HT News

Reports: Warriors trade David Lee to Boston for Gerald Wallace

HANG TIME BIG CITY — The Golden State Warriors may have finally found a home for the player for whom they couldn’t find room.

According to numerous reports, the Warriors will trade David Lee to the Boston Celtics for Gerald Wallace.

Having recently turned 32 years old and entering the final season of his contract, Lee should find plenty of opportunity to contribute on a rebuilding Boston roster. Since going to Golden State before the 2010-11 season, Lee had started 276 regular-season games. Two seasons ago, his last as a regular rotation player for the Warriors, Lee averaged a healthy 18.2 points and 9.3 rebounds.

But an early season hamstring injury essentially hamstrung Lee’s season. In Lee’s absence, Draymond Green stepped into a starting role and Lee was never able to break back into the rotation. It speaks to Lee’s character and professionalism that he remained a valuable member of the team even though the two-time All-Star was the team’s highest-paid player and was asked not to play regularly.

In exchange for Lee, the Warriors pick up the 33-year-old Wallace, who played in only 32 games last season for the Celtics. Wallace is also entering the final season of his contract, and as one former league executive points out, Wallace’s biggest contribution to the Warriors may come only as a contract …

Report: Kevin Garnett to return for Timberwolves

HANG TIME BIG CITY — The Big Ticket is back.

According to a report from KSTP in Minnesota, Kevin Garnett has agreed to return to the Minnesota Timberwolves for what will be his 21st NBA season. Garnett, who recently turned 39, spent the first 12 years of his career with the T-Wolves, before being traded to Boston. The Brooklyn Nets traded Garnett back to Minnesota in February at the trade deadline, where Garnett could assume a mentoring role for Minnesota’s young roster, which included former number one overall picks Andrew Wiggins and Anthony Bennett. The Wolves have since added another number one overall pick, center Karl-Anthony Towns.

A 15-time All-Star, Garnett is perhaps the most popular player in Timberwolves history, and the return to Minnesota is thought to set Garnett up for a role with the franchise even after he’s finished playing. Garnett may not be the spry young forward he was when he entered the League, but his wealth of institutional knowledge about the NBA should more than serve his teammates well going forward.

 

Morning shootaround — July 7


VIDEO: What do the Cleveland Cavaliers have planned next in the offseason?

Okafor solid in Summer League debut | Continuity keeps Spurs chugging along | Parsons wants Jordan to be top-flight NBA center | Report: NBPA may fund health insurance for ex-players

NEWS OF THE MORNING

No. 1: Okafor impresses overall in Summer League debut — The Philadelphia 76ers endured another awful season with the payoff coming in mid-June in the form of an NBA Draft lottery pick. That pick became Duke big man Jahlil Okafor, taken No. 3 overall, and in a rare turn of events of late for the Sixers, he is a rookie healthy enough to suit up for Summer League. Our Scott Howard-Cooper was on hand for Okafor’s debut in the Utah Summer League and says that after some early jitters, Okafor looked more than solid

His first game as a pro, his first five-on-five game since winning the national championship on April 6, his first time playing since the Philadelphia 76ers picked him third on June 25, but normal. The best possible outcome for Okafor and Philadelphia, in other words.

The Sixers desperately need the typical when 2015-16 arrives, the inside muscle with the ball that makes Okafor the ideal complement alongside the defensive presence of Nerlens Noel as an interchangeable power forward-center combination, no matter what happens with Joel Embiid and his uncertain recovery from a foot injury. The offense from anywhere, really, after they finished No. 29 in scoring, one-tenth of a point ahead of the Knicks for last. If Okafor can just be Okafor — and a lot of teams think the post game that abused defenses in the one-and-done at Duke will translate immediately because of that advanced skill level, along with being 6-11 and 270 pounds at 19 years old — Philly instantly moves forward.

Monday night inside EnergySolutions Arena, in the first game of the Utah Jazz Summer League, Okafor got the obligatory hit of nerves just before tipoff. And then he had a very slow start, making just three of 11 shots, mostly from close range, in the opening half. It was early July, so no big deal.

Then came the second half and the taking control inside and the seven baskets in 11 attempts, until he finished with 20 points and nine rebounds (five offensive) in a 74-71 loss to the Spurs. Okafor was being Okafor.

“I’ve been saying it for a week or so now, with every possession he’s going to just grow and grow,” said Billy Lange, the Philly assistant coach who is running the bench here. “We’ve been preparing him for — everybody’s going to come in and try to make a name for themselves against him. He wants to win and he wants to please. He’s a great kid, his heart is so pure that he’s probably pressing himself a little bit. But once he settled into the third quarter and we’re drawing plays up for him and he’s getting the ball in spots he probably hasn’t seen in a long time … I thought he did really, really well. And he pushed through. He played (29) minutes in this altitude and, I thought, competed pretty hard.”

That was the other thing. Actually, that was the bigger thing: After being knocked by some front offices for a lack of ideal conditioning last season, Okafor played his first organized game in exactly three months, played it at 4,300 feet, and not only lasted the 29 minutes but with his best moments in the second half.


VIDEO: Jahlil Okafor scores 20 points in his Summer League debut

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Summer league returns to Salt Lake City


VIDEO: The Jazz top the Celtics in their Summer League opener

SALT LAKE CITY — The Utah Jazz Summer League began Monday night with four teams at EnergySolutions Arena as the second such event of the offseason, but actually more as an extension of the grandest of all, the Las Vegas session.

The return of Summer League to Salt Lake City, after several years away, is the result of the Jazz initially approaching Warren LeGarie, the executive director of the Las Vegas gathering, four years ago. The conversations not only led to LeGarie also running the Utah schedule, but also with Salt Lake City purposely linked to Sin City: the four teams here were also required to be there, the games here would be directly before the games there to help logistics and promotion, and the locations are only about a 75-minute flight.

“I think Utah’s always had a desire to continue with Summer League,” LeGarie said. “When our league [in Las Vegas] grew exponentially, it sort of got in the way of this one, which was unfortunate. … At this point, they’re here to stay. As long as its viable, it’ll continue.”

The Celtics, 76ers, Spurs and host Jazz are here for doubleheaders Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, before they head to Las Vegas for the start there Friday with a schedule that includes 23 NBA teams and a D-League Select squad. Meanwhile, the Orlando event — not run by LeGarie — began Saturday and continues through Friday with 10 teams, including two from the host Magic.

“We’ll never knock out Orlando because there’s a certain number of teams that prefer that atmosphere,” LeGarie said. “And as long as certain coaches and management have houses there, Orlando will continue. So we’re not looking to knock out Orlando, we’re trying to serve the basketball community. And clearly there is a strong basketball community [in Salt Lake City.]”

The difference is atmosphere in that the Orlando event is closed to the public and held in the Magic’s practice gym, while the Utah games are played in the home of the Jazz and the Las Vegas schedule in the arena that hosts UNLV and a smaller adjacent facility as well. The “certain coaches and management” is a dig at Doc Rivers, a Central Florida resident who pulled the Clippers out of Las Vegas and joined the Orlando summer league.

Rivers said he prefers Orlando as more of a businesslike setting.

The right time for Donovan in OKC


VIDEO: Kevin Durant talks about his recovery and new coach Billy Donovan

ORLANDO, Fla. — Eight years after a head-fake that seemed to put him in charge of the Magic for several days, Billy Donovan was back in Central Florida as an NBA head coach.

Now 50, the one-time Billy the Kid, is trying to learn his way around Oklahoma City, shagging rebounds in practice for Kevin Durant and convinced that his shared ideas with general manager Sam Presti finally made this the right time to jump to the NBA.

“Knowing Sam over the years, I think the biggest thing for me in the decision was I really felt when I took the job at Florida, I felt like I was really aligned with (athletic director) Jeremy Foley and his vision,” Donovan said between games Monday at the Orlando Pro Summer League. “I think a lot of times in job situations you want to make sure that that’s the case.

“Sam, I thought, the first time we sat down and really talked about this, he really laid out what the organization stood for, what it was about, what the core values were about, what he envisioned going forward, how he wanted to go forward, the things that were important to him as a general manager. And I identify with all those things. I felt aligned with those things and I think I shared a lot of those same values with Sam. That was first and foremost the most important thing to me.

“Anytime you’re working with somebody, are you always going to agree on everything? No. Are there gonna be some differences? Yes. But at the core of it, we’re working in the same direction.”

Donovan, who had agreed to a non-compete clause with the Magic that banned him from taking another NBA job for five years, was hired just eight days after the Thunder fired Scott Brooks on April 22. It could, quite simply, be the most important hire the franchise ever makes.

That’s because the 2015-16 season is pivotal for OKC for far more than just wins and losses. Durant is entering the last year of his contract before becoming a free agent next summer. Russell Westbrook’s contract is up in two years. The Thunder now have less than 12 months to convince Durant to stick with the franchise that drafted him and then hope that his magnetism will be enough to keep Westbrook.

Fact is, depending on how those scenarios play out, the Thunder could be playing in the 2017 Finals or taking part in the 2017 NBA Draft Lottery. It’s that wide gap that’s at stake.

Donovan, who made the University of Florida a national power in his 19 seasons there, winning back-to-back NCAA titles in 2006 and 2007, could be the key to it it. Durant has already said he likes the new coach’s hunger and attitude as a basketball junkie.

Theirs is a budding relationship that could literally determine the balance of power in the league in the coming years. Durant is on the record saying he approved of LeBron James returning to Cleveland to be close to home last summer and LaMarcus Aldridge leaving Portland for his native Texas in the past several days to play for the Spurs. He spoke of admiring those players for doing what made them happy. It brings up the possibility of Durant going to his native Washington, D.C., in a year or going to any other NBA city that might catch his fancy.

Therefore it’s all about Donovan, how much he can impress Durant, the kind of hooks he can sink into Westbrook.

Eight years after he could have made the jump to the NBA in Orlando, it’s the time, the place, the leap of faith the Thunder are making with the grown-up version of Billy the Kid.

Summer League refs tuned in to learn

ORLANDO, Fla. — In addition to whistles dangling from strings around their necks, you might have noticed that referee crews in the Orlando Pro Summer League are also wearing headsets.

As the quest to improve the flow of games and communication on the floor continues, the NBA is experimenting this year with game officials using technology that keeps them in constant touch with each other and a sideline supervisor.

“It’s helped us with two things,” said 21-year NBA veteran ref Scott Foster, who is acting as an officiating supervisor in the Orlando league. “For one, we can hear everything they say to one another and evaluate when they say something to a coach. Is that the proper response or what? For instance, if the referee says to a coach, ‘I got that call right!’ We know to change that behavior and tell him he needs to be a little more communicative with that.

“The second thing we can do is hear them talking to one another and can understand when they’re telling one another, ‘Hey, I’m watching the ball right now.’ It’s easier, it’s better than having them screaming across the floor.

The NBA D-League used the headsets last season and they’re likely to make their way to the NBA eventually.

“Yes, I think so,” Foster said. “It’s just a matter of when. I think it’s something that will help our [NBA] staff down the road. We’ll be able to communicate in loud arenas in critical situations during live play. We’ll be able to make sure the entire crew is at a higher level of concentration.”

During the Summer League games, Foster sits at a front row seat along the baseline, mostly taking notes to be used in their postgame reviews. But he also has the capability to talk to the officials during the game.

However, that off-the-court observer — or super-ref, if you will — would not likely be part of an NBA scenario.

“I don’t think we’d have the guy on the sidelines chiming in,” said Foster. “In fact, I think that would be dangerous. As far as public opinion is concerned, you don’t want anybody thinking that we’re being told to do something. I don’t think you’ll ever see that.”

Foster, who officiated two games in the 2015 NBA Finals, is open to the idea, though he can see a drawback in the sense that a hands-free device on a cell phone doesn’t entirely eliminate distracted driving.

“Personally, I’d be OK either way,” he said. “I see the positives in it. But I also see some negatives in it. That is, the earpiece does take away one of your senses. If I have something going on over here and I’m not wearing an earpiece, I might turn my head real quick and realize, ‘Oh, my God, there’s a foul.’ Or there’s a matchup that’s deteriorating. Whereas with this earpiece, it does take away a little of my sense to my side on whichever ear I’m wearing it.”

But as a teaching tool, to give out and receive feedback in real time is invaluable.

“It’s phenomenal,” Foster said. “And it’s really helped me to understand where each referee is at and helps me teach them, because I can hear what they’re having to tell their partner.

“Look, despite what people might think when they’re out there rooting for their own teams, our goal is always to have the best game possible and that means having the best-officiated game possible. Using the earpieces here is a logical, good step toward that.”

Report: West agrees to deal with Spurs

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — David West said his next move would be about winning above all things. The veteran power forward meant what he said.

West has agreed to a deal for the veteran’s minimum, of $1.4 million, to join the San Antonio Spurs, a deal first reported by TNT’s David Aldridge. West turned his back on a $12 million deal with the Indiana Pacers to join the summer renaissance in San Antonio.

The Spurs have already agreed to deals with LaMarcus Aldridge and to re-sign both Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green. They also got confirmation earlier today from veteran sixth-man Manu Ginobili that he will return for the 2015–16 season alongside Tim Duncan and coach Gregg Popovich.

West had grown disenchanted with the franchise meltdown he felt occurred in Indiana the past two seasons, when the Pacers went from back-to-back Eastern Conference finalists and one of the top teams in the league to a lottery team. He opted out of the final year of his deal with the Pacers and vowed that his next opportunity would be one that gave him the best chance to win a title and delivered with his decision today.

 

Report: Gasol agrees to deal with Grizzlies


VIDEO: Marc Gasol and the Grizzlies will continue their grit and grind ride together

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Marc Gasol was never going anywhere and the Memphis Grizzlies’ All-Star free agent center confirmed as much today by agreeing to terms on a five-year, $100 million deal to stay with the Grizzlies, according to a report from Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports.

Gasol didn’t even entertain overtures from other teams in free agency, opting instead to deal only with the Grizzlies. The centerpiece of a tea that has been one of the best in the Western Conference the past three seasons.

More details on the reported deal from Yahoo!:

The deal includes an early-termination option after the fourth year in 2018-19, league sources said.

Gasol met with Grizzlies owner Robert Pera in Spain last Wednesday, and progressed toward a final agreement over the next several days, sources said.

Gasol, 30, never seriously considered leaving the Grizzlies. He attended high school in Memphis while his older brother, Pau, played for the Grizzlies, and has spent all seven seasons of his NBA career with the Grizzlies.

Gasol developed into one of the league’s best centers during his previous four-year, $58 million contract. He averaged a career-high 17.4 points with 7.8 rebounds and 3.8 assists in 81 games this past season.

 

Continuity drives Spurs’ success


VIDEO: Manu Ginobili is back for another year, and another run at a title, with the Spurs

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Manu Ginobili surely couldn’t bring himself to walk away from it all, not with the very real possibility that he and his San Antonio Spurs teammates could make yet another run at a Larry O’Brien Trophy.

Manu’s decision to saddle up for another season with the Spurs only serves to reinforce the driving principle that has sustained the organization during their decade and a half run of dominance. The continuity that comes with keeping the core group of a championship crew together is what allows the Spurs to absorb star talent, and sometimes discard it, and maintain their position as a league power.

While others lose franchise pillars — the Spurs’ biggest acquisition this summer, LaMarcus Aldridge, was exactly that in Portland — the Spurs keep their most critical pieces in the fold and keep finding ways to rebuild around them.

Witness the report later Monday that David West has agreed to join the Spurs for the veteran’s minimum of $1.4 million, opting out of a deal with the Indiana Pacers that would have paid him $12 million in 2015-16.

It’s masterful work, buoyed no doubt by having a future Hall of Fame and all-time great rock like Tim Duncan to build around. But it’s still work that has to be done, work that Gregg Popovich and R.C. Buford and the rest of the Spurs’ brain trust has done masterfully for years.

While aging stars like Duncan, Ginobili and one day Tony Parker fade into the background in San Antonio, the baton will be passed to Aldridge, Kawhi Leonard and others in much the same way that David Robinson passed it to Duncan a generation ago.

The only other team during the Spurs’ current run capable of duplicating this sort of succession of power, the Los Angeles Lakers, has failed miserably in that department. Their free agent work this summer, or lack thereof, is proof that they have been unable to find the right mix of stars, culture and continuity to sustain their success.

The sacrifice needed to keep the train rolling is what has kept the Spurs viable for so long. The sacrifice from players like Ginobili, who could have easily chased his fortunes elsewhere once he went from a starter and All-Star to a world-class sixth man and super sub.

We might not see a run like this again anytime soon in the league, this sort of cosmic mix of the right stars, with the right coach, in the right system at just the right time. It’s a lesson that championship crew in Golden State might want to pay careful attention to, if they plan on staying relevant for the long haul.

Ginobili understood as much while he was deliberating about his own future. All of the Spurs’ big dogs have over the course of their run.

And that’s why Manu had to come back for at least one more season of doing it the Spurs way.

Ginobili confirms he will play in 2015-16


VIDEO: Manu Ginobili’s 2014-15 season highlights

NBA.com staff reports

From the start, the offseason couldn’t have gone better for the San Antonio Spurs. On the first night of free agency, they came to an agreement with star forward/former Finals MVP Kawhi Leonard on a five-year deal. Days later, they reached an agreement with 3-point shooter/perimeter defender Danny Green to stay in the Alamo City on a four-year deal. Shortly after that came word from franchise superstar and future Hall of Famer Tim Duncan that he would return for the 2015-16 season.

Then, of course, came the Independence Day weekend in which they got an agreement with the crown jewel of their offseason — former Trail Blazers power forward LaMarcus Aldridge.

So, how could they top those moves? How about getting word that a long-held fan favorite, franchise legend and potential Hall of Famer will be back in the mix.

The Spurs got exactly that when Manu Ginobili tweeted today that he will be back with the Spurs for the 2015-16 season