Posts Tagged ‘Team USA’

Morning shootaround — Aug. 20

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Rose’s status for Team USA unknown; Cousins 50-50 vs. D.R.? | Report: Heat in pursuit of Barbosa | Report: Monroe’s agent sought sign-and-trade deals

No. 1: Rose’s status for next U.S. exhibition unknown — Team USA coach Mike Krzyzewski gave point guard Derrick Rose a chance to rest during Monday’s practice in New York, but Rose again sat out most of yesterday’s practice, too. As our John Schuhmann reports from U.S. camp, Rose may not start tonight’s game against the Dominican Republic:

The U.S. National Team continues to take precautions with Derrick Rose, who sat out a second straight day of practice on Tuesday.

After Monday’s visit to the U.S. Military Academy, Team USA got back to work at the Brooklyn Nets’ practice facility. Rose was in practice gear and did some light work, but did not participate in the full practice, which included some scrimmaging.

Rose’s status for Wednesday’s exhibition against the Dominican Republic at Madison Square Garden (7 p.m. ET, NBA TV) hasn’t been determined. He started at point guard against Brazil on Saturday and should do the same when the World Cup begins on Aug. 30, but if he plays Wednesday, he could be coming off the bench.

“Chances are he won’t [start],” USA Basketball managing director Jerry Colangelo said Tuesday, “because the rule is if you don’t practice the day before, you don’t start.”

That rule “is just kind of an informal thing,” Colangelo added.

Asked if he knew if he would be playing Wednesday, Rose said, “Hopefully, I am.”

“Today was just another rest day,” he added, saying that it wasn’t planned. “I’m just seeing how I feel every day. There’s nothing wrong with rest. It’s not like it’s the season, so I’m not worried about it.”

So, there’s no need for panic, Chicago. Rose has played just 10 games over the last two seasons and has had surgeries on both knees. The status of his comeback was the biggest focus of the U.S. team’s first week of training in Las Vegas. But he has looked ridiculously quick and explosive every time he has taken the floor. And he doesn’t feel the need to push himself every day with the Bulls’ season still 10 weeks away.

Chris Sheridan of SheridanHoops.com has some additional notes on Rose, as well big man DeMarcus Cousins saying he’s “50-50″ tonight:

Knee soreness kept Derrick Rose out of practice Tuesday, making it the third straight day he has not played any basketball. And that left Team USA officials wondering whether Rose will be capable of handling the rigorous World Cup schedule.

Also, DeMarcus Cousins practiced Tuesday but listed himself as 50-50 for Wednesday night’s exhibition game against the Dominican Republic, an assessment that appeared to catch Mike Krzyzewski by surprise when the comment was relayed to the coach.

But if Rose’s knees remain sore – officially, the team said he was held out for “precautionary reasons – and he does not play, the makeup of the final roster will be much more uncertain than it appeared it would be when this week began. If Rose cannot handle the workload of playing three games in three nights and five games in six nights when pool play begins in Bilbao, Spain, the roster would effectively be reduced to 11 1/2 players.

Tuesday’s practice marked Cousins’ first live scrimmage since he was injured last Thursday in Chicago, suffering a bone bruise in his knee.

“He did well today, he’ll play tomorrow … I’m expecting him to play,” Krzyzewski said before being informed of the “50-50″ comment. “He should be a guy who’s in the rotation. The fact that he’s come here and I’ve gotten to know him, I can push him better and I can understand him better. He gives us somebody different when Anthony (Davis) is out of the game. But we still have decisions about whether you might (have) Anthony at the 4 and one of the other bigs, DeMarcus or one of the others, at the 5.”


VIDEO: GameTime’s crew discusses the state of the U.S. National Team

***

No. 2: Report: Barbosa on Heat’s radar — The Heat re-signed point guard Mario Chalmers this offsesaon and still have his backup, Norris Cole, under contract. Could another point guard soon join Miami’s mix? According to Ira Winderman of the South Florida Sun-Sentinel, Miami has interest in former Suns guard Leandro Barbosa, especially after Toney Douglas officially inked a deal with a team in China:

The Miami Heat continue to distance themselves from some of last season’s roster in the wake of LeBron James’ free-agency departure to the Cleveland Cavaliers.

The latest member of last season’s roster to relocate is point guard Toney Douglas, who has signed with play with the Jiangsu Dragons, the Chinese Basketball Association team that previously featured current Heat center Chris Andersen.

The Dragons will be Douglas’ sixth team in five seasons, having previously played over that span for the New York Knicks, Houston Rockets, Sacramento Kings, Warriors and Heat.

Douglas’ deal in China has been reported at $1 million for one season.

Free-agent guard Leandro Barbosa, who currently is working with the Brazil national team in advance of the World Cup in hopes of showcasing his game for an NBA return, has drawn interest from the Heat.

A source familiar with the situation said Barbosa is on the Heat’s radar, but is one of several veterans the Heat are considering, with no signing imminent.

***

No. 3: Report: Monroe’s agent pursued sign-and-trade deals — Although it hasn’t officially happened yet, it’s just a matter of time before Detroit Pistons big man Greg Monroe signs a one-year qualifying offer with the team in order to be an unrestricted free agent next summer. Monroe will be in Detroit for at least one more season, but according to a report by Michael Lee of The Washington Post, his agent tried to get him to the Western Conference via sign-and-trade deals:

The only leverage Monroe possesses is to take the qualifying offer and take control of his own destiny next year without the restrictions he faces now.

Monroe and his agent, David Falk, never sought an offer sheet from another team but pursued sign-and-trade proposals with at least five other teams, including Portland and Oklahoma City, according to person familiar with the discussions. Monroe denied receiving a reported five-year, $60 million offer – or anything close – from Pistons and would’ve been unlikely to accept either way.

His frustrations with the Pistons are understandable since he is about to have his fifth coach in five years with incoming coach Stan Van Gundy (who will also serve as team president) and Detroit is no closer to being a playoff team than it was when he arrived.

Monroe has until Oct. 1 to sign the deal and would essentially flip the tables on the Pistons. He would then have the right to veto any trade but would sacrifice his Bird rights in the process, making it more unlikely that he will move on before next summer. If a player wasn’t enamored with his situation in the past, he would typically take the money now — either from his current team or another suitor — and force a trade later.

The Pistons are aware of Monroe’s desires to leave and Van Gundy has alluded to the possibility of losing their talented big man in a year.

“I really don’t feel a real sense of anxiety about it,” Van Gundy told reporters last month. “I know I would love to have Greg long-term, that’s what I want. But you can only control what you can control. I’m fairly relaxed about it.”

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Thunder star Kevin Durant stands by his decision to pull out of Team USA play … ICYMI, Brandon Jennings got Twitter riled up yesterday after saying Kobe Bryant is better than Michael Jordan … Good news for New Orleans Pelicans fans: Jrue Holiday, Ryan Andersen and Eric Gordon are all said to be healthy … Ex-Knicks, Nets, Wolves, Celtics and Suns guard Stephon Marbury will play himself in a play about himself in China … Sixers rookie Joel Embiid recently became Twitter friends with WWE legend The Iron Sheik

 

Morning shootaround — Aug. 19

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Final cuts loom for USA | Irving says he hasn’t been a ‘leader’ on Cavs | Boeheim: ‘Melo should have picked Bulls | Scott to keep Madsen on staff

No. 1: Final cuts for Team USA looms — The players vying to make Team USA’s roster for the 2014 FIBA World Cup are in New York this week as exhibition dates against the Dominican Republic (Wed., 7 p.m. ET, NBA TV) and Puerto Rico (Friday, 7 ET, ESPN2) loom. By that Friday game, though, it’s likely the roster will be set as the U.S. gears up for the start of FIBA play roughly a week later. ESPN.com’s Marc Stein reports that the final cuts for Team USA could happen Thursday:

Final cuts to the Team USA roster could come as soon as Thursday, according to USA Basketball chairman Jerry Colangelo.

Colangelo told ESPN.com that one scenario under consideration by USA Basketball officials is reducing the current 16-man roster to 12 or 13 players after Wednesday night’s exhibition game against the Dominican Republic at Madison Square Garden.

“We’ve said we wanted to wait through the end of the week in New York before we made cutbacks,” Colangelo said Monday, “but that could still change.”

The appeal of making cuts after the game against the Al Horford-less Dominicans, Colangelo said, is setting up coach Mike Krzyzewski and the group that will ultimately represent the United States at the FIBA World Cup starting Aug. 30 in Spain for “one good practice together” before Friday night’s MSG exhibition against Puerto Rico.

Colangelo, though, did stress that keeping all 16 players through the Puerto Rico game is also still an option. Team USA is then scheduled to fly to Europe on Saturday to begin a 23-day stay in Spain for FIBA’s inaugural World Cup, which runs through Sept. 14.

USAB must submit its official 12-man roster for the World Cup on Aug. 29 — one day before the tournament starts — but Colangelo said there remains “a possibility we could carry 13 to Spain” and then make one last cut in the final week before the tournament begins.


VIDEO: Coach Mike Krzyzewski talks about how Team USA his progressing

***

No. 2: Irving admits he hasn’t been a ‘leader’ in Cleveland — Accolades have followed Cleveland Cavaliers point guard Kyrie Irving throughout his still-young NBA career as he’s already garnered the Rookie of the Year trophy, has been an All-Star and is a potential member of Team USA. Yet for all that success, Irving sees a glaring hole in his on-court skills — that being in leadership. In a chat with RealGM.com’s Shams Charania, Irving opens up about how he is looking forward to having LeBron James and other NBA veterans aboard next season to learn from:

Across the NBA, LeBron James and Kobe Bryant heaved praise on Irving at such a young age, as such a genius scorer and wizard of the ball, and only he understands the truth. He knows he’s been no leader, no influence for players, but just a one-and-done collegiate athlete given apprentice status and ownership of an underdeveloped program.

“I haven’t been a leader – not at all,” Irving told RealGM.

He swears he’s unconditionally focused on USA Basketball, but away from here LeBron James has long since returned and helped bring Mike Miller, Shawn Marion and James Jones to Cleveland. Kevin Love is coming, too. The Indiana Pacers pushed hard for Marion, and sources say they laid out a $1.7-plus million offer and an outline of a significant role in discussions with the free agent veteran.

Irving is an unquestioned talent, and he admits his ongoing lessons about turning personal accolades into team success – knowing how desperately he needed this roster upgrade, in talent and professionalism.

“Everybody asks me if this is my year to be a leader … I haven’t been so far though, not at all,” Irving said. “I’ve just been a kid trying to figure it out. There’s no perfect way to be a leader, and coming in as a 19-year-old kid and having everything bearing on your shoulders, there are a lot of ups and downs. Now it’s about being the best every single day and not being afraid.

“I’m more than excited with our new veterans. I’m really excited just from the standpoint of how the locker room is going to go and how to really be a professional. I’m not saying that the veterans that we had weren’t professionals themselves, but we didn’t have enough. Given the right and wrong things to do in the league, I’ve had to learn on my own and that’s what some of us been doing.

“Now, we have guys who’ve been in the league for years, guys who’ve won championships and have had to give a piece of their game for the greater good of the team. It’s something I admire and something I’m going to learn from.”

And out went Mike Brown; in came David Blatt, a creative offensive coach abroad. When hired, Blatt reached out to Irving and swiftly laid out an initial game plan. “My offense is tailored to you, to all my players, and what your strengths are,” Blatt told Irving.

Irving says his decision to re-sign with Cleveland on July 1 was simple, and yes, a five-year, maximum-salary deal brings ease to that choice. Yet, Irving is adamant: “I had nothing to do with the [coaching search].” No input and consultation needed, he says, and David Griffin had been entrusted with the hiring process.


VIDEO: Kyrie Irving talks about his potential role on the U.S. National Team

***

No. 3: Boeheim thinks ‘Melo should have picked Bulls — Give Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim credit for this: he’s consistent on his message. Back in late June, Boeheim said he thought the then-free agent Carmelo Anthony — a former player under Boeheim at Syracuse — would thrive if he signed with the Chicago Bulls. Anthony decided to re-sign with the New York Knicks instead this summer and how that will play out going forward is anyone’s guess. As Ian Bagley from ESPNNewYork.com reports, though, Boeheim is holding to his opinion about where Anthony would have had the best chance to succeed:

If Carmelo Anthony had based his free-agency decision this summer purely on basketball, Jim Boeheim believes that he would have been better off in Chicago than New York.

“Just from a basketball point of view it would have been better to go to Chicago because they’ve got better players,” Boeheim, who coached Anthony on Syracuse’s national championship team in 2003, said on Monday. “But he wanted to be in New York and he wants to see if they can turn it around there. I think that’s a great thing.”

Boeheim’s belief that the Bulls are currently a better team than the Knicks isn’t unfounded. Chicago boasts a team featuring Derrick Rose, Joakim Noah and the newly signed Pau Gasol.

“I think anybody would agree with that. That’s not rocket science,” Boeheim said after Team USA practiced at the United States Military Academy at West Point.

Boeheim also said that Anthony probably would have left New York if Phil Jackson hadn’t taken over as president of the team.

“I would think so. He stayed because he believes Phil,” Boeheim said. “Derek Fisher, he knows the game. If you’re going to pick a coach who hasn’t coached, he would be the guy I would pick. I think he’s a great choice. I talked to Derek a little bit. I think he’s really smart. I think he’ll be a really good coach. I think they’ll show significant improvement this year. If they get a couple of guys down the road, I think they’ll be good.”


VIDEO: Knicks.com looks at the team’s 10 best matchups for 2014-15

***

No. 4: Scott rounding out his staff in L.A. — New L.A. Lakers coach Byron Scott has a few months to go until the team opens up training camp, so it makes sense for him to get his cadre of assistants squared away well before then. According to Mark Medina of the Los Angeles Daily News, Scott will retain Mark Madsen as an assistant and add a couple other folks to the mix:

Mark Madsen is expected to stay, according to league sources, after spending the past year as a player development coach for former Lakers coach Mike D’Antoni and an associate head coach with the team’s Las Vegas Summer League team. Madsen also played a heavy role with the Lakers’ drafting efforts, attending both the NBA pre-draft combine and participating in various draft workouts. Madsen also had played nine years in the NBA and was on the Lakers’ 2001 and 2002 championship teams. It is not currently clear what Madsen’s title will be under Scott.

Scott is also expected to add veteran assistant Jim Eyen to his staff, according to league sources. Eyen has spent 23 years as an NBA assistant coach in various capacities, most recently with the Sacramento Kings (2009-2013). Such stops also included the Lakers (1989-92), Clippers (1988-89, 2003-09), Milwaukee Bucks (1992-96) and Portland Trail Blazers (1997-2001). Eyen also had scouting jobs with the New York Knicks (1996-97, 2003), was an assistant coach at University of California at Santa Barbara (1984-88) and served as a consultant for professional teams in the Netherlands, Germany and Japan. Eyen is also the son-in-law of Bill Bertka, the Lakers’ current special assistant and basketball consultant to general manager Mitch Kupchak.

ESPN Los Angeles first reported the Lakers’ likelihood to add Eyen to Scott’s staff.

Scott will likely have four people on his coaching staff. Possibilities include Lakers assistant Johnny Davis and player development coach Larry Lewis, both of whom are still under contract. It is widely expected that Scott’s son, Thomas, will join his staff after coaching with the D-Fenders, the Lakers’ Development League affiliate.

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Cleveland Cavaliers forward Anthony Bennett is doing what he can to try and tune out the Kevin Love trade rumors … GM Billy King says the Nets don’t plan to limit Brook Lopez‘s minutes next season … The Knicks will reportedly hire Jim Cleamons as an assistant on coach Derek Fisher’s staff … Former Phoenix Suns guard Leandro Barbosa may be nearing a deal with the Miami Heat … Ex-Heat guard Toney Douglas will reportedly play in China next season … Former Grizzlies player Josh Selby will be playing in Israel next season

 

Morning shootaround — Aug. 16

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Paul George starts long road back | Did Durant “withdraw” or “quit?” | Searching for USA’s sixth man | Wait till it’s your home, not Ray Allen’s

No. 1: Paul George starts long road back — Two weeks removed from the gruesome (sorry if we’re overusing that word, but it’s the best adjective available) injury that shut down Paul George‘s Team USA experience, wiped out his plans for the 2014-15 NBA season and had many onlookers worried about his pro career, the Indiana Pacers’ All-Star wing player met with media in Indianapolis on Friday. Through them, he spoke to the fans – not just to those who root for the Pacers and him but for the league and for dazzling young athletes of any kind who might endure such a cataclysmic mishap. And the 24-year-old put a lot of minds at ease with his optimism, as chronicled by Zak Keefer of the Indianapolis Star:

“A bump in the road,” he called it at one point. “I’ll be able to battle through this. There will be a story I can tell, a testimony I will have.”

And yes, he has seen the video.

“I watched it one time,” George said, “and that’ll be the last time.”

At what was largely a feel-good gathering at Bankers Life Fieldhouse, George even talked about playing again before the end of the coming season. That might have been emotions running ahead of the prognosis, of course, and no one’s holding him to it:

What remains, of course, is the cold reality: A metal rod was planted in George’s right leg, pins screwed in his knee and ankle to hold it in place. His coming season is all but lost. A rigorous road of rehabilitation awaits.

“I’m very aware of not being able to play this year; that’s a huge possibility,” George said. “[But] if I have the opportunity, I’d love to make a comeback.”

He firmly resisted doling out any blame — not to USA Basketball, not to the stanchion at the Thomas & Mack Center he fell on that originally appeared to be considerably closer to the court than one at a typical NBA game. This was nothing more than a freak accident, George said.

“It sucks I was on the bad side of it, but USA Basketball doesn’t deserve any criticism because of this,” he said, noting several times that after a successful recovery, he would still love to suit up for Team USA in the 2016 Olympic Games in Brazil.

***

No. 2: Did Durant “withdraw” or “quit?” — Words matter, and there currently is a little war of them going on as far as Kevin Durant‘s decision to end his participation with Team USA this summer in its pursuit of the 2014 FIBA World Cup title. Durant notified USA Basketball managing director Jerry Colangelo on Aug. 7 that he felt too mentally and physically drained from Oklahoma City’s long 2013-14 season and his other activities to continue. Unfortunately, his decision came after Team USA laid its X’s & O’s foundation for this summer’s tournament in a week of workouts and walk-throughs in Las Vegas. That – and what some perceive as outside business interests creating a tail-wags-dog situation for Durant – has Chris Sheridan favoring the latter word on his SheridanHoops.com Web site (click through to Sheridan’s site for coach Mike Krzyzewski‘s intriguing assessment of Durant’s work while in the USA camp):

Yes, Durant quit the team.

It is semantics, but “withdrew” is reserved for players who told the federation before training camp began that they would not be attending. If you attended camp in Las Vegas, and if you called coach Mike Krzyzewski to ask for advice on how to be a “leader” when camp resumed in Chicago, and then you blindside Coach K and every other member of the national team, you have “quit.”

What Kevin Durant did was shameful.

And what I have discovered in talking to members of the U.S. federation over the past two days is this: Durant and his agency, Roc Nation, are more interested in cashing in on his MVP award and his expiring Nike deal than they are in having Durant keep his word to the people who were with him in 2010 in Turkey at the World Championship and in 2012 in London at the Olympics.

Team director Jerry Colangelo said he could see signs in Las Vegas that Durant was distracted. Krzyzewski reiterated Friday that Durant’s actions blindsided everyone.

“Looking back, if you could turn back time. you would like for him to make that decision before Vegas. We might have invited somebody different,” Krzyzewski said. “But saying that, that’s in the past, we’re forward, and it puts us a little behind, just like the injuries.”

***

No. 3: Searching for USA’s sixth manCarmelo Anthony never got better reviews than when he voluntarily and affably accepted a reserve role for the 2012 USA squad that won gold at the 2012 London Olympics. The Knicks’ scoring star proved invaluable with his production, points and otherwise, off the bench. He showed, to some, how he might play if he had better talent around him than the rosters in Denver and New York have offered. Anyway, it’s time for some other top-tier talent on a roster full of stars to fill Melo’s sneakers as Team USA’s sixth man and spark plug. Our Steve Aschburner looked at possible candidates as Krzyzewski’s rotations begin to take shape now:

“I really think there are a lot of guys who would be willing to do it,” [Kyle] Korver said. “I don’t think it’s a hard thing. It’s one thing for a guy to be the sixth man on his NBA team, but there have been a bunch of guys [to do that for Team USA]. Every time someone’s done it, it seems that person has gotten a lot of praise and a lot of credit.”

Having a green light to shoot, at the urging of the coaches, at a rate that probably would lead the stellar squad in attempts-per-minute? Yeah, someone might raise his hand for that.
“We’ve got so many guys who can come in and contribute in any aspect of the game,” said [James] Harden, who might pick up some of Durant’s shots in Team USA’s reworked offense. “From Klay Thompson to Kyle Korver to Damian Lillard, so many guys who can be effective at what they do.”

Harden was the NBA’s Sixth Man of the Year in 2012 before getting traded to Houston and emerging as an All-Star the past two seasons. He knows a little about managing one’s ego from the bench.

“It’s all about your mindset,” he said Friday. “If you come in with the mindset that you’re going to impact the game, that as soon as you step out there you’re going to make your presence felt, then you’ll be more effective and your team will be better off. We won’t have that problem with this team – I’m sure guys will be ready and super-prepared at all times.”

***

No. 4:  Wait till it’s your home, not Ray Allen’s — The initial reaction of local authorities struck some of us as a tad too casual after the intrusion into longtime NBA sharpshooter Ray Allen‘s luxury home in Coral Gables, Fla. Overnight Wednesday/Thursday, seven males in their late teens entered Allen’s home while his wife and children slept (Allen was not home), waking and alarming Shannon Allen. After she shouted out, the intruders allegedly exited without incident and, when rounded up by police, were not charged with a crime. And that seemed disproportionately light to Allen and his family, who have sought legal representation in the matter and released a statement, carried by the Miami Herald, that included this harrowing description of a scene to which no one should wake:

“She heard male voices loudly discussing our personal property and sat up in a state of alarm to find at least five people inside our bedroom with large flashlights. She was immediately fearful for the safety of her own life, but more importantly the lives of our young children. When she screamed at them, the intruders quickly fled the scene and laughter was heard as they made their way out of our bedroom, down the stairs and out of our house.

“As these individuals were fleeing our house, Shannon immediately called security and the police for help. Shannon and I believe that a number of the public statements made through media outlets have mischaracterized certain important facts and what we believe to be the seriousness of this potentially devastating invasion upon our lives, home and family.

“The suggestion that anyone can unlawfully enter into someone’s locked home and then into an occupied bedroom in the middle of the night without consequences is unsettling…”

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: DeMarcus Cousins‘ sore knee won’t let him play for Team USA against Brazil, but he’s on his way back Andre Drummond would love to pounce on the opportunity Cousins’ layoff opens for a big man. … Itinerary change for Team USA: Taking no chances with Ebola in Senegal. … Greg Oden, who once might have been a Team USA big man, gets a trial date instead.

USA Basketball seeking sixth man, among other things, in Chicago

VIDEO: Team USA gets together for posterity

CHICAGO – Team USA doesn’t have Carmelo Anthony this summer in its quest for the 2014 FIBA World Cup. It doesn’t have a Carmelo Anthony, either, as in an established NBA scoring champion, a volume scorer – 25.3 ppg in 11 seasons – and a bail-out option who can make something out of nothing, inside or out, to salvage possessions. Kevin Durant was that guy but he withdrew last week. USA Basketball, which faces its first real competition vs. Brazil on Saturday (9 ET, ESPN),  is once again looking for “that guy.”

That complicates the task of finding even a “Carmelo Anthony 2012 Edition,” a.k.a., that potent scorer off the bench who harnesses his ego even as he’s unleashing his skills in game-changing spurts.

Anthony filled that role expertly for the USA Basketball squad that took gold at the London Games. In the process, the New York Knicks scoring star – a polarizing player for what some see as me-first tendencies in his NBA work – wound up generating some of the best media clippings of his career and altering a few critics’ assessments.

“I don’t think he needed to do that. He always had respect from me,” said Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim, a Team USA assistant who had Anthony in his only NCAA season, 2002-2003. They won the national championship that year.

“Back then, he was content. If he got 10 points and we won, he was fine,” Boeheim said Friday after Team USA’s workout at a West Side sports complex. “I think his main role in the NBA has been to score. I don’t think you should be criticized when a coach asks you to score and you score. That’s what he does.

“He’s a great offensive player. He’s not LeBron James. He can help, he can make passes. But his primary focus and what he does best is score. He did it for us when we needed him. He’s great under pressure.”

That’s one of the reasons coach Mike Krzyzewski wanted Anthony in that sixth-man role two years ago. Then there was that other reason.

“He was willing to do it, that’s No. 1,” said Jerry Colangelo, Team USA’s managing director.

There’s an esprit de corps each time the U.S. national team revs up nowadays, with All-Stars and franchise players generally accepting whatever roles Krzyzewski and his staff ask of them. But it’s not automatic and it certainly didn’t jibe with Anthony’s profile as an NBA dilettante whose teams in Denver and New York were, and needed to be, built around him.

Yet just two summers ago, with egos as assertive as Durant’s, James’ and Kobe Bryant‘s on board, Anthony agreeably took on the job of super sub. He came off the bench in all eight games and played less than half-time (17.8 mpg), but averaged 16.3 points, trailing only Durant (19.5 ppg in 26.0 mpg) in U.S. scoring.

Back in 2008, in Beijing, Anthony ranked fourth in scoring (11.5) behind Dwyane Wade (16.0), James (15.5) and Bryant (15.0). That year, it was Wade who did the sixth-man thing, outscoring each of the starters while averaging just 18.8 minutes.

And in 2004, Anthony’s first Olympics, he averaged just 2.4 points while appearing in seven of the eight games. The scoring load then was carried by Allen Iverson (13.8 ppg), Tim Duncan (12.9) and Stephon Marbury (10.5).

“These guys will do anything that you need ‘em to do to win,” Krzyzewski said. “Carmelo, for U.S. basketball, was really as good a ‘stretch 4′ as there was in international competition, starting or coming off the bench.”

With Durant tapping out and Paul George getting hurt two weeks ago – after other top candidates such as LaMarcus Aldridge, Kevin Love and Blake Griffin opted not to participate – Team USA’s roster has been thinned.

As Colangelo said: “We originally thought we had guys coming off the bench – on paper – who would bring something to the table. Up tempo. A little more quickness. A little more shooting. But because of some injuries, they might end up starting.”

After Friday’s workout, Krzyzewski did not name his starting lineup for the tune-up game against Brazil’s national team Saturday at United Center. That’s part of what this pre-medal round schedule is for, flipping through the various combinations. But four of the five spots seemed heavily penciled in – Derrick Rose, Stephen Curry, James Harden and Anthony Davis.

Candidates for the fifth starting spot include Chandler Parsons, Kenneth Faried, Rudy Gay, Klay Thompson and DeMar DeRozan. Big man DeMarcus Cousins (right knee bruise) will not face Brazil, so going small against that team’s big front line – Anderson Varejao, Tiago Splitter and Nene – might yield better results in a counter-programming way.

The candidates for sixth man – this squad’s ‘Melo – are in that above group, too, along with Kyrie Irving, Damian Lillard, Gordon Hayward and Kyle Korver, pending the cutdown next weekend to 12 players. Krzyzewski’s substitution pattern Saturday won’t necessarily reveal anything, because the first game is all about “what if?” lineups. Even the game’s outcome – beyond setting, perhaps, a winning atmosphere – matters less than using the exhibition as a measuring stick.

“We’ll find out some things by trying new things, which will help us,” Krzyzewski said. “The main thing is medal round in Barcelona. We need to keep improving until we get to Barcelona, then it’s one and done. By that time hopefully we’ll be healthy, have whatever is good for our team in and then be ready to go for a World Cup.”

That includes a viable sixth man.

“I really think there are a lot of guys who would be willing to do it,” Korver said. “I don’t think it’s a hard thing. It’s one thing for a guy to be the sixth man on his NBA team, but there have been a bunch of guys [to do that for Team USA]. Every time someone’s done it, it seems that person has gotten a lot of praise and a lot of credit.”

Having a green light to shoot, at the urging of the coaches, at a rate that probably would lead the stellar squad in attempts-per-minute? Yeah, someone might raise his hand for that.

“We’ve got so many guys who can come in and contribute in any aspect of the game,” said Harden, who might pick up some of Durant’s shots in Team USA’s reworked offense. “From Klay Thompson to Kyle Korver to Damian Lillard, so many guys who can be effective at what they do.”

Harden was the NBA’s Sixth Man of the Year in 2012 before getting traded to Houston and emerging as an All-Star the past two seasons. He knows a little about managing one’s ego from the bench.

“It’s all about your mindset,” he said Friday. “If you come in with the mindset that you’re going to impact the game, that as soon as you step out there you’re going to make your presence felt, then you’ll be more effective and your team will be better off. We won’t have that problem with this team – I’m sure guys will be ready and super-prepared at all times.”

Super-willing, it sounds like, to accept whatever role. From starter to sub, from sixth man to 12th man, and anything in between if the minutes change from night to night. Colangelo and Krzyzewski have worked wonders selling these guys on the honor of participating. They’re all fully marinated.

“When we started coaching NBA players,” Boeheim said, “everybody said, ‘Well, they won’t do this and they won’t do this.’ We found out they would do ‘this’ and they would do ‘this.’ They would come off the bench. They would play defense. They would sacrifice. Dwyane Wade came to us the first year [2008] and said, ‘I’ll come off the bench.’ Kobe Bryant came to us and said, ‘I’ll take the toughest guy defensively.’ Chris Paul came off the bench.

“These are great players. They do what they can to help us win and that’s why we’ve been successful. These guys have sacrificed, they’ve worked hard, they play defense and, really, I’ve never had a better experience in basketball than working with NBA players.”

Morning shootaround — Aug. 15

NEWS OF THE MORNING
Rose committed to Team USA | Blazers submit All-Star weekend bid | Trainer opens up about ‘Melo’s weight loss

No. 1: Rose won’t forsake his Team USA commitment — The U.S. Men’s National Team is practicing away in Chicago on the second leg of its preparation stint for the 2014 FIBA World Cup. It’s the first time the squad has practiced since Paul George suffered his leg injury during the team’s scrimmage in Las Vegas. His absence from the team — coupled with Kevin Durant pulling out from the team for personal reasons — has thrust Bulls star Derrick Rose into the spotlight as the likely No. 1 option on the squad. Rose, for his part, told the media after Thursday’s practice he’s sticking with Team USA no matter what. The Chicago Tribune‘s K.C. Johnson has more:

But seeing Paul George on his back, his right tibia and fibula fractured and his 2014-15 NBA season over before it began, won’t deter Rose from his commitment to USA Basketball and his own comeback. The Bulls star stated as much on Thursday following Team USA’s practice at Quest Multisport, Rose’s first public comments since George’s horrific injury cut short an intrasquad scrimmage in Las Vegas on Aug. 1.

“I have no fears, I have faith,” Rose said. “I know that I’m going to be fine. I know that I busted my ass the entire two summers — you can say two seasons — to get back to where I am right now. Just try to keep it moving, stay positive every day, do everything consistent like I’ve been doing.

“I think everything will go my way.”

And so Rose keeps pushing forward, on to a Friday practice and Saturday exhibition against Brazil at the United Center. Next week, training camp shifts to New York and more exhibitions before the FIBA World Cup begins in Spain on Aug. 30.

Neither Rose nor USA assistant coach Tom Thibodeau believes George’s injury or Kevin Durant’s subsequent departure create an added burden.

“There’s a lot of depth to this team,” Thibodeau said. “We have a ton of scoring. “I don’t think anyone is going to be taxed with heavy minutes.

“That’s the value of having depth. I still think it’s good for him to come back in this setting.”


VIDEO: Derrick Rose talks about his Team USA experience and more

(more…)

Morning shootaround — Aug. 14


VIDEO: GameTime’s crew breaks down the games during the 2014-15 season’s opening week

NEWS OF THE MORNING
Anthony slims down for Knicks’ offense | Team USA faces key questions | Sacramento starts preparing future arena site

No. 1: Anthony slims down to better mesh with Knicks’ offense — Via his Instagram account, Knicks star Carmelo Anthony revealed a photo of himself after a workout and it was quite noticeable that the All-Star forward had slimmed down quite a bit. Aside from just getting in shape for a new season, though, Anthony dropped the pounds to better fit into the Knicks’ expected plans of running the triangle offense. Marc Berman of the New York Post has more:

Carmelo Anthony took a $5 million pay cut on his new contract, but it appears he took a bigger cut in weight. According to an Anthony confidant, Anthony has done so in order to resemble his physique as a rookie with the Nuggets and to be more viable in Phil Jackson’s triangle offense.

A photo of Anthony this week on his Instagram showed what appeared to be a dramatic weight loss since the season ended. Anthony, who turned 30 on May 29, looks younger with the weight loss.

“He wants to be as athletic as he was when he was a rookie,’’ the confidant told The Post. “Plus he wants to be a facilitator in the triangle and speed will help that.’’

Anthony was listed at 230 pounds as a Denver rookie in 2003 and appears to be close to that goal. Last season, the 6-foot-8 Anthony was listed in the Knicks preseason media guide at 240, but likely played at least 5-to-10 pounds heavier as the season wore on.

Orlando Magic forward Tobias Harris, a Long Island product, worked out three times with Anthony in June at the Terminal 23 gym Anthony owns in midtown. Harris noticed a major difference in his appearance. “He looked real good,’’ Harris told The Post recently.

According to a source, the Harris camp was told Anthony was working out three times a day, doing basketball drills, agility drills, weights and yoga.

(more…)

Morning shootaround — Aug. 11


NEWS OF THE MORNING

Team USA cut motivates Wall for 2014-15 | Ginobili’s international playing days likely done | Who will be in HOF come 2015?

No. 1: Wall has his motivation for next season — Washington Wizards guard John Wall has had his fair share of doubters throughout his NBA career, although his being a part of Team USA’s training camp and his All-Star nod last season has quieted some of that chatter. Wall, though, was cut last week by Team USA in the first roster pare down and tells Ben Standig of CSNWashington.com he will use that as his motivation in 2014-15:

The NBA leader in total assists this past season spoke with CSNwashington.com on Saturday at his charitable foundation’s “Back2School” event for children in Washington. Asked if he was given a fair shot to make the final 12-player roster, Wall said, “Nah, I don’t think so, but it’s a part of the game. I’m just happy to have the opportunity to be there and represent my country. I wish them the best of luck and hope they can win gold.”

Wall, who had treatment on his knee last month, stated he was pleased with his performance during the week.

“It was cool. It wasn’t bad at all,” Wall said of his left knee. “I got through the whole week. I thought I played pretty well. Things didn’t go in my favor. But, we’ll (get) past it.”

Several players from the initial group of 28 passed on competing internationally this summer, including point guards Chris Paul, Russell Westbrook and Deron Williams. Those absences combined with Wall’s breakout performance in his fourth NBA season led to the invitation.

Wall didn’t use the relative lateness of the invitation as an excuse, especially since he’s shown plenty in the past.

“I’ve been (around) for four years in a row. I think that’s enough time,” Wall said. “Everybody had the same fair amount of time as far as being (in Las Vegas) and playing. I think [Team USA] already had kind of in their mind what they wanted to do and what decisions they were going (to make).”

 

As the odd man out, Wall now has a new source of motivation heading into the upcoming season.

“Yeah, definitely, always. You want to make every team you try out for. When you don’t, it’s more motivation for me.

“Not even (against) just those (Team USA point guards), but the NBA, period. I guess I’m overlooked again. I guess have to prove myself one more time.”

(more…)

Morning shootaround — Aug. 8


NEWS OF THE MORNING


VIDEO: Kevin Durant has withdrawn from Team USA participation

How does Team USA cope with Durant’s move | Fatigue a legit storyline for Durant | Kirilenko clears air on Kidd comments

No. 1: Where does Team USA go from here? — Team USA’s roster seems to be losing household names quickly, what with Kevin Durant officially saying yesterday that he won’t participate in the 2014 FIBA World Cup to do ‘physical and mental’ exhaustion. Combined with the injury to Paul George, the U.S. national team has some key holes to fill … and fast. How will they tackle this issue? Our John Schuhmann, who has been on the pulse of Team USA since camp opened in Las Vegas, shares his thoughts:

Some random thoughts…

  • The U.S. still has a lot of offensive firepower with Derrick Rose, Stephen Curry, James Harden, Kyrie Irving and Anthony Davis. But there’s just no replacing Durant’s combination of size and shot-making.
  • The U.S. still has a relatively clear road to the gold medal game. Not only will Spain be on the opposite side of the bracket (after group play is completed), but so will Argentina, Brazil and France. Lithuania could be the biggest challenge out of the USA’s side.
  • But only the winner of the World Cup (along with Brazil) qualifies for the 2016 Olympics. If the U.S. doesn’t win, it would have to qualify via the FIBA Americas tournament, to which it hasn’t sent a team since 2007.
  • So this is also bad news for the Canadian National Team, general manager Steve Nash, coach Jay Triano, and their group of young NBA players, which could include Andrew Wiggins next summer. Only two teams from the 2015 FIBA Americas tournament will qualify for the Olympics, and if the U.S. is competing for one of those two spots, Canada’s chances are cut in half.
  • As has been noted many times in this space, the U.S. typically plays two NBA small forwards together at the three and four. Both Durant and George, like Carmelo Anthony and LeBron James in the past, would have been able to play the four. But now Chandler Parsons is the only three left on the roster with much size.
  • That could mean that we’ll see more of Kenneth Faried than originally planned. Faried has broken the mold of what the U.S. looks for in a power forward, providing a combination of energy and athleticism that’s been impossible to ignore. But he appeared to be an energy guy who plays a few minutes at a time. Now, he may be a bigger part of the rotation (and possibly a starter). If he’s playing next to Davis, who has range out toward the FIBA 3-point line, the U.S. can still space the floor pretty well.
  • If the U.S. is going to take only one of DeMarcus Cousins, Andre Drummond and Mason Plumlee for the back-up center spot (with Davis and Faried as the other bigs), there would be only one more player cut from the current 15-man roster. That final spot would likely come down to Damian Lillard and DeMar DeRozan, who obviously bring two different skill sets. Durant’s withdrawal may have guaranteed Gordon Hayward a spot on the roster.

(more…)

Morning shootaround — Aug. 6


NEWS OF THE MORNING


VIDEO: Reggie Miller talks about Paul George’s injury and its effect on Team USA

Team USA brass downplay effect of George’s injury | Report: Pacers interested in Marion | Report: James has first meeting with Blatt

No. 1: Krzyzewski, Colangelo downplay effects of George’s injury — Team USA pared down its roster to 16 yesterday as John Wall, Bradley Beal and Paul Millsap were cut, but the squad also will obviously  not feature Paul George after he suffered a devastating broken leg injury on Saturday. Coach Mike Krzyzewski and USA Basketball managing director Jerry Colangelo talked with the media about how they will go about assembling Team USA’s roster. Our John Schuhmann has more on what those two men had to say:

“We’ve been in communication with our players,” Colangelo said. “They are all on board. They recognize that injuries and sports go together, unfortunately. And we all have experiences that we could talk about, where players have been lost in practice, players have been lost in games and pick-up games for seasons. I personally have experienced that with my 45 years in the NBA.”

It wasn’t long after George broke his leg that people (rightfully) started to wonder how the injury — seen on national television — would affect the willingness of NBA players to play in international competitions in the summer. And we won’t really know if it will until 2016, when Colangelo calls on players for the Olympics in Brazil.

But he believes the pull of representing your country will overcome any risks players might see in playing competitively in the offseason.

“To be able to represent your country is what it’s all about,” Colangelo said. “It is about being patriotic. It is about selfless service. And our players get that. All you need to do is ask any of them who have been involved with us in our last three competitions and they would, to a man, say they feel they’re better people, better players, and felt a real warming within their soul to represent their country.”

NBA owners, of course, deserve a say in the matter. Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban, who has long been a critic of NBA guys playing for their country without compensation, continues to advocate for an international tournament run by the NBA.

“I think people need to read between the lines,” Colangelo said of Cuban’s comments. “He’s against international competition when he believes the beneficiary, being the IOC, is getting the money. So he’s basically saying it’s OK for our players to play internationally if the money goes to the NBA and to the team owners. That’s the difference.”

(more…)

With time, work and patience, George can return to his All-Star self

By Jeff Caplan, NBA.com


VIDEO: Mike Krzyzewski and Jerry Colangelo talk about Paul George’s injury

HANG TIME SOUTHWEST – The  injury suffered by Paul George Friday night during the USA Basketball Showcase in Las Vegas was shocking, but the Indiana Pacers’ All-Star small forward can make a full recovery and even regain the tremendous explosiveness and athleticism he displayed on the very play on which his lower leg snapped.

To get to that point is going to take time, perseverance and a lot of sweat.

Paul George

Paul George faces a long road to recovery from his injury.

He suffered what’s called an open tibia-fibula fracture of his right leg, meaning he fractured both the tibia and fibula. George was immediately taken to the hospital and underwent surgery performed by USA Basketball team physician Riley Williams (who is also the team physician for the Brooklyn Nets). The procedure typically involves inserting a titanium rod over the fracture and using screws to hold it in place.

The good for news George, an All-Star in each of the last two seasons, is that while the injury is rarely seen in basketball, it is a common sight among orthopedic surgeons. The procedure to repair it is also very common, according to Dr. T.O. Souryal, head physician for the Dallas Mavericks and a renowned orthopedic surgeon in sports medicine who is also president of the NBA Team Physicians Association.

“This is orthopedic surgery 101. They know what to do with an open tibia fracture,” Souryal said. “We see this injury in car accidents, we see this injury in motorcycle accidents, we see these injuries with people falling off a ladder, we see these injuries on the soccer field, so this is a relatively common orthopedic trauma injury. There’s a long track record of dealing with this injury and dealing with the issues that are unique to this injury.

“What makes this unique is that it was videotaped from five different angles.”

George, 24, faces an exhaustive rehabilitation process that begins immediately with simple, muscle-firing exercises that can be done from his hospital bed. As George moves away from early recovery challenges — such as infection — in the initial weeks following surgery, his rehab will escalate incrementally in intensity, complexity and duration as the bone heals over a period that typically spans 4-6 months. Souryal cautions that healing time for the tibia can be slow and involve complications, but he noted that for a young, well-conditioned athlete such as George, odds are high for a clean healing process.

Once the bone heals, the real work for George begins with what Souryal terms the late challenges. Regaining motion in his ankle and knee are crucial as George then begins the gradual strengthening process. A regimen that includes — at various phases — a stationary bike, walking on the underwater treadmill or zero-gravity treadmill and ultimately weight machines and leg presses is typical.

“During the recovery and healing, both of those joints can be involved in the injury, so he has to work on getting his mobility back, getting his knee moving normally and getting his ankle moving normally, and ultimately getting his strength back,” Souryal said. “During the stages, sometimes you’re on crutches, sometimes you’re in a machine or in a cast and you suffer a tremendous amount of atrophy. Part of the recovery is going to involve strengthening, and that by itself takes a long time to get your strength back.”

Will Carroll, sports injuries writer for Bleacher Report, recently spoke with Dr. Bert Mandelbaum about George’s injury. Mandelbaum is one of the top orthopedic physicians in sports medicine and said George can expect to be on crutches for six weeks.

“Then the athlete gradually progresses to rehabilitation, physical therapy and cross training,” Mandelbaum told Carroll. “Once the fracture healing is strong, the athlete will return for progressions to practice and games. Once completed, most athletes can perform at pre-injury levels.”

Souryal, who has not examined George, but has treated numerous similar injuries, agrees. Souryal said George’s final hurdle will be getting his explosiveness back, a goal that will challenge George both physically and mentally. But it is one that can be reached.

“That’s always the last thing to come back after a major injury like this,” Souryal said, “is your ability to explode and dunk the ball and have the confidence to land back on that leg.”

Once George completes the recovery process, one which Souryal cautions against setting a timetable because of the numerous variables in play at this early stage, Souryal said George can feel confident that he won’t re-injure his leg. Souryal said the bone heals stronger than it was prior to the injury and the titanium rod inserted during surgery reinforces it.

Unlike an ACL injury, Achilles injury or other soft-tissue injury in which consideration of re-injury is always present, Souryal said the risk of re-injury with a tibia fracture “is almost zero.”

George’s recovery process will be grueling and require patience. But through it he can remain focused on the likelihood of resuming his burgeoning career where it left off. How long that takes will depend on how quickly the bone heals followed by the rigorous, time-consuming strengthening process.

“Can he be back to his old self? Yes,” Souryal said. “How long will that take? I don’t know.”