Posts Tagged ‘Washington Wizards’

Cavs use Sunday as day of rest for LeBron, inciting usual grumbles


“Take rest,” Ovid said. “A field that has rested gives a bountiful crop.” But of course, the ancient Roman poet from the B.C. era hadn’t forked over several pieces of gold to watch the farmer tend to his crops, so what did he care if the guy worked that day or not.

Things are a little different in the NBA, where resting an otherwise healthy player – the way Cleveland Cavaliers coach Tyronn Lue did with superstar LeBron James on Sunday afternoon in Washington – is a touchier subject for multiple reasons.

There’s the competitive aspect, in terms of a team voluntarily not using its full roster in taking on that day’s opponent. There’s the fairness angle, since in this example James is a player who usually plays and wreaks havoc on most foes; sitting him down against Washington but not against Detroit, Orlando, Chicago or Charlotte does a favor for the Wizards while cutting no similar slack to the teams bunched around them in the Eastern Conference playoff race.

Then there’s the entertainment factor or, in this case, the caveat emptor factor. Sports franchises market their offerings according to schedules; the more formidable and famous the opponents, generally, the more sought-after tickets to those games become. These days, teams often price their tickets accordingly, charging more for the glamour opponents that feature gawk-worthy stars or suggest the most hotly contested games.

Injury or illness is one thing; sometimes theater-goers get stuck seeing the understudy on Broadway when the star isn’t able to appear. But rest is different, with choice and strategizing typically involved.

When San Antonio’s Gregg Popovich decided to rest four players in November 2012, having them sit out a TNT network game in Miami that fell at the end of a six-game Spurs trip, the NBA reacted swiftly. San Antonio was fined $250,000 by former commissioner David Stern, who called Popovich’s decision “a disservice to the league and our fans.”

Tensions have eased since then, as more coaches have followed Popovich’s lead – OK, not generally for huge TV games in the season’s first month – and even the league HQ has backed off. Commissioner Adam Silver has made schedule-relief a priority in his first two years on the job. Still, it seems a protocol could be provided or suggested, since not all games, opponents and occasions are equal.

When Tim Duncan, Tony Parker, Manu Ginobili and Danny Green were held out of that 2012 Heat game, Stern – in announcing the penalty – noted that it was San Antonio’s lone Miami visit that season. While James sat Sunday, he at least had played in D.C. on Jan. 6, scoring 34 points in a Cavs victory. He will face the Wizards again Friday in Cleveland. At least some Washington fans got to see James up close and personal.

The whole home vs. road dynamic seems to have a role here too. Some fans at the Verizon Center might have welcomed James’ “DNP-Rest” because it upped the Wizards’ chances of winning. Others, though, surely wanted to see the four-time MVP perform, preferring basketball artistry and Monday-morning highlights chatter to any potential edge in the group effort.

Wouldn’t it be more fair, for instance, if NBA stars got their rest by sitting out home games? At least then, the fans in the building – while inconvenienced that night – presumably would reap the benefit of the rest, getting a fresher James, Kevin Durant or whomever for a deep playoff run. Home crowds have 41 chances each season to see its teams’ stars. Road crowds get just one or two.

This likely can’t be legislated away, not entirely. Coaches rest players when they need it, we’re told, not just according to the schedule. Road trips tend to be more draining than home stands, so that needs to be accounted for.

Maybe the Board of Governors – not disinterested parties, considering how much each team touts the dates when James, Durant, Steph Curry or Kobe Bryant visits – could mandate that voluntary rest be taken at home only. Or split evenly between home and road. Or maybe the bookkeeping would drive everyone batty.

But it still seemed odd to have James, in the same week he played against the Pistons, the Hornets and the Raptors, sitting idle in warm-ups Sunday, grooming his fingernails or watching Kiss-Cam on the scoreboard same as them. The Wizards didn’t seem to mind, opening up their fat lead and controlling the action on their way to a 113-99 win, but some of their fans surely did.

Morning shootaround — Feb. 27


VIDEO: Top 10 Plays from Friday night

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Johnson heading to Miami | They the North | Rivers wants replay challenge system | Cuban suggests deeper 3-point line

No. 1: Johnson heading to Miami The Miami Heat are in the mix to finish in the top half of the Eastern Conference’s playoff teams, but for the most part sat out the trade deadline, not making any major moves. Instead, it appears they managed to pick up a seven-time All-Star yesterday without having to move any assets: After accepting a buyout from the Brooklyn Nets, Joe Johnson will be signing with the Miami Heat, according to multiple reports. As Ethan Skolnick writes in the Miami Herald, Johnson’s relationships with Miami’s players probably had a lot to do with his decision

Dwyane Wade made it clear. If his contemporary and friend Joe Johnson accepted a buyout from the Brooklyn Nets, Wade would be “blowing up his phone” to recruit him to Miami.

Johnson, after initial resistance, did take that buyout.

It appears that Wade got his man.

According to several league sources, Johnson, a seven-time All-Star, has chosen to join the Heat after he is expected to clears waivers Saturday night. Johnson was pursued by nearly all of the NBA’s top contenders, including LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers, with James even saying “he knows we want him” while speaking to reporters at Friday’s Cavaliers shootaround in Toronto.

But, according to sources, Cleveland, with its crowded backcourt and wing rotation, wasn’t one of the finalists. Johnson narrowed his choices to Miami, Oklahoma City and Atlanta due to the possibility of greater playing time, and the chance to prove worthy of another contract this season, even after earning nearly $200 million in his career.

Also helping Miami? His relationships with many of the Heat players. That started with Wade, with whom he became close when they were U.S. teammates in the 2008 Olympics.

While Johnson isn’t quite what he was — and got off to a terrible start with the broken Nets in the 2015 portion of the 2015-16 schedule — he has played extremely well since New Year’s, averaging 13.4 points and 4.4 assists and shooting 46 percent from three-point range. Miami is last in the league, shooting 32.1 percent from three-point range, and its two most reliable three-point shooters, Chris Bosh and Tyler Johnson, might both be out for the season, Bosh with a blood clot and Johnson with a surgically-repaired shoulder.

Joe Johnson has had an odd career arc, going from underrated to overpaid to somewhat underrated again. He was the player the Heat most feared in the 2014 Eastern Conference semifinals, because of his ability to post up, catch-and-shoot, play isolation and made critical plays down the stretch.

The question wasn’t whether the Heat would be interested. It was whether Miami could make it work, while also meeting another aim — staying under the luxury tax, to avoid being classified as a “repeater” team, and dealing with the punitive tax multipliers.

To stay under the tax, when it was roughly $218,000 from the line, Miami would have needed Johnson to wait to start a new Heat contract for at least another 10 days. But, with the Johnson commitment, the team began exploring options that would allow him to come sooner, and still stay under the tax. That could include waiving a current player, such as injured point guard Beno Udrih, but it would only help if another team claimed him. Miami has also explored adding outside shooter Marcus Thornton, whom it nearly signed this summer, signing Gerald Green instead; Thornton was recently traded from Houston to Detroit but, after that trade was negated by the league, was waived by the Rockets.

There was no official update on Bosh on Friday, and he didn’t speak to the media at the team’s annual gala Thursday night. But teammates are proceeding as if he won’t return this season. But now, if he doesn’t, Miami appears to have an opportunity to remain highly competitive in the Eastern Conference, with a lineup of either Amar’e Stoudemire or Hassan Whiteside at center, Luol Deng (coming off four straight double-doubles) at power forward, and either Johnson or Justise Winslow at small forward, with Wade and Goran Dragic in the backcourt. Johnson, who is 6-foot-7, could also play some power forward in smaller lineups, or some shooting guard, occasionally pairing with Wade in the backcourt.

***

No. 2: They the North The Toronto Raptors entered this season with high expectations, fueled by last season’s 49-win team and the addition of free agent DeMarre Carroll. Yet even with Carroll missing most of the season with injuries, the Raptors have met those expectations, and entered last night’s game against the Eastern Conference champ Cleveland Cavaliers looking to make a statement. They didn’t disappoint, as Kyle Lowry was up to the challenge, scoring a career-high 43 and leading the Raptors to a come-from-behind 99-97 win. As ESPN’s Brian Windhorst writes, it was a much-needed win for the Raptors, who still have plenty to prove

Trying to play it cool in the wake of one of the greatest moments of his career, Kyle Lowry went straight Bill Belichick.

“We’re moving on to Detroit,” Lowry said with a straight face, in reference to the Raptors’ next game, after his Toronto Raptors upended the Cleveland Cavaliers 99-97 after a furious fourth-quarter comeback Friday night. “It’s just a win.”

The Raptors do not have a storied history or much of an inventory of unforgettable moments outside the Vince Carter early years file. As such, it was not much of a stretch to say Lowry’s 43 points, a career high, against the Cavs rank as one of the greatest shows in team history.

Lowry’s stepback jumper over Matthew Dellavedova with 3.8 seconds left, the winning points, was unequivocally one of the best moments of Lowry’s career. It was his first game winner since he tipped one in at the buzzer when he was at Villanova. It was a moment to celebrate under any circumstances. If Lowry did so, though, it was in private.

“I will maybe enjoy it for a few minutes,” Lowry said.

Here is why.

There isn’t a day or so that goes by in which the Raptors don’t remind themselves of the past two seasons. Their first-round playoff exits, despite home-court advantage, hang over them like a cloud, amplified by the two Atlantic Division banners hanging above their bench that can feel like a needless, pointless taunt.

As masterful as Lowry was Friday — his relentless attacking and aggression wore the Cavs’ defenders out — it only briefly covered up the sting of his wilting a year ago. He refuses to let the way his body betrayed him with back and leg injuries be driven from his mind. Lowry was almost helpless in his team’s four-game sweep by the Washington Wizards last year. Injuries or no, it is a black stain on his record that doesn’t easily come off.

That’s what inspired him to report to this season in tremendous shape, and it is what won’t allow him to accept February success as anything but that.

“I know this sounds boring, and you’re going to get tired of hearing it,” Lowry said. “But we have to just focus on the process. We’ve been here before.”

Lowry has twice taken down the Cavs this season. Back in November, he scored six points and had two assists in the final five minutes of a quality win. In this one, with DeMar DeRozan and Cory Joseph battling illness and DeMarre Carroll recovering from knee surgery, the Raptors appeared to be toast without Lowry. They were almost toast anyway; the Cavs held the lead for most of the first 44 minutes.

For the Cavs, it was infuriating to watch, with Lowry getting to the line 15 times and thoroughly outplaying Kyrie Irving, who had just 10 points and one assist.

“We’ve got to get somebody who can guard him,” Cavs coach Tyronn Lue said.

***

No. 3: Rivers wants replay challenge system The Los Angeles Clippers have developed a reputation as a team unafraid to let referees know when the disagree with a call. But Clips coach Doc Rivers has an idea that might simplify the appeals process. As Marc Spears writes for Yahoo, Rivers is in favor of an NFL-style replay challenge system

While the NBA has instant replay, it currently doesn’t allow coaches to challenge a ruling on a play. Rivers said the NBA has discussed the subject of a coach’s challenge during competition committee meetings in recent years, but it has not come close to being approved. NFL coaches are allowed two challenges per game before the snap of the ball at any time before the two-minute warning of each half or overtime period.

“I would throw it out [a challenge flag] with both hands like a shot. That’s why I couldn’t shoot,” Rivers said Friday morning during the Clippers’ shootaround for the Sacramento Kings game. “It’s a tough one to me. It’s not like officials are trying to make mistakes, but they do at the end of the games.”

A controversial call during the Clippers’ 87-81 loss to the Denver Nuggets on Wednesday sparked Rivers’ call for a challenge system.

With 30.4 seconds left and the Clippers down 85-81, Los Angeles forward Jeff Green was called for an offensive foul on a made basket after driving into defender Danilo Gallinari. The NBA admitted on its “NBA Officiating Last Two Minute Report” on Thursday that the referee made a mistake on the offensive foul call on Green. Green potentially could have had a made basket with a free throw. Rivers described it as a “horrible call, which the league acknowledged.”

“I’ve been pushing for a [challenge] flag for a year now,” Rivers said. “We should have a challenge flag. That is the third time this year [against the Clippers] that [the NBA] has come back and said it was a bad call. It doesn’t do anything for us.”

One of the games Rivers noted was a 100-99 loss to the Oklahoma City Thunder on Dec. 21 that he said included three missed calls late in the contest. The Clippers (37-20) are in fourth place in the Western Conference standings and 3 ½ games behind the third-place Thunder (41-17).

“The league has done a great job of transparency and that has been phenomenal,” Rivers told Yahoo Sports. “But the problem with it is you don’t get anything from it if you’re the [losing] team. … The one thing I keep saying and make the point of is the refs are trying to make it right, too. It’s not like we’re mad at refs. We just want to get it right.”

***

No. 4: Cuban suggests deeper 3-point line Shooting a 3-pointer used to be something of a novel concept around the NBA, a high-risk, high-reward chance at a bonus point on a field goal attempt. But these days some teams (e.g. the Warriors) throw up threes like they’re layups, and as ESPN’s Tim McMahon writes, Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban wonders if perhaps moving back the 3-point line would open up the floor even more …

Mark Cuban has a suggestion to reintroduce the midrange shot to the NBA game: Move back the 3-point arc.

“It’s getting too close,” the Dallas Mavericks owner said Friday night of the 3-point arc, which is 23 feet, 9 inches at the crest and 22 feet in the corners, where there is no room to move it back. “Guys are shooting a foot behind it anyways. … That’s something we should look at. It’s worth looking at.

“I don’t think the number of shots would decline, but I think it would reward skill and open up the court some more. So guys would still take [3-point] shots if it’s seven inches back or whatever, but at the same time, it opens up the court for more drives, more midrange game.”

The midrange jumper has become an endangered species of sorts, while NBA players are firing 3-pointers at record rates. The single-season record for 3s is 55,137; according to ESPN Stats & Information, teams are on pace to hit 58,477 this season.

Cuban thinks moving back the 3-point arc is an idea the NBA should consider, not to discourage the deep ball, but to improve the spacing of the game.

“I think it’d open it up more so guys with different skill sets could play,” Cuban said. “It would open up play for more drives. Guys with midrange games would be rewarded and that would stay in the game. There would be more diversity of offensive action in the game.

“You’d see a little bit of decline in the 3. I’m not saying it’s a bad thing that we shoot so many 3s, but it’s worth it in the D-League to see what happens [with a deeper 3-point line].”

Cuban quickly dismissed a question about whether the NBA would benefit from adding a 4-point line, perhaps 30 feet from the basket.

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Jerry Colangelo says it’s too soon to come to any conclusions about the 76ers … Is Gregg Popovich mellowing? … Dwight Howard has parted ways with his longtime agent Dan FeganTiago Splitter had successful hip surgery … Vince Carter’s eponymous restaurant is closing

Blogtable: More likely to miss playoffs — Bulls or Rockets?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Build around Lillard or Davis? | More likely to miss playoffs: Rockets or Bulls? | Thoughts on Russell as starter?



VIDEOJazz outlast Rockets, push Houston to No. 9 in West

> More likely to miss the playoffs this season: The 29-26 Bulls or the 28-29 Rockets?

David Aldridge, TNT analyst: Houston. Just don’t like the vibe from that squad, which can Kumbaya all it wants — there are issues in that locker room that have nothing to do with Xs and Os. And, I’m not sure Detroit or Washington can put together a run for long enough to surpass the Bulls, while I see Utah being more than capable of finishing the season with a flourish — especially with Shelvin Mack looking like he’s going to solidify the Jazz at the point for the stretch drive.

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comForced to pick between disappointments, I’m going with the team that is committed to its current coaching staff. Fred Hoiberg and his bosses understand the embarrassment they’ll face if they miss the playoffs, having dumped Tom Thibodeau and his sixth-best winning percentage of all time (.647) among coaches who’ve worked at least 300 games. Management turned Thibodeau into a lame duck last season and suffered consequences that still linger. But there are signs Chicago is starting to click, if it can hang in long enough for Jimmy Butler and Nikola Mirotic to return from injuries. Houston clearly gained little from its impulsive firing of Kevin McHale and is likely to dump interim J.B. Bickerstaff before next season too. The Rockets’ dysfunction runs deeper and, unless they have a bunch of games left against Phoenix, they’ll be done at 82.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Call it a cop-out, but I’m saying neither. But if you make me pick, I’d say the Bulls are more likely to miss out. The Rockets have to beat out only one of either the Portland Trail Blazers and Utah Jazz, both of whom are playing close to their limit. And they might even have a shot at the struggling Mavs coming down the stretch. Over in the East, this seems to be a lost season for the Wizards and the Magic are again headed toward disappointment. That keeps the door open for the Bulls. But I think Stan Van Gundy is doing everything he can to drive the Detroit Pistons into the playoffs. The question mark that puts the Bulls in danger is when Jimmy Butler returns to the lineup.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com The Rockets. Chicago expects to get Jimmy Butler back, maybe within a few weeks, and Nikola Mirotic as well. No one who can play at an MVP level when healthy is walking through that door in Houston. I’m not crossing the Rockets off the list because that’s not exactly an overwhelming group of playoff hopefuls around the cutline in the West. But the Bulls’ roster could get significantly better.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: This is something of a coin flip, but my gut says the Bulls are more likely to miss the playoffs. Yes, I realize Jimmy Butler will return at some point, but Chicago is being chased by Detroit and Washington for the final spot at the moment, and both teams — while flawed — are capable of finishing strong. Meanwhile, the Rockets are dealing with only the Jazz. Honestly, I wouldn’t be surprised if Chicago and Houston sit this one out.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com The Rockets. First of all, they’re out of the playoffs right now, while the Bulls have a three-game cushion in the loss column. Secondly, the Rockets’ record is a little inflated (they have the point differential of a 25-32 team), because they’ve been good in close games (though the Bulls’ record is similarly inflated). And finally, they have a tough schedule relative to the teams they’re fighting with, playing 17 of their final 25 games against teams that are currently at or above .500.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Both teams are stuck in their current predicaments due to their own mistakes as well as some unfortunate injury issues. That said, I can see the Bulls sinking in the bottom of the Eastern Conference playoff quicksand. The Detroit Pistons, Washington Wizards, Orlando Magic and Milwaukee Bucks are all capable of walking down a Bulls team that will limp to the finish of this regular season with key players (Jimmy Butler, Joakim Noah, Mike Dunleavy, etc.) dealing with injuries. The dysfunctional Rockets have a huge challenge ahead of them, but they at least will have their best player to lean on down the stretch.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comAs much as I prefer the roster and chemistry of the Bulls, they must deal with a lot more competition in the East than the Rockets are facing in the West, where there are essentially nine teams competing for eight playoff spots. James Harden should be able to drive Houston into the postseason, whereas the Bulls are going to have to fend off the Pistons and Wizards in addition to the higher-ranked teams in their tightly-bunched conference.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog The Bulls have been through a lot this season, but I think they’re more likely to qualify for the playoffs. The Rockets have been through a coaching change, a few trades, and even a trade that was rescinded. I don’t know this for certain, but it sure seems like there isn’t a lot of confidence right now in that Rockets locker room. I think the Bulls make it.

Five takeaways from the deadline

VIDEO: Houston’s Dwight Howard may opt for a new address over the summer

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — The 2016 trade deadline came and went rather quietly. Dwight Howard is still in Houston, Jeff Teague is still in Atlanta, and Ryan Anderson is still in New Orleans. Blake Griffin and Kevin Love were never going anywhere.

But some deals – two on Tuesday and 10 on Thursday – were made at the deadline. And a couple of them involved title contenders, though none were moves that will make a major impact.

Here are five takeaways from a deadline day that didn’t exactly alter the NBA landscape…

Stay tuned for the summer

This summer was already set to be a big one. With revenue and the salary cap rising, almost every team in the league will have cap space and most will have enough to sign at least one max-level player. The list of 2016 free agents includes Kevin Durant, Dwyane Wade, Mike Conley, Al Horford, Nicolas Batum, Andre Drummond, Harrison Barnes and Bradley Beal, as well as LeBron James, DeMar DeRozan and Howard (if they decline their player options).

But cap space can also be used to absorb players via trade without having to send out salary, and the opportunity will be there for teams to unload players in July.

So if the Hawks want to hand the reigns to Dennis Schroder, they could shop Teague (who still has one more year left on his contract) again in the summer. There definitely will be multiple teams looking for a starting point guard at that point, and Conley is the only one on the list above.

Brooklyn is another team that could decide to be a seller in July. Sean Marks was hired as the Nets’ new general manager less than five hours before the deadline, so he didn’t have much time to make a decision on Thaddeus Young (who was reportedly in demand) and Brook Lopez. Both of those guys have two guaranteed years left on their contracts and Marks could look to move them this summer if he wants to go for a slower and more organic rebuild.

The Cavs and Clippers will take one more shot at a championship with Love and Griffin. And if either team falls short again (at least one of them will), other teams will come calling, wondering if Cleveland and L.A. are ready to try something different.

All that cap space may have also kept teams from trading multiple assets for players – like Anderson, Al Horford and Howard – they could lose to free agency (or sign away from the teams they’re still on) in the summer.

Playoff push in the East

The three teams that made the most impactful moves are currently sitting in the eighth, ninth and tenth spots in the Eastern Conference.

On Tuesday, the eighth-place Charlotte Hornets (27-26) traded for Courtney Lee, while the Detroit Pistons (27-27) got Tobias Harris from Orlando. On Thursday, Detroit gave up their first round pick for Donatas Motiejunas and Marcus Thornton, and the Washington Wizards (23-28) traded for malcontent Markieff Morris.

There was some risk involved in those last two deals. Motiejunas has played just 14 games this season, dealing with back problems. He was a key to the Rockets’ success last season, but might not be ready to help the Pistons get over the hump. Morris, meanwhile, fought with a teammate (Archie Goodwin) just last week and has actually shot worse this season (effective field goal percentage of 42.2 percent) than one of the guys – Kris Humphries (47.8 percent) – he was traded for.

Only 2 1/2 games separate the fifth-place Miami Heat from the ninth-place Pistons with 28 or 29 games to go. So the opportunity is there for both Charlotte and Detroit to move up into a position where they don’t have to face Cleveland in the first round. The Wizards have a lot more work to do, but also seem to have more pressure on them to make something of this season.

All about the bottom line

The No. 1 concern for the Heat right now is Chris Bosh, and if the All-Star isn’t going to be available down the stretch, Miami could fall out of the playoff picture for a second straight year.

But whether they’re going to the playoffs or not, the Heat had some fiscal issues to deal with. And team president Pat Riley and general manager Andy Elisburg used three trades in the last three days to unload fringe salary and get under the luxury tax line.

Miami was one of *two teams that was subject to repeater tax levels this season. While other teams over the tax line pay $1.50 of tax for every dollar they’re over the line, the Heat were going to pay $2.50. So before Tuesday, Miami had a tax bill of more than $25 million. But the three trades they made (sending Chris Andersen, Jarnell Stokes and Brian Roberts out) got them under the tax line. Now, they’ll get some of the luxury tax paid out by the remaining tax paying teams (like Cleveland and Oklahoma City).

* Brooklyn was the other, but got under the tax line with its buyout of Deron Williams and a couple of minor moves in July.

Two contenders get bench help

The Cavs and Thunder also lightened their tax bills with moves that were seemingly more about the fringe of their rotation. Cleveland swapped Anderson Varejao for Channing Frye, whose shooting should complement LeBron James and Kyrie Irving. Oklahoma City, meanwhile, traded D.J. Augustin (who had lost his back-up point guard spot to Cameron Payne) for Randy Foye.

Foye has shot less than 30 percent from 3-point range this season, but he gives the Thunder more depth in the backcourt with Andre Roberson out, another option when Dion Waiters isn’t shooting well, and a little more flexibility in regard to playing small against a team like the Golden State Warriors.

It’s hard to believe, though, that either of those moves will make much of a difference against the champs or the San Antonio Spurs.

Trash or treasure?

A trade that got in just before the buzzer was a swap of disappointing reserves on Western Conference playoff teams. Of course, if you paid attention to what they did at their previous stops, you can’t say that Jeff Green and Lance Stephenson were all that disappointing in Memphis and L.A., respectively.

Green gives the Clippers a little more stability, but it’s hard to believe that he moves the needle for a team that has played at a level below the three best teams in the West. The Grizzlies’ season is seemingly on the brink with Marc Gasol suffering a broken foot before the break, but they’ll take a shot with a roster that now includes a plethora of interesting characters and a lot of small ball, featuring Zach Randolph at center.

Green has an expiring contract and Stephenson has a team option for next season, so the only long-term risk is with the Clippers sending a first round pick to Memphis.

2016 Trade Deadline blog

From NBA.com staff reports

One of the busiest days in terms of NBA roster chatter and speculation is here: trade deadline day. With the deadline behind us, here’s everything that happened on a mostly quiet day. While you’re reviewing all the action, don’t forget to check out our Trade Tracker and other 2016 Trade Deadline coverage.

Highlights

Live blog — Part I | Live blog — Part II
Howard, Horford, Teague, Anderson staying putStephenson dealt to Grizzlies | Markieff Morris to Washington | Hinrich to Atlanta | Pistons trade pick for Motiejunas | Frye headed to Cleveland | Jazz trade for Mack | Thunder trade for Foye | Heat get under the tax line

UPDATE, 3:52 p.m. ET — Bucks, others had Howard talks

Dwight Howard is staying in Houston for the rest of 2015-16, but there was a chance he could have been in Milwaukee, reports Marc Stein of ESPN.com …

UPDATE, 3:28 p.m. ET — Sixers get Anthony from Rockets

Hours have he was acquired by the Rockets from the Pistons in the Donatas Motiejunas deal, Joel Anthony is on the move again

UPDATE, 3:18 p.m. ET — The names that didn’t move

There was plenty of chatter surrounding Dwight Howard, Al Horford, Jeff Teague, Thaddeus Young and Ryan Anderson, as well as minor rumblings about Blake Griffin, Kevin Love and Pau Gasol. But none of those guys are going anywhere at the deadline.

UPDATE, 3:15 p.m. ET — Stephenson to Memphis

UPDATE, 3:06 p.m. ET — Hinrich to Atlanta

Another small deal has trickled in after the deadline…

UPDATE, 2:43 p.m. ET — Markieff Morris to Washington

Markieff Morris, who’s been unhappy in Phoenix since his brother was traded last summer, was always the most likely player to be traded on Wednesday. And the destination for Morris is Washington…

Both Blair and Humphries had non-guaranteed deals for next season, so Morris’ contract (three more years, $7.4 million next season) eats into the Wizards’ cap space, which has been earmarked for Kevin Durant.

UPDATE, 2:16 p.m. ET — Heat get under the tax line

No team has made more deals than the Miami Heat this week, and it’s all been about getting under the luxury tax line. Pat Riley did just that with the third of the three deals…

Because the Heat were subject to repeater tax levels this season, they were set to pay more than $25 million in tax before the trades that sent out Chris Andersen, Jarnell Stokes and Roberts (who was acquired in the Andersen, three-team trade). Now, they’re not paying any tax, and will get a portion of the money that the remaining tax-paying teams are paying out.

UPDATE, 2:04 p.m. ET — No quit in the Kings

It’s not clear why the Kings covet Pau Gasol, but it is clear that they do…

UPDATE, 2:01 p.m. ET — No deal for Howard?

With the trade deadline just an hour away, the biggest name that had a decent chance of being traded is still in the same place…

UPDATE, 1:41 p.m. ET — Talk, but no action in Minnesota

When the Minnesota Timberwolves host the New York Knicks on Saturday, it will be Ricky Rubio bobblehead night. The real Rubio will probably be there, but the Wolves have talked with at least one team about trading their point guard…

A Kevin Martin trade would seemingly be more likely, but…

UPDATE, 1:26 p.m. ET — Thunder trade Augustin for Foye

Looking for a boost to their bench, the Oklahoma City Thunder have acquired Randy Foye from Denver…

UPDATE, 1:24 p.m. ET — Teague staying in Atlanta

Jeff Teague will be the Atlanta Hawks’ point guard for at least another two months.

The Hawks could field more offers for Teague in the summer, when multiple teams will be looking for a starting point guard and when the market is pretty shallow beyond the Grizzlies’ Mike Conley. Teague has one more season (at just $8 million) left on his contract.

UPDATE, 1:09 p.m. ET — No action in Dallas

The Dallas Mavericks are standing pat.

Morning shootaround — Feb. 17


VIDEO: Breaking down Tuesday’s three-team trade

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Report: Clippers, Magic talking deal | Report: Wizards pursuing Anderson | Report: Rockets, Hornets had Howard trade talks | Prokhorov pens open letter | Report: Nets offer GM job to MarksFuture unclear for Bucks’ Carter-Williams | Griffin apologizes publicly for incident

No. 1: Report: Magic, Clippers talking deal; Wizards pursuing Anderson — We’re a day away from the trade deadline, which means talk is bubbling up everywhere and anywhere. How much of what is discussed vs. what happens in reality remains an unknown, but the latest from overnight is that several teams are knee-deep in trade discussions. The targets du jour include Channing Frye, Lance Stephenson, Kevin Martin and Ryan Anderson. The Vertical’s Adrian Wojnarowski gets us started with the latest from Orlando and some other outposts:

The Los Angeles Clippers are pushing closer on a deal to acquire Orlando Magic forward Channing Frye but want to finish exploring a larger trade scenario before finalizing an agreement, league sources told The Vertical.

Frye is enthusiastic about the chance to join the Clippers, league sources said. Nevertheless, Cleveland also has been discussing a deal for Frye, and could still be aggressive in pursuing him prior to completion of a Clippers trade.

The Clippers need to include Lance Stephenson‘s contract into the package for Frye, and told the Magic they need until Wednesday to finish pursuing what it is a long-shot larger deal, league sources said. As part of the deal for Frye, the Clippers would include Stephenson, C.J. Wilcox and a future second-round pick, league sources said.

The New Orleans Pelicans are pushing hard to find a trade for forward Ryan Anderson, whom they expect to lose in summer free agency, league sources said.

Teams trading for Anderson believe he’ll command a starting salary of $16 million-$18 million a season in free agency.

New Orleans and Detroit had serious talks on an Anderson deal in the past few days, sources said, but the Pistons ultimately reached an agreement with Orlando on a trade for Tobias Harris on Tuesday.

The issue for the Pistons – and several teams around the league interested in Anderson – remains this: How much will it cost to re-sign Anderson this summer in free agency? With Harris, the Pistons have cost-certainty on the three-years, $48 million on his deal through the 2018-’19 season.

Minnesota hasn’t been actively searching for a trade for point guard Ricky Rubio this week, but that is likely to change this summer, league sources told The Vertical.

Minnesota may start canvassing the market for a better shooting point guard to pair with young stars Karl Anthony-Towns and Andrew Wiggins. One NBA coach who has long been enamored with Rubio, league sources said: Milwaukee’s Jason Kidd. The New York Knicks’ desire to find a point guard could lead them to Rubio, too.

Minnesota has wanted to move guard Kevin Martin, but a deal is unlikely unless he’s willing to forgo the $7 million player option on the final year of his contract in 2016-2017, league sources said. That is unlikely, given that Martin would be hard-pressed to recoup that money on the market.

BasketballInsiders.com’s Steve Kyler reports the Washington Wizards may also be hot on the trail of Ryan Anderson:

If the Clippers cannot consummate a deal with the Pelicans for Ryan Anderson, expect the Washington Wizards to return to the front of the line for Anderson in trade. The Wizards have made several passes at New Orleans on Anderson but are unwilling to include draft picks in their offer.

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Morning shootaround — Feb. 12


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Feb. 11

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Wall (knee) unsure of All-Star Game status | DeRozan planning to stick with RaptorsNext steps for Hornets after Kidd-Gilchrist’s injuryScott: Irving, Paul more mature as rookies than Russell

No. 1: Wall (knee) unsure if he’ll play in All-Star Game — After last night’s road loss to the Milwaukee Bucks, the Washington Wizards head into the All-Star break in 10th place in the Eastern Conference. They’re three games behind the Charlotte Hornets for that final playoff spot, not too bad considering all the injuries Washington has faced all season. A new injury cropped up last night, though, as All-Star point guard John Wall suffered a bruised knee and is unsure if he’ll play in Sunday’s All-Star Game. The Washington Post‘s Jorge Castillo has more:

Washington Wizards point guard John Wall will travel to Toronto to attend the NBA’s All-Star weekend festivities but is not sure if he will participate in his third all-star game Sunday after bruising his right knee in the first quarter of the Wizards’ 99-92 loss to the Milwaukee Bucks.

“If I can’t move and I need more time then I won’t [play Sunday],” said Wall, who received treatment on the knee at halftime and after the game. “But it’ll be frustrating not to.”

Wall injured the right knee early in the first quarter when he collided with Bucks guard O.J. Mayo while driving to the basket. He stayed on the floor in pain for a few moments, but remained in the game and logged 41 minutes, including the entire second half.

“It’s a deep bruise,” Wall said. “As you can see, it’s swollen. It hurts and I’ll do as much treatment as I can on it.”

Wall, who was limping in the locker room after the game, made just three of the three-pointers and scored 15 points on 5-of-19 shooting overall from the floor.

“I just knew how important this game was, trying to get a game before the break,” Wall said. “It’s an honor to be in the all-star game and have the opportunity to play but I can’t do it if it’s still a problem. My team is too important.”

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Rescheduled game throws post-All-Star hurdle at Wizards, Jazz

Imposing some sanity on the schedule was a priority for the NBA again this season, and the league was successful in reducing the number of back-to-back games – and a near-vanishing of the old four-games-in-five-nights grind.

But Mother Nature can be mightier than the agenda at NBA HQ in Manhattan, as the Washington Wizards and Utah Jazz learned Friday the steep schedule price they’ll be paying for the Jan. 23 date that was postponed by the severe winter storm that hammered the East Coast that weekend.

The NBA announced Friday that the Wizards and the Jazz will make up that game on Feb. 18 at 7 p.m. ET at the Verizon Center in Washington. As our own John Schuhmann noted on Twitter, there is serious inconvenience awaiting both teams:

So everybody has to cut short their All-Star break by one day, the Jazz have to haul back three-quarters of the way across the country to Salt Lake City for their back-to-back, while the Wizards face the dreaded three-games-in-three-nights that’s been avoided by the schedule makers for decades.

Still, 82 games means 82 games. Playoff positioning could be impacted. And given the limited availability of open dates for two teams and one multi-purpose arena, the Wizards and the Jazz weren’t working from a position of strength in squeezing in their make-up date.

Morning shootaround — Feb. 4


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Feb. 3

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Cufrry blisters Wizards for 51 | Nowitzki disagrees with Abdul-Jabbar’s assessment | Report: Rockets unlikely to deal Howard | Report: Dunleavy to return Saturday | Caldwell-Pope injured vs. Celtics

No. 1: Curry breaks out of his ‘slump’, torches Wizards — Entering last night’s road game against the Washington Wizards, reigning MVP Stephen Curry had 21 games of 30 points or more, but hadn’t broken the 30-point barrier in three games. Is that considered a slump when you’re averaging close to 30 points per game in a season? Who knows. What is certain is Curry showed he hasn’t lost his touch, abusing the Wizards for 51 points and 11 3-pointers (one off tying the NBA single-game record) writes, Rusty Simmons of the San Francisco Chronicle:

Stephen Curry just kind of left this hanging out there: “Maybe next time.”

That’s what he said after he made eight three-pointers in three quarters against the Lakers on Jan. 14, falling four shy of Kobe Bryant’s and Donyell Marshall’s single-game record.

His comment seemed innocuous until “next time” arrived.

On Wednesday at the Verizon Center, the arc opened up enough for Curry to hoist 16 three-point attempts, and because he often made the rim look the size of a hula hoop, he strutted away with 11 three-pointers in a 134-121 victory over the Wizards in front of a national TV audience.

“I missed one too many,” Curry joked. “At the end of the game, I knew I was within reach, and I was kind of searching, without trying to force it. You can’t mess around with the basketball gods, trying to chase records, if the game doesn’t call for it.”

If averaging 16.7 points on 37.9 percent three-point shooting in his previous three games constituted a slump for the MVP, his 51-point game — giving him four 50-point performances in his career — certainly constitutes a slump breaker.

“I didn’t know Steph was in a slump,” Warriors head coach Steve Kerr said. “Steph is never in a slump. He was just scintillating tonight.”

“I said, ‘Here he goes,’” interim head coach Don Newman said of Curry’s fast start. “I knew it, because that’s what they usually do. I mean, they come out and they just want to kill you.”

Curry thrilled the crowd, then his bench, and finally himself with a flurry of three-pointers in the first quarter. The fans got louder and louder as he made his first four three-point shots. Andre Iguodala bowed to him from the scorer’s table when he knocked down No. 5, and Curry didn’t really know how to react act following his sixth.

Curry swiped a dribble from Wall in the backcourt and corralled the ball about 25 feet from the rim on the right wing. Why not launch it? He tracked the arc of the ball like a baseball player enjoying a towering home run from the batter’s box, and then started spinning into a happy dance.

He finished the first quarter with 25 points — his seventh 20-point quarter of the season. He made 7 of 8 three-point attempts and was well on his way to his single-season record of 10 games with at least eight three-pointers. George McCloud previously held the record with six such games.

“The shots that you know feel good, they go in, and the shots that you think, ‘Oh, that’s off,’ they go in,” Curry said. “It’s a fun feeling, and you want to ride it until you can’t anymore.”

“We watch it on TV every day, and you’re like, ‘Ah, it’s not like that,’” Washington forward Otto Porter said. “But when he does it against you, it’s eye-opening for you.”

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Analytics Art: Wall, Bazemore, Vucevic among worst shooters of week

By Ben Leibowitz, Special to NBA.com

The NBA announced is 2016 All-Star reserves on Thursday, unveiling who the league’s coaches deemed most deserving of the midseason honor.

Typically speaking, those voted to be All-Stars are the most well-rounded players in the league — but even the best of the best are not immune to shooting slumps. This week, one player bound for the 2016 All-Star Game was mired in a big enough cold spell to be pegged among the worst shooters.

With the aid of interactive visualizations from PointAfter, we’ll take a look at three players (guard, wing and forward/center) who need to put their poor performances behind them.

Note: Statistics in this article cover games between Jan. 22-28.

Guard: John Wall, Washington Wizards

John Wall was named an Eastern Conference reserve and has been the Washington Wizards’ alpha dog all season long. The Wizards have struggled to win games with consistency, but Wall has a team-high 19.9 PER, is tied for fifth in the league in steals (2.07 per game) and is tied for second in assists (9.8 per game).

It was a good week for Wall in that he earned a third consecutive All-Star nod, but his shooting stroke completely deserted him, too.

Wall went 3-for-11 (0-for-3 on 3-pointers) on Monday, then combined to make just 11 of 34 shots on Tuesday and Thursday (32.4 percent).

Add it all up, and he finished the week shooting 31.1 percent and 23.1 percent on 3-pointers. The Wizards were 0-3 during that span with losses against the Boston Celtics, Toronto Raptors and Denver Nuggets.

Wing: Kent Bazemore, Atlanta Hawks

After a magical 2014-15 season spent flirting with the first ever 50-50-90 campaign, Kyle Korver has careened to earth in 2015-16. His struggles have necessitated teammates stepping up their game — chiefly, Kent Bazemore.

Bazemore has been stellar while playing a bigger role, shooting 46.2 percent overall and 41.3 percent on 3-pointers, the latter of the two figures ranking him tied for 18th in the league in 3-point accuracy. But Bazemore (and, consequently, the Hawks) experienced a rough week.

Atlanta went 1-3, with one loss coming at the hands of the lowly Phoenix Suns. Bazemore shot 7-for-16 against the Suns (43.8 percent), which was his best showing of the week.

From there, the 26-year-old swingman shot 34.3 percent overall (and 25 percent from 3-point range). Consider this a blip on the radar, because Bazemore has otherwise had a solid January.

Power Forward/Center: Nikola Vucevic, Orlando Magic

A career 51 percent shooter, Nikola Vucevic has been floundering in January. After shooting 55.4 percent in December, he’s shooting 44.2 percent in 2016. He’s getting shots, but they simply are not falling.

Vucevic went 6-for-17 last Friday, 8-for-17 on Monday and 7-for-19 on Tuesday. That’s 39.6 percent for the week — truly unheard of for a guy Vucevic’s size.

After a career-best season in 2014-15, Orlando’s center is merely trying to find his rhythm again. Perhaps the upcoming All-Star break will give him a chance to clear his head and remember exactly how good he can be.

Ben Leibowitz is a writer for PointAfter, a sports data aggregation and visualization website that’s part of the Graphiq network. Visit PointAfter to get all the information about NBA PlayersNBA Historical Teams and dozens of other topics.