Posts Tagged ‘Tony Parker’

Morning shootaround — Nov. 16


VIDEO: Highlights from Saturday’s NBA action

NEWS OF THE MORNING

LeBron loves seeing the Hawks| Knicks ready to fight for Marc Gasol? | CP3 rescues the Clippers | Rockets talking mental toughness

No. 1: LeBron loves seeing the Hawks — Perhaps this is his way of taking out his frustrations on the San Antonio Spurs. Since he couldn’t do it against the real Spurs, LeBron James and his Cleveland Cavaliers went in on the Atlanta Hawks Saturday night in record fashion. LeBron, as Joe Vardon of the Northeast Ohio Media Group makes clear, loves seeing the Hawks:

LeBron James’ body language spoke volumes Saturday night.

Consider what was said in the second quarter of the Cavaliers’ 127-94 thumping of the Atlanta Hawks.

Cleveland was on its way to a 71-point first half, had drained its first 11 three-pointers, and would end the half with assists on 22 of 25 field goals. James wasn’t sprinting so much as he was gliding around the court, tossing one-handed, no-look, razor-sharp passes into traffic for layups.

The way he was moving around the court, his leg churning like pistons and eyes up, looking for open teammates with a little grin on his face – was a look seldom (if ever seen) on James since he returned to the Cavaliers.

He looked like he was having fun.

“I have fun every time I step out on the basketball court – win, lose, or draw,” James said. “I have a love for the game, I have fun, I show it on my face sometimes more than others. Inside, the kid is always excited to put another uniform on and go out and play.”

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No. 2: Knicks ready to fight for Marc Gasol? — Leave it up the Knicks, a team struggling in every facet in this early season, to worry about free agency before Thanksgiving. They are already poised to pick a fight with the reigning world champion San Antonio Spurs … for Marc Gasol, who by the way is busy leading his Memphis Grizzlies to the top of the Western Conference standings right now. Those little details won’t stop Knicks Nation from dreaming about what could be. Frank Isola of the Daily News has more:

Phil Jackson has made a career out of taking pot shots at the San Antonio Spurs so even if the Knicks president doesn’t respect Greg Popovich’s club he should fear them.

The Knicks’ main free-agent target, Marc Gasol, is also being targeted as a possible replacement to Tim Duncan assuming Ol’ Man Riverwalk retires this summer. The Knicks will be players for the Memphis center mainly because of the first three rules of real estate — location, location, location — and because Gasol is familiar with both Jackson and Derek Fisher since older brother Pau spent the best years of his career with the Lakers.

Otherwise, staying in Memphis will be appealing to Gasol, whose team is a legitimate championship contender. The Grizzlies can offer Gasol the most money, and he has grown to love the city, having lived there since high school when Pau broke in with the Grizzlies.

Coincidently, Pau considered the Spurs this past summer but took more money to join the Chicago Bulls, much to Jackson’s chagrin. When Pau signed, Jackson tweeted a photo of lightning striking the city of Chicago. He might end up tossing his iPhone in the East River if Marc signs with the Spurs, arguably the best run franchise in all of pro sports. They also have the nucleus to remain a contender for years to come.

Signing with the Knicks strictly for basketball reasons is a tougher sell, although his Spanish teammate, Jose Calderon, will be a key part of the recruiting pitch. History, however, is not on the Knicks’ side. The last major free agent to make a significant impact was Allan Houston all the way back in the summer of the 1996. Back then, Jeff Van Gundy was winning big as the head coach, and Jim Dolan was learning to play the guitar, not running the Garden. Crazy coincidence, no?

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No. 3:CP3 to the rescue for Clippers — It’s an act Chris Paul will probably have to perform more often than he wants to this season, rescuing the Los Angeles Clippers from despair the way he did against the Phoenix Suns. But that’s the burden he signed on for when he became the face of the franchise. Broderick Turner of The Los Angeles Times explains:

After taking four days off to collect themselves after a difficult loss to San Antonio, Chris Paul made sure the Clippers played better basketball.

Paul took over the game in the third quarter and then saved the Clippers from imploding in the fourth, pushing Los Angeles to a 120-107 victory over the Phoenix Suns on Saturday night at Staples Center.

Paul scored a season-high 32 points on 10-for-13 shooting, including five for six on three-point shots. He had nine assists and five rebounds in helping the Clippers score a season high in points.

When the Clippers’ 26-point lead was cut to 11 points late in the fourth quarter, Paul went to work.

He scored seven consecutive points in the fourth to help the Clippers pull out a victory in which six players scored in double figures.

He made two free throws, a three-pointer and a jumper.

The Clippers outscored the Suns, 42-20, in the third quarter in opening their big lead.

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No. 4: Rockets talking mental toughness – The Houston Rockets have clearly turned a corner on the court from last season. They look every bit as fit to chase a championship as we thought they should have and would have a year ago. But the real test is about the mental toughness needed to win it all. And the Rockets are working on that, as should be expected after a narrow escape against the lowly Philadelphia 76ers. Jenny Dial-Creech of the Houston Chronicle explains:

After barely pulling out an 88-87 win over Philadelphia on Friday night, the Rockets practiced Saturday in preparation for their third set of back-to-back road games this season.

On Sunday, the Rockets will play at Oklahoma City and on Monday they will travel to Memphis.

“We already know these are two playoff teams,” guard Jason Terry said. “Both of these teams, barring they stay healthy, will be in the playoffs this year. Oklahoma is a tough team. We know their system very well.

“Memphis is a division opponent. It is sort of a rivalry. You have to say that because they are in the division so you never want to lose division games. It will be a tough challenge because they have two great big men that are the toughest two tandem in the league and you have a great, young point guard in Conley who pushes the tempo and is always on the attack.”

Terry said that headed into the road trip, he felt the Rockets were mentally stronger than ever thanks to the close call against the Sixers.

“We grew as a team,” he said. “On this journey that we go on through the regular season, there are going to be times where your mental toughness is tested and (Friday) was one of those times. We got back late from Mexico City. We didn’t practice. We came right back here and the game came so fast against a team that lost by 50 the night before. They were ready, they were hungry, they challenged us and we weathered the storm. I learned a lot about us, about our mental toughness. It’s good to see, and it’s good to see early on in the season. It won’t be the last test, but we passed the first one.”

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SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: The Magic finally get Victor Oladipo back in their starling lineup … The Chicago Bulls love what Pau Gasol brings to the Windy City  … Bradley Beal targeting a return to practice this week with the Wizards … Warriors coach Steve Kerr is keeping his (starting lineup) options open … The Milwaukee Bucks’ dedication to defense is paying off

 

Report: Spurs, Leonard unlikely to reach extension

HANG TIME BIG CITY — NBA teams have until midnight tonight to reach extensions with players drafted in the first round of the 2011 NBA Draft. Some players, such as Charlotte’s Kemba Walker and Denver’s Kenneth Faried, have already agreed to long-term deals with their respective teams. But according to a report this morning, perhaps the most valuable player from the class of 2011 may not reach an agreement in time.

ESPN.com’s Marc Stein reports that NBA Finals MVP Kawhi Leonard and the San Antonio Spurs are unlikely to make a deal before tonight’s deadline:

Sources told ESPN.com this week that Leonard and the San Antonio Spurs, despite more serious discussions between the parties in advance of the Halloween buzzer, are unlikely to come to terms during this extension window, setting up the 23-year-old to become a restricted free agent in July.

‎Negotiations, however, do remain alive going into the final day for at least three other prominent 2011 first-rounders: Golden State’s Klay Thompson, Minnesota’s Ricky Rubio and Cleveland’s Tristan Thompson.

Leonard has been billed as the Spurs’ future face of the franchise for some time — long before he emerged as the star of San Antonio’s five-game destruction of the LeBron James-led Miami Heat in the 2014 NBA Finals — and had his agent, Brian Elfus, in San Antonio this week to negotiate with Spurs officials.

But sources say that San Antonio prefers to wait until the offseason to address Leonard’s future in the name of maintaining maximum financial flexibility.

That strategy does come with an element of risk, since Leonard is sure to attract max offer sheets of varying contract lengths on July 1, his first day as a restricted free agent. But the Spurs would have the right to match any offer Leonard gets next summer in that scenario and would be able to do so with a better feel about how much longer stalwarts Tim Duncan and Manu Ginobili want to keep playing. If the Spurs were to extend Leonard’s contract now, and then either Duncan or Ginobili — or both — decides to retire, San Antonio’s cap space to replace them would be lessened significantly.

Not coming to an agreement hardly pushes the Spurs into crisis mode — they still retain Leonard’s rights, and next summer, when Leonard becomes a restricted free agent, the Spurs will have the right to match any contract offer he receives. But after Leonard’s performance in the NBA Finals, he seems primed for a breakout season, and it is highly likely he could draw a maximum contract offer from a franchise looking for game-changing building block.

Not coming to an agreement with Leonard would seem to indicate that the Spurs are comfortable letting another franchise set the market for Leonard. And with San Antonio’s big three of Duncan, Ginobili and Tony Parker getting older, how the Spurs respond to an offer to Leonard will shape their franchise for years to come.

Blogtable: The Kawhi conundrum

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Next great international player | Kawhi and the Spurs | Pick a champ


> The Spurs have done a lot of things right in the last 15 years or so. What should they do, contract-wise, with Kawhi Leonard?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comGet it done. Now. Acknowledge that Leonard has a rare bargaining chip (NBA Finals MVP) and move the “future” along. Either max him out now as reward and good will, in the hopes that eventually he’ll enter that “home team discount” realm of other Spurs stars in mid-to-late-career negotiations. Or at least pay him $1 more than the best offer sheet he can sign (max money, four years, lesser raises) as a restricted free agent next offseason. It’s time, and a lot of young NBA talent may be watching.

Kawhi Leonard (Jesse D. Garrabrant/NBAE)

Kawhi Leonard (Jesse D. Garrabrant/NBAE)

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comNothing right now. At this point, there is no reason for Leonard to sign an extension for anything less than the max. He’ll get that kind of offer next summer from somebody. And at this point, there’s no reason for the Spurs to pay out the max ahead of time.  When he gets the max offer, as a restricted free agent, they’ll be able to match it. No panic. No worries.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: The Spurs should do the Spurs thing and sell Leonard on the benefits of being in a stable organization that remains a championship contender, hoping it will get him to lower his demands. It probably won’t. Maybe Tim Duncan, Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili can apply some pressure. And if nothing works, San Antonio has no choice but to meet the demands. Leonard is the next generation. If the Spurs don’t pay him now, they’ll certainly have to pay him later when an opponent hands Leonard a max offer sheet.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comThere’s no need to panic, that’s for sure. The Spurs keep their payroll manageable, so even if another team throws a poison-pill contract at him, they can comfortably match. One way or another, I don’t see Leonard leaving the Spurs. He has the perfect team and town for his personality, and the perfect coach at this stage in his development. Duncan, Parker, Manu … the Spurs found a way to keep them all happy and in one uniform for their entire career. This team gets it done.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Ideally for the Spurs, they sign him now for a fixed amount, rather than a “max” extension, because the max (four years or five years if they make him their Designated Player) will rise with any cap jump next summer, and it could jump quite a bit if the league and NBPA agree on a smoothing procedure. So if Leonard is holding out for the max, it becomes a tough decision, because this team is going to need to reload when Tim Duncan and Manu Ginobili hang ‘em up. Either way, I try to get something done now, so that the situation isn’t hanging over them this summer.

Sekou Smith, NBA.comSimple. Do the right thing by The Finals MVP. Kawhi is a franchise pillar for the Spurs. So they should have no problem figuring out the right number to get a deal done. The quintessential Spurs’ Draft find, Leonard’s game seems to have progressed even faster than some inside the machine in San Antonio expected. The Spurs have worked to craft a salary structure that keeps all of their core talent in the fold. And Leonard is certainly a critical piece of that core, perhaps the most critical if you forecast what they’ll be like in the future. So his new contract needs to be commensurate with what his role will be over the next four or five years as the Spurs transition from one era to the next.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: Their dynasty has been built on the wisdom of reasonable contracts that work for both the player and the franchise. So far Leonard (like Rajon Rondo during the Celtics’ run of contention) has had the luxury of being their No. 4 player; the Spurs know better than anyone whether he has the temperament to be their Nos. 1 or 2 star someday. I don’t know what they should do; but I do know that the Spurs – better than any other team – have an established record of knowing what needs to be done, and how and when to do it.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogThe easy call would be to max him out. With the new TV deal in place and the requisite rise in the luxury tax figure on the horizon, singing Leonard — the reigning Finals MVP and man Gregg Popovich singled out as the future of the franchise — to a max extension might end up looking like a bargain. There’s just one thing, though, that would keep me from handing out a max deal is that being so cavalier with their cash just isn’t, at the risk of being glib, the quote-unquote Spurs Way. The Spurs stars have traditionally taken somewhat less than market value in order to be part of what has been one of the NBA’s premier franchise over the last few years. From Duncan, Parker and Ginobili on down, the Spurs players have proven their devotion to team over the individual starting with their wallets. Will that trend continue with the next batch of Spurs’ stars? Kawhi Leonard might make an interesting case study.

Davide Chinellato, NBA Italy: Leonard will likely be the face of the Spurs for at least the next decade, so I think they should give him what he asks, even if that’s a maximum deal. That would send a message to Kawhi that the organization believes a lot in him, that they’re ready to make him their next superstar once Tim Duncan finishes his legendary career. And if your concern is money, don’t forget the salary cap is supposed to increase a lot in the next couple of season. He’s a potential superstar, probably one of the top 3 two-way player in the NBA: you have to believe in him.

Rodrigo Mendez, NBA Mexico: San Antonio has built a philosophy as good as any franchise: spend a little and make a team without superstars. Now San Antonio needs to make a decision, pay an absurd amount for Leonard or not. I am sure that Leonard isn’t the superstar of the future in the NBA — he’s just a different player — and he can bring 25 point each game in the next 10 years, but I don’t know if also Leonard can give them championships. San Antonio must be true its philosophy with which they were winners.

Blogtable: Picking the champions

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Next great international player | Kawhi and the Spurs | Pick a champ


The Spurs (and Tim Duncan, center) celebrate their win in the 2014 NBA Finals. (Noah Graham/NBAE)

The Spurs (and Tim Duncan, center) celebrate their win in the 2014 NBA Finals. (Noah Graham/NBAE)

> Hey, this is simple: Who do you like to win the 2015 NBA Finals and why?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comMy head says San Antonio, because of what they showed us in June, because none of the competition can play a pat hand quite like the Spurs and because that “2007” to “2014” gap in championship banners in their rafters speaks volumes about their ability to at least fend off Father Time. But then I see Manu Ginobili come down – hard – when he gets banged in the lane (and the thigh) against Dallas, and the prospect of San Antonio navigating 82 games without something debilitating looks slim. So … I’m going with the Spurs anyway. Tired of being wrong about them.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comSpurs.  The caveat, of course, is health.  If the Spurs still have all their pieces together and fit in April, they have the chemistry, experience, ability and definitely the know-how.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: The Bulls. I’m counting on Derrick Rose to remain healthy, a risky move when the stakes are as high as a Blogtable prediction. But if he can deliver 70 games in the regular season and still be strong for the playoffs, that’s a team with depth, with defense, with experience, with coaching, with a mental toughness and now with increased scoring thanks to the return of Rose and the additions of Doug McDermott and Nikola Mirotic.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: The basketball gods will see to it that the Clippers sip champagne in June. It’s just to prophetic: Their first season without The Ex-Owner Who Shall Not Be Named, Chris Paul‘s playoff legacy on the line, and Doc Rivers putting it all together. Besides, who wouldn’t want to see how Steve Ballmer plans to celebrate?

Two reasons to like the Clippers: Blake Griffin and Chris Paul (Andrew D. Bernstein/NBAE)

Two reasons to like the Clippers: Blake Griffin and Chris Paul (Andrew D. Bernstein/NBAE)

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: I don’t want to make a prediction based on the possibility of injury, and the Spurs old heads looked just fine in the opener on Tuesday. So I’ll guess that they repeat for the first time, because they’re simply the best team in the league, elite on both ends of the floor. And I’ll guess that they beat Chicago in The Finals, because the Bulls have the edge in both defense and continuity over Cleveland.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: While I’d love to see the Spurs chase history and their first back-to-back titles, I just don’t see how they can possibly make a third straight trip to The Finals. The Clippers are my pick and I think it all starts with Doc Rivers and my belief in the way he develops the culture of his team and the fact that they are loaded. Plus, I want to see some new blood in the championship circle this season. I know the Spurs, Cavaliers, Bulls and Thunder are probably much safer picks at this point. But as I told my main man Clipper Darrell this summer, if Doc could see them through all of the drama of last season, the Clippers would be my pick to win it all this year.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: No contender is hungrier than the Thunder. Kevin Durant will come back healthy, focused and fresh, and his teammates will have improved in his absence. They have three young stars with years of experience, and they’ve suffered enough in the playoffs that they’ll know how to win. This is their time. OKC beats Cleveland in the NBA Finals.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: I love the way the Cavaliers are constructed and think David Blatt will be a natural, but one stat keeps me from buying into the Cavs as a championship team this season: 0. That’s the number of combined career playoff appearances and wins from three of Cleveland’s starters (Kevin Love, Kyrie Irving, Dion Waiters). I don’t think that inexperience will keep them from making a splash in the postseason, but I do think experience matters, and I don’t know that these Cavaliers can overcome that in their first season together. That said, I will admit that I’ve learned my lesson, and instead of going trendy or flashy, I’m going smart: I’m taking the defending champs, the San Antonio Spurs. They brought almost everyone back from last year’s team, and in the Finals seemed to discover a transcendent level of basketball. They may chase that for a while this year but they know it’s out there.

Davide Chinellato, NBA Italy: I’d like to see the Spurs do what they haven’t done so far: win back-to-back championships. This is likely Tim Duncan‘s and Manu Ginobili‘s final season, so I’d love to see them retire with one more ring. Winning back-to-back rings will add more fashion to the Spurs’ legend. And finally, as Italian, I’d like to see Marco Belinelli get another ring and Ettore Messina start (for real) his NBA career helping Pop win another ring.

Guillermo Garcia, NBA Mexico: San Antonio, because it has the best coach in the league, because it dominates a system and has the same team from the previous year that brought them the title.

After jewel of season, Spurs get rings


VIDEO: Spurs receive their championship rings before their season opener

SAN ANTONIO — Even the fifth time around, it never gets old.

Tim Duncan beamed with glee and practically skipped out to midcourt to be greeted by NBA commissioner Adam Silver. Manu Ginobili grinned as a roar of approval washed over him. Tony Parker bounced up and down like a newly-inflated ball. Even cantankerous coach Gregg Popovich received his 2014 championship ring and pumped his first as he ran down the line of his assistants.

The Spurs returned to the AT&T Center on Tuesday night to collect their gaudy jewelry, to see the championship banner unveiled at the rafters and then to embark on the next chapter.

“Man, that’s awesome,” Parker told the jubilant crowd. “That’s the best. It’s been an unbelievable year, great memories and now we get a shot at having another one.”

NBA TV Champions Day to celebrate Spurs


VIDEO: Champions Day for the San Antonio Spurs will take place Oct. 27 on NBA TV

They were hurt. They were bruised. They were wounded. But the San Antonio Spurs turned the agony of their lowest moment of letting the 2013 title slip away turn into a force that drove them to the 2014 NBA championship.

Manu Ginobili: “I remember the looks on our faces. We were devastated.”

Tony Parker: “I never felt so sad in basketball.”

Tim Duncan: “The worst loss ever.”

Those candid comments and more are part of a day-long celebration of Champions Day on NBA TV Monday that will look back at the 2014 Spurs.

The network will premiere three original programs — “Champions Revealed: 2014 San Antonio Spurs“, “Open Court: NBA Champions Edition” and “2014 San Antonio Spurs: Go Spurs Go”along with re-airs of past NBA Finals performances and season reviews from the Spurs’ five title-winning seasons.

“Go Spurs Go” will air at 8 p.m. ET, “Champions Revealed” at 9 ET and “Open Court: Champions Edition” at 10 ET.

In “Champions Revealed”, Duncan, Parker, Ginobili and coach Gregg Popovich hold a sometimes-funny, often-informative and always-brutally honest conversation about their long journey of discovery about each other that has produced a bond in the locker room and more than a decade of excellence on the court.

Popovich on the beginning of the Duncan Era in San Antonio: “(Tim Duncan) came to training camp and David Robinson watched him play and about the second practice the whole offense changed. David was now in the dunker spot and Timmy was on the block catching the ball and David never even said a word … You know this new kid comes in and all of a sudden David’s not getting all of his touches … I never said, ‘David this is the way it’s going to be.’ We just did what we did and he knew it right off the bat and he loved it. Timmy just grew and grew from there, unbelievable.”

Duncan to Parker: “How many times have we gotten yelled at for something (Ginobili) has done? We’re sitting there on the bench and (Popovich) yells: ‘Did you see what he just did? He’s your teammate. Go talk to him.’ ”

Parker to Ginobili and Popovich: “I wasn’t sure if it was going to work out between you two.”

Popovich: “One day I just asked him: ‘What are you doing?’ and he said, ‘I am Manu. This is what I do.’ So I started letting him just do it.”

Duncan on Parker’s arrival as a 19-year-old point guard under the demands of Popovich: “It was brutal. I felt bad. I had never seen anyone get yelled at as much as you.”

Parker: “It made me a better player.”

Popovich: “I’ve got the easiest job in the NBA because you guys allow it to be said the way it should be said.”

During the hour-long show, the highlights from the early days when Duncan and Ginobili both had more hair (and all had less experience together) show the four principal figures growing on the court as All-Star players. From there, they’d grow into a unit that could somehow overcome the hurt of the Game 6 collapse in the 2013 Finals loss to Miami.

Popovich: “It wasn’t the basketball gods. It was in our control and we didn’t get it done.”

They talked openly about reliving that defeat by watching the video on the first day of training camp last season. Manu said that he could see almost from the start the Spurs’ redoubled commitment to playing as a team.

Ginobili:  “I start on the bench so I get to see what’s going on more and there were some plays…where it was like boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, wow, or those passes from Tony to a wing to Boris (Diaw) to (Tim) or an extra pass to the corner, it was fun … I said, ‘This is nice. We are playing at a really high level and if we could understand that this is the way to go on a daily basis it can be so special.’ ”

The entire show is like a peek into a private living room where the family members have finally let their guard down in the aftermath of their redemption.

Ginobili: “I felt like something that was stuck inside all of last year had healed.”

Parker: “Perspective…this is my favorite.”

Duncan: “Not bad for a bunch of old guys.”

Amen to that.

Earlier on Monday, NBA TV will re-air season in review shows from the Spurs’ previous four championship seasons starting at 9 am ET, followed by encore airings of Games 1, 3, 4 and 5 of the 2014 NBA Finals, beginning at 2 pm ET.

 

Blogtable: The NBA’s best backcourt

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Darkhorse MVP | Best backcourt | Speeding up the game


Stephen Curry (left) and Klay Thompson enjoy a taste of gold medal at the FIBA World Cup. (Garrett Ellwood/NBAE)

Stephen Curry (left) and Klay Thompson enjoy a taste of gold medal at the FIBA World Cup. (Garrett Ellwood/NBAE)

> Lots of talk this preseason, little resolution: So, which team has the best backcourt in the NBA (when everybody’s healthy)?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: Since you didn’t specify “starting” backcourt, I’m going with the team entry and saying the San Antonio Spurs. They’re the only defending-champion backcourt in the entire NBA. (That said, I’d love to hear Lance Stephenson answer this in an unguarded moment about himself and Kemba Walker. Would anticipate bravado and entertainment.)

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: If they’re healthy and it’s June, I want Parker and Ginobili. Over the full 82 games, give me the dynamic talent, youth and sheer brashness of Curry and Thompson.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: It’s really hard not to designate Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson for this distinction, but there’s a good reason why Suns management and ownership caved and paid Eric Bledsoe all that money, right? The Bledsoe-Goran Dragic combo is my pick, just a couple of hard-nosed, hustling, penetrating, 3-point shooting, defensive-minded point guards sharing the same backcourt. In the 38 games they played together (Bledsoe missed 39 games with a knee injury), they had a 108.4 offensive rating (points per 100 possessions) and 97.4 defensive rating, plus a True Shooting percentage of 55.7.

Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili (Jesse D. Garrabrant/NBAE)

Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili
(Jesse D. Garrabrant/NBAE)

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comGolden State over (in no particular order) Washington, Toronto and Phoenix. That’s if you’re asking about starters. If that qualifier is off, Tony Parker-Manu Ginobili should be in any conversation that has to do with best tandems, and not just in the backcourt. The Warriors get the edge because not only are Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson electric scorers, but Thompson is the kind of defender that can check multiple positions and Curry has improved as a distributor to where he is dangerous with the pass as well.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: I’ll take Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson. Curry is one of the two or three toughest matchups in the league, as one of the best shooters in the world, with the ball in his hands all the time. Thompson is another great shooter and a solid wing defender. But there are a ton of other backcourts — Brooklyn (if you count Joe Johnson as a two), Chicago, the Clippers, Phoenix, Portland, San Antonio, Toronto and Washington — who you could consider if you’re putting together a top-five list.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Everyone wants to claim top honors, even backcourts that have yet to play regular season minutes together. All things being equal and with each group at their best, I don’t know you could be more explosive and more dynamic than the group the Golden State Warriors can throw at you. Steph Curry and Klay Thompson are two of the best shooters/scorers in the game. Adding a wild card like Shaun Livingston to this already potent mix (which also includes swingman Andre Iguodala) makes this the most dynamic crew in the game, in my opinion.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: There are three pairs of players that to me jump out as being above the rest, and I mean that in terms of their offense and their defense. in no particular order: Golden State (Curry and Thompson); Toronto (Lowry and DeRozan); Washington (Wall and Beal). If I had to pick one from that trio of duos, I’d probably go with Curry and Thompson, even though Curry’s defense can lapse below average. But I think Wall and Beal aren’t far behind them, and have the advantage of youth on their side.

Stefanos Triantafyllos, NBA Greece: Love the question! Reminds me of my NBA Jam years. Boomshakalaka! The best NBA back-court is the “Spash Brothers”, Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson. The make a great duo, they play excellent together (in Golden State, in Team USA) and they make a deadly one-two punch from beyond the arc.

Abraham Romero, NBA Spain: The Warrriors with the ‘Splash Brothers’ Curry and Thompson are in the top right now. More points than any backcourt in the last regular season.

Davide Chinellato, NBA Italy: Easy W for Golden State here. The Splash Brothers are too good together to be compared to other backcourts: high shooting and passing skills, very high basketball IQ, they can win the games by themselves or play with their teammates. I think the Wizards’ Wall-Beal backcourt can have a chance to get close to the Splash Brother this year, but they both have to improve their respective overall game.

Simon Legg, NBA Australia: The Splash Brothers! They scored more points per game than any other backcourt, had the best 3-point percentage and outscored their opponents by 11 points per 100 possessions when they were both on the floor. They can also exploit opponents in a number of ways. Curry may be the best shooter in the game and can hit all types of whacky shots off-the-dribble, his passing game seems to improve all the time and when he gets strong defensive coverage, he dishes it off to Klay. Thompson shot 41.7 percent from deep on 535 attempts and have improved as a perimeter defender, making up for some of Steph’s defensive lapses. Klay’s offensive game has expanded as well, including post-ups, slashing and even handling and penetrating. I just wish he’d pass more!

Akshay Manwani, NBA India: I don’t see any reason why we should look at anyone else other than Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson for the Golden State Warriors. Former head coach Mark Jackson already anointed them the greatest backcourt ever.  Those two guys played a big part in Team USA’s win at the 2014 FIBA World Cup in the offseason as well. The ‘Splash brothers’ can light up at any time, turning an entire ballgame on its head.

Takuma Oikawa, NBA Japan: Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson of the Warriors. Their shooting skill is one of the most dangerous in the league. They can shoot from every area on the court and make clutch shot.  Curry can handle the ball and Thompson can defend. Additionally, they can pass. If they played a 2-on-2 tournament, I think they’d beat all other teams.

Morning Shootaround — Oct. 11


VIDEO: LeBron touches on Heat-Cavs in Rio and comments from Wade, Bosh

NEWS OF THE MORNING
LeBron surprised by Heat talk | Parker: “I’m still hungry” | League plans aggressive marketing campaign | Ray Allen isn’t a lock for Cavs?

No. 1: LeBron caught off guard by former teammates’ comments — The Big Three that won two titles and played in four consecutive NBA Finals doesn’t seem so chummy anymore. Remaining Heat players Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh have had some interesting things to say about what it’s like to play with the King while the Heat and Cavaliers are both in Brazil and will play an exhibition game Saturday. Apparently LeBron James has been surprised by their words. Jason Lloyd of the Akron Beacon-Journal has the story:

RIO DE JANEIRO: Maybe it shouldn’t be such a surprise to LeBron James that his former Heat teammates are upset at his departure. After all, he went through this the first time he left a team.

When James bolted the Cavs for Miami in 2010, Daniel Gibson and Mo Williams were two of the most hurt and outspoken about it. Gibson implied his friendship with James was over, and Williams appeared in front of the media before James’ initial return game to Cleveland wearing a Boston Red Sox jacket — the one and only time he wore a Sox jacket in all his years in Cleveland. Even those within the Cavs organization took it as a subtle jab at James, who is a big Yankees fan.

Now that James has spurned his Heat teammates to return to Cleveland, the bitterness has shifted to the other side. James said Friday he was caught by surprise by some of the comments from Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh in recent days.
“I know a lot of words have been coming out of their camp as of late, and some of it is surprising,” James said Friday prior to the Cavs’ practice at Flamengo Club. “We’ve got so much history together.”

The three stars guided the Heat to four consecutive Finals appearances and two championships. But Wade recently said last season wasn’t much fun and Bosh earlier this week said he hasn’t spoken to James since he left and he doesn’t have time for guys who aren’t on his team.

Bosh has since clarified those comments, but he also told Bleacher Report this week that Kevin Love will have to make a huge adjustment playing alongside James.

“It’s going to be very difficult for him,” Bosh said of Love. “Even if I was in his corner and I was able to tell him what to expect and what to do, it still doesn’t make any difference. You still have to go through things, you still have to figure out things on your own. It’s extremely difficult and extremely frustrating. He’s going to have to deal with that.”

Bosh explained how dramatically he had to change his game to adapt to playing alongside James, essentially cutting out his inside game to leave room for James and Wade to operate.

“It’s a lot more difficult taking a step back, because you’re used to doing something a certain way and getting looks a certain way,” Bosh said. “And then it’s like, ‘Well no, for the benefit of the team, you have to get it here.’ So even if you do like the left block, the volume of the left bock is going to be different.”

There is merit to Bosh’s claims. He sacrificed the most of his game during the Heat’s Big Three era. But losing James clearly cripples the Heat’s odds at another deep playoff run, which could easily explain any lingering frustration among those teammates left behind.

By tipoff Saturday night, the Cavs and Heat will have spent more than 100 hours together in Rio, yet neither James nor the Heat players made any effort to see each other off the court this week.

While a handful of Cavs players joined a few Heat players on Thursday for a joint NBA Cares project, James was not one of them. Friday’s schedule provided a huge window between practices, so the Heat (which cut practice early) were long gone before the Cavs arrived at Flamengo Club.

“We don’t dislike each other or anything like that, it’s nothing like that,” Bosh said Friday. “On the court, he’s about the Cavs, we’re about the Heat. That’s where it ends.”

***

No. 2: Tony Parker isn’t satisfied yet — In a wide-ranging interview with Yahoo! France, Spurs point guard and four-time NBA champion Tony Parker talks about becoming a father and getting married, says he feels great physically and that it feels like he’s living a dream. Pounding The Rock delivers the translation of the French interview:

Question: You’re a father now, how has it changed your life ?

Tony: It changes your priorities so you don’t look at your life the same way. I’m very proud that he’s [Josh Parker] here and I hope that we’ll help him to grow up and be a good person.

Question: Do you take part in the parental tasks?

Tony: Yeah, sure. I am a father who’s involved in all the tasks. I like to help with the diapers, all of that… I like to be aware of what’s going on.

Question: You also got married. Is this important for you?

Tony: I think it is important for your balance. I’ve always been well supported. There’s always support behind every top sportsman from their family and friends…You can’t succeed all alone. I have always been very close to my family and it’s been important for me to have my parents and my brothers by my side throughout my career.

Question: How can you stay a bit French, which we’re proud of, considering that you’re more and more American?

Tony: I regularly come back to France to play with the national team, to work with my sponsors, or to help with my foundation. I’m also an ambassador for the Make-a-Wish Foundation. I host my basketball camps in Fécamp, Normandy, which is the place where I started to play basketball. I always have a foot here.

Question: You’ve become a symbol of success in France. How do you handle that?

Tony: I always try to be a good representative of my country in the United States. You know, I left when I was a very ambitious 19 year old with “The American Dream.” I’ve always been a big dreamer. I’ve always had an entrepreneur-like approach and I wanted to succeed both on and off the court. I wanted to be an ambassador for French basketball.

My idol growing up was Michael Jordan. He was the perfect example for succeeding on and off the court. So at my level – of course I’m not going to compare myself to MJ – I want to do the same for French basketball.

Question: What is the reason for your success? Work?

Tony: I don’t want to sound too cliche, but yes, you’ve got to work hard. You have to be disciplined, take care of your body and watch what you eat. All of the things that you’re told about when you’re trying to become a pro athlete, all of that is true. There are many guys who are very talented but not disciplined enough. Partying too often is an example. There are many little things that can make the difference between a good career and a great career.

Question: At 32, sports wise, where do you think you are? At the top?

Tony: I feel really good physically. I don’t feel like I’m getting old or like I’m slowing down. I’m still hungry, even though I have won everything in my career. I want to continue to be challenged, and with the Spurs, we’ve got a great challenge now: try to repeat, which we have never done.

With Team France, there’s the Eurobasket 2015 tournament and getting to play it in your home country is huge. Defending the title is not going to be easy. And then, there’s an Olympic medal. For me, the perfect ending would be to win the European championship in France in 2015 and meet the US in the Olympic finals in 2016. That would be great.

Question: Do you feel like you’re still improving, or like you have reached your apex?

Tony: I feel like I reached the apex. Basketball players are commonly thought to have their best years between 28 and 32. Because you have the experience but you’re still strong and fast. So I think I reached the apex. Then, you can always try to improve, to become a better shooter, a better defender.

Question: Frankly, when you think about it… Four NBA titles [is quite an achievement]

Tony: I can hardly believe it. Sometimes I must pinch myself because I feel like I’m living a dream. When I see the names I have surpassed on the various lists – best scorers, best passers…and all of the things I’ve accomplished with Tim, Manu and Popovich…It feels odd.

***

No. 3: Following new TV deal, NBA targets casual fans — The league’s new chief marketing officer says it is increasing the marketing budget and planning to be more aggressive with its marketing to attract a larger fan base. The NBA debuts its new season-long campaign, “Everybody Up” tonight. E.J. Schultz of Ad Age has the inside look:

The National Basketball Association, which recently inked a lucrative media rights deal, will increase its marketing budget as it looks to lure more casual fans, according to the league’s new chief marketing officer.

Some of the new spending will back the league’s season-long campaign, which debuts Saturday and will run on a broader set of networks than in years past, said CMO Pam El, who joined the NBA in August after stints at insurance companies State Farm and Nationwide.

“We are going to be much more aggressive with our marketing. We want to go after a larger fan base,” she said in an interview.

While she declined to reveal spending figures, she said the new campaign, called “Everybody Up,” will run on news and entertainment networks such as BET, CNN, TBS and VH1 “just to name a few.”

The first ad of the campaign (above) is called “Roll Call” and will first air on Saturday during the Miami Heat vs. Cleveland Cavaliers preseason game that will be played in Rio de Janeiro and air on ESPNews. The ad is by Goodby Silverstein & Partners and features narration by hip hop artist Common.

Previously, the league had mostly confined its early-season campaign to ESPN and TNT, which both carry NBA games, Ms. El said. The league will still air ads on the two networks, but “we are going to branch outside of that media to reach not only the avid fan, but also our casual fan,” she said.

***

No. 4: Ray Allen’s still in no hurry to sign — While many assume Ray Allen will play this season and like do so with LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers, Boston Celtics general manager Danny Ainge isn’t so convinced. A. Sherrod Blakely of Comcast Sportsnet has more:

BOSTON — You can count Danny Ainge among those not convinced that Ray Allen will sign with the Cleveland Cavaliers … at least not right now.

“Ray can really help them, but I anticipate that Ray will wait and see the landscape of the NBA,” Ainge, the Boston Celtics’ president of basketball operations, said during his weekly call-in to 98.5 the Sports Hub. “I just think he might wait and see how everybody’s clicking. There’s a handful of teams that would love to have Ray on their team right now that are trying to win a championship.”

In addition to the Cavaliers, Chicago, Oklahoma City and defending champs San Antonio are among the teams that have reportedly expressed interest in bringing in the former Celtic who has won NBA titles in Boston (2008) and Miami (2013).

“He may wait until All-Star break or January,” Ainge said. “And just see what teams are playing well, which teams are the healthiest and which team that he thinks that he might fit in, just in the style of play. With new coaches at some different places, he may just want to see how it unfolds before he makes a decision.”

Ainge, who won a pair of NBA titles (1984, 1986) with the Celtics, said he has no issue with veteran players choosing to latch on with clubs that they believe are title contenders.

“The rules sort of indicate that’s what you can do,” Ainge said. “Ray’s probably, if he goes to one of the contending teams he’ll be making minimum salary. He’s been a max player a couple times in his career. That’s his right, to try and win a championship. It’s just the way the collective bargaining agreement is structured. It’s different than how it was structured back in the ’80s and ’90s. I don’t blame a player like Ray, right now, for wanting to find a perfect fit for him as he finishes his career.”

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Thunder’s Reggie Jackson left Friday’s game with a wrist injury … Ankle injury will sideline Cavaliers point guard Kyrie Irving for tonight’s preseason game against Miami in Brazil … Under new TV deal could salary cap reach $100 million? … LeBron still the one most GMs want to start a team … Lakers weren’t good enough to attract Carmelo Anthony … Mavericks guard Raymond Felton left Friday’s game with a sprained right ankle … Spurs forward Boris Diaw can earn an extra $500,000 my maintaining his weight throughout the season … Kevin Durant isn’t interested in giving up guaranteed money as a trade-off to do away with max contracts.

Joseph gets another chance to prove his point for Spurs


VIDEO: Relive Cory Joseph’s highlights from 2013-14

Cory Joseph spent much of his first two NBA seasons wearing out a path along I-35 in south Texas. He’d been drafted by the Spurs in 2011, but got most of his playing time in the NBA D-League with the Austin Toros.

Last season in the Spurs march to the championship Joseph was part of the band, but stayed mostly in the rhythm section as Patty Mills stepped into the spotlight with his Finals play.

Now with Mills on the shelf through at least the first half of the season following shoulder surgery, the 23-year-old Joseph will enter the season as the clear backup to Tony Parker at point guard.

“Every time I go out on the court, I look at it as an opportunity,” said Joseph, a 23-year-old Texas-ex entering his fourth NBA season. “All I can do is prepare the best I can for when game time comes.”

The truth is Joseph gets the job almost by default. There’s only one other point guard to training camp and, in order to keep the rookie Bryce Cotton, the Spurs would have to cut one of the 15 guaranteed contracts already on the roster.

“He’s done well in that role in the past, so I look forward to him doing that again,” said Spurs coach Gregg Popovich.

While he played in 68 games last season — averaging 5.0 points, 1.7 assists and 13.8 minutes per game — Joseph’s time diminished during the playoff run (right as Mills’ star was rising against the Miami Heat in The Finals).

The Spurs feel comfortable with Joseph as the only pure backup point because they also have Manu Ginobili to be the ball handler/director of the offense with the second unit.

In February 2013, when Parker was injured, Joseph became the Spurs’ starting point guard. In his first five starts, averaged 8.8 points and 2.6 assists while shooting 58.6 percent.

“I feel comfortable now on the team and in the offense and the system and I’ll play any role and do whatever they ask of me,” Joseph said. “I’m not looking at it like ‘this is my big chance.’ It’s always your chance every day you come to practice and show that you are capable of doing your job. That’s what you want to do — prove to the coach that he can trust you.”

With his aging core of Tim Duncan, Ginobili and Parker, no coach in the league relies on his bench more than Popovich. He kept so tight a rein on minutes last season that the Spurs became the first team in NBA history to not have a single player average 30 minutes per game. That makes those backup roles even more critical.

Joseph spent the summer working his shot and his overall game, knowing that he’d be needed to do more. The opportunity comes at a time when Joseph — like Finals MVP Kawhi Leonard – is eligible for a contract extension by the Oct. 31 deadline. If he is not signed to a new deal by then, he’ll become a restricted free agent next summer.

“I have an agent and that’s his job,” Joseph said.

Joseph claims won’t even won’t be the least bit distracted by what could happen.

“I don’t think about that stuff,” he said. “I just play.”

This is his chance.

Thunder happy to have fresh KD


VIDEO: Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook talk about coming into the season well-rested

OKLAHOMA CITY – Kevin Durant turned 26 on Monday. Not exactly old age, but he’s also no longer the kid leader of the 25-and-under Oklahoma City Thunder fun bunch climbing the rungs of the NBA ladder.

He is on the climb to 30 now and things have become a bit more serious as titles have become more elusive. Human frailty has twice sabotaged potential championship runs in successive seasons and Durant’s upcoming eighth season in the league — and who knows, perhaps his penultimate season in OKC — presents another excellent opportunity to finish first. So with age comes a sharpened perspective, a narrowing of time and thus, a wisdom to make different decisions than one might have made previously.

Durant made one such decision in early August and not everybody appreciated it. After committing to play for Team USA and participating in its July training camp in Las Vegas, Durant exited it conflicted. He wanted to uphold his commitment, but his fatigued body was pushing him the other way and his head was telling him training camps would open two short weeks after the six-week World Cup odyssey with Team USA.

“He had actually texted me before he actually made it public that he was going to take a step back from it,” Thunder teammate Kendrick Perkins, a Durant confidant, said Monday. “He asked me what I thought about it. I said it’s what’s best for you. KD did a lot. He carried the load when Russell [Westbrook] was out, he was averaging a lot of minutes, played a lot of time on the court. Going through the season he kept it going to win his MVP and he played at a high level. And we’ve been playing damn near to June every year since I’ve been here. So it’s well-deserved.”

Durant’s decision to leave Team USA three weeks before the start of the FIBA World Cup in Spain came as a surprise to everybody, including chairman Jerry Colangelo and coach Mike Krzyzewski. Durant had made a well-intentioned commitment to play even when many of the NBA’s other superstars had not. The 2010 world championship MVP and 2012 Olympic gold medalist put his employer and Thunder teammates ahead of country this one time. He’s been clear he plans to play for Team USA in Brazil 1n 2016.

Yet when Durant offered a well-reasoned explanation for leaving the team on short notice, some called him a quitter, suggested he was being selfish during a summer in which he reaped millions in endorsement deals and said he unfairly left the team in a lurch. The next day, Rudy Gay happily accepted an invitation to replace Durant and the U.S. cruised undefeated to another gold medal, without even having to face Durant’s Thunder teammate Serge Ibaka and might Spain, thought to be Team USA’s toughest foe.  The Americans won their semifinal and championship games by a combined 65 points.

If only they had KD.

“I think it was more so that I didn’t want to be in full-season mode in August or July,” Durant said during the Thunder’s media day on Monday when asked about his decision not to play. “I just wanted that time to just free my body and my mind of it all and just go out there and workout and work on my game and just enjoy the rest of the summer. Because I know how long the season is, and I just wanted to be fully prepared for that.”

Durant has led the Thunder to at least the Western Conference finals in three of the last four years. No player logged more minutes than he did last season and his workload over the last five seasons is beyond reproach.

“I’d rather have a guy tell the powers-to-be, ‘you know what, I can’t give you my 100 precent effort both mentally and physically,’ because if you don’t you’re not going to help your team,” Thunder coach Scott Brooks said. “I have a lot of respect for Kevin stepping up. That was not an easy decision, but he stepped up and said, ‘I wasn’t mentally and physically ready to compete with the 12 guys we had.’ He played a lot of basketball. He’s entitled to have a summer off, right?”

Westbrook also pulled out of Team USA to properly rest a right knee that had been operated on three times in the span of eight months and sidelined him for half of last season. Both players had as restful a summer as they’ve had in years. Ibaka is back at full strength from the calf injury that forced him out of the first two games of the West finals against the Spurs. There is a lot of optimism entering camp that OKC is equipped to get back to the NBA Finals.

“I was glad to see him make a decision he felt like he needed to do,” said Nick Collison, Durant’s teammate since his rookie season in Seattle. “He felt that he needed to step away and I was glad he was able to make that decision because I know that was a tough decision. So, yeah, for our team, for us, I think it’s a positive that those guys [Durant and Westbrook] are coming in fresh.”