but no one could have guessed that the Warriors’ other top two defenders would pull a no-show.

Iguodala dealt with lower back stiffness that turned him into a seemingly 70-year-old version of himself. He shuffled up and down the court, barely lifting his feet off the ground and trying to keep his back as straight as possible.

“I wanted to make sure it wasn’t anything that was going to get worse,” Warriors head coach Steve Kerr said. “His back was tight, but we tried to limit his minutes as much as we could. He wanted to play, and this is probably the first time I’ve been happy that we have two days before the next game in the series.”

Green, who has finished second in Defensive Player of the Year voting in consecutive seasons, wasn’t that man in Game 6. He was seemingly lost in the fog of flagrant-foul points and technical fouls that have haunted him in the past two series and finally got him suspended for Game 5.

“They’ve got to feel us from the jump,” Green said. “We’ve got to come out with an edge and impose our will on the game from the beginning.”

Instead, Green felt the Cavaliers. He was tackled once by Tristan Thompson and got up without saying a word. Green has had a beef with Dahntay Jones for 15 months, but he walked away from two potential altercations with the Cavaliers’ end-of-the-bench player.

Without the intensity that allows him to overcome his 6-foot-6 frame while playing center, Green was dominated by Thompson. The Cavs’ center had 15 points on 6-for-6 shooting, to go with 16 rebounds and a team-leading plus-32.

Green had eight points, 10 rebounds, six assists, and the Warriors were outscored by 12 during his team-high 41 minutes. The Warriors got outscored 42-30 in the paint and got outrebounded 45-35.

Morning shootaround — June 14

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Bogut to have MRI on knee | Report: Wolves interested in trading for Butler | Reports: Robinson tries out for Seahawks | Rondo reflects on Kings’ season

No. 1: Bogut set to have MRI on left knee — The Cleveland Cavaliers won Game 5 last night in large part because of their shot selection, taking 34 of 83 shots (or 41 percent) were inside the restricted area. Part of that easy access to the front of the rim came with Golden State Warriors forward Draymond Green being suspended for Game 5 and another part came when Green’s teammate, Andrew Bogut, left the game early in the second quarer. Bogut blocked J.R. Smith‘s shot, but collided with him and landed awkwardly, causing his left knee to buckle. He’ll have an MRI today, writes John Shea of the San Francisco Chronicle:

Missing Draymond Green was bad enough for the Warriors, who were without their two most significant big men once Andrew Bogut injured his left knee within the first two minutes of the third quarter Monday night.

Bogut collided with Cleveland guard J.R. Smith after blocking his shot. Bogut planted his left leg when he landed and Smith then fell on it, appearing to hyper-extend it. Bogut remained down, holding his knee on the baseline and writhing in pain for two possessions until the Warriors called timeout and assisted their center to the locker room.

He played just 7½ minutes, didn’t score and had two rebounds, three blocks and four fouls.

 

Bogut will have an MRI exam Tuesday to discover the severity of the injury, which initially was diagnosed as a sprain, and his status for Thursday’s Game 6 in Cleveland hasn’t been determined.

Backup center Festus Ezeli could see a spike in minutes in Game 6 if Bogut doesn’t return, but coach Steve Kerr could also use a variety of players and lean on a smaller alignment.

“All year long, I’m used to my role changing,” Ezeli said. “If that’s the case, I’ll be ready.”

What he wasn’t ready to do was blame the loss on Bogut’s absence.

“You could look at Bogut’s injury as another thing that sucked energy out of our team, but at the end of the day, those are all semantics,” said Ezeli. “Kyrie (Irving) and LeBron (James) hit some tough shots, but they also got some easy looks to get them going. We turned the ball over, and Bogut not being out there didn’t force those turnovers. We’ve just got to play a better, smarter game. I believe in this team, and I think we’ll be fine.”

Harrison Barnes said, “I hope (Bogut) gets better and he’ll be able to play, but if he’s not there, we’ll have to compensate. Obviously, we’ll have Draymond back, so we’ll have another body, but everyone has to pitch in.”

Blogtable: Who made your All-NBA teams?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Who made your All-NBA teams? | Which remaining playoff team has the best bench? |
Who should Mavs pursue in offseason?


> Give me your All-NBA selections (first, second and third team).

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com

All-NBA First Team

F: Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs
F: LeBron James, Cleveland Cavaliers
C: Andre Drummond, Detroit Pistons
G: Stephen Curry, Golden State Warriors
G: Russell Westbrook, Oklahoma City Thunder

Generally, my First Team is a reflection of my MVP ballot, which goes five deep. Doesn’t always synch up position-wise but this year it was close (I plugged in Drummond at center and had to put Chris Paul on my Second Team). I don’t agree with the gimmick deployed by a few voters who put Draymond Green as First Team center because of how he and Golden State do in his 15 minutes or so, on average, in the middle. If a guy played only 15 minutes, period, at a position, we’d never consider him All-NBA at that spot.

All-NBA Second Team

F: Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City Thunder
F: Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors
C: DeAndre JordanLos Angeles Clippers
G:
 Chris Paul, Los Angeles Clippers
G: Damian Lillard, Portland Trail Blazers

There’s Green where he belongs, and Durant would have been sixth on my MVP ballot. I had Jordan on my Defensive Player of the Year ballot, so he’s an easy pick from a Top 6 team. What Lillard did in leading a brand-new group in Portland was, to me, no less impressive than the job Terry Stotts did coaching them up or Neil Olshey did in assembling them.

All-NBA Third Team

F: Paul Millsap, Atlanta Hawks
F: Paul George, Indiana Pacers
C: DeMarcus Cousins, Sacramento Kings
G:
 Klay Thompson, Golden State Warriors
G: Kyle Lowry, Toronto Raptors

A pair of Pauls at the forward spot, determined by Millsap’s underrated game along with George’s remarkable, reassuring return season. Cousins’ team didn’t make the playoffs, he’s a certified coach killer and he might not “get it” until it’s too late, but there’s no denying the talent. Thompson is a two-way sidekick to greatness who deals well with the shadow Curry casts. Lowry’s postseason hasn’t matched his regular season but then, the latter is what All-NBA status honors. Supremely talented James Harden? Nope. The way he ball-hogs, he’s unwatchable. 

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com

All-NBA First Team

F: LeBron James, Cleveland Cavaliers
F: Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs
C: Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors
G: Stephen Curry, Golden State Warriors
G: Russell Westbrook, Oklahoma City Thunder

Leonard steamrolled onto the first team with his dominant play at both ends of the court. Green practically reinvented the center spot with his versatility. Westbrook was the king of triple-doubles. And do I really need to explain about Steph and LeBron?

All-NBA Second Team

F: Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City Thunder
F: Paul George, Indiana Pacers
C: Andre DrummondDetroit Pistons
G:
 Damian Lillard, Portland Trail Blazers
G: Chris Paul, Los Angeles Clippers

Drummond stakes a claim for the traditional big man. George’s comeback to an elite level was inspirational and maybe is finest season. I still would take Paul as my point guard in one game with everything on the line. Lillard was no surprise on the surprising Blazers. And it’s almost sacrilegious to make K.D. a second-teamer.

All-NBA Third Team

F: LaMarcus Aldridge, San Antonio Spurs
F: Paul Millsap, Atlanta Hawks
C: Karl-Anthony Towns, Minnesota Timberwolves
G:
 Klay Thompson, Golden State Warriors
G: James Harden, Houston Rockets

Aldridge made steady progression into the perfect fit in San Antonio. Millsap is the heartbreak in Atlanta. Towns is the future. Thompson spends too much time in Curry’s shadow. And if Harden played just a little less defense — is that possible? — he might have slipped right off the map here.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com

All-NBA First Team

F: Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs
F:
 LeBron James, Cleveland Cavaliers
C: Andre Drummond, Detroit Pistons
G: Stephen Curry, Golden State Warriors
G: Russell Westbrook, Oklahoma City Thunder

The only room for change would be putting Draymond Green at center and moving Drummond to second team. I considered that, before ultimately going the conventional route. Otherwise, the other four spots are pretty locked in.

All-NBA Second Team

F: Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors
F: Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City Thunder
C: DeAndre JordanLos Angeles Clippers
G:
 Chris Paul, Los Angeles Clippers
G: Klay Thompson, Golden State Warriors

Not too bad of a pair of forwards on the second team. And if CP3 can’t crack the first team, that says a lot about what kind of 2015-16 that Curry and Westbrook had.

All-NBA Third Team

F: Paul George, Indiana Pacers
F: Paul Millsap, Atlanta Hawks
C: Hassan Whiteside, Miami Heat
G:
 Kyle Lowry, Toronto Raptors
G: Damian Lillard, Portland Trail Blazers

I thought about George for second team and would have put him there if the dominoes fell once Draymond Green was first-team center. Either way, there is no way to overemphasis the importance of George’s season. The same could be said for Lillard as the foundation in play and personality of the new Blazers.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com

All-NBA First Team

F: LeBron James, Cleveland Cavaliers
F: Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs
C: DeMarcus Cousins, Sacramento Kings
G: Stephen Curry, Golden State Warriors
G: Russell Westbrook, Oklahoma City Thunder

I didn’t struggle with this one. Putting aside his team wrecking and coach killing attitude, Boogie was clearly the best center in the game, so he was judged purely on that. In fact, the entire first team is comprised of players who show ability on both ends or at least bring multiple skills, something that helps separate them from their peers.

All-NBA Second Team

F: Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors
F: Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City Thunder
C: Andre Drummond, Detroit Pistons
G: Chris Paul, Los Angeles Clippers
G: Klay Thompson, Golden State Warriors

All-NBA Third Team

F: Paul George, Indiana Pacers
F: Anthony Davis, New Orleans Pelicans
C: DeAndre Jordan, Los Angeles Clippers
G: Damian Lillard, Portland Trail Blazers
G: James Harden, Houston Rockets

John Schuhmann, NBA.com

All-NBA First Team

F: Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs
F: LeBron James, Cleveland Cavaliers
C: DeAndre Jordan, Los Angeles Clippers
G: Stephen Curry, Golden State Warriors
G: Chris Paul, Los Angeles Clippers

I’m tempted to put Draymond Green at center, but he played most of his minutes at power forward. I’m taking Chris Paul over Russell Westbrook, because he was just as important to his offense as Westbrook is, and was a much better defender. Center is obviously the weakest position and it’s difficult to find one that really deserves a first-team designation, but Jordan was a two-way force for a team that ranked in the top six on both ends of the floor.

All-NBA Second Team

F: Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors
F: Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City Thunder
C: Andre DrummondDetroit Pistons
G: Russell Westbrook,
Oklahoma City Thunder
G:
 James Harden, Houston Rockets

The guards and forwards here are pretty straightforward. Green really deserves a first-team designation, but the forward position is just stacked. Harden’s defense was a disaster, but he carried such a huge load for a top-10 offense.

All-NBA Third Team

F: Paul George, Indiana Pacers
F: Paul Millsap, Atlanta Hawks
C: LaMarcus Aldridge, San Antonio Spurs
G: Klay Thompson,
Golden State Warriors
G:
 Kyle Lowry, Toronto Raptors

Bending the position designations a little bit, so that I can include Aldridge, George and Millsap. Aldridge was huge in the second half of the season for a team that won 67 games, George was the best player on both ends of the floor for a playoff team, and Millsap was an all-around stud for a top-four seed. Lowry and Thompson were pretty easy picks, though it was difficult to leave off Damian Lillard. He’s obviously a great player, and he emerged as a real locker-room leader this season.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com:

All-NBA First Team

F: LeBron James, Cleveland Cavaliers
F: Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs
C: Andre Drummond, Detroit Pistons
G: Stephen Curry, Golden State Warriors
G: Russell Westbrook, Oklahoma City Thunder

Despite rumors of his demise, LeBron remains the most dominant all-around talent in the game, Leonard has emerged as the best two-way threat in basketball, Drummond’s a double-double machine. Curry had an otherworldly season and Westbrook morphed into a walking triple-double down the stretch of the season.

All-NBA Second Team

F: Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors
F: Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City Thunder
C: DeAndre JordanLos Angeles Clippers
G: Klay Thompson,
Golden State Warriors
G:
 Chris Paul, Los Angeles Clippers

Green could have been on this team at two positions. Durant showed us this season that he’s all the way back from his injury hiccup. Jordan’s continued improvement (everywhere but the free throw line) is remarkable. Thompson is the best shooter in the world not named Curry and Paul was as valuable to his team as any player in basketball after Christmas.

All-NBA Third Team

F: Paul George, Indiana Pacers
F: LaMarcus Aldridge, San Antonio Spurs
C: DeMarcus Cousins, Sacramento Kings
G: Damian Lillard,
Portland Trail Blazers
G:
 Kyle Lowry, Toronto Raptors

George’s comeback from his nasty injury to two-way superstar is complete. Aldridge clearly made the right choice to leave Portland for San Antonio in free agency. Cousins, as much as it pains me to reward someone who causes as much drama as he does, is simply a force. Baby Dame put on a show this season and Lowry led the Raptors to the best season in franchise history.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com

All-NBA First Team

F: LeBron James, Cleveland Cavaliers
F: Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City Thunder
C: Hassan Whiteside, Miami Heat
G: Stephen Curry, Golden State Warriors
G: Chris Paul, Los Angeles Clippers

Whiteside turned the Heat into the No. 7 team defensively. Paul (and Jordan) kept the Clippers in contention without Blake Griffin. My most difficult absences are James Harden and DeMarcus Cousins, whose tremendous statistical years were offset by their disappointing leadership.

All-NBA Second Team

F: Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs
F: Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors
C: DeAndre JordanLos Angeles Clippers
G:
 Russell Westbrook, Oklahoma City Thunder
G: Damian Lillard, Portland Trail Blazers

All-NBA Third Team

F: LaMarcus Aldridge, San Antonio Spurs
F: Paul Millsap, Atlanta Hawks
C: Andre Drummond, Detroit Pistons
G:
 Klay Thompson, Golden State Warriors
G: Kyle Lowry, Toronto Raptors

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog

All-NBA First Team

F: LeBron James, Cleveland Cavaliers
F: Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs
C: DeAndre Jordan, Los Angeles Clippers
G: Stephen Curry, Golden State Warriors
G: Russell Westbrook, Oklahoma City Thunder

Picking three centers was the toughest call for me. I know some people argued that Draymond Green could be an All-NBA center, but to me that’s not his primary position, and I think Andrew Bogut and Festus Ezeli would agree. So, DeAndre makes the cut, which I don’t mind because of his durability and defensive presence for a top-four team in the best conference.

All-NBA Second Team

F: Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors
F: Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City Thunder
C: DeMarcus CousinsSacramento Kings
G:
 Chris Paul, Los Angeles Clippers
G: Klay Thompson, Golden State Warriors

For the most part, I tried to reward winning with my selections. And then there’s DeMarcus Cousins. I thought about it a lot, but eventually came to the conclusion that I couldn’t entirely blame Cousins for the dysfunction in Sacramento, and his 26.9 and 11.5 per game were just too great to overlook.

All-NBA Third Team

F: Paul Millsap, Atlanta Hawks
F: Paul George, Indiana Pacers
C: Al Horford, Atlanta Hawks
G:
 Kyle Lowry, Toronto Raptors
G: Damian Lillard, Portland Trail Blazers

I thought really hard about putting Andre Drummond in as my third-team center, but couldn’t justify saying someone is one of the three best at his position in the NBA when he can’t play at the end of games. The one player who I couldn’t find room for was James Harden, who is still an elite scorer but, at least to me, wasn’t one of the best six guards in the NBA this season.

Blogtable: Most attractive coaching vacancy in NBA is …?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: How long to rest Steph? | Your All-Defensive team picks? |
Most attractive coaching vacancy?



VIDEOThe Washington Wizards fired Randy Wittman on April 14

> You’re a head coach looking for a job in the NBA. Which vacancy is more attractive: Minnesota, Sacramento or Washington?

David Aldridge, TNT analyst: This is a serious question? Only one of those teams has the combo platter of Karl-Anthony Towns, aged 20, and Andrew Wiggins, aged 21, along with side dishes Ricky Rubio, Zach LaVine, Gorgui Dieng, Shabazz Muhammad and Nemanja Bjelica. That’s in Mary Richards’s town, Minneapolis. You do notice that just about everyone who’s ever picked up a clipboard is angling for the Wolves’ gig, don’t you?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: Minnesota is the winner here by a considerable margin, on par with how easily Andrew Wiggins and Karl-Anthony Towns won (or will win) their Kia Rookie of the Year awards last season and this. Those two, along with Zach LaVine, Gorgui Dieng, Ricky Rubio, Shabazz Muhammad and the lottery pick they add this June are gems in various stages of being cut. Flip Saunders in 2014-15 and Sam Mitchell this season handled some of the dirty work, while the next head coach will end the Timberwolves’ playoff drought at 12 or 13 seasons (they last qualified in 2004). That will end my claim as the only Minneapolis beat writer to cover that franchise in the postseason, but it’s a streak I’ll be happy to see end.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comDo well really have to ask this question? It’s Minnesota by a mile. Karl-Anthony Towns, Andrew Wiggins, Zach LaVine to start. There’s a reason why the Timberwolves got the choosy veterans Tom Thibodeau and Jeff Van Gundy to sit down with them first. It’s a solid foundation that could become a contender for a decade.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comI know which is the least attractive: Sacramento. That leaves us with Minnesota and Washington. Tough call. Based on current rosters, the Wizards have a better chance to win now, led by John Wall and Bradley Beal. But the young Timberwolves have a higher ceiling projecting to the future, and probably much higher. The Wolves also have a big chip the Wiz will not be offering for a top candidate: the chance to also run basketball operations. That won’t be offered to everyone, but for someone like Tom Thibodeau it could be the ultimate selling point between Minnesota and somewhere else.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comThis is like saying who should be MVP, Steph Curry or the field? Minnesota by far is the more attractive opening because of a combination of young talent, a lottery pick on the way and lots of salary cap space. The only hazard is Minneapolis’ winter. The Wizards are next because if nothing else, they have John Wall. Then there’s Sacramento, and the best you can say about the Kings’ job is that it’s one of 30, at least you’re in the NBA.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Minnesota, for sure. Karl-Anthony Towns, a perennial MVP candidate in time if he has the right supporting cast, is reasons Nos. 1, 2 and 3 for his ability to make an impact on offense, defense and in the locker room. Andrew Wiggins has a world of talent, Zach LaVine was much improved after moving to shooting guard in the second half of the season, and Ricky Rubio is a point guard you can trust to run your offense and stay in front of his man on defense. Sacramento is obviously last on the list. Your reputation might take a hit for just accepting that job.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Minnesota has the highest ceiling, when you factor in the quality of the young talent already in place, the assets (Draft and otherwise) available and the non-existent expectations that are in place right now. A program-builder could come in there and mold talents like Karl-Anthony Towns, Andrew Wiggins and Zach LaVine into the pillars of a playoff team for years to come. Sacramento and Washington have All-Stars in place, but the outlook for the immediate future isn’t nearly as promising.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog

Morning Shootaround — April 10


VIDEO: The Fast Break — April 9

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Spurs trying to solve Curry and vice versa | Rockets’ brass will be evaluated at season’s end | What can Bryan Colangelo bring to Philly? | Should losing teams rest players?

No. 1: Spurs trying to solve Curry and vice versa After three games this season, and with another showdown looming Sunday, it’s clear the Spurs have targeted Steph Curry as the player they must stop. That’s not exactly breaking news; Curry is the league’s leading scorer and the heavy favorite to win his second straight MVP. But the Spurs bring one of the league’s top defenses and can throw multiple bodies in Curry’s direction, starting with Tony Parker and Patty Mills and at times they might surprise Curry with Kawhi Leonard.  Curry spoke about the Spurs on the eve of the final meeting between the teams before the playoffs with Rusty Simmons of the San Francisco Chronicle

Stephen Curry thinks he figured out something in Thursday’s meeting with the Spurs, and he’ll get a chance to test his theory when the Warriors play at San Antonio on Sunday.

After scoring 14 points on season lows in field-goal (4-for-18, 22.2 percent) and three-point (1-for-12, 8.3 percent) shooting in the Warriors’ 87-79 loss to the Spurs, the Warriors’ point guard bounced back with 29 points on 11-of-19 shooting from the floor in Thursday’s 112-101 win.

“I just watched the film and made adjustments based on how they played me in San Antonio and how I thought they’d probably continue,” Curry said before Saturday’s game against the Grizzlies. “Instead of searching for the three, I was trying to keep them off-balance by getting into the paint and making plays.

“I just slowed down, really. Any game where somebody makes crazy adjustments like that, you’ve got to be able to take your time and figure out how you’re going to attack that space. I didn’t do it well in San Antonio, but I made the proper adjustments last game.”

Curry is averaging 11.1 three-point attempts per game, but with the Spurs switching on pick-and-rolls and running him off the three-point line, Curry made a concerted effort to get into the lane.

He attempted only seven three-pointers Thursday, and two were prayers at the end of quarters. It was the eighth time all season that Curry attempted seven or fewer three-pointers.

“I think teams have mimicked what the Spurs did the last time we played them in San Antonio,” Warriors head coach Steve Kerr said. “Teams really started jumping out at him and switching, so we’re seeing it more and more. They definitely have a plan, and they’re good at it. They’re obviously smart. To do something like that, you have continuity, understanding and togetherness, and they’re really good at it.”

Curry has gotten pretty good at handling it, too.

That’s one of the reasons that the entire basketball world will be tuned into Sunday’s game.

***

No. 2: Rockets’ brass will be evaluated at season’s end With the Rockets qualifying as the heavy favorite to win the season’s most disappointing team award, are big changes coming? That question wouldn’t even be asked right around this time last season, when the Rockets were one route to an appearance in the Western Conference finals. But this season has been all sorts of hell, starting with the early firing of coach Kevin McHale and the failure to incorporate Ty Lawson into the lineup. It would be big news if Daryl Morey loses the GM job if only because Morey has a reputable track record. Anyway, owner Leslie Alexander must decide the fate of Morey and also interim coach JB Bickerstaff. Here is Calvin Watkins of ESPN.com …

Sources told ESPN that the Rockets believe every aspect of the organization — coaching staff, front office and, of course, their roster — must be subject to a thorough review in the wake of Houston’s slide to a 38-41 outfit that’s at serious risk to miss the playoffs after damaging losses this week to Dallas and Phoenix.

Houston won 56 games and reached the Western Conference finals last season.

Rockets owner Leslie Alexander has publicly acknowledged that Bickerstaff — who replaced Kevin McHale in an interim role just 11 games into this season — would have to be assessed at season’s end.

Significant roster changes are likewise expected, with free agent-to-be Dwight Howard widely anticipated to move elsewhere and little certain beyond the Rockets’ presumed intention to reload around star guard James Harden.

Sources say Morey, whose contract runs through the 2017-18 season, ‎also faces some uncertainty in the wake of the Rockets’ struggles. Morey’s ever-bold approach to roster assembly won deserved kudos for bringing Harden (October 2012) and Howard (July 2013) to Houston in quick succession, but team chemistry has been a rising concern this season given the well-chronicled deterioration of the Harden-Howard relationship and the failed offseason gamble on guard Ty Lawson.

“You’re asking the wrong guy about that,” Morey told ESPN in a recent interview when asked about his job security. “That’s Mr. Alexander’s choice and all I do is my job every day. He makes that call.”

After a 4-7 start, Houston made the stunning decision to part ways with McHale, who had barely begun the first year of a new three-year extension.

Bickerstaff has fared better, going 34-34 in his interim role, but Houston’s defensive frailties and repeated inability to hold big leads have conspired to put the Rockets on par with the Chicago Bulls on the list of this season’s most disappointing teams.

Bickerstaff, for his part, says he has not yet commenced discussions with management about his job status.

“No, not at all, that’s not even a issue [or] a concern,” Bickerstaff said of his future prior to the Rockets’ loss to the Suns on Thursday night.‎

***

No. 3: What can Bryan Colangelo bring to Philly? The Sixers haven’t officially named Bryan Colangelo as the successor to Sam Hinkie, who resigned last week, although it could happen by Monday. But that hasn’t stopped Philly from wondering if the team of Colangelo and Colangelo — no, not a law firm, but the father-son front office combo of Jerry and Bryan — can produce a somewhat drastic turnaround for the rebuilding team. Here is Keith Pompey of the Philadelphia Inquirer on the possibilities …

Folks bashed the Sixers for nepotism, immediately after learning it would be Bryan Colangelo. They brought up that he was unable to win an NBA championship during his stops as general manager of the Phoenix Suns and the Toronto Raptors.

And they delivered perhaps the lowest blow of all, mentioning that he drafted 20-year-old Italian Andrea Bargnani with the first overall selection in the 2006 NBA draft. Let’s just say making Bargnani the first European to be selected first overall didn’t pan out. He never lived up to the hype surrounding that pick and is on his third NBA team.

But what the disappointed folks don’t mention is that Bryan Colangelo is a two-time NBA executive of the year. The 50-year-old first won the award in 2005 with the Suns. His second award came in 2007 with the Raptors.

“If you are the Sixers, you should be really happy about this,” said a league executive, who spoke on condition of anonymity. “Plus it will be a seamless transition with Jerry and his son. Everything will be on the same page.”
That wasn’t the case with Jerry Colangelo and Hinkie over the last four months.

But aside from Bargnani, Bryan Colangelo has been known for excelling while making aggressive moves.

He drafted Steve Nash 15th overall in the 1996 NBA draft and traded him to the Dallas Mavericks in 1998 in exchange for Pat Garrity, Martin Muursepp, Bubba Wells, and a 1999 first-round pick that he used to select Shawn Marion.

He also drafted Amar’e Stoudemire ninth overall in the 2002 draft.

Some of his most noteworthy roster moves came during and after the 2003-04 season, when the team finished, 29-53.

In January 2004, he sent Anfernee Hardaway, Stephon Marbury, and Cezary Trybanski to the Knicks for Howard Eisley, Maciej Lampe, Antonio McDyess, Charlie Ward, Milos Vujanic, and 2004 and 2010 first-round picks. Then he signed Nash as a free agent that summer.

The following season, the Suns went 62-20 and lost to the Spurs in the Western Conference finals. Nash was named the league’s MVP, and Mike D’Antoni, now the Sixers’ associate head coach, was the NBA coach of the year.

That was the first of three Pacific Division titles and the first of back-to-back conference finals appearances for the Suns.

However, Bryan Colangelo wasn’t there to celebrate all that put in place due to a soured relationship with managing owner Robert Sarver, who bought the team from Jerry Colangelo.

So he took over the Raptors’ on Feb. 28, 2006. In 2006-07, the Raptors finished 47-35 and made their first playoff appearance in five seasons. It was also their first winning season since 2001-02.

Bryan Colangelo is also an architect of this season’s Raptors, who are the Eastern Conference’s second-best squad.

He selected DeMar DeRozan with the ninth pick of the 2009 draft. Colangelo hired Dwayne Casey as the head coach in June 2011. He drafted Jonas Valanciunas with the fifth pick of the 2011 draft two days later. Then, after drafting Terrence Ross with the eighth pick in 2012, he acquired Kyle Lowry in a trade with Houston Rockets in July 2012.

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No. 4: Should losing teams rest players? The Sacramento Kings are going nowhere except the draft lottery again, a fate that has been assured for weeks. However, that hasn’t stopped them from sitting players. DeMarcus Cousins and Rajon Rondo, among others, have “rested” as though they were veterans with minor ailments, awaiting for the playoffs to begin. Is that fair, especially since the NBA, beginning with this season, spaced games apart and reduced back-to-backs? The Kings are hardly the only non-playoff team to sit players for reasons other than injury; but some fans in Sacramento sounded off on it to Andy Furillo of the Sacramento Bee

At 12:31 p.m. Thursday, the Kings put out a news release that said DeMarcus Cousins and Rajon Rondo would not play that night at home against the Minnesota Timberwolves. It attributed the planned absences of the star center and flashy point guard to their need for rest. The two must have really been tired, because they just got a night off Saturday in Denver and a night off the previous Monday in Portland.

Along with Rondo and Cousins, another young man at Sleep Train Arena on Thursday night was tired. His name is Terrence Zwane, and he was tired of big-money players resting on nights like Thursday, when he paid $300 to sit in the lower bowl.

“I don’t think it’s cool,” said Zwane, 26, a legal assistant who attends about 10 games a year.

Zwane reasoned, accurately, that the salaries of Cousins, who is making about $15.9 million this season, and Rondo, who punches the clock for $9.5 million, are largely responsible for his high cost for a good seat. The abilities of the two, of course, are the reason Zwane was willing to spend the money. Then he came to the game and they didn’t play, and the team didn’t even make the announcement that they were not going to play until seven hours before the game, when the two players were as healthy as could be reasonably expected for the 79th game of the season

Resting a player for one or two games over the course of a long season, “if you need to do that,” makes sense to Zwane. Otherwise, in instances such as Thursday, “It’s really pointless, especially when you are paying them big money and we are paying big money to watch them,” he said.

Without Cousins and Rondo, the Kings understandably lost to the Timberwolves 105-97. Maybe they needed Thursday off to ensure they would be rested enough to play in Saturday’s final game at Sleep Train Arena, which is expected to be filled beyond capacity to celebrate 28 seasons there.

After Thursday’s game, Kings coach George Karl was asked what he would say to the fans, if he could say anything, about paying big money to see the game and then having Cousins and Rondo miss it to rest.

Karl was the wrong guy to take the question. It should have been directed to general manager Vlade Divac, but Divac wasn’t on hand, so the coach gave it a shot.

“I’m old school,” Karl said. “I like playing every game like it means something.”

But in the modern NBA, “everybody’s doing it,” Karl said about giving guys days of rest when it appears to people like Zwane that they don’t really need it.

“Philosophically,” Karl said, “I can see the good in why you do it, and I can see philosophically why the fans should be upset, why they’re upset.”

In addition to holding Cousins and Rondo out of the Minnesota, Denver and Portland games, the playoff-eliminated Kings rested Kosta Koufos, Rudy Gay and Darren Collison in Tuesday’s loss at home to Portland.

As Karl said, it is popular for teams to dial back on playing time for those who have been pounding the floorboards fairly relentlessly since October. Most of the time, the decisions to rest players are made collectively – between the front office, coaching staff and players – although it’s not known how the decision was made by the Kings.

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Not only does Kobe Bryant want the Warriors to break the Bulls’ record of 72 wins, so does LeBron JamesFred Holberg says the Bulls need to figure out a leadership command for next seasonBrent Barry was asked his opinion of the Timberwolves and also about the coaching position, and Bones was to happy to share his thoughtsCan Alec Burks stay healthy and help the Jazz lock up a playoff spot?

Morning shootaround — March 31


VIDEO: Highlights from Wednesday’s games

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Spurs won’t chase 41-0 home mark | Warriors set franchise wins record | Report: Chemistry issues dogging Bulls | Cousins, Rondo face suspension | Russell deals with fallout from video incident

No. 1: Spurs won’t chase perfect home record — The San Antonio Spurs had to endure a fourth-quarter push by the New Orleans Pelicans, but held on last night to win 100-92. The victory moved the Spurs to 38-0 at AT&T Center this season, marking the best home start in NBA history to break the 37-0 record the Chicago Bulls compiled in 1995-96. Three home games stand between home court perfection, but in typical San Antonio fashion, going 41-0 at home means nothing to the Spurs. Michael C. Wright of ESPN.com has more:

Gregg Popovich’s blank stare on Wednesday previewed what he would say when asked what it meant for the San Antonio Spurs to run off their 38th consecutive home victory and set a record for the best home start in NBA history.

“Absolutely nothing,” Popovich said. “Maybe a cup of coffee. Maybe.”

While observers might view what’s percolating in San Antonio as special, the Spurs consider the regular-season accolades meaningless if they’re walking away in June without a championship trophy in hand. Most made that abundantly clear in a business-as-usual locker room on the heels of San Antonio’s 100-92 win over the New Orleans Pelicans.

“The only thing I see is that we can try and win a championship,” point guard Tony Parker said. “I don’t really think about having a good regular season, how many games we won. It doesn’t matter, because at the end of the day, the only thing you remember is how many championships you won.”

Manu Ginobili hadn’t played since March 25, as the club deactivated him for matchups on Saturday and Monday at Oklahoma City and Memphis. Ginobili’s last extended rest came in February as the result of testicular surgery, which kept him out of 12 games. Upon return from that setback, Ginobili racked up a season-high 22 points in 15 minutes. After this latest two-game rest, Ginobili came back to the lineup and lit up the Pelicans on 5 of 6 from 3-point range for another 20-point night while tying Leonard for the team high in steals at three.

San Antonio faces Toronto, Golden State and Oklahoma City in its next three home games.

Parker said earlier in the week that he doesn’t expect Popovich to play all the front-line players in either of the remaining matchups against the Warriors (April 7 and April 10). Parker reiterated that point at Wednesday’s shootaround and said it “doesn’t matter to me” when asked about the importance of the club’s current home streak.

Ginobili echoed those sentiments.

“No, it really doesn’t [matter],” Ginobili said. “If we would have lost Game 24, and now we are 37-1, it wouldn’t make that much of a difference. Having a 38-game streak or 37-1 is unbelievable, anyway. So I really don’t care about streaks. We know we are having a great season. If we would have lost one more or two more, it wouldn’t change that.”


VIDEO: Gregg Popovich talks after the Spurs’ win Wednesday

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Sacramento’s Cousins to seek treatment on feet while keeping eyes on Rio


VIDEO: DeMarcus Cousins with 29 points, 11 boards vs. Suns

DeMarcus Cousins sat out the final six games on the Sacramento Kings’ schedule at this time last season and could be on the verge of a shutdown again.

With playoffs obviously not on the horizon for Cousins or his team, some folks might want to see Cousins gut out what he can over the Kings’ final 10 games and put off some recurring foot and ankle problems until the offseason. But Sacramento’s two-time All-Star center has a deadline for good health that drops before training camp this fall, one that’s worth heeding if he can hit it: Team USA’s play in the 2016 Rio Olympics.

That opportunity for Cousins – he was a member of the 2014 World Cup team, recovering from a strained knee suffered during an early workout with that squad – is important both to the Kings’ big man and his reputation. He got some of his best reviews as a pro for his sacrifice and work with the other NBA stars on Team USA, stepping out of the indulged, allegedly immature franchise guy he’s known as from his work with Sacramento.

So if the 6-foot-11, 270-pound native of Mobile, Ala., and produce of the University of Kentucky were to call it quits on this NBA season for legitimate health reasons, it might be best for him and the Kings in the long run. Sacramento is headed nowhere but home soon enough, with Cousins already missing 11 of its 72 games, mostly from an early Achilles strain and turned ankles.

The Team USA roster won’t be announced until after the NBA playoffs but Cousins is one of 31 finalists from which chairman Jerry Colangelo and coach Mike Krzyzewski will select the 12-man squad. His hope would be to seek a unique treatment on his feet in particular, yet recover in time to participate in the Olympics. James Ham, the Kings insider for CSNBayArea.com, was on hand when Cousins addressed his health and summer ambitions Friday:

Cousins is in noticeable pain following games. He walks gingerly on his oversized feet, and it’s not without reason. At 6-11, 270-plus-pounds, Cousins’ lower legs take a beating this season. From an early season Achilles strain to multiple rolled ankles, Cousins has played in 61 games this season with 10 games remaining.

“I’ve been playing with tendinitis in my feet all season,” Cousins told a small gathering of reporters. “That’s why you see me walking up and down funny. Hopefully this procedure goes well and I can start preparing for Team USA.”

Cousins said he is planning to undergo Platelet Rich Therapy (PRP) on his feet and possibly shock-wave treatment as well following the offseason, with the hopes that it will relieve some of his pain.

According to Emory Healthcare, “Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Therapy utilizes platelets from the athlete’s own blood to rebuild a damaged tendon or cartilage. It has been successful in not only relieving the pain, but also in jump-starting the healing process.”

The procedure is not considered surgery and takes less than an hour to perform. The recovery for this type of treatment is roughly 4-6 weeks and Cousins should be ready in plenty of time to compete for a roster spot for the Olympic Games in Rio, which begin on August 5.

Cousins won gold as part of Team USA at the 2014 World Cup and is looking forward to a shot at taking home Olympic gold as well. The 25-year-old center plans to rehab and train in Las Vegas in preparation for training camp.

Analytics Art: Crawford, Barnes, Cousins among week’s worst shooters


VIDEO: Barnes leads the way for Grizzlies in win

By Ben Leibowitz, Special to NBA.com

As 2016 NCAA March Madness kicks off, the NBA keeps plugging along. Now with less than a month to go until postseason play for the pros, teams will continue fighting for playoff seeding or remain trapped in the league’s cellar.

Aside from teams like the Phoenix Suns and Los Angeles Lakers, who have already been eliminated from the playoffs, it’s gut-check time for players and coaches alike. Slogging through ugly shooting slumps at this time of year are far from ideal.

PointAfter found the week’s coldest shooters who have done their teams few favors offensively during the stretch run.

Note: Statistics in this article cover games from March 11-17.

Guard: Jamal Crawford, Los Angeles Clippers

As the Clippers geared up for big tests this past week against the Cleveland Cavaliers and San Antonio Spurs, they needed all hands on deck to improve their shoddy record against the league’s top teams. Instead, the Clips went 0-2 versus those elite opponents, while Jamal Crawford bricked his way to 4-for-20 shooting in those two affairs.

Crawford didn’t fair well in LA’s other two games, either — wins over the New York Knicks and Houston Rockets, respectively. Over the course of the week’s four games, “J-Crossover” shot a combined 28.6 percent. He’s been brilliant at the free-throw line (where he leads all qualified players at 91.5 percent), but his marks from the field and beyond the arc are some of his worst ever.

As it stands, the Clippers don’t appear to have an ice cube’s chance in Death Valley at beating either the Spurs or Golden State Warriors out West. It will take much more than a Crawford revival to get them on the same level as those juggernauts.

Wing: Matt Barnes, Memphis Grizzlies

The injury-ravaged Grizzlies need all the offensive help they can get with the core of Mike Conley, Zach Randolph and Marc Gasol all sidelined. Matt Barnes started the week with aplomb on March 11, compiling his first career triple-double with 26 points, 11 rebounds and 10 assists in a win over the New Orleans Pelicans.

From there, however, the 36-year-old veteran was far less effective as a scorer.

The UCLA product shot a ghastly 6-for-21 from the floor (including 1-for-7 from long range) in Wednesday’s loss against the Minnesota Timberwolves. For the week overall (five games), Barnes converted just 33.7 percent of his field goals.

Of course, it’s tough to fault Barnes for two reasons. First, the aforementioned injury woes Memphis has faced of late, and second, the brutal scheduling the Grizzlies were put through this past week.

Barnes and his teammates had to play two back-to-backs over the past seven days, which is a pretty darn good excuse for his poor shooting.

Forward/Center: DeMarcus Cousins, Sacramento Kings

Sacramento’s enigmatic center was suspended one game for “conduct detrimental to the team” after yelling at head coach George Karl in the huddle during the Kings’ home loss to the Cleveland Cavaliers on March 9. Cousins started his week sidelined, and he didn’t perform very well upon his return.

“Boogie” found his way to the charity stripe quite often, but his shooting performances — 10-for-23, 4-for-10 and 8-for-21, respectively — left a lot to be desired. Cousins didn’t shoot better than 43.5 percent in any of his three games this week, and the Kings were only able to beat the lowly Los Angeles Lakers.

As has been the case all throughout the Cousins era in Sacramento, the front office has some big decisions to make this coming offseason. Perhaps it’s time for a bigger shakeup.

Ben Leibowitz (https://twitter.com/BenLebo) is a writer for PointAfter (http://www.pointafter.com), a sports data aggregation and visualization website that’s part of the Graphiq network (http://www.graphiq.com). Visit PointAfter to get all the information about NBA Players (http://basketball-players.pointafter.com)NBA Historical Teams (http://nba-historical-teams.pointafter.com) and dozens of other topics.