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Posts Tagged ‘Tom Thibodeau’

Timberwolves still awaiting word on Kevin Garnett’s plans for 2016-17

With training camp less than three weeks away and their first preseason game set for Oct. 8, the Minnesota Timberwolves still are waiting to hear from veteran forward Kevin Garnett on his decision to play in 2016-17 or to retire.

“Kevin hasn’t told me or informed me yet if he’s coming back to play or if he isn’t coming back,” Wolves owner Glen Taylor told Thursday. “I can only assume I’ll be hearing from him in the next three weeks.”

Garnett, whose contact not just with media but also Wolves management is limited in the offseason, is under contract for $8 million to play this season. From that standpoint, no news is good news — or at least status quo. If Garnett does play, it would be his 22nd NBA season.

Garnett — the only player in NBA history with at least 25,000 points, 10,000 rebounds, 5,000 assists, 1,500 steals and 1,500 blocks — played in only 38 games last season due to chronic knee pain, averaging 3.2 points, 3.9 rebounds, 1.6 assists and 14.6 minutes. His career numbers: 17.8 ppg, 10.0 rpg, 3.7 apg and 34.5 mpg.

Tom Thibodeau, the Wolves’ new coach and president of basketball operations, told Wednesday at the coaches meetings in Chicago that discussions on Garnett’s status still are between Taylor and the player.

Morning shootaround — Sept. 8


Riley: ‘We move on’ from Wade | How Magic nearly flubbed drafting Shaq in ’92 | Towns on Wolves: ‘We’ve got to make the playoffs’

No. 1: Riley has ‘no regrets’ as 2016-17 season nears — The Miami Heat have retooled their roster this summer and as part of it, watched as franchise icon Dwyane Wade left in free agency to sign with the Chicago Bulls. Team president Pat Riley knows a new era is afoot in Miami and acknowledged as much in an interview with the Palm Beach Post‘s Tom D’Anglelo:

Heat president Pat Riley is looking forward to Sept. 27, the start of yet another era in his 22 years with the Heat. While the expectations have been lowered, that does not mean Riley and the organization will approach this year any differently.

“No apologies, no regrets – except for one – no tears,” Riley told me today, obviously referring to losing franchise icon Dwyane Wade to the Chicago Bulls. “Good luck. We move on. Players come and go, but franchises move on.”

The reason for our conversation was to speak about Shaquille O’Neal’s induction into the basketball Hall of Fame on Friday. Riley took the time to speak from San Tropez where he and Heat owner Micky Arison are on a five-day journey through the Mediterranean to celebrate the 25th wedding anniversary of Magic and Cookie Johnson. (More in this below)

Riley, 71, does not sound like a man ready to cruise into retirement. He clearly is looking at ways to rebuild this team into one that can one day compete for the organization’s fourth title.

The Heat have been remade since losing Wade, Luol Deng and Joe Johnson among others. They are a mix of young athletic players with fewer veterans than Heat teams of recent years.

“I’m excited for our new guys,” he said before already talking about the next move. “Maybe we make a deal or catch lightening in a bottle again next summer (in free agency) like we did in 2010.”



Morning shootaround — Sept. 7


Rivers says Pierce still unsure about playing | Mitchell sounds off about dismissal | Gordon, Magic expecting playoffs in 2016-17

No. 1: Rivers says Pierce still unsure about 2016-17 — The last news we heard about Paul Pierce was that the 38-year-old former Finals MVP was leaning toward returning to the LA Clippers for what would be his 19th overall NBA campaign. Clippers coach Doc Rivers, who was speaking at a fundraiser for the ABCD Camp in Boston, told reporters he remains unsure if Pierce will play for LA next season.’s Chris Forsberg has more:

“Depends on the day I talk to him. Paul has had the summer, he’s gone back and forth,” Rivers said while back in Boston to host the annual ABCD Hoops Dream fundraiser at TD Garden. “I think he has a right to do that. I really do.

“Paul didn’t have the best year last year. I don’t think he wants to go out that way. So I think that’s why he’s working to try to come back. But he still may change his mind next week. So we just have to wait. I told him if I see him at training camp, I’m assuming he’s playing.”

Rivers plans to talk with Pierce again this week but does not expect an answer until training camp draws closer.

Rivers said he would be brutally honest with Pierce if he didn’t think Pierce was capable of helping the Clippers next season.

“If I don’t think they can play, then I tell them that. But I think Paul can play,” Rivers said. “I don’t know how much he’ll play, but he can play. I’ve always thought it’s easy for someone else to tell you to retire; I think that’s something that the player has to come to by himself.”

Rivers reaffirmed that, should Pierce choose to retire, he’ll encourage him to sign a one-day contract with the Boston Celtics in order to retire as a member of the Celtics organization.

“I think it’s important. I think we have to do that. And I think we will,” Rivers said. “[Celtics president of basketball operations] Danny [Ainge] and [assistant general manager] Mike [Zarren], we’ve already talked.

“The day [Pierce] retires, he’s going to retire a Celtic. He has to. Paul’s a Celtic. So when he retires, he’s got to retire as a Celtic. I don’t think anyone disagrees with me.”

Rivers talked with Ray Allen this summer but wouldn’t tip his hand on whether he thought Allen would resume his NBA career after sitting out the past two seasons.

“I don’t know. I won’t talk about what we talked about. I think if Ray was in the right spot, he may play,” said Rivers. “I think Ray wants to golf a lot too, right now. But Ray is in amazing shape. I don’t know how he does that. I didn’t know how he does that as a player; I don’t know how he does it as a non-player. He’s probably in top-5 shape in the NBA. So could Ray play? Absolutely, I believe he could.”

Rivers sounded most confident that Kevin Garnett would continue his playing career, even as he aids the rebuilding process with the Minnesota Timberwolves.

“I think Kevin — and I know it, because I talk to him — loves the young guys on his team,” Rivers said. “He loves how they work. He thinks they have an old-school mentality. So I think he’s really gotten into Kevin, the teacher. And I honestly never saw that coming, either. Yet he was a phenomenal teacher with [Boston]; I just didn’t think he would have the patience to do it. And I think Kevin loves teaching these young guys.

“And I think Paul just loves playing. He was the one that I thought would play the longest because the way he plays, and he’s doing it.”



Morning shootaround — Aug. 6


CJ McCollum feels blessed | GM feels Blazers on right track | Colangelo anxious for Team USA

No. 1: CJ McCollum feels blessed — The Portland Trail Blazers are feeling great about themselves after a very uplifting season and CJ McCollum shares that sentiment. Not only is McCollum rapidly rising among the ranks of young guards, he just signed a four-year, $106 million extension this summer, so life is good. Not only is McCollum just touching his prime, he has a great relationship with backcourt mate Damian Lillard and the franchise. Here’s Joe Freeman of the Oregonian getting the goods from McCollum and his new fortune:

“I’m just thankful to be in this position, first and foremost. I want to thank Neil for having that patience and that trust in me. I want to thank Mr. (Paul) Allen for taking a chance on a 6-foot-3 skinny kid from Lehigh University and being patient as I was hurt early on. I was breaking fingers and not consistent with my performance. But I was consistent with my work ethic throughout. But thank you guys.

“I told (my agent) before, I said, ‘Do whatever you have to do to get me to stay here.’ I want to be here. I’ve been looking at houses since my rookie year, kind of picturing myself here for the long-term, so I’m thankful for the opportunity and looking forward to building something special with this young core group of guys we have. I think we’re going to be very good. We have a lot of work ethic, a lot of guys who were unproven, had one year of success and are looking forward to continuing to have success and continuing to kind of building a lasting legacy in the NBA. I think that’s the type of attitude all our players have, starting with Dame, a guy who’s come from a small school, who’s earned everything he’s received and looks forward to continue to build and to continue to win.

After a breakout season and signing this big contract, what will motivate and drive you moving forward?

“The biggest thing is just continuing to strive for greatness. I think that’s kind of my mindset. I want to continue to get better. I know there’s a lot of areas I can improve on, having only played, what, 80 regular season games. This was my first full season of understanding scouting reports, understanding that I’m actually on the scouting report now instead of being the guy, ‘Huh, he’s the backup and he can shoot.’ That’s kind of how the scouting report went for a lot of teams. So understanding now that the role is going to increase, the pressure is going to increase and I look forward to the challenge of continuing to represent my last name to the best of my ability, represent coming from a small school, continuing to try to keep that pipeline open for the next guy that plays like CJ McCollum and might have been undersized or not had a position in college.”

How do you keep underdog attitude now that you’ve signed a $106 million contract?

“That’s a good question. I think it’s how you’re wired. I think the money is circumstantial, it doesn’t change you. A lot of times it changes the people around you, it puts them in better position to succeed. It allows you to buy things you need and want. It allows you to kind of uplift people who need help. But for me, I already have money. I’m already in a good situation. Obviously I don’t have generational wealth. But I’m already in the top 2 percent. Now I move up to the 1 percent. But from the standpoint of basketball, this is what we love to do. We play for free all our lives. And a lot of guys would play for free at this point, just because of what the game means to them. You look at rec centers, you look at old man leagues, they’re playing, barely getting up and down the court. But they love the game. And that’s the kind of passion I have for the game. I told the story about the little kid coming to the game and being able to say he played for the first time and you want to impact his life and you want him to leave the gym saying, ‘Wow, CJ goes hard. He cares about the game. He loves basketball.'”

Can you elaborate on what you like about the team heading into next season?

“I think we have a little bit of everything. You look at the roster, the way we put different pieces together, bringing in Festus (Ezeli), a guy who has championship-level experience defensively, impacts the game right way. Can hedge ball screens. Can do a lot of things we’re not accustomed to. Then you look at (Mason) Plumlee, a big who can handle the ball, can initiate the offense, can kind of serve as our defacto point guard a lot of times in situations where Dame and I were getting trapped. Bringing back (Allen Crabbe) was big, a guy who can knock down shots, defend high-level wings. Bringing in Evan Turner, a versatile wing, who can pass, play-make, play on the ball, and I think he’ll be an improved three-point shooter. So we brought back Moe (Harkless), we brought back Meyers (Leonard), we brought back a lot of young guys who are thirsty, thirsty to get better, thirsty to prove that the success wasn’t a fluke, thirsty to prove they’re worth what they are getting. A lot of guys are looking forward to the challenge of, like Neil said before, exceeding expectations again and continuing to win and build. Because we care about the city, we care about where we come from, we care about what we represent. And I think that’s what you get, guys who are team-first.”

he day you actually signed your contract, did you have flashbacks to growing up and all the work you put into getting here?

“Yeah. My girlfriend kept asking me: ‘Are you happy?’ I was like, ‘I won’t be happy until I sign.’ Laughs. Because you’re programmed to continue to try to get better, to get more, don’t get content. And I just kind of blocked it out. And then when you start reading about it, then you get a little more excited. I did a little dance. Besides that, I just like to work out, I like to get better, I don’t like to get content. So I just try not to think about the money and try to think about the pressure, just because it’s a game I played since I was a kid and I tried to not talk the fun away from it. When you take the fun away from it, it becomes a job. When it’s a job, it feels like you’re forced to go. I’m not forced to go. I enjoy going. I love it. So I was happy about it, we celebrated, we had a nice meal, a little bit of pinot.”

Oregon pinot?

“Yeah. How do you say it: Willamette? Willamette. (Laughs) I’ll get it right eventually. She paid, too.”

Now that you have a contract and longevity here, does that increase your need to be a leader?

“I think from a leadership standpoint, you don’t just, ‘Oh, he got paid, he’s a leader now.’ I think you just have to continue to be who you are. And that’s what I’m going to do. I’m going to be myself. When I see something and I think something should be said, I’m going to say it. Not because I just signed for $100 million, but because I think that’s the right thing to say. I think leaders are born. You develop as a leader; you don’t just appoint somebody. So for me, I just have to continue to build off what I’ve done to this point. When it’s time to lead, I’ll lead. When it’s time to follow, I’ll follow. But there’s not a rule or a saying to where he signed for $75 million, so he’s the third leader. I just go hoop and I’m not afraid to take advice from, say, Luis (Montero), who, no offense, is at the bottom of the depth chart right now. I’ll listen to anyone if it can help me.”

How would you compare your state of mind now to when you were injured and rehabbing your broken foot?

“You just stay paranoid. That’s the biggest thing. because there’s so much can happen. You look at the window of us trading for Arron Afflalo to me going to the bench, to Wes (Matthews) tearing his Achilles. I just try to be thankful and understand that anything can happen at any given time. So just stay paranoid and put your work in, knowing that there’s a guy on our bench, on somebody else’s bench coming up, that’s looking at you as a target, (thinking), ‘I want what he has.’ So I just continue to work and understand that I’ve got to put that same work in as when I was getting DNPs. Now that I’m a starter and established in the league after one year, I have to put that same work in and have that same work ethic. … I have to continue to remember what it felt like when I didn’t play. What it felt like when you show up the arena knowing you’re not going to play. Now that I know I’m going to play, when I get there, I have to have that same mindset and continue to take my game to the next level.”


No. 2: GM feels Blazers are on right track — These are good times in Portland. The two main players are now locked in long-term contracts after McCollum inked his extension this week. The Blazers had a rousing and unexpected run in the playoffs this summer and have a solid and relatively young core with a decent salary cap situation. Much of this is due to general manager Neil Olshey, who helped the team overcome the loss of four starters two summers ago. He recently spoke to Joe Freeman of the Oregonian on the state of the club:

From signing free agents Evan Turner and Festus Ezeli, to retaining restricted free agents Meyers Leonard, Allen Crabbe and Moe Harkless, to rewarding CJ McCollum with a contract extension, Olshey has carefully made the moves necessary to keep Portland among the Western Conference’s most competitive teams.

“Player retention was big this summer,” Olshey explained during a press conference Friday. “We did what we could in terms of free agency, bringing in skill sets more than players – skill sets from the outside. But at the end of the day when you’re the youngest team in the playoffs last year, you made the second round, we had a much better second half of the year than we did the first half, we felt like we were tracking up … it was imperative we keep this group together because we think it has tremendous upside and potential and it’s going to continue to grow.”

What was the advantage of doing this now?

(Laughs) “The advantage is that we now have a five-year commitment from CJ. More than anything, he earned it. One of the things we’re trying to establish here is that we take care of our players. Sometimes being in a market that is somewhat removed geographically from the core of other areas of the league, I think we end up in situation where it’s really important that players know when they come here, they’re treated well. And that’s not just with the resources we’re lucky enough to have because of an owner like Paul Allen and practice facility and travel and coaches and the expertise we have in the training room. But it’s also contractually. We want guys to know that when they come here, when they perform, that when they buy into our culture, that they are valued. And we want to make sure that we keep the guys that want to be here. We’ve talked about that all summer. CJ wanted to be here. When Dame (signed an extension), Dame wanted to be here. That’s why you see the chemistry on the floor. We don’t have mercenaries here. We have guys that choose to be here, buy into Terry’s system, buy into our culture and how we do things. It’s why we’re very selective with the kind of guys we bring in, whether it’s via trade, draft or free agency. Because we do have a culture that we really think is imperative to success. We have one of the youngest teams in the league still. We were the youngest team in the playoffs last summer. We didn’t get any older this year. We need guys that, when they come in, they know that if they do the right things, we’re going to do right by them.

“Also, look, strategically, you want to know you have consistency. We don’t want guys playing in contract years if they don’t have to. I don’t want that hanging over anybody’s head. I want it to be pure and about winning basketball games and competing at the highest level and for the good of the team. We talk about this all the time; we’re a players-first organization. As evidence by things we do for our players. But in turn, the quid pro quo is, they become team-first guys. And I think if you ask Dame and you ask CJ, who are the leaders of this team, we don’t have any non team-first guys in the organization. If we did, they’d be gone. Because that’s the culture we’re building, it’s why we overachieved last year and it’s why we’ll probably overachieve relative to expectations this year.”

Thoughts on what impact signing such a lucrative contract will have on McCollum:

“Just to piggyback on your question about the money with CJ. Just as an organization, we wouldn’t have given this kind of money to anybody we thought was about the money. I think when you look at the guys we have, there wasn’t one ounce of reticence about the amount of money we spent this summer. We’re blessed to have Paul as an owner that wanted to be aggressive, wanted to retain all of our players, wanted to maximize all of our cap room. But they were all guys that we know are going to walk into the gym no different than they did Day 1 as rookies, based on their approach to the game, the substance of their character, the way that they treat the game, the way they treat their teammates, the respect that they have for themselves and the organization. Any player that would be about the money, we wouldn’t be about. So I don’t think CJ is any different — or AC or Meyers or anybody else — other than I think the parking lot in front of building, I don’t know how good my 2012 (Toyota) Highlander is going to look our there this summer. But I have a feeling that the bar might be a little raised. But other than that, I know that our here, with Terry and the coaches, the same level of effort and commitment and respect for the game, is going to continue to exist absent any new contract information.”


No. 3: Colangelo anxious for Team USA — When he began working with Team USA, Jerry Colangelo had a hunch that it would add a satisfying chapter to a basketball career that was mainly rooted in Phoenix with the Suns. He had no idea. And now, with the Olympics ready to begin, Colangelo was feeling fortunate that he found something just as fulfilling as, if not more than, his time as a team executive and franchise part-owner. Colangelo recently spoke with collaborator Dan Bickley of the Arizona Republic on the team as it prepares for Rio:

Never mind the NBA championship ring that has eluded him for nearly 50 years. Basketball has been very good to Jerry Colangelo.

The Valley icon has made sure to return the favor.

He helped launch the Bulls and buy the Suns. His name is on the court at the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. And on the eve of his third Olympic tour as chairman of USA Basketball, Colangelo has restored the glory to Team USA.

With one unintended consequence.

“When we put this whole thing together back in 2006, we had no idea that players were going to connect with each other the way they have,” Colangelo said.

ranslation: The current trend sweeping the NBA, where star free agents are teaming up with other star players, choosing friendships and working conditions over everything else, much to the chagrin of NBA Commissioner Adam Silver?

It all began with Colangelo’s early work with Team USA, when he recruited marquee names to an idea gone stale. He convinced the NBA’s best players to give back to Olympic basketball, to play for zero compensation and forgo their summers.

Most of them had no idea how fun it would be.

I witnessed this phenomenon from behind the scenes in Beijing, where LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Carmelo Anthony talked openly about collaborating in the near future, joining forces with some lucky NBA franchise. They often joked and laughed about the possibilities.

Shortly thereafter, James, Wade and Chris Bosh teamed up to play together in Miami, officially ushering in the age of empowerment in the NBA, where free agents no longer play by the same rules. They don’t feel wedded to the city that drafted them. They don’t feel overwhelming loyalty to a fan base or a cause. They don’t need to climb the highest mountain, carrying a team on their shoulders. They value the collective experience, the path of least resistance.

“The camaraderie was really neat to see, by the way,” Colangelo said. “Don’t assume all the players know each other intimately. They don’t. But when you’re together for a month, you get to really know a person and relationships are formed. And that’s what took place.

“When you look at the economics of pro basketball, the money is so great in terms of salary. The contracts being paid out today are over the top, but that’s what the system allows, and that’s a reflection of how well the league is doing financially. But the reality is, players are not going to be leaving for the money in most cases. Players are looking for what they want in terms of location, where they fit in and where they have the best chance to win.”


SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Jimmy Butler believes his former coach Tom Thibodeau will do just fine in Minnesota  … New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie had some interesting things to say about the NBA’s decision to move the All-Star Game from Charlotte … The debate about the Sixers and their abundance of bigs continues on, and the Philly media just can’t get enough.

Morning shootaround — Aug. 4


Mitchell unsure about KG’s future | Irving ready to seek gold with Krzyzewski | World Peace: ‘I can still play’

No. 1: Mitchell thinks Garnett is still weighing his future — As a player for the Minnesota Timberwolves from 1995-2002, Sam Mitchell was the veteran voice who often guided a young Kevin Garnett during his formative NBA years. When Garnett returned to the Wolves in the 2014-15 season via a trade deadline-day deal, Mitchell was an assistant coach on the team and, following coach Flip Saunders‘ passing before the 2015-16 season, Mitchell was the team’s interm coach. But Mitchell is no longer with the Wolves, having been fired at season’s end as Minnesota hired Tom Thibodeau. In an interview with Sirius XM NBA Radio (transcribed by, Mitchell opened up about his former teammate/player:

Kevin Garnett has been in the NBA for 21 seasons. If he decides to come back for the final year of his contract with the Minnesota Timberwolves in 2016-17, K.G. will have played more seasons than anybody in NBA history. That decision hasn’t been made yet, at least as far as anybody outside of Garnett knows. Sam Mitchell, Garnett’s former teammate and coach believes the way the 2015-16 season ended could possibly lead to Garnett’s retirement, rather than coming back for another season at the age of 40.

Mitchell is referring to the way he was fired as Minnesota’s interim coach and how general manager Milt Newton was pushed aside for the full-time position. They took over their respective interim positions after the passing of Flip Saunders right before the season ended. At the end of a strong finish to the season, Mitchell was informed a couple hours before the last game that he would not be coming back as coach in 2016-17. The Wolves would eventually hire Tom Thibodeau to be the president and coach of the team with Scott Layden helping him in the front office.

“Last time I talked to him, he hadn’t made up his mind. I just think the way last year ended with the owner at the very last minute — and people don’t understand, we all felt pretty good about us. Myself, Milt Newton, and the coaching staff, we all felt pretty good about us coming back. We felt like we did a good enough job to at least earn us a couple of years, a year or two, to keep that thing rolling. And I just think KG was just so hurt by the way things happened.

“For people to send you messages as if you were going to be back and your staff was going to be back and we had everything going in the right direction, and to get a phone call [from owner Glen Taylor] two hours before your last game basically saying, ‘I’ve changed my mind and I’m going in a different direction,’ it just kind of knocked us all for a loop. We’ve all recovered from it and moved on but if you know Kevin, Kevin is very sensitive and he’s very loyal. And there was a lot of people in that organization that was let go, and the way it was done just left a bad taste in a lot of people’s mouth.

“To be honest with you, I don’t know how he’s going to deal with that. Kevin takes that stuff personally and it’s going to be interesting to see ultimately what he decides to do. It’s a shame that if he doesn’t come back and play, that his last year in Minnesota ended the way it did.”


No. 2: Irving looking forward to run for gold with Krzyzewski — Five seasons into his NBA career, Cleveland Cavaliers guard and former Duke standout Kyrie Irving has amassed three All-Star appearance, a Rookie of the Year trophy, an All-Star Game MVP and, roughly two months ago, hit one of the biggest Finals shots ever to give Cleveland its first NBA title. Yet there remains a longing to accomplish a feat he missed out in college — winning a championship with coach Mike Krzyzewski. Kurt Helin of has more on how a quest for gold is driving Irving as the U.S. team heads to Rio:

Kyrie Irving has gone all the way to Rio this summer seeking the culmination of a conversation that started in Irving’s parent’s New Jersey home back in 2009.

That’s when he and Mike Krzyzewski first talked of winning a title together.

“I did win a World Championship with him (in 2014), and this will cement our relationship of finally getting to play for a championship that we envisioned when I was 17 years old and he was recruiting me,” Kyrie Irving said. “I’m glad I have this opportunity with him.”

Seven years ago when that conversation began, Krzyzewski and Irving pictured that title as one in Durham — but the basketball gods were not going to let that happen. Irving played just 11 games at Duke due to a toe injury his freshman year. Rather than return to the Blue Devils, he went on to the NBA where he was the No. 1 pick of the Cleveland Cavaliers in 2011 (the season after LeBron James left them to take his talents to South Beach).

Now, the culmination of that title conversation could come with a gold medal at the Rio Olympics — in Coach K’s final run as the coach of USA Basketball.

“It’s definitely emotional — and I don’t shy away from that at all,” Irving told NBC Sports during a break in the shooting of a Kids Foot Locker commercial in Las Vegas, after a Team USA practice. “The 2014 World Championships was great, but being this is his last hurrah, thinking about the storyline of him and Jerry Colangelo taking over USA Basketball and what they did just to shape American basketball in general, and the honor of playing for USA Basketball.

“We were all reminded when they took over. It was a prestige honor before, but once they came in and built up a culture, it totally changed into a different dynamic. Every generation that is coming up has to come through USA Basketball if you’re, quote/unquote, a top player in the country. I enjoy that it’s now a generational shift. Constantly, constantly, we’re getting kids coming in and playing a part of USA Basketball. I myself played when I was 17 years old going into Duke. I end up going (to college) for one year, then I end up playing on the select team that I’m playing against today (the NBA rookies and young stars that the USA scrimmages against). I get a chance to, every summer, get better with USA basketball.

“That it’s being his last year is definitely an emotional one, but I’m glad I could be part of it.”

Sure, it Coach K’s last run and they feel the pressure to win for him. However, just putting that USA on your chest brings pressure, Irving said — adding that he welcomes it.

“There’s pressure every single year,” Irving said. “I mean American basketball is at the top of everything, we’ve proven that through the World Championships as well as the Olympics, and as well as the NBA — everyone wants to be part of this. So for us it’s not any added pressure — because I don’t know what pressure is — all I know is going out there, going all out, leaving it all on the floor and living with the results after that.”

While the title didn’t change his summer plans for Rio, Irving admitted this summer has been different — being a champion raised his profile.

“Not any other summer in my life have I won an NBA championship, which has been great,” Irving said. “It’s just been awesome because of partnerships I’ve had throughout the years in my career, and now we get to put a lot of great ideas out there, and I get to be part of a lot of great things. I’m just thankful and I’m just trying to take advantage of it, but also do it in a creative space I’m comfortable with.”


No. 3: World Peace: ‘I can still play’ — Los Angeles Lakers forward Metta World Peace is long since removed from his glory days as a top-flight scorer for the Indiana Pacers and Sacramento Kings. His highly regarded defense remains there in flashes, but more or less, World Peace served as a veteran voice and mentor for the young Lakers last season. But even after 16 seasons of the NBA grind, he tells’s Ian Bagley that he can still play at a high level and even average double-figure scoring if given the chance:

Metta World Peace has been in New York City for the past few days playing in summer hoops tournaments, visiting with family, supporting his father’s Artest Foundation and spreading the word about his new clothing line, The Panda’s Friend. We caught up with World Peace and asked about his plans for next season:

Q: What are your plans for next season? Are you headed back to training camp with the Lakers? You’ve talked about a potential future in coaching. Is that on your radar?

A: Right now, I’m life coaching a lot of people that are in the NBA. I can’t say [who]. But I coach a couple players. But it’s not a thing where I’m going to hide and be that perfect mentor. I just give them the best advice I can and live my life accordingly. I’m doing that now and one day I would love to coach. The Lakers are tattooed in my heart. They gave me a second chance when everyone was down on me, they gave me a chance to win a ring. The city of Los Angeles, they put up with me. Because in our world, the world of corporate basketball, you should act accordingly, you know? And I don’t like to act accordingly (smiles). I’m just trying to be authentic. I’m trying, as much as possible, to keep that if I coach one day.

Q: So is the NBA on the back burner right now?

A: No, the NBA’s always on the front burner.

Q: Are you still planning to play next season?

A: Absolutely. The NBA is always on the front burner.

Q: Are you talking with teams right now?

A. I’m waiting for teams. I can still play. I can play, it’s not even a question man. But, you know, sometimes you don’t get in the game, man. What are you going to do? I’m not going to be upset, I’m going to support. So if I don’t play, like this year on the Lakers I could have averaged 15 or 20 on the Lakers if I played, easily. But you know, I’ll be supportive [if I don’t play]. But the only thing that gets me frustrated with the whole basketball is people think I can’t play anymore. So as a man, I take that personally. But at the same time I’m able to still focus on making sure Julius Randle is doing his thing, and he’s focused, making sure I can give back. But when the season’s over, then I like to explain that I can play, and I can bust people’s ass. But the fans have to understand, it’s not up to me. It’s so frustrating to keep hearing it from the fans. ‘Come back to New York, come to Chicago. Why didn’t you play.’ It’s so frustrating at times.


SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Former New York Knicks star Latrell Sprewell says the thing he disliked the most about former Indiana Pacers star Reggie Miller was that ‘he was a flopper’ … Back in the day, Michael Jordan was very, very unhappy when he wasn’t offered a front-office job with the Washington Wizards after he played for them …  Minnesota Timberwolves youngster Andrew Wiggins tried to throw down a 540-degree dunk

Blogtable: Biggest team turnaround with new coach?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Thoughts on away-from-play rules changesBiggest turnaround with new coach?Incoming rookie destined for NBA stardom?

> Which team is poised to have the most dramatic jump in winning percentage next season: Tom Thibodeau’s Timberwolves, Scott Brooks’ Wizards, Luke Walton’s Lakers, Dave Joerger’s Kings, Nate McMillan’s Pacers, David Fizdale’s Grizzlies, Jeff Hornacek’s Knicks, Mike D’Antoni’s Rockets, Frank Vogel’s Magic or Kenny Atkinson’s Nets?

Steve Aschburner, Thibodeau’s Timberwolves will improve the most. No one coaches harder in the 82-game regular season, and Minnesota’s three youngest core players — Karl-Anthony Towns, Andrew Wiggins and Zach LaVine — would naturally take a step or two in their development under almost any coach. Combine that, along with a pretty easy act to top (29 victories in 2015-16) and I’m expected an improvement of 10-15 games.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comThe 17-win Lakers have the most room to work with, but the Lakers are also the farthest away. Frank Vogel’s solid defensive base will make the Magic jump if they can sort out the sudden glut of big men. But I’m making it a two-team race for biggest improvement. The Grizzlies and David Fizzle with a healthy Marc Gasol should go from 42 back to their customary 50-plus level. But I’ll give the nod to Minnesota. All that young talent combined with Thibs’ defensive chops will have the Wolves howling with a possible leap from from 29 to 40+ wins.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comLuke Walton’s Lakers, but in large part because they have the most realistic room to grow. It’s not hard to see L.A. adding 10 wins based on the energy of the coaching change, the experience D’Angelo Russell and (basically) Julius Randle didn’t have last season, the arrival of Luol Deng as a veteran presence and the addition of Brandon Ingram in the Draft. Ten wins is close to a 60-percent jump. A lot of the other options you mention will improve — Minnesota, New York, Orlando — but the Magic, for example, aren’t going to be 60-percent better in the standings. They will have more wins than the Lakers, just not a bigger increase.

Shaun Powell, I’ll say the Lakers only because they were mostly dreadful and won just 17 games. Only one way to go, and if they win 30, which is somewhat realistic, that almost a 50-percent jump. Can’t see anyone else in this group pulling that off (where are the Sixers?) But again, it’s a backhanded compliment to the Lakers, who if nothing else should be exciting to watch even in defeat.

John Schuhmann, The Wolves are going to the playoffs next season. Tom Thibodeau will have them improve at least 10 spots in defensive efficiency, where they ranked 27th last season. The development of their young players — along with, hopefully, Zach LaVine playing a lot more shooting guard than point guard — should have them improved offensively as well. Karl-Anthony Towns is the league’s next star and should do well with his first summer of work after finding out what the league is all about. He could make a huge leap.

Sekou Smith, As entertaining as I believe the Minnesota Timberwolves could be under Tom Thibodeau, I’m going to have to go with Luke Walton’s Lakers. They’ve got as much ground to gain (in percentages and raw numbers) as any team in the league, given their dreadful performance last season and the fresh new look they’ll have under Walton. David Fizdale’s Grizzlies, however, will go into the season as my potential surprise team in the Western Conference (provided they have a healthy roster to work with), where things could shift dramatically with all of the changes that have occurred in free agency.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comThe Timberwolves may reach the playoffs next season because of Thibodeau, who will hasten their development defensively and turn their athleticism into a force. D’Antoni has a history of elevating the value of his players and the Rockets appear to be in the mood to rally around him after embarrassing themselves last year.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blogI don’t know if there is a “most dramatic” winner out there. Scanning past those names, I don’t see any one team that immediately jumps out at me and looks like sudden a title contender. If I had to pick one, I’d pick a team in the East, where improvement may be easier to come by, and say either the Knicks (if they are healthy, which is a gigantic if) or maybe Frank Vogel’s Magic show in Orlando.

Report: Bulls deal Rose to Knicks

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The Derrick Rose era has come to an end in Chicago.

Rose is the centerpiece of a trade that would send him from his hometown to the New York Knicks, according to a report from the Chicago Tribune, where he would team up with Carmelo Anthony and Kristaps Porzingis under new coach Jeff Hornacek.

The Bulls would also send Justin Holiday and a 2017 second round Draft pick to the Knicks in exchange for Robin Lopez, Jerian Grant and Jose Calderon.

This is the latest and boldest move from Knicks boss Phil Jackson, who is trying to push the Knicks back into the playoff mix in the Eastern Conference.

Rose was once ticketed as the star who would lead the Bulls back to championship glory, only to see his career derailed by knee injuries after he became the youngest MVP in league history. The Bulls missed the playoffs this season, Fred Holberg‘s first after replacing Tom Thibodeau as coach.

Rose, the No. 1 overall pick in the 2008 Draft, finishes his Bulls career having averaged 19.7 points, 6.2 assists and and 3.4 rebounds while starting in 405 of the 406 games he suited up for with Chicago.

Rose’s departure also seems to indicate the choice the organization has made in regards to who they will build around going forward, a choice between Rose and All-Star shooting guard Jimmy Butler.


Morning shootaround — June 6

Green delivers in Game 2 | Cavaliers heart, toughness questioned | LeBron: ‘I have to be better’ | Warriors breezing into history | Report: Rubio open to trade

No. 1: Green is money for Warriors in Game 2 winDraymond Green‘s role for the Golden State Warriors is clearly defined. The All-Star forward serves as the emotional and vocal leader for the world champions, a defensive-minded hybrid point forward/center capable of playing the role of rim protector and facilitator in the same sequence. But Green showed off his splashy side in the Warriors’ Game 2 blowout win over the Cleveland Cavaliers Sunday at Oracle Arena. Our very own Scott Howard-Cooper describes the Day Day takeover:

This didn’t earn him a flagrant foul, maybe even an ejection, and a suspension for the next game? Seriously?

Draymond Green openly pummeled Cleveland, the team and the city, on Sunday. He stepped on their throat, belted away their response plans with a tight fist, kicked them where it hurts and yet not one disciplinary whistle from referees to slow the rampage. It was like no one could stop him.

There were about 20,000 people watching in person and millions more on TV — they are all witnesses — though maybe not the Cavaliers, since they undoubtedly turned away in disgust and shame. And the way everyone around Green cheered the intentional infliction of pain. He hit back-to-back three-pointers in the second quarter, following a make from behind the arc about four minutes earlier, and Oracle Arena erupted.

The Warriors, too. With Green leading the charge, they went from trailing 28-27 to leading 52-37 to turn Game 2 of the Finals into an early blowout and eventually a 110-77 win. When the smoke cleared, the man facing the most unique of scrutiny had 28 points, including five three-pointers, seven rebounds and five assists against one turnover.

Green is one flagrant-foul point from a suspension and/or two technicals away from being forced to sit out a game ever since his emotions became the focus of attention in the Western Conference finals against Oklahoma City. Or, rather, the focus of negative attention. His energy and role as a locker-room leader, even in last season’s championship despite while in just a third-year pro, has long been credited as a driving force for Golden State.

These playoffs, though, are when the emotions became a problem and maybe even a pressing problem. Kicking the Thunder’s Steven Adams in the groin — inadvertently, Green insisted repeatedly — could have cost the Warriors their starting power forward and small-ball center for a game at the very moment Golden State was fighting for survival. And then, after the league decided against a suspension, Green got a technical in the third quarter of Game 5 of the West finals.

But he has been the personification of composure since. Zero flagrants, zero techs in his last four-plus playoff games. In that time, the Warriors became only the 10th team to ever rally from a 3-1 deficit in the playoffs and now own a 2-0 lead against the Cavaliers in The Finals. Twenty-two assists against nine turnovers over the same time.

“Draymond does everything for us,” coach Steve Kerr said. “He defends. When we play our small lineup, he’s our rim protector. It’s a tough job in this series because he has to guard Kevin Love, who is usually spaced out at the three-point line. So he’s got to pick his spots, how to help and try not to stray too far away from Love and still be able to help out on LeBron. So it’s a difficult job. But I thought Draymond was great. Obviously he knocked down his three-point shots tonight, which is just a bonus. But he’s always one of our most important players and had a heck of a game.”



Blogtable: Smartest coaching move of the offseason so far?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Smartest coaching move of offseason? | Your advice for Tim Duncan? |
More pressure on Lakers or Sixers in Draft?

> What has been the smartest coaching move (so far) this offseason?

David Aldridge, TNT analyst: Orlando hiring Frank Vogel to replace Scott Skiles. Bringing Skiles in always seemed odd, and his decision to walk had the optics of disaster for the Magic’s highest-ups, who pushed for his return. Fortunately, Vogel became available, and he’ll be a much better fit for the team’s young core. Whatever you think of Elfrid Payton, the Magic’s basketball people think a lot of him and want him to succeed, so he should have a coach who believes in him and can get the most out of him. Vogel should be able to do that, as well as find ways to maximize the Magic’s youth and length to raise its defensive profile.

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comEach of the interviewees and candidates who turned down the Sacramento job? The hierarchy there, both formal and unofficial, should trouble any solid basketball professional, in my view. But let’s not dwell on the negative. I’ll go with Tom Thibodeau’s hiring in Minnesota. He was the best available candidate landing in the best situation as far as talent base and a willingness to (finally) make significant changes. He has the authority in his dual role to make the necessary changes and he’s already made a few in the front office. The Timberwolves are on their way up and Thibs will end up doing Flip Saunders‘ legacy proud.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comThere’s a lot to like. Luke Walton has the smarts, the championship experience as player and coach as well as the Laker bloodlines to make his hiring the right move. Frank Vogel should be the guy who finally gets the Magic shifted out of neutral. But I’m going with Tom Thibodeau in Minnesota as exactly the right prescription to get the young talent of the Timberwolves howling on defense and taking the first steps to become a long-time force in the Western Conference.

Scott Howard-Cooper, The Jazz and Quin Snyder doing an extension. I don’t think many others will make the same choice, and there are other good moves to pick, but Snyder-Utah is such a good fit. His background of working with veterans and developing prospects has already come through, and I sure would have liked the Jazz’s chances to be in the playoffs if they were anywhere close to healthy. This is a team obviously heading in a good direction. Snyder is one of the reasons.

Shaun Powell, Tom Thibodeau took a year off after getting booted from the Chicago Bulls, rather than jump at the first offer. In hindsight, this was the best offseason move. He waited for the best opening this season, and now gets the luxury of coaching a young and intriguing Timberwolves team that’s on the way up and also serving as GM. On paper anyway, it appears to be a solid match, especially if Thibodeau learned from the mistakes he made in Chicago.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comThere were also big upgrades in New York and L.A., but it’s hard not to like the addition of Tom Thibodeau in Minnesota the most. The Wolves have a group of young talented players that’s ready to take the next step and can play great defense with the right direction. The offense will come, but if Thibodeau can take them from the bottom five to above average in defensive efficiency, they can be a playoff team next year.

Sekou Smith, The smartest coaching move, by far, is the Los Angeles Lakers adding Brian Shaw to the staff to assist Luke Walton. No one knows the importance of a top flight assistant head coach like Walton does, having served in that role for reigning NBA Coach of the Year Steve Kerr this season. Shaw would have been a fine coaching candidate himself, but lands in the perfect spot with a franchise he knows inside and out after years of experiences in The Finals as both an ex-Lakers player and assistant coach (under Phil Jackson). For an organization that hasn’t earned praise for much recently, this is one of the better moves they’ve made.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comMany of them — Tom Thibodeau to Minnesota, Scott Brooks to Washington, Frank Vogel to Orlando and Nate McMillan’s elevation with Indiana — make a lot of sense. One that was not so obvious was the contract extension for third-year coach Quin Snyder, which speaks to Utah’s investment in the longterm. The Jazz, who haven’t made the playoffs since 2012, appreciate the direction of their steadily-improving young team and with Snyder they’re looking to build a program that can last.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blog: The move that keeps coming to mind for me is the Magic grabbing Frank Vogel. They really lucked into him, in a lot of ways, with Scott Skiles surprising everyone by stepping down, and Larry Bird removing Vogel in Indy despite what seemed like Bird not really wanting to part ways. Vogel took a young Pacers team a few years ago and made them a legitimate challenger to the Heat’s Big Three, and came up with a defensive scheme that made Roy Hibbert an All-Star. In many ways, it’s thanks to Vogel that we still talk about “verticality.” Now Vogel has a roster he can shape and mold to play any style he wants.

Morning shootaround — May 21

Love conquers all | Thibs cleans house | Kerr’s fight continues | Casey defends Lowry | D’Antoni or Silas in Houston?
No. 1: Playoffs a perfect fit for Love here — A season ago there were all the problems trying to fit into the new atmosphere and new system and new team in Cleveland. Then came the playoffs and he was quickly injured and forced to the sidelines. But a year later Kevin Love is not only comfortable alongside LeBron James and Kyrie Irving, but he’s a perfect 14-0 in the playoffs for his career and having fun riding the wave. Our own Steve Aschburner caught up with Love, who talked about the change:

“I think there’s a sense of purpose now,” Love said. “We have our identity. And we also know that because of last year [injuries to Irving and Iman Shumpert, as well as Love], things can be taken away from you at any time.”

For Love the biggest difference between playoff basketball and that regular-season variety to which he was limited in six seasons with Minnesota is the urgency.

“Every play really does matter,” said Love, who made it to three All-Star games before ever helping a team reach the playoffs.

“Plays in the first, second, third quarters that can change the ball game in the fourth. Everything counts. One bad defensive play. A technical foul [or a flagrant] where they get the ball back and hit a three. Things that, in the regular season, you might be able to brush off. Here you have to really stick with it.”

Love said he has embraced the physical nature of the postseason, too, and he’s reminded himself to attack the offensive boards, rather than floating from his spots around the perimeter.

“I’ve had a mentality where I want to hit first,” said Love, who takes enough punishment — shoulder “stingers” in particular — to unnerve some Cleveland fans. “It’s going to get chippy. Both teams want to win so bad. You definitely remember [hard fouls]. But whether it’s a success or failure, you have to handle it quickly and get on to the next play.”


No. 2: Thibodeau cleans out Wolves front office — You really didn’t expect Tom Thibodeau to take long to put his footprint on the Timberwolves, did you? The new leader of the wolfpack came down hard on Friday, firing GM Milt Newton, president of basketball operations Rob Babcock and several others and it’s likely just the start. Kent Youngblood of the Minneapolis Star Tribune has the gory details:

“If you’ve been around sports, you know how things happen,” Newton said. “Once you bring in a new group they want to put their stamp on it. It’s part of the job. I definitely don’t have any hard feelings towards anyone. I wish those guys well. And I wish the players well.”

Said Babcock: “Nobody likes to be let go, but that’s part of this business. When someone comes in new, the likelihood is there will be changes. I’ve been through it on both ends. They’ll do an outstanding job here. I’m disappointed I don’t get to be a part of it. But I understand completely. I hold nothing against them at all.”

These could be the first of many moves made by Thibodeau, who is clearly intent on building the organization in his image.

He spent a lot of time preparing for this. During his season away from the NBA, Thibodeau visited 13 franchises looking for ideas on how to run a front office, assemble and coach a team.

The moves were made shortly after the NBA’s scouting combine finished, as the team is ramping up preparations for June’s draft.


No. 3: Being back with Warriors helps Kerr with recovery — What should have been one of the best, most fun-filled seasons of Steve Kerr’s career in the NBA has instead been a constant battle with pain as he continues to recover from offseason surgery. Though he’s far from mended, Kerr told our Scott Howard-Cooper that there’s no way he’s walking away from the job and the group of players that are the best medicine:

“I wouldn’t equate my health with anything that’s happened basketball-wise,” Kerr said. “I’ll put it this way. Under normal circumstances if I hadn’t had this health issue this would have been one of the great years of my life. But instead it was, honestly, one of the worst. Probably the worst.”
But quit, now that he’s made it back this far?

No. Not a chance. Not even if he could have slid into some advisory role with the team and whispered to assistant coach Luke Walton not to take the Los Angeles Lakers job because the big chair was opening on the Golden State bench. Not even if the Warriors follow their 73-9 finish, the best record in league history, with a second consecutive title in June and Kerr can go out on top like few others.

He loves the gig too much. Returning to broadcasting isn’t appealing, as good as he was as an analyst, and the idea of becoming head of basketball operations somewhere again, a role he had for three years with the Phoenix Suns, practically makes him cringe. GMs are separated from the team a lot, and the daily interaction is exactly what Kerr enjoys most. Nothing at age 50, far removed from a playing career of five championships with the Chicago Bulls and San Antonio Spurs, compares to the competitive energy, the trash talking, the camaraderie, the adrenaline rush of being on the sideline and under pressure, especially in the playoffs.

That is why Kerr fought his way back to the Warriors. It’s not that he wanted to get healthy to return to the job. He wanted to return to the job to get healthy.

Kerr required the frenzy of the 2015-16 Warriors.
“I needed the job to distract me and engage me,” he said.


No. 4: Casey says Lowry didn’t quit — With his team already getting hammered before halftime of Game 2 on Thursday night, Raptors point guard Kyle Lowry headed to the locker room early and opened the door for a ton of criticism. But Toronto coach Dwane Casey came to Lowry’s defense and said there’s no way the quarterback gave up on his team, according to Mike Mazzeo of

“Kyle did not walk out on his team,” Casey said. “He and Cory Joseph use the bathroom more than any two human beings I know during the game. … I don’t think he quit on his team.”

Lowry faced criticism after he left the bench with 2½ minutes remaining in the second quarter “just to kind of decompress.” At the time, he was 0-for-4 from 3-point range and had committed five turnovers. Cleveland closed the first half on a 16-2 run to take a 14-point halftime lead.

“It’s whatever. I think it’s an overreaction, personally. I’ve done it countless times,” Lowry reiterated. “Maybe I went to go to the bathroom. I’ve done it before, going to the bathroom. It’s just the magnitude of the situation, which makes it a lot bigger than what it really it is.

“So next time I’ll clarify, ‘Hey, I’m going to the bathroom,’ or ‘Hey, I’m doing this.’ I’ll make sure I’m clear on it so everyone knows.”

Through the first two games of the Eastern Conference finals, Lowry is averaging 9.0 points, 4.0 assists and 4.5 turnovers while shooting 28.6 percent from the field and 1-for-15 from 3-point territory.

The Raptors lost Games 1 and 2 by a combined 50 points. Game 3 is Saturday in Toronto.


No. 5: Rockets search down to D’Antoni vs. Silas — It could be down to a matter of years in Houston. The final two in the Rockets’ search for a new head coach is evidently down to 65-year-old veteran Mike D’Antoni or 42-year-old up-and-coming Stephen Silas. The deciding factor could even be the choice of lead assistant. Jeff Bzdelik with D’Antoni or Lionel Hollins with Silas. So says the always tapped in Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle:

Though very traditional in his approach, Hollins has long been favored by Rockets general manager Daryl Morey, who hoped to add Hollins to Kevin McHale’s coaching staff after the 2013-14 season before Hollins landed the head coaching position with the Brooklyn Nets.

Much of the conversations with D’Antoni since his meeting with Morey and Rockets owner Leslie Alexander have also been about the staff he would put together with Grizzlies assistant Jeff Bzdelik emerging as D’Antoni’s likely choice as a defensive specialist. Bzdelik, a former Nuggets head coach, met with Morey and Alexander about the Rockets head coaching position on Thursday.

Just as D’Antoni, 65, has had many head coaching stops — with the Nuggets, Suns, Knicks and Lakers in addition to a celebrated career in Italy — Silas has been with five teams as an assistant. Silas, 42, coached with the Charlotte/New Orleans Hornets, the Washington Wizards, Golden State Warriors and Portland Trail Blazers before returning to Charlotte for his current position under former Rockets assistant Steve Clifford.

Silas, the son of longtime NBA head coach Paul Silas, who was a candidate to be the Rockets head coach in 2003, became the youngest assistant coach in NBA history when he was hired by the Charlotte Bobcats at age 27 in 2000.


SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Steph Curry says his elbow is fine and because of that the Warriors are feeling better heading into Game 3…Is America ready for Vice President Mark Cuban?…The buddy-love between LeBron James and Dwyane Wade doesn’t sit right with NBA old-timers…Pat Riley says he’s expecting a lot more from Goran Dragic next season….It seems that Draymond Green has a very long memory…New head coach Frank Vogel says the Magic are ready to take the next step…Steven Adams is getting bruised and battered in the playoffs, but will keep plugging away…The Coyote is retiring in San Antonio.