Posts Tagged ‘Steve Nash’

Morning shootaround — March 22

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Westbrook bangs knee; Durant scores 51 | Gasol leaves in walking boot | Knicks make it eight straight | Nash dishes 11 dimes | Bynum out indefinitely


VIDEO: Closer look at Durant’s 51-point performance

No. 1: Westbrook gets scare, Durant scores 51 — In a wild game at Toronto, Oklahoma City Thunder point guard Russell Westbrook left in the third quarter after banging knees with Toronto’s Kyle Lowry. It was Westbrook’s right knee, the one he’s had three surgeries on since initially tearing the meniscus in the first round of last year’s playoffs. He immediately reacted to the pain and slammed his palm on the floor. He was assisted off the floor as the Thunder held their breath. More will be known as Westbrook is re-evaluated in Oklahoma City today. The Thunder won the game in dramatic fashion, 119-118, in double overtime. Kevin Durant capped a remarkable night with his seventh 3-pointer with 1.7 seconds to go, giving him 51 points. Darnell Mayberry of The Oklahoman has the details:

The official word is a right knee sprain, and the plan is to re-evaluate him Saturday in Oklahoma City.

Although Westbrook didn’t return to the Thunder’s thrilling 119-118 double-overtime victory over the Raptors, he was in great spirits after the game and said he doesn’t expect to miss any time. He left the Air Canada Centre walking just fine, without crutches or even a knee brace, just a routine black sleeve hidden under his pants.

And judging by Westbrook’s demeanor and that of his teammates and coach Scott Brooks, the injury didn’t appear to be serious.

“I feel good, man,” Westbrook said. “I’m pain-free. I’m just going to, (Saturday), get it looked at and go from there.”

The injury occurred with 7:37 remaining in the third quarter.

Westbrook made a slight jab-step beyond the 3-point line on the left wing. As Westbrook held his left foot in place as his pivot, Raptors point guard Kyle Lowry inadvertently bumped into Westbrook’s right knee while closing out.

Westbrook’s knee bent inward, and he immediately called a timeout, slamming the ball to the court upon doing so.

“You’ve been hurt before, you kind of get nervous like I did,” Westbrook said of his reaction.

After briefly attempting to walk off whatever pain or discomfort he was feeling, Westbrook was helped to the locker room by Thunder center Hasheem Thabeet and trainer Joe Sharpe. He remained in the dressing room for the duration of the game as the Thunder battled back from an eight-point deficit inside the final minute of double overtime.

Kevin Durant hit the game-winner, a 3-pointer from 31 feet with 1.7 seconds remaining. He then forced Raptors guard DeMar DeRozan into contested fadeaway from the right baseline. It fell short as the clock hit zero.

Durant finished with a game-high 51 points, his second 50-point game this season, and added 12 rebounds and seven assists.

“We couldn’t go another overtime,” Durant said. “So I had to live with whatever happened.”

***


VIDEO: Gasol injured in Grizzlies’ loss in Miami

No. 2: Gasol sprains left ankle — Midway through the third quarter, Grizzlies center Marc Gasol hobbled off the floor with a sprained left ankle and left the American Airlines Arena floor in a walking boot. It was a double whammy for the Grizzlies, one of the hottest teams in the NBA since Jan. 1. Not only must they wait and wonder about the health of the reigning Defensive Player of the Year, they lost a lead they had held for most of the game as the Heat pulled out the victory. More will be known on the severity of Gasol’s injury, but one thing is certain — Memphis needs its big man in the final month of the regular season to ensure it makes the playoffs, let alone have a chance to return to the Western Conference finals. Ronald Tillery of the Memphis Commercial Appeal has more:

Memphis’ bigger issue seemed to be executing without Gasol.

The 7-footer left with 6:34 left in the third period. He was hurt earlier on a non-contact play. Gasol appeared to roll his ankle as he turned to run. Gasol left the arena wearing a walking boot and he’ll be re-evaluated Saturday before the Griz face the Indiana Pacers for the second game of a back-to-back.

“It made it tough, but we tried to play small and stretch them out,” Griz coach Dave Joerger said. “I thought we did a good job of getting it to Zach. He had a heck of a game.”

Gasol had been a force, too, and not just because of his 14 points and six rebounds.

“We were using him to make the second and third pass,” [Mike] Conley said. “He was playing point forward. The whole scheme went through him.”

The game was knotted at 68 entering the fourth quarter after both teams exchanged large scoring runs in the third. Memphis allowed a 12-point advantage to disappear in the final few minutes of the third.

***

No. 3: Knicks keep playoff push alive — The Knicks handed the Philadelphia 76ers their 23rd consecutive loss, but the bigger news was that New York kept its playoff hopes alive despite already having 40 losses as the calendar turns to spring. But that’s the beauty of the Eastern Conference, folks. And with the Atlanta Hawks losing, the Knicks moved within three games of the eighth and final playoff spot. And guess what? New York’s upcoming schedule offers even more hope with games against the hobbled Cavaliers and Lakers followed by the Kings. Peter Botte of the New York Daily News has the story:

With new team president Phil Jackson returning to his California home following his triumphant Garden return two nights earlier, the bench nearly coughed up a 17-point lead in a game the Knicks had controlled with five minutes left. But [Mike] Woodson turned back to his first unit in the final 30 seconds, and the Knicks just barely did what they had to do to survive and advance Friday night against a team that now has dropped 23 straight games, holding on for their season-best eighth straight win, 93-92, over the dreadful Sixers at Wells Fargo Center.

“We didn’t have no choice at that point. I felt like we had a very comfortable lead. It happened. Them guys never quit,” [Carmelo] Anthony said about having to return to the game after it looked like his night was finished. “You could just see the lead dwindling, possession by possession. You go from up (17) and you look up and we’re only up two with a couple of seconds on the clock, so hopefully we didn’t have to come up with a prayer.”

***

No. 4: Nash shines in return — Maybe 40-year-old Steve Nash has something left after all. Fighting injuries all season, the two-time MVP made yet another return Friday night just a week after being declared done for the season. The Los Angeles Lakers still lost to the Washington Wizards, but the aging wizard for L.A. put on quite a show, dishing out a season-high 11 assists to go with five points, four rebounds and three steals in 19 minutes. He came off the bench for the first time since March 9, 2000 with Dallas, snapping a stretch of 975 consecutive starts, reports Ben Bolch of the Los Angeles Times:

“Just to feel good and feel like you can make a play for your teammates and put pressure on the other team and move freely,” Nash said. “It’s why I love this game and that’s why I’ve kept fighting and trying to work in case I got another opportunity.”

Nash said he came out of the game in the fourth quarter after tweaking his back but remained hopeful he could play Sunday against the Orlando Magic. Lakers guard Xavier Henry also hurt his left wrist and said he would have an MRI exam on Saturday after X-rays were negative.

Nash made his first appearance since Feb. 11, when he suffered a recurrence of the nerve irritation in his back that has limited him to 11 games this season. There was concern in that Nash might never play another NBA game.

Lakers Coach Mike D’Antoni told reporters March 13 that Nash would not return this season because it didn’t make sense for him to push his 40-year-old body with so few games left.

Then Jordan Farmar strained his right groin in practice Monday, opening the door for Nash.
After entering the game to warm applause late in the first quarter, Nash quickly found Hill for a jump hook and made a couple of behind-the-back passes on the way to collecting five assists in his first six minutes.

D’Antoni said Nash probably would continue to come off the bench unless he “gets to a certain point and gets that good” because of limited practice time and the Lakers wanting to be cautious with his body.

Nash has one more season and $9.7 million left on his contract but could be waived by Sept. 1, allowing the Lakers to spread out his salary over three seasons.

He would prefer to prove over the next month that he’s ready to play one more.

***

No. 5:  Swelling puts Bynum on ice — If the Indiana Pacers truly signed big man Andrew Bynum to keep him away from the Miami Heat, well the Heat’s training staff will probably be sending a thank-you card. Experiencing continued swelling and soreness in his right knee, Bynum will be out indefinitely, the team announced Friday. Bynum signed with the Pacers on Feb. 1, but has played in just two games. On a strange note, although not so much when it comes to Bynum, he reportedly got his hair cut at halftime of Friday’s game against Chicago. Candace Buckner of the Indianapolis Star has more on Bynum’s injury status:

Bynum has played in two games with the Pacers, averaging 11.5 points and 9.5 rebounds in just under 18 minutes per game.

Though the Pacers expected to play Bynum in short spurts, last Saturday he reached 20 minutes against the Detroit Pistons. Since then, Bynum has been on the inactive list.

On Tuesday, Bynum, who did not participate in practice, said after the session that his swollen right knee needed to be drained.

“This one is a lot more concerning for me because it caused me a lot more fluid,” Bynum said.

Now days later, Pacers coach Frank Vogel answered “no” when asked if there had been any progress with Bynum’s knee since the return from Detroit.

“There’s still swelling,” Vogel said on Friday. “I really don’t have anything new. Other than it’s swollen right now, we’ll give you an update when we’re ready to.”

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Heat present Mike Miller his 2013 championship ring as Grizzlies visit Miami … Tony Parker says he will play five or six more years with Spurs then play for French team he owns … Andre Miller says Nuggets made him out to be the bad guyKevin Garnett is unsure of return from back spasms … Bobcats ask Charlotte for $34.1 million to improve arena.

Nash making his case for next year

By Fran Blinebury, NBA.com


VIDEO: Steve Nash talks about his love and desire for the game

Why does the basketball equivalent of an octogenarian drag a beat up, worn down body out onto the court at the tail end of a lost season?

If you’re Steve Nash, the reason is the same as the one that kept Kobe Bryant hoping and holding the door open for so long until Lakers team doctors finally slammed it shut.

It’s what you do.

When you’re one of those ancient warriors who’s been playing for so long, it’s never just about the record or the place in the standings. It’s about testing yourself, pushing at the limits and pushing back at the critics who say it’s impossible or insane. It’s always about competing in the next game.

However, in the case of Nash, this would also seem to be about next year. Over these final weeks, he’s got to make a statement with his ability to perform and a case to bring him back.

The 40-year-old recently vowed to retire from the game if the Lakers’ offseason rebuilding plan takes them in a different direction.

“If the Lakers release me this summer this is it,” Nash said during Episode 2 of the Finish Line, the documentary he’s doing with Grantland.com that chronicles his final season(s) in the league. “You know, I finally got my kids here in L.A., I’m not going to move them again, and I’m not going to be without them for another year. So, it’s either back with the Lakers next year or I’m done.”

Nash has been plagued by nerve damage in his back and hamstring injuries, averaging 7.6 points, 4.7 assists and a near career low of 22.5 minutes in just 10 games. He has not played since limping off the court before halftime on Feb. 11 against the Jazz.

After playing in just 50 games last season due to another spate of injuries in his first season with the Lakers, it would seem that Nash’s body is telling him that it’s time to call it a career after 18 seasons that produced two MVP awards and probably exceeded the expectations of everyone who saw him come out of Santa Clara way back in 1996.

Yet that’s the thing about the great ones, the players who reach that elite level. It’s not so much that they won’t ever let go as it is them being the deciders of the time and the place.

You know that’s the driving force behind Kobe’s determined bid for an unprecedented comeback, much mores than the $48.5 million on the new contract. After all the accolades and all that he’s accomplished, he doesn’t want the lasting image to be that hobbling off the floor a year ago when the Achilles tendon tore or the six ineffective games he played this season.

They may look vastly different and play two entirely different kinds of basketball, but Nash has that ingredient in his DNA makeup. He want to walk out, not limp out. He wants to retire, not have the Lakers cut him to save salary cap space over the summer.

That’s why he’ll be back on the floor tonight at the end of a long lost season. It’s about next year.

Morning Shootaround — March 21


VIDEO: The Daily Zap for games played March 20

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Report: Nash to return tonight | Clips get Redick, Crawford back at practice | Kings’ White may make NBA debut tonight | Kerr: NBA teams like Hoiberg

No. 1: Report: Nash planning to play tonight vs. Wizards — We informed you in this space yesterday that what seemed like a foregone conclusion — Steve Nash‘s season being over — might soon be be completely reversed. That is no less true today as Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports reports that Nash should suit up and play tonight for the Lakers’ home game against the Washington Wizards:

After five weeks on the sidelines, Los Angeles Lakers guard Steve Nash is planning a return to the lineup on Friday night, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

The Lakers, left with only one healthy point guard, are planning to use Nash as a backup to Kendall Marshall against the Washington Wizards at Staples Center.

Nash, a two-time NBA MVP, participated in a full practice session with the Lakers on Thursday.

After recently ruling out Nash’s return, Lakers coach Mike D’Antoni changed course on Wednesday and suggested Nash could return over the final 15 games of the regular season.

D’Antoni informed reporters that guard Nick Young and forward Jordan Hill would return from injuries on Friday, too. The Lakers lost point guard Jordan Farmar to an injury this week.

Nash, 40, has suffered from nerve damage in his back and hamstring injuries this season. Nash, who hasn’t played a game since Feb. 11, has averaged 7.6 points and 4.7 assists in 10 games.


VIDEO: Coach Mike D’Antoni addresses the state of the Lakers’ roster

***

No. 2: Redick, Crawford back at Clippers practice — You’re not that far off in thinking it seems like the Los Angeles Clippers have been dealing with injuries to their backcourt practically all season long. Point guard Chris Paul missed several weeks with a shoulder injury, J.J. Redick has been in and out of the lineup with various maladies and Jamal Crawford (calf) has been the most recent casualty of late. But things are looking up for the Clips, perhaps, at just the right time as Redick and Crawford practiced with the team yesterday, writes Dan Woike of The Orange County Register:

Doc Rivers and his coaching staff had a plan for the Clippers’ practices on Thursday and Friday. They were coming off two days of rest, a rare gift from NBA schedule-makers.

Then, for the best possible reasons, Rivers tore up those plans.

J.J. Redick (back) and Jamal Crawford (calf) were cleared to practice, and with the team still trying incorporate new acquisitions Glen Davis and Danny Granger, Rivers thought better of trying to use the time to add new things.

“There are just too many guys coming back now,” Rivers said before Thursday’s practice. “As a staff, we basically scratched all the stuff that we were going to do. There are too many guys coming back, and we’ve just got to get them back playing basketball.”

Redick hasn’t played since Feb. 3 because of a bulging disk in his lower back. He ramped up his individual workouts in recent weeks in hopes of returning this season.

There’s still no date targeted for when he’ll play in a game again.

Crawford first strained his left calf Feb. 26. He tried to return March 8, but he admitted that was too soon.

After working on strengthening the muscle, Crawford went through an individual workout Wednesday and came through it with confidence.

He said the plan is for him to play Saturday against the Pistons.

“Rhythm, wind and stamina will come back at some point. I just want to make sure I don’t hurt the calf and feel confident.” Crawford said. “I can get in shape fast and get my wind back, but the peace of mind that nothing will happen if I do a certain move or change a certain direction, that’s more important.”

Darren Collison, who missed the last two games with a stomach virus, also returned to practice.

Thursday was the first time this season Rivers was able to hold a full practice with the current roster.


VIDEO:
Jamal Crawford talks about his return to Clippers practice

***

No. 3: Kings’ White ready to make his NBA debut Royce White, the 16th pick of the 2012 Draft, has experienced a long and winding road in and out of the NBA since that night. White, who suffers from generalized anxiety disorder, never played in an NBA game with the Houston Rockets (the team that drafted him). He was traded to the Philadelphia 76ers in the offseason and while he played in the preseason, he was cut before the opener of the 2013-14 season. The Sacramento Kings signed White to a 10-day contract on March 6 and to a second 10-day deal last week. He’s spent time with the Kings’ NBA D-League affiliate, the Reno Bighorns, and was called up to the team and could play in an actual NBA game tonight against the San Antonio Spurs, writes Jason Jones of The Sacramento Bee:

Players signing 10-day contracts usually isn’t big news.

But most players who sign 10-day contracts aren’t fewer than two years removed from being a first-round draft pick and have never played in an NBA regular-season game.

White, 22, was selected by Houston with the 16th pick in the 2012 draft. White, however, never played a game for the Rockets. White and Houston never agreed on the best way to deal with his mental-health concerns. White has been diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder, which leaves him susceptible to panic attacks and having a fear of flying.

White said those issues are not a problem with the Kings after his experience with Houston, which eventually traded White to Philadelphia. The 76ers waived him before the the start of this season.

“I think (the issues) kind of resolved themselves over time,” White said Thursday after his first practice with the Kings. “Just me being in the league for a year and a half and having things be on the table with the league and the union and discussing it put this organization in a better position to handle things. It’s been so good we haven’t even had a discussion about anything. That’s exciting.”

The Kings went into the first 10-day contract with a plan of how to bring White along, beginning with a four-game stint in the D-League. He spent last weekend working out in Sacramento before signing his second 10-day deal. White said the process of joining the Kings has gone well, and that it began with a workout in late February.

“It happened really quick, but we still did it in a way that was really thought out,” White said. “We took a number of things into account. (General manager Pete D’Alessandro) has been great and understanding with me, where I’m coming from, where I want to go and how that fits into the Kings’ organization and being real flexible with me, and I really appreciate that.”

After White’s first practice with the Kings, coach Michael Malone said he was impressed with his strength, passing and basketball IQ.

Malone said White would be treated like every other player on the roster. When asked if there were any concerns, the coach said, “Not at all.” Malone said if White doesn’t play tonight, he would against Milwaukee on Sunday.

“This whole process between Royce and the Sacramento Kings is about him as a basketball player,” Malone said. “He did everything that we asked him to do up in Reno. He’s been tremendous while he’s been in Sacramento. No problems at all. No worries from our standpoint as a coaching staff. We’re going to expect him to do what everybody else is expected to do. Show up on time, work hard, pay attention, be disciplined and buy in to what we’re trying to do. He appears to be ready, willing and able to do that.”

Regarding rumors and stories that have been written about White and the issues that have delayed his pro career, White said: “Read what you want. There’s nothing I can really say in a sentence. There’s a lot of things I want people to know.”


VIDEO: Royce White talks about potentially making his NBA debut tonight

***

No. 4: Kerr: NBA teams interested in Cyclones’ Hoiberg – Iowa State coach Fred Hoiberg has a pretty extensive NBA resume, boasting 10 seasons as a player in the league plus a season as the Vice President of Basketball Operations for the Minnesota Timberwolves. At ISU, he’s led the Cyclones to three NCAA tournament appearances in his four seasons in Ames, Iowa, and, according to TNT analyst Steve Kerr, Hoiberg has a future as an NBA coach. Randy Peterson of The Des Moines Register has more:

Fred Hoiberg’s future as an NBA coach rests with him — and him only — says a former NBA player and executive.

“I’ve talked to a lot of people in the NBA. The minute he says he’s interested, he’ll have some offers,” said Steve Kerr, part of the television crew calling this weekend’s NCAA Tournament for TNT.

Hoiberg has acknowledged that he had head coaching inquiries from NBA franchises that he would not identify. He said he hasn’t let it extend beyond the inquiry stage.

“Nothing got to the point where there was an offer,” Hoiberg, 41, said when his contract was re-worked last summer.

If Hoiberg accepts a head coaching or general manager position in the NBA before his contract expires, he owes Iowa State $500,000. His buyout increases to $2 million if he accepts another Division I head coaching position.

In other words, if he’s ever going to leave Ames, it’d make most sense to go to the NBA.

Hoiberg has an 88-46 record in his fourth season as the coach.

Hoiberg has ties to Minnesota, as a player and front-office administrator for the NBA’s Timberwolves. His family, however, is in Ames.

“It’s been great for me to be home,” Hoiberg told reporters at last season’s NCAA Tournament. “I grew up five blocks from Hilton Coliseum, used to walk to games. I was a ball boy as a kid. I was a ball boy for the football team, and I’ve just always had such a great passion for Cyclone athletics.”

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Sponsor logos on NBA jerseys are looking more and more like an inevitability … It seems a lot of folks are getting upset over Drew Gooden‘s recent in-game shoulder shrug … Surprising Bucks rookie Nate Wolters was injured in last night’s game vs. Golden State … Kings big man Carl Landry had successful arthroscopic surgery on his knee … Lakers coach Mike D’Antoni has high praise for backup big man Robert Sacre … Remember Mickael Pietrus? He plans to make an NBA comeback next season

ICYMI(s) of the Night: Houston was without Dwight Howard last night, so fellow big men Omer Asik and Terrence Jones did their best impression of him in terms of guarding the paint …


VIDEO: Omer Asik gets up to deny Luc Mbah a Moute


VIDEO: Terrence Jones swats away Gorgui Dieng not once, but twice

Morning Shootaround — March 20


VIDEO: The Daily Zap for games played March 19

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Sanders done for season | Might Nash play again this season? | Lowry’s long road to NBA stardom | NBA rules on Buss-Jackson relationship

No. 1: Bucks’ Sanders done for season — From start to what is now the finish, the 2013-14 season has been one to forget for Milwaukee big man Larry Sanders. A season after making a name for himself with the Bucks with his defensive play and flashes of offensive skill, Sanders struggled through an injury and off-the-court-incident marred season. Playing against the Rockets on Feb. 8, Sanders went up for a rebound and got hit in the right eye, suffering an orbital fracture. Sanders says he’s done for the season, writes Charles F. Gardner of the Journal-Sentinel, and is gearing up for 2014-15:

Sanders, traveling with the Bucks on their current four-game western trip, confirmed he would not return this season in a locker-room interview.

Now Sanders is focusing on the future and his role in helping the rebuilding Bucks. He will be starting a four-year, $44 million contract next fall, the extension he signed last summer.

And he said he has learned some things after being sidelined six weeks early in the season due to a torn ligament in his right thumb, an injury he suffered in a fight in a downtown Milwaukee nightclub.

“I think you just take from it what you can,” Sanders said of his unfulfilling season, with 23 games played and 20 starts. “It’s funny you go through things in life and they help mold us into better people, if you learn from things.

“I think that’s what this year was all about. Going through it is tough. But when you get through it you start to understand how you become better.”

Sanders said he has major goals to achieve in the off-season, including getting stronger to battle the centers he must face each night.

“I want to put on a lot of weight,” he said. “At least 15 pounds. I want to get to 240, 245, a good running weight. I want to be really strong. I want to feel unmoveable out there.

“I just see it being the hardest working summer since back when I was in college, maybe when I was going out for the draft (in 2010). That will be the only one I could probably compare to this one.”

A team source said Sanders could not do any activities over the last few weeks due to the delicate nature of the eye surgery. The repairs were needed to make sure Sanders would not suffer from double vision issues.

But the source indicated Sanders should be able to begin light activities (jogging, running on a treadmill) by mid-April and eventually return to the basketball court.

Sanders said fans have stuck behind him despite his travails.

“A lot of fans are still rooting for me,” he said. “I’m out and they’re looking for me to come back and be better. With that in mind, I’m going to carry it with me every day. I’m carrying it with me now. It’s building up.

“It’s going to be a good summer for work.”

Sanders said he’s optimistic about the team despite its 13-55 record this season.

“It can only get better,” Sanders said. “I guarantee you we’ll have a better season than this year. We’ll get a lot of time to spend together this summer, catch these guys out on the road, wherever they’re at. Try to get some team stuff going, too.”

***

No. 2: D’Antoni changes stance on Nash’s status — On March 13, it looked like Steve Nash‘s season with the Los Angeles Lakers — and perhaps his NBA career as we know it — was over. It was on that day that the Los Angeles TimesMike Bresnahan reported that Lakers coach Mike D’Antoni had closed the door on Nash’s season, telling reporters he wouldn’t play this season. But it seems that may not be the case after all. According to ESPNLosAngeles.com’s Dave McMenamin, D’Antoni could be reversing field on Nash’s status:

Los Angeles Lakers coach Mike D’Antoni opened the door for the chance that Steve Nash could return at some point this season after the veteran guard supposedly shut it down last week because of nerve root irritation in his back and hamstrings.

“It’s still a possibility,” D’Antoni said Wednesday when asked if Nash could play at some point in the Lakers’ final 15 games. “We have to see where he is physically. … We’ll have to see some practices and see how it goes.”

The Lakers are down to one healthy point guard in Kendall Marshall, with Jordan Farmar out for a minimum of two weeks because of a strained right groin.

The 40-year-old Nash told Time Warner Cable SportsNet on Tuesday, “I feel pretty good. I feel as though I could play now at a good level. The question is could I sustain it?”

Nash has not played since Feb. 11 when he exited just before halftime against the Utah Jazz.

“We’ll have to see,” D’Antoni said. “Again, we’re just trying to get him totally healthy. You just don’t want to send him out there and play him when he’s not healthy. The last time we tried, if you remember, he didn’t make it through a game. We can’t have him start the game and then at halftime not be able to come out. We got to look and see and maybe try it in a couple practices and see if he can get 100 percent healthy, but right now he’s not there.”


VIDEO: Mike D’Antoni talks after the Lakers’ home loss to the San Antonio Spurs

***

No. 3: Inside Lowry’s long road to NBA stardom – If you are a Toronto Raptors fan or, for that matter, a Kyle Lowry fan, we’ve got the story for you. Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports has a fantastic, lengthy look at the career of Toronto’s star point guard who has gone from late Draft pick out of Villanova, to backup point guard in Memphis, to part-time starter in Houston, to part-time starter in Toronto to a full-fledged elite point guard this season with the help of some coaching from Pistons guard Chauncey Billups:

Once and for all, Masai Ujiri told Kyle Lowry the truth.

Oh, how Ujiri loves Lowry’s game – his talent, his ferocity, his intellect – and how he wanted him to understand: Spare your career this maddening, self-fulfilling prophecy and honor a relentless summer of conditioning and commitment with the best season of your life.

Ujiri didn’t hear excuses out of Lowry, only noticing his knowing nods and hurting eyes. Lowry was listening. Finally, he was listening.

From Ujiri to Lowry’s agent Andy Miller to his NBA mentor Chauncey Billups, this had been the summer of tough love and tougher introspection. Ultimately, the truths coated Lowry like a second skin: He was pissing his promise away, trading All-Star winning talent and long-term financial security for a loser’s legacy and journeyman status.

“I had to look at myself in the mirror,” Lowry told Yahoo Sports over a shrimp salad inside the e11even restaurant in Rogers Centre. “I know what people are saying now, ‘Oh it’s a contract year,’ but it’s bigger than that for me. Yes, I want a contract. And then I want to outgrow that one and get another one. But I want to win. I want to grow. And to grow, you’ve got to be able accept coaching.

“You’ve got to be able to be coached.”

Lowry, 27, has transformed himself and transformed a franchise this season. When everyone expected the Raptors to be liquidated for draft picks, young players and salary-cap space, Lowry played the biggest part of holding the team together and chasing an improbable Atlantic Division title. He does it all for the Raptors, and he’s rapidly validating himself as one of the NBA’s finest point guards.

For the season, Lowry’s been magnificent, averaging 17.2 points, 7.9 assists and 4.7 rebounds. Across the past 15 games, he been even better: 19 points, 9.3 assists and 5.7 rebounds. Most of all, the Raptors are winning – 37-29 and in third place in the Eastern Conference.

“I struggled to prove that I belonged,” Lowry says. “My first couple years in the NBA, my fear was that I was going to go to the D-League – and maybe never get back to the NBA. I was picked 24th and that’s not the cushion that a lottery pick gets in the NBA. You get a few chances, and then you’re done. Then you’re just a label, never to be a frontline guy.

This season, the seeds of a transformation were born out of the voice that carried the most credibility with Lowry: Billups, the Detroit Pistons guard. After Lowry left Villanova in 2006, Miller, his agent connected his most treasured client – Billups – with one of his most promising in Lowry. So much of the reason Lowry and Miller connected as agent and client had been Miller’s willingness to tell him the truth, to never placate Lowry over his early missteps with excuses. If nothing else, Lowry’s fiercely loyal, and part of him always knew he needed those voices in his life – even if he wasn’t fully ready to listen.

Nevertheless, Miller always understood Billups was his best chance to reach Lowry on the most important levels, that Billups’ mentoring of Lowry promised the best possible path for the young guard’s career. The thing was, Billups loved Lowry and saw so much of himself in him. Billups wanted to make Lowry understand the consequences awaiting at the crossroads of his career.

Between morning basketball workouts in Las Vegas and afternoon golf outings, Billups worked over Lowry. Billups’ story lent credibility, a riches-to-rags-to-riches tale of rising again. For everything Billups has become in the NBA, he had gone the way of Lowry in his first several years: rudderless, teetering and on the brink of fading into the league’s abyss. These weren’t lectures, but lessons.

“I told him, ‘If you squander this opportunity, this is it for you,’ ” Billups told Yahoo Sports. “I kept telling him, ‘You going go Toronto was like me going to Detroit.’ That was my last real chance, and that was the case for him there now, too.

“Kyle’s always been a little stubborn, a little bit of a know-it-all. Those things held him back. But I think he finally looked deep into the mirror and realized, ‘Hey, it’s not my game that’s causing problems, it’s everything else.’

“He had to learn to listen to constructive criticism. He had to learn to lead. In this league, perception is reality. Once you’ve created a reputation, it is hard – really hard – to shake it. He has an older generation mindset of competitiveness, with a younger generation skillset.

“Kyle has the perfect combination. And now he’s sharpened it.”

Two years ago, the Houston Rockets traded Lowry to the Raptors. Two stops, two bad endings. He had been the 24th pick of the Memphis Grizzlies in 2006 but a year later, they selected Mike Conley fourth overall and it became clear whom the organization had committed itself. Houston made a deal for Lowry, and he flourished for a season under coach Rick Adelman. The Rockets made him a starter, and Lowry made everyone see his talent in the 2010-11 season.

Only Adelman left, and Lowry couldn’t get over it. He fought new coach Kevin McHale on everything – and relationships were even worse with the assistant coaches. Lowry lost his starting job and lost the clear-mindedness to lead the locker room.

“He never gave the coaching staff a chance,” assistant coach Kelvin Sampson told Yahoo Sports. “He wouldn’t let Kevin coach him. Kyle’s greatest strength is the bulldog in him, and when that bulldog is channeled the in right direction, he’s tough to handle on the floor. And when it isn’t, he’s tough to handle everywhere else.”


VIDEO: Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan talk about the Raptors’ success this season

***

No. 4: NBA addresses Buss-Jackson relationshipPhil Jackson is two days into his new gig as president of the New York Knicks. His fiancee, Los Angeles Lakers executive Jeannie Buss, has been in the front office of the team since 1998. The two started dating in 1999 and got engaged in December of 2012. But with both people in such high-profile roles with their respective teams, the NBA thought it appropriate to establish some parameters to the relationship as it pertains to NBA business, writes Darren Rovell and Ramona Shelbourne of ESPN.com:

An NBA official has acknowledged that the league has put parameters in place to make sure that the high-profile relationship between Jeanie Buss and Phil Jackson doesn’t create any issues.

“The Knicks’ hiring of Phil Jackson is subject to the league’s conflict of interest rules,” NBA spokesman Mike Bass told ESPN.com. “To avoid even the appearance of a conflict, we have addressed the issue with the Knicks and Lakers to ensure that the relationship between Jeanie Buss and Phil Jackson will not affect how the teams operate.”

Since the engagement, sources say the league has gotten more serious about the two being on the up and up.

Recently retired NBA commissioner David Stern had several conversations with Buss as Jackson entertained potential jobs with the Toronto Raptors, the potential Seattle franchise and the Cleveland Cavaliers.

Buss acknowledged, in an interview that will air in its entirety on Time Warner Cable Sportsnet in Los Angeles on Wednesday, that she had dinner with new commissioner Adam Silver and the topic was broached.

“There is an understanding all trades are approved by the NBA, and I don’t anticipate any problem because I don’t make the basketball decisions on behalf of the Lakers,” said Buss, who has indeed previously ceded all basketball decisions to her brother Jim and team general manager Mitch Kupchak. “So I really don’t see where there would be a conflict.”

But the league is sensitive to the impression of any impropriety. On Tuesday, Lakers forward Pau Gasol told reporters that he isn’t allowed to talk to his former coach because he’ll be a free agent and any talks with Jackson could be considered tampering.

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Spurs swingman Manu Ginobili takes the blame for his shoe malfunction a few weeks ago … Dirk Nowitzki has provided a lot of heroic moments in his Mavs career, but last night against the Wolves just wasn’t one of those nightsChauncey Billups is weighing whether or not to play next season or pursue a front-office job with the Pistons … Ricky Davis, the high-flying former standout of the Cleveland Cavaliers, was released by the NBA D-League’s Erie Bayhawks yesterday … The Pelicans don’t figure to be a big spender on the free-agent market this summer … Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce are still shunning Ray Allen, it seems … Markieff Morris has developed more confidence in his low-post game this season

ICYMI of the Night: With the words of the famous philosopher Tommy Boy (“brothers don’t shake hands … brothers gotta hug!“) in mind, we present this nice Marcus Morris-to-Markieff Morris alley-oop from last night …


VIDEO: Morris twins hook up on a nice alley-oop against the Magic

Kobe criticism can’t all fall on Jim Buss

By Jeff Caplan, NBA.com


VIDEO: Shaq weighs in on Kobe’s frustration with the Lakers organization

HANG TIME SOUTHWEST – Phil Jackson is gone. Mike D’Antoni remains, for now. Two parties at the top of the Lakers pyramid aren’t going anywhere: Jim Buss and Kobe Bryant.

The latter, reduced to six games this season due to injury but signed to a two-year extension for $48.5 million, last week turned up the heat on the former to put the broken Lakers back together. This summer.

As Kobe should know after signing his over-market deal, it’s easier said than done. Yet during his press conference to officially announce that his slowly healing knee will prevent him from playing again this season, Bryant dug into the late, great owner Jerry Buss‘ son-in-charge Jim — and to an extent Jeanie, Jim’s sister and Phil’s girlfriend — to set a distinct course for the future on everything from team culture to the team’s coach.

“You got to start with Jim,” Bryant said. “You got to start with Jim and Jeanie and how that relationship plays out. It starts there and having a clear direction and clear authority. And then it goes down to the coaching staff and what Mike is going to do, what they’re going to do with Mike, and it goes from there. It’s got to start at the top.”

Of course no one, not Kobe, was fanning distress signals at the start of the 2012-13 season when the conversation was whether the Lakers would win 70. They had pulled off a deal for Dwight Howard (no complaints at the time in Lakerland), a move the club had planned to come after trading for Chris Paul following the 2011 lockout, but everybody knows that story.

Then-commissioner David Stern, acting as decision-maker for the then-New Orleans Hornets because the league owned the team at the time, vetoed the trade that would have joined Paul with Kobe. A week later Stern stamped Paul’s ticket to the Clippers, leaving Lakers general manager Mitch Kupchak fuming. The next summer, as consolation, the Lakers made the swap with Phoenix for Steve Nash, again prompting praise void of complaint.

Only nobody could foretell the freak leg fracture Nash would suffer in his second game in purple-and-gold, an injury that spawned relentless nerve damage and could well end his career next month.

Mike Brown was fired five games into the season. The hiring of D’Antoni over Jackson was, yes, mishandled, messy and ill-advised, deserving of criticism. The maniacal Kobe despised the happy-go-lucky Dwight. Dwight pouted over D’Antoni’s no-post offense. Then Kobe blew out his Achilles in the final days of the regular season. Conveniently lost in the clutter was the 28-12 finish to the season. Before Kobe’s injury and before injury would again force Nash to bow out, experts on TV, including the highly critical Magic Johnson, were calling the Lakers a serious threat to beat the Spurs in the first round.

Only now, as this injury-plagued disaster of a season limps to the end, it seems so long ago.

Now, as Jackson takes the controls of the Knicks to Kobe’s dismay, the Lakers’ future, as murky as it is, will have to unfold one step at a time, regardless of how quickly Kobe wants a contending team to magically appear around him.

Jim Buss might not be his father, but it’s also not the same NBA. The collective bargaining agreement doesn’t make a quick rebuild easy even for big-market, high-revenue teams. Kobe’s high-priced extension eats into this summer’s cap space, making it next to impossible to re-sign Pau Gasol along with a max-level free agent despite Kobe’s constant lobbying to the front office keep Pau on board.

In fact, Jim Buss believed he had already secured contending seasons for Kobe’s final years by securing the franchise’s next superstar in Howard.

Kobe had no tolerance for Howard’s playfulness nor did he hold an interest in convincing him to stay. And now Kobe is short on teammates, patience and time. He says he’s not interested in a drawn-out rebuild, even as few other choices are plentiful.

His turning up the heat on Jim Buss can’t come without also looking in the mirror. The Lakers will have cap space to work with this summer and next, and a high draft pick this June. That’s Jim Buss’ new starting point.

“It’s my job to go out there on the court and perform. No excuses for it, right?” Kobe said. “You got to get things done. It’s the same thing with the front office. The same expectations they have of me when I perform on the court is the same expectations I have for them up there. You got to be able to figure out a way to do both.”

Unfortunately for Kobe and the Lakers, it’s easier said than done.

Is this the end of the Steve Nash era?

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com




VIDEO: Steve Nash on his career and overcoming injuries

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — You hate to see anyone who loves his job as much as Steve Nash does dealt the blows he has been in the twilight of his career.

But Father Time spares no one, not even a player as beloved by his teammates, coaches and fans as Nash. The two-time MVP point guard is facing what could be the final crossroads of his storied career. His 2013-14 season is over, and really never got started thanks to an assortment of injuries, aches and pains that simply did not allow him to perform up to his lofty career standards.

But just to be sure, Lakers coach Mike D’Antoni closed that door this afternoon …

The news comes just hours after Kobe Bryant‘s season was officially sacked, the casualty of a knee fracture and recovery from a torn Achilles tendon that cost him all but six games. All this happens in Lakerland as legendary Lakers and Chicago Bulls coach Phil Jackson decides to take his talents to New York and run the Knicks.

Nash’s season included appearances in just 10 games. He just couldn’t overcome the avalanche of injuries that have plagued him throughout his two-season run with the Lakers. He’s already said that if the Lakers use the stretch provision (the NBA’s collective bargaining agreement gives the Lakers the option of waiving Nash and spreading the cap hold of $9.7 million salary over three seasons) and release him this summer that he’s all but calling it a career.

“If the Lakers release me this summer this is it,” Nash said during Episode 2 of the Finish Line, the documentary he’s doing with Grantland.com that chronicles his final season(s) in the league. “You know, I finally got my kids here in L.A., I’m not going to move them again, and I’m not going to be without them for another year. So, it’s either back with the Lakers next year or I’m done.”

Nash was a part of the core group the Lakers assembled before the start of the 2012-13 season — Dwight Howard, Pau Gasol and Bryant were the others — that was supposed to return the franchise to its previous championship glory.

It never happened. Nash suffered an early injury, never regained his form and wound up playing in just 50 games. Howard struggled with his recovery from back surgery and the adjustment from Orlando to Los Angeles and ultimately bolted for Houston in free agency last summer. Gasol struggled with injuries and his new role as a set piece on the periphery for Howard and Bryant and will be a free agent this summer. Kobe suffered that Achilles injury late in the season, as he was grinding away to make sure the Lakers made the playoffs, and ended up missing the postseason altogether.

Kobe and Nash were expected to lead the Lakers this season, but again, injuries derailed those plans.

The accumulation of that wear and tear on Nash’s body and mind could very well lead to the future Hall of Famer (I don’t think there is any doubt he’s headed there eventually) to indeed call it a career.

No one can blame Nash, 40, for hanging it up at this point. When it takes this much painstaking work just to get fit enough to take the floor, any player in his right mind would consider closing the door on that part of his career and moving on.

Nash has other endeavors that will surely keep him plugged into the game, including his post as head of the Canadian national program.

His playing days, however, could very well be over.

)
VIDEO: Steve Nash talks about the stretch provision in The End Of The Line: Episode 2 on Grantland

Reports: Kobe done for the season

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com




VIDEO: Kobe Bryant addressing the media during All-Star Weekend

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Kobe Bryant‘s 2013-14 season looks to be finished after just six games. All that’s left is the word from either Kobe or the Los Angeles Lakers, according to a report from Bleacher Report columnist Kevin Ding that broke late last night.

ESPN.com’s Chris Broussard confirmed what Ding first reported, saying that Bryant is indeed finished for the 2013-14 season:

Los Angeles Lakers star Kobe Bryant will miss the remainder of the season, a league source confirmed to ESPN The Magazine’s Chris Broussard.

Bryant has been sidelined since Dec. 17 with a fracture of the lateral tibial plateau in the knee. He also missed the Lakers’ first 19 games while recovering from a torn Achilles in his left leg suffered last season.


The five-time NBA champion had called his recovery “a slow process” during a news conference held in New Orleans during All-Star Weekend last month.

Bryant was examined by team physician Dr. Steve Lombardo on Feb. 21, and it was determined the 18-year veteran would be sidelined another three weeks before being re-evaluated because of continued pain, swelling and soreness in the knee.

This is yet another blow in a season full of them for Lakers fans, who have been reeling since last summer when Dwight Howard bolted from the scene via free agency for Houston. Bryant missing the remainder of the Lakers’ season, though, is just the latest dagger:

The Los Angeles Lakers are expected to declare Bryant out for the rest of the 2013-14 season later this week, according to team sources. Bryant is not accompanying the team on its trip to Oklahoma City and San Antonio, staying back to be reexamined by team doctor Steve Lombardo. And considering where Bryant’s level of discomfort remains with the fractured lateral tibial plateau in his left knee, barring an unforeseen change, the team will finalize the decision that Bryant will not play again this season.

After his highly anticipated recovery from his torn left Achilles tendon suffered 11 months ago, Bryant played just six games before hurting his knee Dec. 17. He was encouraged by his performance in that final game, a victory over the Memphis Grizzlies, unaware at the time that what he thought was a hyperextended knee was much more significant.

Although the Lakers’ original estimate was that Bryant would miss approximately six weeks, he is now expected to miss the final 17 weeks of the season. He said at the All-Star break he was frustrated by the slow recovery with his knee and noted, “It’s not the mind that wears down, it’s the body.”

Bryant will still be expected to anchor the Lakers next season, when he will be 36. He signed a two-year, $48.5 million extension in November to remain the NBA’s highest-paid player and continue through the 2015-16 season, at which time he will consider retirement.

Although he has expressed hope the Lakers will reload this summer via free agency, indications are the team will piece together a roster around him again with an eye toward saving its salary-cap space for a rich 2015 free-agent class.

Despite Bryant’s limited availability, Lakers general manager Mitch Kupchak said last month that no one should question Bryant’s ability to play “at a high level” next season.

Some of us have been calling for Bryant, as well as Steve Nash, to punt the remainder of this injury-plagued season for a while now. There’s nothing that can be salvaged from the wreckage of the tire fire that has gone on since last summer. Not even a few late-season appearances from one of the most beloved Lakers of all time.

When the trade deadline came and went last month and Pau Gasol was still a part of the team, it was clear that the Lakers were waving the white flag on this season and preparing for the future with a healthy Bryant as the centerpiece.

The timing of this pending announcement comes during the same week former Lakers coach Phil Jackson, who joined forces with Bryant for five of his 11 titles as a coach, is set to be announced as the basketball operations chief (the title is reportedly still being negotiated) of the New York Knicks.

The Lakers chose Mike D’Antoni as their coach last season over a third round of Jackson, who has chosen not to return in that capacity this time around.

Bryant apparently won’t come back in any capacity this season, either. All that’s left is the official announcement, which could come before the end of the week.

Morning Shootaround — March 6


VIDEO: The Daily Zap for games played March 5

NEWS OF THE MORNING

George wants to learn from James | Report: Nash unlikely to be waived | Durant adopts Nowitzki’s training methods | Knicks fans to protest game? | Brown sides with NCAA, not D-League

No. 1: George wants to learn from LeBron — Throughout the season, Pacers star Paul George has been in and out of an MVP debate that has recently shifted to LeBron James vs. Kevin Durant. Still, there’s no denying the superstar turn George has experienced over the last two seasons and a big part of that rise came from Indiana’s last two playoff series against the Miami Heat and James. George and the Pacers are hoping for a third straight playoff series matchup with Miami this season and as George tells BasketballInsiders.com’s Jessica Camerato, he hopes he can someday learn from James, too:

They are two of the league’s most talented on the court: the king of the NBA versus the rising star, reigning MVP against future contender. There is no doubt George views LeBron James as fierce competition as they battle for the Eastern Conference. One day, though, he’d also like to call him his mentor.

“It would be great to be able to pick his brain, pick his mind and just talk about the game because I think he’s a player that can help me get to the next level and continue to keep going to the next level,” George told Basketball Insiders. “I wish some day we have that relationship where he is someone I can talk to—not during the season because I’m too competitive during the season—but maybe in the summertime.”

James has not been shy about his appreciation for George’s game since he was drafted by the Pacers with the 10th overall pick in 2010. He has expressed encouragement along the way, telling the 23-year-old to continue playing at a high level. During the 2013 Eastern Conference Finals James made a PDA (public display of appreciation, in this case) when he offered George a low five following a sequence in which George drove past him and dunked on Chris Andersen, and then responded by pulling up for a buzzer-beating trey against George.

They engage in small, casual conversations when they’re on the court together. Once the games are over, James will congratulate George and urge him to keep pushing. Other than those in-game exchanges, though, George explained “we don’t talk really.”

That’s something he would like to see change over time. While George already considers James to play a mentor role in the sense of being someone who has been positive toward him, he would also like to have the type of relationship where he can reach out to talk basketball. George said he could message James “if need be,” but hasn’t done so yet.

“He’s someone that motivates me,” said George, who is averaging 22.7 points, 6.5 rebounds, 3.5 assists and 1.8 steals per game. “This league is all about guys being competitive and competing. And don’t get me wrong, every time I’m matched up with him I’m going to try to get the best out of him and come out as the best player of that game. But at the same time, he’s been someone that I looked up to. He’s someone I’m going to continue to look up to because at the end of the day, the position I want to be in is where he’s at.”

George has his sights set high when it comes to his desired list of mentors. Along with James, he would like to add Kobe Bryant also.

“All-Star Weekend, he gave me a couple words and every time I do run into him he gives me a couple words,” George said. “He’s a player as well that I look up to and wish would mentor me.”

While there are basketball hopefuls of all ages who strive to reach George’s level of talent, he feels he has a ways to go before he is ready to assume the mentor position he is still seeking out for himself.

“I’m still young so there’s a lot of stuff I have to learn before I feel like I can help a young guy,” George said. “I’ve got to grow into my mentoring role and then I’ll be one of those guys that mentors young guys.”


VIDEO: Paul George and LeBron James talk about the Pacers-Heat rivalry

***

No. 2: Report: Lakers expected to keep Nash on board next season — In the most recent of Grantland.com’s solid video series with Steve Nash, the former two-time MVP guard spends a lengthy part of the video discussing how he expects to be waived from the team via the stretch provision this summer. The stretch provision allows a team to basically stretch out the amount owed on a player’s contract over multiple seasons instead of having to fork over a lump-sum payment upon being waived. Kevin Ding of BleacherReport.com reports that scenario is looking less and less likely for Nash, though:

And the fact is, as of this time, Nash will get one last chance to play next season with the Lakers, who are not planning a free-agent spending spree this summer and are therefore thinking it does not make sense to use the stretch provision to waive Nash.

The Lakers would rather be done with the entirety of Nash’s $9.7 million salary next year if they’re not planning on spending much next season, as opposed to stretching that money across the next three seasons if they waive him and suffer future burdens.

That decision by the Lakers would give Nash one last season to get his body as right as possible, control the nerve-root irritation sapping his back and legs, and try to go out on something close to his terms.

“Yeah,” Nash said Tuesday night about the Lakers letting him play it out next season. “It sounds like it.”

If the Lakers change their mind and waive Nash, he intends to retire: “That would be it,” he said. “I’ll either be back here or I’ll be done.”

If he is granted this reprieve, though…

“It means that anything is still possible,” Nash said.

Nash is well beyond assuming anything with how his body heals now, and he was still cautious when discussing what he acknowledged looks to be one good tiding coming his way if the Lakers don’t cut him.

He did allow himself to smile about it.

“If I can get healthy and come back,” he said, “it’d be great.”

For the Lakers’ purposes, Nash being able to contribute next season would lessen the bust of his acquisition only slightly. The losing hedges with Dwight Howard and Nash are severely limiting the Lakers’ rebuilding options now, and as Lakers general manager Mitch Kupchak said last month, the one thing the franchise cannot afford is to gamble again and lose.

To Kupchak, paying maximum dollars to star players who the Lakers are not certain can deliver championship performances would be bad business—and is, in fact, exactly what has happened in New York with the Knicks struggling despite having Carmelo Anthony.

So don’t expect to see Anthony or Chris Bosh—if he opts out of his Miami Heat contract—getting epic offers from the Lakers.

Everything goes out the window if LeBron James opts out of his Heat contract and is interested in the Lakers this summer, but otherwise the Lakers plan to piece a roster together again next season around Kobe Bryant and save their cap space for 2015 free agents such as Kevin Love, LaMarcus Aldridge, Rajon Rondo, Marc Gasol and maybe James.

***

No. 3: Durant has adopted some of Nowitzki’s training methods — Practically since he became an NBA player, Dallas Mavericks All-Star Dirk Nowitzki has leaned on help from his trainer from Germany, Holger Geschwindner, throughout his career. Nowitzki has become an all-time great in the game and an NBA champion thanks, in part, to Geschwindner’s tutelage and it appears that another star in the league — Kevin Durant — is adopting Geschwindner’s methods. Jared Zwerling of BleacherReport.com has more:

Even though they’ve been in Dallas the same amount of time, Mavericks scout Reggie Johnson still has a difficult time describing Dirk Nowitzki’s quirky workouts with his longtime German trainer Holger Geschwindner.

“Besides all the shooting, it’s hard to explain the types of things he does—because they are so unorthodox,” Johnson said. “It’s one of those things you have to see, but it’s like he’s working on balance, leg strength and shooting all in one motion. His personal coach from Germany thinks outside the box with the drills. Some drills with the ball, some without. He has a routine.”

Interestingly, because of Nowitzki’s connection to Kevin Durant’s trainer, Adam Harrington, who had a limited stint with the Mavericks in 2002-03, the Oklahoma City star has been utilizing some of Geschwindner’s drills since last summer.

“They’ve been paying off for KD,” Johnson said. “He’s definitely incorporated the one-legged fadeaway, and it’s working very well for him. Just ask his defenders. Also, his three-point shot looks a lot more natural and fluid.”

As for those exercises, they’re still coming in handy for Nowitzki, who at the end of the season could join Larry Bird and Steve Nash as the only players in NBA history to have multiple campaigns of shooting at least 50 percent from the field, 40 percent from three-point range and 90 percent from the foul line.

“It’s great to watch Dirk play, but watching him work is incredible,” Johnson said. “Everyone has heard about his work ethic, but until you’ve witnessed it, you have no idea. He loves the game, and he loves getting better daily. The three things I’ve been most impressed with are his basketball IQ, passing and vision on the court, and his leadership.

“He’s also changed a few things over time. Dirk has an improved post game, he’s mentally and physically tougher and he has a more efficient all-around game. He was known as just a killer jump shooter, but now he’s a threat inside and out, as well as a better passer. He recognizes where double teams are coming from and when they’re coming, which allows him to react quicker and become a playmaker.”


VIDEO: Kevin Durant does his version of Dirk Nowitzki’s trademark shot during a game from 2011

***

No. 4: Knicks fans planning protest before March 19 game? — The New York Knicks beat the Minnesota Timberwolves last night to end their seven-game losing streak, but ICYMI, it’s been a pretty difficult season in New York. Fans are no doubt unhappy with the team’s surprising downfall this season after a banner performance last season and as such, may soon let team ownership know of their displeasure. Marc Berman of the New York Post reports that Knicks fans may be staging a protest of owner James Dolan before a March 19 date with the Pacers:

A rally to protest Knicks owner James Dolan’s handling of the sinking franchise is on tap for March 19 in front of the Garden before the team hosts the Pacers.

The organizers of the “KF4L Rally,” which has its own Facebook page, are promoting the rally via social media. The KF4L stands for “Knicks Fan for Life.’’

Knicks fans Michael Brown, who has staged demonstrations in the past, Anthony Samaroo, a Chicago-based Knicks fan, and Mark Griffin are the rally’s promoters.

In a statement, the organizers wrote the rally is being staged because of “Dolan’s failure to allow knowledgeable basketball people the autonomy/power to make basketball related decisions…His insistence on overriding the opinions of his basketball people by bidding against himself in negotiations and overpaying in trades.’’

The statement also took issue with “the rehiring of Steve Mills who has never been in the GM role before and presided over one of the most embarrassing eras in Knick history.’’

***

No. 5: Coaching legend sides with NCAA, not NBA D-League– As an NBA coach, Larry Brown amassed 1,198 victories and won a championship with the Detroit Pistons in 2004. Today, Brown is the coach of the SMU Mustangs and as a collegiate coach, has amassed 300 wins and led Kansas to the 1988 NCAA championship. Suffice it to say that Brown is well-rounded enough to speak on whether the NCAA or NBA D-League is a better path for a talented player out of high school. As ESPNDallas.com’s Tim McMahon notes, Brown is siding with the college game, unlike Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban:

SMU’s Larry Brown, a Hall of Famer with 1,198 NBA coaching wins, strongly disagreed with Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban’s suggestion that elite prospects would be better prepared for the NBA by playing in the D-League instead of spending one season in college.

“I admire him and I think he’s one of the bright guys we have in our profession, but that was the worst thing I heard,” Brown, who has won titles in college and the NBA, said during an appearance on 105.3 The Fan in Dallas.

“They don’t teach guys how to play, in my mind,” Brown said of the D-League. “The head coaches in the NBA and a lot of the assistants do, but [college basketball] is the greatest minor league system in the world. If you didn’t go to one class and just live in a college environment, then you’re way ahead. And I think most coaches are responsible enough to make them go to class, make them go to study hall, give them life lessons.

“How about being around [SMU assistants] Eric Snow and George Lynch? Those two guys played 13, 14 years in the league, have families, are successful. In all honesty, I love Mark, but [college basketball] is pretty good.

“Now, it’s our job to make [players] realize getting an education is something that’s important, because here’s the deal: Life after basketball is a real long time.”

Cuban emphasized the importance of life skills courses for prospects who might choose to play in the D-League straight out of high school, but Brown believes that sort of education is better delivered on college campuses.

“I always was amazed the NBA had this program before this season where they’d bring everybody in, similar to what you do in college before school starts, orientation,” Brown said. “I used to always ask my players what they got out of it, and it was comical. You’re not going to get anything out of four days of orientation, but play for Rick Pitino for a year or two or Tom Izzo or John Calipari or Bill Self, I think Cuban would be happy with what they’re getting.”

Brown did agree with Cuban’s suggestion that prospects be required to play three years in college before being eligible for the NBA draft. However, Brown would prefer to make exceptions for players who would like to jump to the pros out of high school.

“I want this to be like baseball,” Brown said. “If a kid is good enough, like LeBron or like Durant, to come right out of high school, let him go. Put it in his contract, though, that you’re going to make X amount of dollars if you go back to school. Then if you decide to go to school, stay three years. Then all these NBA people wouldn’t have to keep these workout coaches, because the kids would be prepared.”

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Wizards coach Randy Wittman has Washington poised for a return to the playoffs, but will he get a new contract? … Like mama always said, all good things must come to an end. Such was the case for Kyle Korver and his streak of games with at least one 3-pointer, which ended at 127 last night in Portland … The Kings are reportedly going to sign troubled forward Royce White to a 10-day deal today … The Nets may soon call up guard Jorge Gutierrez from the NBA D-League … Cavs big man Anderson Varejao went through Wednesday’s practice and could return soon … Rockets center Dwight Howard hopes Magic fans can one day forgive him … Lakers forward Wesley Johnsonis hoping he’ll be back with the team next season … Blazers backup point guard Earl Watson, who has played in just 17 games this season, may soon explore coaching opportunities in the league …

ICYMI of the Night: You gotta feel bad for poor Jerryd Bayless on this play. He thinks he’s got a wide-open look at a 3-pointer and then … whammo! Andrew Bogut comes out of nowhere for the fantastic swat …


VIDEO:Andrew Bogut comes flying in to deny Jerry Bayless’ 3-point attempt

Blogtable: Remembering Steve Nash

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the three most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


Deciding factor, KD vs. LBJ | Next step after preps | Remembering Nash



VIDEO: Nash on his career and overcoming injuries

Mike D’Antoni says Steve Nash may be done for the season. He may be done for his career. If so, how will you remember him?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: My personal memory of Nash is my first glimpse of him, sitting in the Minnesota Timberwolves’ locker room in the spring of 1996 after a draft workout for the team. He looked impossibly young and innocent, all smiles, and he happened to be wasting his time: The Wolves were going to figure out some way to land Stephon Marbury in that draft, either by selection or trade, to team with buddy-at-that-time Kevin Garnett. Never, ever imagined that kid would become a two-time MVP and, as the premier point guard of his generation, a certain Hall of Famer.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comGreat ball handler, creative passer and sparkplug to those fun to watch run-and-gun Suns teams. But in no sane world should he ever have been a two-time MVP, especially when Shaquille O’Neal and Kobe Bryant have only one apiece.

Steve Nash, June 1996 (Andy Hayt/NBAE)

Steve Nash, June 1996 (Andy Hayt/NBAE)

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: I’ll remember Steve Nash in a Suns uniform with his stringy hair bouncing up and down as he dribbles, dribbles, dribbles from the top of the key to the baseline, under the basket, through the trees, out the other side and back into the paint for a fallaway 8-foot floater that tickles the twine.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: As a guy with bad hearing. He didn’t listen when most every college in the United States said he wasn’t good enough to deserve a scholarship. He didn’t listen when NBA people said he was too slow to make it big as a point guard in the pros. He didn’t listen when Mark Cuban said Nash wouldn’t hold up long enough to earn the kind of contract other teams were willing to offer — before Nash won MVPs in Phoenix. Nash has been a brilliant point guard and one of the best parts of the league for a generation, all while exceeding expectations.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: I’ll remember Nash as a brilliant pick-and-roll point guard, who made creative passes with incredible vision. I’ll remember him as the floor general of the league’s most efficient offense for nine straight seasons (with two different franchises). And I’ll remember him as a funny and thoughtful interview. I hope he’s not done.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: If Nash is done for the season, that’s fine. I’ve said for weeks now that he and Kobe Bryant should spend the rest of this season in designer duds on that Lakers bench and plot their revenge, as Kobe mentioned on radio recently, for the 2014-15 season. I’m conflicted on Nash’s career. He was a breath of fresh air when he transitioned from an All-Star point guard in Dallas to an All-Star in Phoenix and helped turn the Suns into one of the most entertaining teams of his generation. A great player? No doubt. An all-time great player? Yup. But a back-to-back MVP during the primes of Kobe, Tim Duncan and Shaq? I’ve never been able to reconcile that one (let’s just say I didn’t vote Nash No. 1 on my ballot in either of those seasons). Nash did his thing. He was fantastic. but he didn’t vote for himself. The blame should be shouldered by some of the other guys commenting here and the scores of other media types who voted and got caught up in the Suns’ narrative, which was no doubt a compelling one. Either way, Nash will be remembered as one of the greats of his era and all time. He’s earned that distinction.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com All Ball blog: Early in Nash’s career, I went to Toronto one summer to write a profile of Nash for SLAM magazine. I spent a day with Nash walking all around Toronto, from visits at Much Music to a speech to the kids at Jane & Finch. At the time, Nash was a burgeoning All-Star, and he wasn’t recognized that often. A few years later, Nash had become one of the most famous people on the planet. You can debate whether his MVPs were deserved, but the truth is Steve Nash is a two-time MVP who had a huge impact on the game of basketball, both in the NBA and internationally. And maybe that’s good enough.

Davide Chinellato, NBA Italia: I still believe Nash’s career isn’t over. Call me a dreamer, but I think a fighter like him can’t accept going down like that. He’s a first-ballot Hall of Famer, the best PG of the 2000s and one of the best PGs ever. He deserves a ring. So I still expect to see him with a Laker uniform next season. He probably won’t win the title he deserves, but I’m sure he’ll give it another shot.

Akshay Manwani, NBA India: Whatever memories I have of Nash, it will be in his Phoenix Suns jersey. Really, as the executor of Mike D’Antoni’s’ ‘Seven Seconds or Less’ he played quite a few memorable seasons with the Suns, which earned him MVP honors and in 2005 and ’06. But above all, it was the bloodied nose, the swollen eye, the leave-it-all-out-on-the-floor attitude for which Nash will endure in my mind.

Emeka Enyadike, NBA Africa: Steve Nash is the epitome of greatness, and what a career he’s had. How I would like to remember him: I think of him every time I see the movie “White Men Can’t Jump.” Steve went into the court like someone going into his neighborhood courts for a pick-up game. He was always relaxed. 2005 was the year I’ll never forget because of how he helped to change the fortunes of the Suns. We also love Steve even more here in Africa because he was born here in Johannesburg. Despite his British and Canadian citizenships, he was our gift to the game.

Selcuk Aytekin, NBA Turkiye: Steve Nash is one of the greatest playmakers and one of the best shooters in league history. His ability and playing style are purely unique. He is only missing a championship ring, but over the course of his time in the NBA, he’s put up 17,361 career points and 10,296 assists. Numbers don’t lie, and they tell the story of a living legend.

Morning Shootaround — March 4


VIDEO: The Daily Zap for games played Mar. 3

NEWS OF THE MORNING

LeBron runs wild on Charlotte | Nash may not play again this season | Big Z’s special guest for Saturday | Abdul-Jabbar, Bridgeman want stake in Bucks?

No. 1: LeBron goes bonkers vs. Bobcats — This far into his career, it seems there are few things LeBron James can do amaze those who follow him or are just NBA fans. But yet, last night in Miami, James found yet another way to add to his lore. He scored a franchise-record 61 points in Miami’s rout of Charlotte, nailing eight 3-pointers and fashioning a night of scoring wonder that harkened back to his days as a Cleveland Cavalier. Our Sekou Smith excellently details how James’ monster night has added a new chapter to a history that is already plenty robust:

What do you do for an encore of one of the greatest months in NBA history? When you’re LeBron James you turn in one of the greatest nights of your storied career.The Heat star had a February for the ages, becoming the first player since Shaquille O’Neal in 2003 to average 30 or more points and eight or more rebounds while shooting better than 57 percent from the field for an entire calendar month (a minimum of five games played). Toss in LeBron’s seven assists a game in February and only Wilt Chamberlain, in February of 1966 has had a wicked stretch of that sort.

That’s why LeBron going for a career-high 61 points in the Heat’s 124-107 home win over the Charlotte Bobcats on Monday ranks right up there among his greatest performances ever. He did it with a mask on, protecting his recently broken nose. He did it with Dwyane Wade resting in street clothes, as part of ongoing maintenance program. And he did it with work from all over the floor, including a career-high tying eight made 3-pointers.

He needed just 33 shots, 22 makes, to notch the 10th game of 50 or more points of his career and his first outing of 60 or more. He’s one of just five players to reach the 60-point plateau shooting better than 65 percent since the 1985-86 season — joining Carmelo Anthony from earlier this season, Shaq in 2000 and Tom Chambers and Karl Malone (both in 1990) as the only players to accomplish that feat.

How many other guys can get 60-plus points without it becoming an absolute hysterical exercise from one basket to the next? If you watch the highlights, it looks just like any other night from LeBron … save, of course, for the 3-point storm he rained down on the Bobcats.

***

No. 2: Nash likely done for seasonRecurring injuries to the roster have sapped any overall sense of hope the Los Angeles Lakers might have had for 2013-14. On the top of that list of injuries has been point guard Steve Nash, who has played in just 10 games this season. He’s unlikely to be back in the lineup before the end of this campaign, writes ESPNLosAngeles.com’s Dave McMenamin:

Los Angeles Lakers coach Mike D’Antoni thinks we’ve seen the last of Steve Nash on the court for the 2013-14 season. Does that mean Nash has played the last basketball of his brilliant 18-year NBA career?”I doubt it,” D’Antoni said after the Lakers’ shootaround Monday when asked if Nash would play again this season with 23 games remaining, starting with the Trail Blazers on Monday night. “I don’t think so. What’s the end game? We’ve talked about it. He’s not completely healthy. We have 23 games left. We’re not going to make the playoffs. So what’s his objective into taking minutes away from the young guys that we’re trying to develop? That’s kind of the theme that we’re talking about.”

Nash was noncommittal about his chances of playing again this season.

“We’ll see,” he said. “I couldn’t really make a prediction. If I get the chance, it would be great.”

Nash has missed the Lakers’ last seven games after returning from nerve root irritation to play a four-game stint in early February. During his short-lived comeback, he collided with Chicago’s Kirk Hinrich, with the point of impact occurring in nearly the same spot on his left leg where he suffered a fracture last season.

“That knee to [his leg], that was crazy,” Nash said. “It just flared everything up. But it’s subsiding, and I’m kind of working through it and coming back to where I was.”

Nash looked like his old self in a 112-98 win against the Philadelphia 76ers in a game played on his 40th birthday, racking up 19 points on 8-of-15 shooting with five assists and four rebounds.

“You look at an 18-year career and, like, one game against Philly [should not matter],” Nash said, “but it meant so much to me just to say, ‘OK, I showed I can do it still.’ Can I sustain it? That’s the next step, and I haven’t been able to prove that yet.”

Nash has one year remaining on his contract with the Lakers, set to pay him $9.7 million. Under the collective bargaining agreement, L.A. could waive Nash via the stretch provision before the start of training camp and have one-third of the $9.7 million owed to him (approximately $3.2 million) counted against the salary cap for the next three seasons.

Nash commented on the possibility of being a stretch provision candidate in the second episode of his documentary series “The Finish Line” on ESPN.com’s Grantland.

“I’d imagine that’s the outcome,” Nash tells his agent, Bill Duffy, in the documentary, believing he will be waived.

Nash said Monday that the stretch provision was a key motivator in him coming back in February after being sidelined since Nov. 10 because of back, neck and hamstring discomfort because he did not know if this would be the last time he would get a chance to play professional basketball.

“The reality that next year’s not guaranteed made me realize that I had to take more risks with my training and try to get back on the court,” Nash said. “When you’re looking at potentially the last few months of your career, I didn’t want to just let that slide by without getting back on the court.”

Lakers general manager Mitch Kupchak told reporters shortly after the trade deadline two weeks ago that Nash’s future will be in the point guard’s hands.

“It’s really his decision,” Kupchak said. “He’s under contract to play basketball next year. There’s a lot of moving pieces in something like this. For us to sit down and influence one way or the other is not ethical.”


VIDEO: The Nash-less Lakers score a big upset win over the Blazers

***

No. 3: Ilgauskas’ jersey retirement may have special guest — Former All-Star center Zydrunas Ilgauskas spent 12 of his 13 NBA seasons with the Cleveland Cavaliers and, upon his retirement from the NBA after the 2010-11 season, stands among Cleveland’s all-time leaders in points, games played, rebounds, blocks and more. His No. 11 jersey is set to be retired by the team on Saturday and one of his famous former teammates — LeBron James — says he’d like to attend Ilgauskas’ ceremony if possible:

LeBron James is considering a return to Cleveland. Well, for one night, anyway.James has been asked to attend Saturday night’s Cavaliers jersey retirement ceremony for his former teammate and longtime friend Zydrunas Ilgauskas, who now works for the organization.James and Ilgauskas were teammates in both Cleveland and Miami.The timing works for James, at least with regard to the Heat schedule. Miami is at San Antonio on Thursday, is scheduled to be off Friday and then hold a practice in Chicago on Saturday afternoon in advance of its Sunday afternoon game there against the Bulls.

That would afford James plenty of time to make the short flight to Cleveland for Ilgauskas’ big night.

“I want to be there, but we’ll see. I’m not sure just yet,” James said. “But I think it’s going to be a great day for my friend, a real dear friend of mine. And I’m excited for him.”

James spent the first seven seasons of his career in Cleveland, and his trips there with the Heat have been highly anticipated by Cavs fans ever since. The venom many felt over his departure for Miami seems to have tapered considerably since the summer of 2010 – even a smattering of cheers have been heard at some recent Miami-Cleveland games – but still his presence at such an event could potentially overshadow the guest of honor.

James said if he goes, he hopes all the attention remains where it should be, on Ilgauskas.

“I hope it doesn’t, if I’m able to make it,” James said when asked if he was worried that his presence would overshadow the former center. “I hope it doesn’t. It’s not my day, it’s not about me. It’s about Z. But it wouldn’t matter to me. Obviously I’m there for a dear friend, to be able to support him, if I’m able to make it, and that’s the main thing.”


VIDEO: Zydrunas Ilgauskas is the Cavaliers’ all-time leading rebounder

***

No. 4: Familiar faces from past may try to help Bucks’ future — The Milwaukee Bucks have been in town since the 1968-69 season and have an NBA title, multiple division championship banners and a storied legacy of legendary players to show for their time in the league. But the Bucks are dealing with an uncertain future of sorts as they search for funding and support for a new arena to replace the aging BMO Harris Bradley Center. Team owner Herb Kohl remains steadfast in keeping the team in town and is only interested in selling it to a buyer who would be committed likewise. Two names from the Bucks’ past, players Junior Bridgeman and NBA legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, may be among those interested in getting in on owning the team, writes our own Steve Aschburner:

First it was Junior Bridgeman, a Bucks alumnus who dropped by Milwaukee over the weekend and fueled speculation that he might buy a chunk of the franchise from owner Herb Kohl to keep it in town.

Now it’s Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, talking in more general terms about his interest in NBA ownership but doing so on the day he’s back in Milwaukee, too.

Abdul-Jabbar, the Bucks’ first and greatest superstar, acknowledged to the Milwaukee Business Journal on Monday that he hasn’t talked with Kohl about investing in the Bucks.

It also sounded as if his commitment — whenever, wherever and if ever — would have more to do with reputation and perhaps sweat equity than the deep pockets Bridgeman can bring to any deal. The NBA’s all-time leading scorer (38,387 points) and six-time champion talked with the Business Journal’sRich Kirchen more about his fit as a minority NBA owner than about securing the Bucks in the city he left after six seasons.

Abdul-Jabbar was in Milwaukee on Monday to promote his role in a new Wisconsin Department of Tourism ad campaign that teams him with “Airplane!” co-star Robert Hays and directors David Zucker, Jerry Zucker and Jim Abrahams. In the retro commercial, Abdul-Jabbar reprises his role as pilot “Roger Murdock,” with he and Hays’ character marveling at Wisconsin scenery from their cockpit view.

Part of the joke is Abdul-Jabbar’s mock second-guessing of his decision after six seasons to leave Milwaukee in 1975, when he pressured the Bucks into trading him to the Los Angeles Lakers. He won five more championship rings by teaming up with Pat Riley, Magic Johnson and the rest of the “Showtime” Lakers, but the Bucks haven’t returned to The Finals since winning the title in 1970-71 with a team featuring NBA legend Oscar Robertson and a young Abdul-Jabbar.

So it rang a little hollow when the Hall of Fame center spoke with Kirchen about the challenge faced by Kohl to build and maintain a winner in a small market.

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Tayshaun Prince had a bit of a throwback performance in the Grizzlies win in D.C. last night … Bucks forward Ersan Ilyasova got off the schnide a bit with his 31-point game against the Jazz … Kings rookie Ray McCallum draws praise from the coaching staff for his play of late …

ICYMI of the Night: Sit back and enjoy as the Blazers’ Robin Lopez powers down a ferocious jam over the Lakers’ Robert Sacre … 


VIDEO: Robin Lopez powers through the lane and jams on the Lakers’ Robert Sacre