Posts Tagged ‘WNBA’

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 249) Featuring Joel Meyers

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — This time a year ago Anthony Davis saw his name included in any legitimate MVP conversation. Alvin Gentry‘s arrival from the Golden State Warriors’ championship team was hailed as the game changer for a New Orleans Pelicans squad that everyone assumed was on the cusp of big things in the Western Conference.

But as often happens in the NBA, reality interrupted that story. Injuries to Davis and others along with the transition to a new system led to a humbling season in the Big Easy.

That would explain the absence of hype and the tempered expectations for the Pelicans’ 2016-17 season. Sure, there a lots of new faces (Solomon Hill, Terrence Jones, Buddy Hield, E’Twaun MooreLangston Galloway and even Lance Stephenson, for starters) and Davis is sure to return with a chip on his shoulder.

Still, there are issues Gentry will have to deal with to start his second season. He won’t have veteran point guard Jrue Holiday, who is out indefinitely to care for his wife Lauren Holiday, who is pregnant and dealing with a brain tumor. Another veteran guard, Tyreke Evans, is also returning from injury.

And there is a culture change that has to take place in that Pelicans locker room, one that will rest as much on Gentry’s leadership as it will that of Davis and the other veterans on the team. Joel Meyers, the play-by-play voice of the Pelicans, joins us to break it all down on Episode 249 of The Hang Time Podcast.

 

We also have NBA TV’s Kristen Ledlow to break down the radical changes to the WNBA playoff format, unearth a big beef with NBA 2K17 (Langston Marbury in the house) and more.

Check it out on Episode 249 of The Hang Time Podcast featuring Joel Meyers.

LISTEN HERE:

As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of NBA.com, Lang Whitaker of NBA.com’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.

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Carmelo Anthony leads meeting on police, community tensions

LOS ANGELES — Continuing to encourage dialogue as an important early step to easing tensions between police and the African-American community in many cities, Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony used Team USA’s day off to help assemble an estimated 200 people, from teenagers to adults, citizens to senior law-enforcement officers, for two hours of discussions at a Boys & Girls Club.

“We had a bunch of youth, had a bunch of police officers, had a bunch of community leaders of all race ethnicities, athletes,” Anthony said. “It was an open forum, open dialogue, an honest conversation. We came together as a group first, as one big group. We discussed some things and then we broke down into eight small groups and each group had athletes, officers, community leaders. What we did was, we just talked about the issues that’s going on out there today and we talked about solutions.

“Now, there’s a lot of solutions that was going on out there today, but we know that nothing’s going to happen overnight. But what we wanted to do was create something that we can start right now and continue on when we leave here today. There were some very, very powerful messages that was being talked about, not just us as athletes but the youth. The youth really, really spoke out today about how they feel about their community, how they feel about police officers, how they feel about relationships and how we can mend these relationships.”

Anthony admitted he does not have an answer on how to move forward from conversation to implementing change — “If  had the solution this would be corrected already,” he said — but was confident meetings like Monday can make a difference. Indeed, others in attendance said the chance to interact in more of a social setting, as opposed to the potential of a confrontational situation on the streets, helps.

So does Anthony and another attendee, Tamika Catchings of the WNBA’s Indiana Fever and the women’s Olympic team, lending their name in hopes of resolving the situation, said William Scott, a deputy chief with the Los Angeles Police Department.

“I think it makes a tremendous difference,” Scott said after the gathering. “The platform that these athletes have is worldwide and this issue is an issue that needs attention. We need to have some dialogue and we need to have some solutions to push this forward, so it makes a tremendous difference. It brings not only attention to the issue but it actually, I think, multiplies the facilitation of that dialogue. A lot of these young folks would not have been in this room talking with police had it not been for what these athletes are doing. That’s a tremendous, tremendous benefit to this issue and to us in the city.”

Team USA, which defeated China on Sunday in Staples Center, departed for San Francisco later Monday afternoon in preparation for a second meeting with China on Tuesday night at Oracle Arena in Oakland.

 

Pat Summitt dead at age 64

Mar 21, 2015; Knoxville, TN, USA; Tennessee Lady Volunteers head coach emeritus Pat Summitt in the first round of the women's NCAA Tournament against the Boise State Broncos at Thompson-Boling Arena. Mandatory Credit: Randy Sartin-USA TODAY Sports

Pat Summitt watches Tennessee’s women’s NCAA Tournament game against Boise State in 2015.

From NBA.com staff reports

Former University of Tennessee women’s basketball coach Pat Summitt, who amassed more than 1,000 career wins at the school and won eight nationl championships there, has died at age 64. The news was first announced via the Pat Summit Foundation’s Twitter account.

Summitt stepped down as coach of the Lady Vols in 2012 after she was diagnosed with early onset dementia, Alzheimer’s type. Even after stepping down, though, Summitt remained involved with the program, holding the title of head coach emeritus.

Summitt’s son, Ross “Tyler” Summitt, issued the following statement Tuesday morning:

“It is with tremendous sadness that I announce the passing of my mother, Patricia Sue Head Summitt.

She died peacefully this morning at Sherrill Hill Senior Living in Knoxville surrounded by those who loved her most.

Since 2011, my mother has battled her toughest opponent, early onset dementia, ‘Alzheimer’s Type,’ and she did so with bravely fierce determination just as she did with every opponent she ever faced. Even though it’s incredibly difficult to come to terms that she is no longer with us, we can all find peace in knowing she no longer carries the heavy burden of this disease.

She’ll be remembered as the all-time winningest D-1 basketball coach in NCAA history, but she was more than a coach to so many – she was a hero and a mentor, especially to me, her family, her friends, her Tennessee Lady Volunteer staff and the 161 Lady Vol student-athletes she coached during her 38-year tenure.

We will all miss her immensely.”

She had coached the team for 38 seasons, amassing 1,098 wins — which is more than any other Division I coach. She was the NCAA’s coach of the year seven times, played for the U.S. Olympic team in 1976 in the first year of Olympic women’s basketball as the team took home a silver medal.

She also sent 39 players to the WNBA, 15 of whom were first-round picks and produced three No. 1 overall picks as well. Two of her former players, Candace Parker and Tamika Catchings, have won WNBA MVPs.

At the time of her retirement, 78 individuals who were mentored in the UT program by Summitt occupied basketball coaching or administrative positions. Among them is Tennessee’s current coach, Holly Warlick, who played for Summitt from 1976-80 and coached beside her from 1985-2012.

In 2012, Summit was the recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Arthur Ashe Courage Award at the ESPY Awards.

Born to the late-Richard and Hazel Albright Head on June 14, 1952, in Clarksville, Tenn., Pat was the fourth of five children. After graduating from Cheatham County High in Ashland City in 1970, she went on to the University of Tennessee-Martin, earning a bachelor’s degree in physical education in 1974 and leading the women’s basketball team to two national championship tournaments. At 22, she was named coach of the Lady Vols and success soon followed for her at the school.

After playing in the 1976 Olympics, Summitt went on to coach the U.S. Junior National and U.S. National teams to multiple championships and medals. The crowning moment there came in 1984 when Summitt, as coach of the 1984 U.S. Women’s Olympic team, lead them to the gold medal during the XXIII Olympiad in Los Angeles.

Summitt is survived by her mother, Hazel Albright Head; son, Ross “Tyler” Summitt (AnDe); sister, Linda; brothers, Tommy (Deloris), Charles (Mitzi) and Kenneth (Debbie).

A private service and burial for family and friends will be held in Middle Tennessee. A public service to celebrate her life will take place at Thompson-Boling Arena, on the campus of the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. Details for the celebration of life will be shared at a later date.

Memorial gifts may be made to The Pat Summitt Foundation by visiting www.patsummitt.org/donate.

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 195) Featuring Chamique Holdsclaw

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — From the inside, the world according to basketball star and cultural icon Chamique Holdsclaw has always looked far different from it did to the adoring public.  From her days as a high school phenom in her native New York to her time playing for legendary coach Pat Summitt at Tennessee to her WNBA career (which includes six stints as a WNBA All-Star), Holdsclaw delivered on the court. But few people knew or understood that Holdsclaw was dealing with mental health issues the entire time.

She’s dealing with those issues now in a very public way, working as an advocate for the movement and by sharing her unbelievable story with the masses. She does so on Episode 195 of The Hang Time Podcast andin the form of a documentary of her life titled “Mind/Game”. Narrated by Oscar nominated actress Glenn Close, “Mind/Game” follows Holdsclaw on her journey to discover her true identity and purpose in this next phase of her life. “Mind/Game” premieres April 17 at the Nashville Film Festival.

In addition to talking about the obstacles she’s faced, Holdsclaw also discusses her formative years in Queens playing alongside and with the likes of Ron Artest (now Metta World Peace), Lamar Odom, Erick Barkley and many other familiar names to basketball fans. While her Tennessee Lady Vols did not make the Final Four, her men’s team, the Duke Blue Devils, are still alive. And she explains why Mike Krzyzewski and his crew remain her favorite men’s team.

She shares all that and much more on Episode 195 of The Hang Time Podcast … featuring Chamique Holdsclaw …

LISTEN HERE:

As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of NBA.com,  Lang Whitaker of NBA.com’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand and the “OG” and best sound designer/engineer in the business, Bearded Clint “Clintron” Hawkins.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.


VIDEO: Chamique Holdsclaw’s return from a two-year hiatus was a seminal moment in the life and career of an icon of the women’s game

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 111) The Carmelo Anthony Debate

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Few players divide the room the way Carmelo Anthony does.

To some, the New York Knicks’ superstar is a scoring marvel to behold in a league that has always cherished guys who could put the ball in the hole at a record pace. Yet to others, Anthony is an elite scorer but little else and needs to expand the boundaries of his game if he wants to be mentioned in the same breath as friends and contemporaries like LeBron James, Kevin Durant and Kobe Bryant.

Of course, the right answer is probably somewhere between those two extreme views. Anthony is arguably the best scorer in the game today (he certainly looked the part scorching the James and Dwayne Wade-less Heat for 50 points in the Knicks’ win Tuesday night on TNT).

But if he was a better rebounder, set-up man and finally “won the big one” then we wouldn’t have anything to debate on Episode 111 of the Hang Time Podcast,  where we also debate and discuss the Brittney Griner to the NBA (instead of WNBA … she’s all for it, by the way) drama, the Mike Rice-Rutgers basketball flap, Shaquille O’Neal‘s retirement ceremony, our Final Four picks (GO BLUE!) and a whole lot more.

LISTEN HERE:

As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of NBA.com,  Lang Whitaker of SLAM Magazine and Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand and the best engineer in the business,  Jarell “I Heart Peyton Manning” Wall.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.