Posts Tagged ‘Warriors’

Rick Barry recovering from bike crash

Rick Barry

Rick Barry was named one of the 50 Greatest Players in history by the NBA in 1996.

It’s the same Rick Barry in spirit. Seventy years old, 34 years removed from the final season of a Hall of Fame career as a scoring-machine small forward, his body is battered but he hasn’t lost any of his trademark tenacity.

The long recovery from a nasty July 19 bike crash in Colorado Springs, Colo., that resulted in fractures, stitches, surgery, layers of skin left on the ground in his adopted hometown and a cracked helmet as a reminder of how bad it really could have been? Just another opponent.

Not being able to put weight on the right leg for another two months or so because of a fractured pelvis, hours of physical therapy already in the books and countless more to come? Bring it on.

“I’ve always been very dedicated to things,” Barry said on the phone from his home. “I’ve always been very strong-willed. If I make my mind up to do something, I’m going to do it. Just like when I was a young kid. I was stupid and I smoked cigarettes. I just flat out said, ‘This is crazy. This is hurting my basketball.’ And so I just quit. I look at everything as a challenge. That’s the way I approach things, especially if it’s things I’m not especially fond of. I look at them as challenges and I hate to lose, so when I make it a challenge, it drives me and motivates me because I’m going to make sure I’m the one that comes out victorious.”

He is not especially fond of the rehab work, needless to say. He calls it extended training camp — and Barry hated training camps. But the strong will that helped drive him to 12 All-Star games in the NBA and ABA, the brash attitude that made him one of the game’s top personalities as well as a premier player, the determination that propelled the underdog Warriors of 1975 to their only West Coast title — it all helps now.

Barry is calling on the past at a time when his basketball is mostly limited to working with youngest son Canyon, who plays at the College of Charleston, wears his father’s No. 24 (retired by Golden State) and, in the ultimate hoops DNA, shoots free throws underhanded.

A month ago, Rick was on a ride with his wife and another couple. One minute, he was cruising downhill and turning a corner. The next, his front tire blew and there was Barry tangled everywhere and headed for five hours of surgery. The pelvis. A broken hand. Stitches and road rash.

“I just feel fortunate that it wasn’t worse than what it was,” he said. “I hit my head and the helmet cracked and all, but I didn’t have any head damage or anything at all, so that was a blessing. I could have had broken ribs and broken arms, other things that would have made it even worse trying to do the rehab. It’s hard enough with my broken left hand. That’s made it difficult enough. But, hey, everybody gets thrown. You get little bumps when you’re going down the road of life, and you deal with them and you move on. That’s the way it has to be. You can’t sit around feeling sorry for yourself. I just feel grateful that it’s not worse than what it was.”

Being forced to slow down does give him more time to promote Ektio, a company that says its basketball shoes have been proven to reduce sprained ankles, as a minority owner. The accident forced him to miss hunting and fishing trips, as well as cancel plans to attend Hall of Fame ceremonies honoring his former Warriors coach, Al Attles. But Barry sees the positives, knowing that the crash could have been much worse.

“I should have a full recovery as long as I don’t put weight on my right leg and continue to do the things that I’m doing,” he said. “I’ve got two more months of that and then I can start to do 50 percent weight bearing. I don’t know whether I do crutches or a cane or do something and then I have rehab to do, but I expect to be back doing the things that I did before. I can assure you I will not be going fast downhill anytime.”

Champ Spurs, LeBron, big All-Star break highlight NBA’s 2014-15 schedule

Tim Duncan and the Spurs will raise a fifth banner in October. (Garrett W. Ellwood/NBAE)

Tim Duncan and the Spurs will raise a fifth banner in October. (Garrett W. Ellwood/NBAE)

After a familiar in-state Texas wrestling match to tip things off, the champion San Antonio Spurs will be living out of their suitcases for much of the first couple of weeks of the new NBA season. That’s just one of the wrinkles in the  2014-15 schedule, released Wednesday.

The 1,230-game marathon includes, for the first time in history, an extended All-Star break.  The last games before the break are scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 12, and the first ones after the hiatus won’t tip until Thursday, Feb. 19. The 64th NBA All-Star Game will be held Feb. 15 at Madison Square Garden in New York.

Tim Duncan, Tony Parker, Manu Ginobili and a Spurs cast that includes 10 international players will celebrate their title with the traditional banner raising and ring ceremony on Opening Night, Oct. 28, when they host the Dallas Mavericks at the AT&T Center.  Also on the schedule that night will be Orlando at New Orleans and Houston at the L.A. Lakers.  The Spurs-Mavs and Lakers-Rockets  — with the likely return of Kobe Bryant — will be nationally televised by TNT. (Full national TV schedule)

HANG TIME: The 10 (or so) must-see games of 2014-15

Opening Night
Oct. 28, 2014, Orlando at New Orleans, 8 p.m., League Pass
Oct. 28, 2014, Dallas at San Antonio, 8 p.m., TNT
Oct. 28, 2014, Houston at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m., TNT

Once they get through Opening Night, though, the Spurs — who finished with the league’s best road record last season — will be on the road for eight of their next 11 games.  Included in that is a four-game blitz through all four California teams, consisting of  a pair of back-to-back sets of Clippers-Warrior and Lakers-Kings.

Cleveland fans, ecstatic over the homecoming of LeBron James, will have to contain their excitement for a few days until the Cavaliers make their debut on Oct. 30 at Quicken Loans Arena against the New York Knicks. The Cavaliers will play the next night, too, at Chicago in Derrick Rose’s first home game after missing all but 10 games in the last two seasons because of knee injuries.  Rose will be joined in the Bulls lineup by Pau Gasol, who left the Lakers as a free agent over the summer.

The Spurs and Cavaliers will both be headline attractions in the NBA’s annual Christmas Day spectacular that features five different matchups, coast-to-coast.  San Antonio will be at home to face last season’s Western Conference finals opponent, Oklahoma City (2 p.m. ET, ABC). James will make his first trip back to Miami, where he won two titles in four years with the Heat, for an afternoon game (5 p.m. ET, ABC) against friends Dwyane Wade, Chris Bosh and the Heat.

Christmas Day (All times listed are ET)
Dec. 25, 2014, Washington at New York, 12 p.m., ESPN
Dec. 25, 2014, Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 2 p.m., ABC
Dec. 25, 2014, Cleveland at Miami, 5 p.m., ABC
Dec. 25, 2014, L.A. Lakers at Chicago, 8 p.m., TNT
Dec. 25, 2014, Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m., TNT

San Antonio once again will face its annual Rodeo Trip, so named because the Spurs must vacate their arena for an extended stretch for the San Antonio Livestock Show & Rodeo.  It’s a nine-game stretch that will keep the Spurs off their home court from Feb. 6 until March 4. It is broken into two legs before and after the All-Star break. But the Spurs aren’t the only team who face long stretches away from home.

The Brooklyn Nets, under new coach Lionel Hollins, will also straddle the break with eight consecutive games away from the Barclays Center. And the longest single road trip of the season belongs to the Clippers, who’ll have an eight-game excursion Jan. 29-Feb. 9 through three different times zones that includes three sets of back-to-backs and ends up  against potential playoff challengers at OKC and Dallas.  The Clippers will also have to endure a seven-game trip starting Nov. 19 at Orlando that includes three back-to-backs.  The Bulls, Philadelphia 76ers and Sacramento Kings also have seven-game road trips.

As part of the NBA’s annual Martin Luther King Day celebration, four games will be nationally televised.  The Detroit Pistons will play at Atlanta (2:30 ET, ESPN), followed by the Bulls at Cleveland (8 ET, TNT) and Lakers at Phoenix (10:30 ET, TNT).  The Mavericks at Memphis (5 ET) will be shown on NBA TV.

Martin Luther King Day (All times listed are ET)
Jan. 19, 2015, Minnesota at Charlotte, 2 p.m., League Pass
Jan. 19, 2015, Philadelphia at Washington, 2 p.m., League Pass
Jan. 19, 2015, Detroit at Atlanta, 2:30 p.m., ESPN
Jan. 19, 2015, Boston at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m., League Pass
Jan. 19, 2015, Denver at Golden State, 4 p.m., League Pass
Jan. 19, 2015, Dallas at Memphis, 5 p.m., NBA TV
Jan. 19, 2015, Indiana at Houston, 5:30 p.m., League Pass
Jan. 19, 2015, New Orleans at New York, 5:30 p.m., League Pass
Jan. 19, 2015, Toronto at Milwaukee, 8 p.m., League Pass
Jan. 19, 2015, Chicago at Cleveland, 8 p.m., TNT
Jan. 19, 2015, Sacramento at Portland, 10 p.m., League Pass
Jan. 19, 2015, L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m., TNT

The NBA Global Game schedule will again include two regular-season games played at international sites.  The Timberwolves will face the Rockets at Mexico City Arena on Nov. 12 and the Bucks and Knicks will meet at London’s O2 Arena on Jan. 15.

The teams with the toughest finishes to the season would seem to be Portland, Toronto and Washington. The Blazers wrap up their schedule with three of their last four on the road, including stops at potential playoff contenders Golden State, OKC and Dallas.  The Raptors play six of their last eight on the road. The Wizards have five of their last six away, with a finale at Cleveland.

The regular season concludes on April 15. The 2015 NBA playoffs will begin Apr. 18.

The Bulls, Cavaliers and Thunder lead with 25 appearances on TNT, ESPN and ABC national telecasts, followed by the Clippers with 23, the Lakers with 20 and the Spurs and Warriors with 19 apiece.

NBA TV will show every team as part of a 97-game schedule that includes 22 Fan Night Games.  Fans will vote on NBA.com  each week to determine which games will appear on NBA TV for the Tuesday Fan Night Games.

Richmond, Marciulionis entering Hall together is a fitting outcome


VIDEO: Sarunas Marciulionis gives his Hall of Fame acceptance speech

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. – The so-called introduction miles in the air led to South Korea, then Oakland, then to Jim Petersen throwing up an excessive amount of food and drink, then Sacramento, then to a connection that reached Eastern Europe, and then, finally and forever, to New England last week.

Why Mitch Richmond and Sarunas Marciulionis were reunited here in late-summer 2014, after all the decades and all the vodka that had gone before them, was certain: their membership in the same Hall of Fame induction class in a wonderful time collision made better for Marciulionis by the enshrinement of former commissioner David Stern, the man who turned the NBA into a global brand. How they arrived here together was far less clear.

Richmond and Marciulionis could have, and maybe should have, been life-long adversaries. A shooting guard from South Florida, a JC in Missouri and a university in Kansas, a shooting guard one year older to the month from Lithuania and the national team of the Soviet Union. The first time either saw the other was when someone in the Soviet traveling party handed Marciulionis a magazine during a plane ride. He doesn’t remember who gave it to him or where the flight was headed, only that it was 1988 and Kansas State’s Richmond was on the cover.

“This big guy with the pretty smile,” Marciulionis said.

They were face to face the first time months later, on Sept. 28 in Seoul, the semifinals of the 1988 Olympics in the first meeting since the controversial outcome at the 1972 Munich Games. The Soviet Union won 82-76 as Marciulionis scored 19 points. And then, starting in fall 1989, they were Golden State teammates going for minutes at the same position.

Richmond had the advantage of one season of NBA experience under coach Don Nelson, and one big season at that, the run to Rookie of the Year at 22 points, 5.9 rebounds and 4.2 assists. Plus, Marciulionis had bad habits to break in the transition to the best league in the world at a time when a player coming from Europe, and especially from behind the Iron Curtain, was a curiosity. But Marciulionis was also fearless when he arrived in Oakland, a physical player backing down from no one.

Those practices. There was no tension amid the international intrigue, no carryover from the Olympics — “Sarunas is too nice of a guy,” Chris Mullin would say in 2014, still close enough to each former teammate that both asked him to be their presenter at the Hall induction ceremony. “He’s such a sweet guy. Two different people, on the court and off the court. On the court, yes, maybe. Tunnel vision and total focus, and Mitch is like that too. But off the court, you couldn’t be mad at Sarunas. There’s no way.” And the Warriors were a tight group that loved to be in the gym anyway, with Mullin and Richmond on board and Tim Hardaway added via the 1989 draft. But Marciulionis and Richmond head-to-head was a sight.

“Guys would say, ‘Man, we thought you guys were fighting on the court,’ ” Richmond said. “I mean, we would go at it. It was just the competitiveness in both of us that we made each other better…. We pushed each other. We fought like we didn’t like each other in practice. But after that, you might see me and Sarunas going to lunch. You might see us hanging out somewhere. But when we were between those lines, man, we played like we hated each other.”

“Sarunas was the toughest guy I ever coached and Mitch was one of the most talented,” Nelson said. “Same size, same position. They just competed and both got better because of it.”

It went on like this for two seasons of ferocious battles one minute, mostly behind the scenes at practice, and friendship the next.

“I had so many things to change and improve because my fundamentals were so far behind NBA teaching, and I came over when I was 25,” Marciulionis said. “Some habits and some basics were missed because our basketball, especially the defensive end, I can’t say were unimportant, but I guess not really explained to me…. During those workouts, practices, they were schooling me all the time. I had to learn how to defend, how to keep the man close, running around those picks all the time — so many details I had to learn the hard way. I was frustrated many times, but that was very, very good training for me.”

The split, for the entire Run TMC era in Golden State, came when Richmond was traded to the Kings with Les Jepsen and a second-round pick for rookie Billy Owens at the start of 1991-92, a deal Nelson would later call one of his basketball regrets. Marciulionis played two more seasons with the Warriors, was traded to Seattle, spent one season there, and became available again. When Richmond heard, he said, he lobbied the Sacramento front office for a reunion.

That happened in 1995-96, but lasted just one season, before Marciulionis was traded again, this time to the Nuggets for what would become his final season. He returned to Lithuania, which gained its independence from the crumbling Soviet bloc in 1990, opened a basketball academy and became a businessman involved in real estate, a hotel and a sports bar among other projects.

Richmond estimated he talked to Marciulionis three or four times a year across the miles, as Richmond played until 2001-02, established a permanent residence near Los Angeles and last season joined the Kings front office that was headed by former Warriors executive Pete D’Alessandro and included Mullin as a top advisor. It helped that Marciulionis would come to winter in San Diego every year, making it easy to swing by Oakland.

“I think we’re pretty close,” Richmond said. “When we see each other, we sit down, laugh and talk and joke and talk about the stories of Sarunas Marciulionis when he used to invite us over to his house (in the Bay Area) and drink that Russian vodka. Ohhhhh, man. He had this thing, when they drink, him and his friends, they liked to box and do crazy things. Who can take a punch in the face and (stuff) like that. Oh, yeah. Oh, they were crazy. They’d be punching each other.

“He had this game where you get one punch. He’ll let you punch him first. You’ve got to punch him anywhere around here,” Richmond said, motioning to the top of his stomach, near the rib cage. “You’ve got to brace yourself. It’s got to be a quick jab. I remember we went over to the house and he was like, ‘Anybody want to do it?’

” ‘No. No. We do not.’

“(Teammate) Jim Petersen says, ‘I’ll do it.’ We’re sitting around and Jim Petersen hits him. Rooney was like, [growling sound] ‘Errrrrr.’ He just turned all red. ‘My turn. My turn.’

“Man, he hit Jim Petersen [high in the stomach.] I thought he threw up everything he ate for two years. Oh, my God. I told my wife, ‘All right, it’s time to go. Everybody, let’s go. It’s time to go.’ That’s how he was. He loved those type of games.”

Suddenly it was Friday night in Symphony Hall, Richmond at the podium with Mullin standing nearby as an official presenter and noting the opportunity to be enshrined with Marciulionis, then later Marciulionis getting his turn and likewise acknowledging the fortunate timing, also with Mullin on stage. All the years, all the countries and all the Jim Petersen regurgitation had led them here, to an unlikely place. It had led them back to being together, now forever.

Attles, several others saluted by Hall


VIDEO: Al Attles is being awarded the John. W. Bunn Lifetime Achievement Award

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. – He accepted a job teaching at a junior high school in his hometown of Newark, N.J., coming out of North Carolina A&T and figured he’d play in the Eastern League for fun on weekends. That’s how sure Al Attles was he had no real future in basketball.

He packed for one week when he set off for Hershey, Pa., and training camp as a Philadelphia Warriors rookie in 1960. That’s how sure Attles was he would have a short NBA life.

And now look. The teaching thing never worked out. And that short life in pro ball turned into 54 years with the same organization, leading to Attles being saluted tonight with the John W. Bunn Lifetime Achievement Award from the Hall of Fame, the highest honor from the basketball museum short of enshrinement.

Attles played for the Warriors for 11 seasons, averaging 8.9 points, 3.5 rebounds and 3.5 assists. He coached them for 13, resulting in six playoffs berths, two division crowns, the best mark in franchise history (59-23 in 1975-76) and the only championship in the West Coast era, the 1975 Finals win over Washington. He was general manager for three more seasons.

Now a community ambassador and a beloved member of the organization, he will be recognized as part of the Hall of Fame festivities that culminate with induction ceremonies for the Class of 2014 on Friday night at Symphony Hall.

“Alvin Attles contributed over 50 years to the Warriors and to the game of basketball,” John Doleva, the president of the Hall said when the honor was announced in February. “He impacted the lives of so many as a player, coach, ambassador and executive during his NBA tenure. We are honored to recognize coach Attles with this prestigious award.”

Others being saluted the next two days, in addition to Alonzo Mourning, David Stern, Mitch Richmond, Sarunas Marciulionis and Bob Leonard, in the Class of 2014:


VIDEO: Nathaniel “Sweetwater” Clifton highlights

Nat Clifton, with induction via the Early African-American Pioneers of the Game committee. Clifton played for the Harlem Globetrotters and for eight seasons in the NBA, averaging 10 points and 8.2 rebounds. Also in the Black Athletes Hall of Fame, he passed away in 1990.

Guy Rodgers, with induction via the Veterans committee. Rodgers led Temple to a pair of Final Four appearances, was a unanimous All-America in 1958 and played 12 seasons in the NBA, twice finishing first in assists. He passed away in 2001.

Nolan Richardson, with induction via the North American committee. Richardson coached Arkansas to the 1994 national championship and three Final Fours as part of a career that also included an NIT title at Tulsa, a junior-college crown with Western Texas and a college coaching mark of 509-207.

Gary Williams, with induction via the North American committee. The Maryland coach made 11 consecutive tournament appearances in the 1990s and 2000s, won the national championship in 2002, led teams to seven 25-wins seasons and finished 668-380.

Immaculata University, with induction via the Women’s committee. The school won three straight AIAW championships, from 1972 to 1974, while going 60-2 and became the first women’s team to play a nationally televised game. The roster included three future members of the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame: Theresa Shank, Marianne Crawford and Mary Scharff.

Joe Gilmartin (print) and John Andariese (electronic), with the Curt Gowdy Media Award. Gilmartin was a columnist for the Phoenix Gazette for more than 30 years, wrote for the Suns’ website, was the team’s television analyst in the 1980s and was voted Arizona sportswriter of the year a record 16 times. Andariese has been a color commentator on Knicks games since 1972, when he teamed with Marv Albert, later joined TVS, ESPN, Turner, did radio broadcasts and currently handles Knicks duties for MSG Network.

Former referee Bob Delaney and former Charlotte owner Robert L. Johnson, with the Mannie Jackson-Basketball’s Human Spirit Award for “striving to improve the community, making a commitment to others, hard work and embracing the core values of the game.” Delaney, a former New Jersey State Police officer who worked undercover to fight organized crime, was cited for his work in providing awareness and education on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Johnson, the co-founder of Black Entertainment Television, is saluted for his philanthropic work.

Aldridge: Livingston’s new deal a ‘long time coming’


VIDEO: Rachel Nichols talks with Shaun Livingston about his long NBA path

Seven years after suffering one of the most gruesome knee injuries in the history of the NBA, Shaun Livingston is almost — almost — all the way back.

Livingston, who resurrected his career with the Brooklyn Nets last season, agreed to a three-year, $16 million deal with the Golden State Warriors on Tuesday that can’t be officially signed until after the league moratorium ends July 10. In Golden State, he’ll back up both Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson for new Warriors coach Steve Kerr.

After tearing just about everything in his left knee and dislocating his kneecap while playing for the Clippers in 2007, Livingston spent the next six years rehabbing, playing for six teams as his game slowly came back to life. Last season in Brooklyn, he was supposed to play a limited role for the Nets. But he wound up playing 26 minutes a night, and starting 54 games. And he started to get back some of the explosiveness he’d lost all those years ago, combining it with the cerebral part of the game he always possessed.

“Long time coming,” Livingston said Tuesday night by phone.

He was immediately drawn to Golden State. He grew up down the way from Andre Iguodala in Springfield, Ill., and played with Warriors center Andrew Bogut when both were in Milwaukee. He also knew he’d be joining a Warriors team that made the playoffs two years straight under former coach Mark Jackson.

“It feels good to be kind of a priority on a winning team,” he said. “It was the same feeling last year with Brooklyn. I was excited about the opportunity. … Out here, I can kind of be rewarded for my play last year, which is rewarding [in itself].

“It’s a great feeling. And I really wanted to be competitive. Being in the playoffs last year, being in a competitive situation, that’s what I’m all about. But this is my road, and my struggle. With all my issues, to have this now, it’s great.”

Livingston said the bizarre departure of Jason Kidd, a strong backer of his, as coach of the Nets over the weekend was not a major factor in his decision to go to Golden State. A bigger issue was the contractual limitation Brooklyn had because of its enormous team salary last season. The only way the Nets could re-sign Livingston was to use the taxpayer mid-level exception, which starts at just more than $3 million for next season.

By contrast, Golden State had the non-taxpayer mid-level exception, starting at $5.3 million next season, to use for Livingston.

“I don’t know if [Kidd’s departure] would have played a factor, because I don’t know that the contract situation would have worked out,” Livingston said. “But Jason’s situation didn’t help matters.”

Morning Shootaround — June 22


VIDEO: The Inside crew has another nuanced discussion about Carmelo Anthony’s future

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Carmelo weighing salary against winning with his decision | Love deal on hold, Thompsons smiling | Report: Bulls pursuing trade for Magic’s Afflalo | Embiid fits Lakers’ needs

No. 1: Carmelo weighing salary against winning — As cold and crass as it might sound, the fact is Carmelo Anthony‘s potentially career-defining decision about whether to opt in for another year in New York with the Knicks or to bolt in free agency is really about trying to win titles or trying to cash in on one last huge payday. Because no one is convinced he can do both by staying with the Knicks. His decision is due Monday, giving Anthony one final night of restless sleep to figure out his future. His options, as Benjamin Hoffman of The New York Times details, are set in stone both ways:

If Anthony does nothing with his contract and chooses to stay with the Knicks for the 2014-15 season, he will earn $23.3 million. If he opts out and signs a maximum contract with the Knicks, he can earn about $129 million over five seasons, depending on the final salary-cap ceiling. If he signs a maximum contract with a team other than the Knicks, he can get up to $95 million over four years. If he forgoes his rights to re-sign with the Knicks and wants to form a Big 4 in Miami with LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh, it is hard to envision a way in which he could earn more than $58.8 million over four seasons.

It is that cold, hard reality that has Pat Riley, the Heat’s president, calling the idea of obtaining Anthony a “pipe dream” — even if he did not specifically use Anthony’s name.

The question now, with the deadline for Anthony to opt out of his contract coming Monday, is how much he values winning. The Knicks seem unlikely to contend next season, and Anthony will be voting with his own money if he chooses to walk away from the rebuilding franchise.

At 30, and with more than 800 games played, including the playoffs, Anthony will probably never again have as strong a case for demanding a gigantic payday. He just had one of his best all-around seasons, even if it came in a frustrating season for his team, and any team looking to sign him can reasonably expect the durable Anthony to be productive for the length of the contract.

The prospect of playing with the Heat’s threesome, all of whom he has shared time with on the United States men’s national team, would certainly be enticing, but the Heat’s ability to manipulate the salary cap can go only so far.

With nearly every contract on the roster involving some form of option, the Heat are currently committed to more than $80 million in salary next season, which is far in excess of the estimated $63 million salary cap. In a highly unlikely move, the team could reduce its salary commitments to $8 million if it declined all its team options and if every player eligible opted to become a free agent. That $8 million would have to fill 10 roster spots, leaving roughly $55 million to sign Anthony, James, Wade and Bosh. Split evenly, they would each earn less than $14 million next season. Anthony last made that little money in 2007-8 and would potentially be leaving $70 million on the table over the duration of the contract.

As good as the Big 4 would be, the Heat would need more than them to re-establish themselves as title contenders.

(more…)

Morning Shootaround — June 20


VIDEO: Injury issues could cost Joel Embiid the No. 1 overall pick in next week’s Draft

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Celtics still interested in Embiid | LeBron’s next move defines him | Cavs go bold with David Blatt | Warriors have to break up Splash Bros. to get some Love

No. 1: Injury or not, Celtics still interested in Embiid — Fear has never been a part of the program in Boston under Danny Ainge. If there is a risk to be taken, Ainge is usually interested in at least exploring the possibilities. And now that the Draft world has been shaken to its core with the news that projected top overall pick Joel Embiid will have surgery on his foot today, in addition to the lingering issues about the back injuries that curtailed his freshman season at Kansas, Ainge’s curiosity factor has to be on high. And as Celtics Insider A. Sherrod Blakely of  CSNNE.com points out, the Celtics have been down this road before in the Draft:

The stress fracture in Joel Embiid‘s right foot will certainly scare some teams away from selecting him near the top of the draft.

But the Boston Celtics aren’t one of them.

In fact, a source tells CSNNE.com that the Celtics will give some serious thought to potentially moving up in the draft to select him.

Boston has kept “all options” open leading up to the draft, including the possibility of moving up from their current No. 6 spot.

However, Embiid’s injury gives them added incentive because this injury – which comes on the heels of a fractured back injury that shortened his lone season at Kansas – opens the door for them to acquire the player with the most upside in this year’s draft.

This latest setback which will force him to miss all of summer league and puts the start to his NBA career on uncertain ground, raises more and more questions about the 7-footer’s durability.

Embiid’s camp sounds resigned to the idea that he won’t be the No. 1 overall pick.

His agent Arn Tellem told Yahoo! Sports, “Joel will be unable to participate in any additional workouts, and will not attend the draft in New York.”

Boston heard similar concerns about Avery Bradley and Jared Sullinger, players they selected who came into the draft with health concerns.

Although Bradley has had multiple injuries since the Celtics drafted him with the No. 19 pick in 2010, the 6-foot-2 guard has developed into one of the NBA’s premiere on-the-ball defenders.

Sullinger, drafted with No. 21 in 2012 after being projected as a lottery pick (top-14), underwent season-ending back surgery after appearing in 45 games during his rookie season.

He bounced back this past season and did not miss any games due to his back.

Moving up to get Embiid certainly would be a high-risk move by Boston. But considering he has the most upside in this year’s draft, the 7-foot native of Cameroon just might be worth the gamble with favorable comparisons made to a young Hakeem Olajuwon.

(more…)

Hang time podcast (episode 160) featuring Stu Jackson and the ‘call’

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com


VIDEO: Stu Jackson joins the Hang Time Podcast crew to discuss “the call” from Game 5 of Clippers-Thunder

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS – Will the “call” from Game 5 really be one of the “definding moments” of the Clippers-Thunder Western Conference semifinals?

Clippers coach Doc Rivers certainly think so.

Thunder coach Scott Brooks certainly hopes so.

The players on both sides better not let it be so, because they’ve got another game to play, maybe two, including Game 6 tonight in Los Angeles. And any lingering issues from that wild finish in Game 5 could be detrimental to the cause.

But before we dive into Game 6, we go back and examine the call with former NBA Executive VP of Basketball Operations Stu Jackson, aka the “Dean of Discipline.”

If anyone can explain what happened, it’s Stu!

We also talk about the crazy ride that is the 2014 playoffs, postgame presser Fact or Fiction, Stan Van Gundy to Detroit as its new boss, the coaching carousel and much more on Episode 160 of the Hang Time Podcast featuring Stu Jackson and the “call.”

LISTEN HERE:

As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of NBA.com,  Lang Whitaker of NBA.com’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand and the best sound designer/engineer in the business,  Jarell “I Heart Peyton Manning” Wall.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.

 

24-Second Thoughts — May 14

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com


VIDEO: The Heat and Nets were upstaged by some breaking news … Steve Kerr to the Warriors

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The phrase “close-out game” has a nasty ring to it for proud veterans like Paul Pierce, Joe Johnson and Kevin Garnett.

It’s a slap in the face, really, especially when said slap comes from the hand of LeBron James and the Miami Heat. That might explain the Nets’ furious grind from the opening tip Wednesday night in Game 5 of their Eastern Conference semifinal.

It’s win-or-go-fishing time for the Nets and they are playing like it.

They don’t appear to be interested in hitting the water for the summer, not yet. Not without at least one last barrage of punches delivered to the gut of their hated rivals from South Beach.

Did you expect them to go out any other way?

We didn’t either. And … this happened …

and the entire night changed from Oakland to Manhattan and plenty of stops between! It didn’t take long for the Twitterverse to go crazy in the aftermath of the breaking news:

24 – No Mark Jackson to the Knicks?

23 – What’s up with the Framily plan in New York …

22 – Kerr turning down Phil has an impact on ‘Melo, no?

21 – The countdown is on …

20 – The Knicks’ loss is the Warriors’ gain …

19 – Keep it in the real family plan Phil …

18 – Waiting for Kerr’s kindergarten team to Tweet out congratulations …

17 – Meanwhile, the Nets are all up in the Heat’s mix …

16 – Here we go again, another crazy finish …

15 – Shuttlesworth!

14 –  “Joe Johnson for threeeeeeeeeee” … this ain’t over yet!

… oh no, not again!

Nets’ ball with one last chance to tie it or win it and send this thing back to Brooklyn …

13 — Survive and advance …


VIDEO: Ray Allen comes up clutch from beyond the 3-point line

12 — A Man Called Ray!

11 – Dancin’ Danny Green shows up just in time …

https://twitter.com/JMcDonald_SAEN/status/466764485617647616XX

10 – Hearts racing in San Antonio …

9 – The Invisible Man in the Heat-Nets series …

8 – #badhammy?

7 – The whole “Sugar K(ane) Leonard” thing is actually starting to grow on me …

6 – This is indeed a grown man’s game!

And Sugar Kane is grown!

5 – #GetWellSager

4 – “I want some NASTY!”

3 – Best man for the job?

2 – #RipCity

1 – The #SpursWay makes it back to the Western Conference finals, all they need now is a dance partner …


VIDEO: LeBron James and Dwyane Wade are back in the conference finals four a fourth straight season

NBA coaching carousel in full swing

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com


VIDEO: The Starters discuss Mike Brown’s latest ouster in Cleveland

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The list stands at seven. As of this moment.

Give it a few hours and that could change.

Such is life in the roller-coaster business that is NBA coaching. Much like the playoffs, things change quickly in a tumultuous environment where everyone is looking for an advantage, for the one perfect fit that can boost a team to the next level.

Mike Brown was gainfully employed in his second stint as the Cleveland Cavaliers coach until Monday morning, when he joined a list that includes Mike Woodson, Mark Jackson, Mike D’Antoni and others who were pink slipped since the end of the regular season.

The best part: Many of the guys on the ousted list are candidates for the other jobs.

We take a quick look at what is available and the coach who fits each vacancy best:

CLEVELAND CAVALIERS

This one is fresh. There were rumblings for months that Brown’s latest run in Cleveland was not going to end well. Once it started to become clear that general manager David Griffin would get the interim tag removed from his title,  it was only a matter of time before he’d part ways with Brown, a defensive-minded coach who simply could not corral a young group led by the talented but enigmatic backcourt duo of Kyrie Irving and Dion Waiters. The Cavaliers were expected to make a run at the playoffs and did give chase late in the season — after Andrew Bynum was cast off, Griffin took over for the fired Chris Grant, and Luol Deng and Spencer Hawes were added to the mix via trade. But the Cavs couldn’t manage the eighth seed in a depressed Eastern Conference playoff chase. What they need is a system designed to fit Irving, who has to be the No. 1 priority for Griffin moving forward.

The best fit: Mike D’Antoni. He has history with Griffin from their time together in Phoenix. All Kyrie has to do is ask some of his former point guards what working in D’Antoni’s system has done for their careers.

DETROIT PISTONS

Another team that was expected to contend for a playoff bid, the Pistons posses an interesting assortment of talent — including  Andre Drummond, Josh Smith, Brandon Jennings, Greg Monroe and Kentavious Caldwell-Pope — that Mo Cheeks couldn’t figure out what to do with during his short stint at the helm. John Loyer had no chance of cleaning up that mess after Cheeks was fired. There were too many things that needed fixing. Without someone in place to take over for long-time team president Joe Dumars (who resigned at season’s end and is now serving as a consultant), it’s hard to know what direction the Pistons are headed in at such a crucial time in the franchise’s history. What’s needed is strong leadership from the bench, someone who can blend the bold personalities in that locker room into a cohesive group.

The best fit: Mark Jackson. Jackson’s issues in Golden State had nothing to do with his roster. The Warriors ran through brick walls for Rev. Jackson. The Pistons would do the same.

UPDATE: According to reports, Stan Van Gundy has agreed to become the Pistons’ coach and president of basketball operations.

GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS

With Steve Kerr reportedly no longer an option for the Warriors, they wisely have turned their attention to candidates with completely different sets of credentials. Both former Magic and Heat coach Stan Van Gundy and former Grizzlies coach Lionel Hollins have moved to the front of the list. Van Gundy, whatever his faults might have been in his previous stops, is still held in the highest regard among front-office types around the league. He’s gotten consistent results and is a known commodity. Hollins brings a measure of toughness to any situation. Steph Curry, Klay Thompson, David Lee, Draymond Green and the crew are plenty feisty. And this is as explosive an offensive group as there is in the league. All that’s needed now is some steadiness and leadership that balances the entire equation.

The best fit: Lionel Hollins. People forget that Hollins had the Grizzlies in the Western Conference finals last season. He ran into a bit of a philosophical disconnect in Memphis with the front office. He’ll know how to navigate that relationship much better this time around.

LOS ANGELES LAKERS

If they’d just listened to Kobe Bryant, Phil Jackson might still be coaching the Lakers and they might still be in the contender mix in the Western Conference. But as Lakers fans know all too well, Jim Buss decided a long time ago that his vision for the future of the franchise trumped anyone else’s. The Lakers have paid for that dearly the past two years, hiring and firing guys (the Mikes, Brown and D’Antoni) who had no chance to fill the enormous void left by Jackson. Now the Lakers have a two-year window with Bryant (and whoever and whatever else they can pull together for a roster) to try to regain some semblance of the championship-caliber form they’ve lost. Keep in mind that this remains the most difficult job in the entire league, one that shouldn’t be thrust upon a coaching newbie like Derek Fisher (as has been widely speculated) just because of his ties to the organization. Then again, if he has Kobe’s blessing and endorsement …

The best fit: Stan Van Gundy. Kobe needs someone who will agitate his competitive juices in a different way than either Brown or D’Antoni ever could. He needs someone who will refuse to acquiesce to his every whim, the way Jackson did when he was in his prime. Stan Van is just crazy enough to do all that.

MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES

How much longer can the Timberwolves, with talents like Kevin Love and Ricky Rubio, go without breaking through to the playoffs? That’s the question Flip Saunders has to answer as he searches for a replacement for Rick Adelman, who despite being one of the best and most respected coaches of his generation, simply never could manage to get the Wolves into the playoffs. Bold leadership is required in this job, someone who will develop Rubio into the complete point guard he has to be in order to take that next step in his career. The superstar-friendly coach isn’t always the best fit, either. There are times when a star needs to be challenged. The Timberwolves appeared to get comfortable under Adelman. The next coach has to raise the bar.

The best fit: George Karl. His style doesn’t work for everybody. And when it does, there’s no long-term guarantee the organization can suffer his demanding ways. But if Karl could work as well as he did, for the most part, with Carmelo Anthony, he should be able to do wonders for Love and Rubio.

NEW YORK KNICKS

The drama surrounding this job revolves around one candidate and only one candidate. Steve Kerr. He is reportedly working out the details on a deal that will reunite him with his one-time coach, the Zen master Phil Jackson, so they can dive in on the long and arduous task of trying to rebuild the Knicks into an Eastern Conference power and championship contender. Kerr will have a host of challenges, financial and otherwise, that are sure to make it a more difficult task than anyone realizes. The salary cap mess and the free agent uncertainty surrounding Carmelo Anthony means the next coach, be it Kerr or someone else, will have little flexibility in terms of roster makeup, until the summer of 2015. As we know now, there is no guarantee a coach makes it through that first year on the job. Kerr’s connection to Jackson and the fact that they have a shared philosophy certainly works in his favor. But that James Dolan factor is always lingering.

The best fit: Steve Kerr. The one no-brainer marriage between the team president/GM and coach in the entire landscape.

UTAH JAZZ

Jerry Sloan is not walking through that door, folks. It’s not happening, no matter how much Jazz fans would love to see him at the helm of a young and precocious group, led by promising young point guard Trey Burke, Derrick Favors, Alec Burks and Enes Kanter. The Jazz have a pair of first-round picks, one a top-five selection, giving them two more quality young pieces to add to a nucleus that, while not necessarily prepared for prime time right now, if cultivated properly should serve as a key part of the foundation for years to come. The tricky part for Kevin O’Connor, Dennis Lindsey and the rest of the Jazz brass is whether to go off the grid for their next coach (four-time Euroleague champ Ettore Messina‘s name has been mentioned often) or follow the recent trend of locating a Steve Clifford-type. Their process couldn’t be more inclusive. They announced they would interview some 20-plus candidates for the job.

The best fit: David Fizdale. The Miami Heat assistant has developed a reputation for being one of the best molders of talent in the business, having worked his way up the ranks the past decade-plus. He’d be a fresh face in a situation where one is desperately needed.


VIDEO: Golden State GM Bob Myers waxes on the Mark Jackson firing and what’s next