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Posts Tagged ‘Steve Ballmer’

L.A. Clippers player with broken hand? Now it’s Austin Rivers


Your first thought: Who’d he punch?

Because it’s another broken hand, because it’s the Clippers and because the estimated recovery time is identical (four to six weeks) that was projected in Blake Griffin‘s case, it stands to reason that Austin Rivers similarly might have fractured his left hand by punching a team employee.

Turns out, Rivers actually suffered his broken hand on the basketball court, taking a blow in traffic against Minnesota Wednesday in what he and the Clippers initially thought was just a bone bruise. The injury proved more serious than that, however, and now Rivers, son of coach Doc Rivers, joins Griffin as an L.A. player with a clipped wing.

Rivers’ broken hand at least came in the line of duty. Griffin has been called out by Clippers owner Steve Ballmer and by Doc Rivers over the unacceptable, extracurricular nature of his injury, the result of punching an assistant equipment manager. Now it’s the coach himself feeling some heat in both his roles.

Things haven’t gone as smoothly as L.A.’s roster and potential would have suggested. The Clippers rack up technical fouls at an alarming rate. And now both an All-Star starter and a helpful role player are out. Griffin was averaging 23.2 points and 8.7 rebounds before he went out, while Rivers is chipping in 8.1 points in 21.6 minutes.

Doc Rivers spoke recently with the Boston Globe’s Gary Washburn about the expectations and pressure that’s only getting dialed up these days:

With [Ballmer] paying a record $2 billion for the team prior to last season, there is immense pressure to win. Rivers is still as smooth and savvy as before, but he fully realized the job would be challenging.

Griffin is facing sanctions from the league as well as the Clippers.

“Really, it’s nothing you want to go through,” Rivers said of the Griffin situation. “You learn that they’re still young. They’re still learning. It’s not anything you want to go through as a team but you keep remembering that they’re young guys that are in the spotlight and it doesn’t take but a minute or two minutes and something happens.”

It was supposed to be a smooth transition for Rivers, but he has found himself playing counselor, mentor, and life coach with his new Big Three (Griffin, Chris Paul and DeAndre Jordan).

“You’re probably being all of them at this point,” he said. “You’re being a coach first because your job is still to get the team to function and then you become a life coach. But I don’t have all the answers. I make as many mistakes as these guys. I’m human, too. But I tell them about the mistakes I made, the mistakes I still make. I tell them you’ve got to stay in life and hang in there and good things will happen.”

Morning shootaround — Feb. 5


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Feb. 4

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Ballmer: Griffin will face ‘consequences’ for fight | Ainge says no trades imminent | Report: Bucks willing to deal | Johnson fills in nicely for Pistons

No. 1: Ballmer says Griffin will face ‘consequences’ for scuffle — The Los Angeles Clippers are about a week into the four-to-six-week timeframe they’re looking at being without All-Star power forward Blake Griffin. He is out with a broken hand, suffered during an off-the-court fight with a team equipment manager in Toronto a few weeks ago. While the NBA is investigating the incident, team owner Steve Ballmer says there will be repercussions for Griffin, writes Dylan Hernandez of the Los Angeles Times:

In his first interview since Blake Griffin punched out the team’s assistant equipment manager, the Clippers owner sounded as if he was prepared to discipline his All-Star forward.

Asked Wednesday night if he felt it necessary for the Clippers to take the kind of action that would represent what they stand for, Ballmer didn’t hesitate.

“There needs to be consequences,” he said. “It’s the right thing to do.”

Citing a team investigation into the incident that resulted in a broken right hand for Griffin, Ballmer didn’t offer any details, so it’s not known whether the Clippers might add to whatever punishment the Kia pitchman receives from the NBA. Still, Ballmer made it clear that employee-on-employee violence would not be tolerated.

If his actions back his words, good for him.

Ballmer was measured when speaking of Griffin, condemning the player’s actions without tossing him under the proverbial bus.

“Just remember, Blake is a key part of his team,” Ballmer said.

At this moment, the courtside goofball in Ballmer emerged, as he extended his arms to mimic an embrace.

“We will welcome him back,” he said with a smile as broad as his shoulders.

This is something of a new experience for Ballmer. As the chief executive of Microsoft, he said there were times when key employees under-performed as a result of doing something stupid. However, he conceded, “We didn’t ever have a situation quite like this.”

Ballmer continued, “You know, everyone’s going to heal, and we’re going to have an opportunity to move forward. We’re going to finish our investigation, decide what needs to happen and move forward. Blake’s a key part of our team. There’s no question about that.

“He certainly has been remorseful, which is great, and we’ll find a way to move past it. That’s part of life. An important part of life is learning how to have consequences.”

***

No. 2: Ainge says no trades imminent for Celtics — Yesterday we brought you news that the Houston Rockets were reportedly not going to try and deal center Dwight Howard, who was recently linked to a trade with the Boston Celtics. Does that mean Howard is staying put for sure? Who knows. But according to Celtics president of basketball operations Danny Ainge, Boston isn’t looking to make a trade just yet — although he is (as always) in talks with other front offices about possible deals. A. Sherrod Blakely of CSNNewEngland.com has more:

Ainge, the Celtics’ president of basketball operations, spoke about the importance of trust in what was the biggest trade he has pulled off to date – landing Kevin Garnett from Minnesota in 2007.

“The biggest trade we made was with my best friend in the business, Kevin McHale,” Ainge said on 98.5 the Sports Hub’s Toucher & Rich Show.

At the time, McHale was the General Manager of the Minnesota Timberwolves.

“It wouldn’t have gotten done if not for Kevin and I, because there had to be so much trust going back and forth,” Ainge said.

But when it comes to evaluating players and their potential fit with the Celtics, Ainge leans on himself and his staff.

“The relationship is important but I don’t necessarily listen to their evaluation,” Ainge said.

That becomes quite topical now with the Celtics having had some discussions with the Houston Rockets about Dwight Howard who played for McHale in Houston prior to McHale being fired earlier this season.

While Ainge did not speak specifically about Howard and Boston’s level of interest in the former eight-time all-star and three-time Defensive Player of the Year, there’s not a team in the NBA that Ainge hasn’t had a conversation with recently.

But does that means he’s close to making a major deal.

Nope.

“Most of the time, ninety-nine percent of the things talked about and discussed, don’t happen,” Ainge said. “This time of year there’s a lot of discussions. It’s really hard to predict if there’s any deals there. Usually they happen at the very end, the very last day.”

“I do feel like we need to make improvements on our team, but not necessarily at the trade deadline,” Ainge said. “We can’t force anything. Right now, there’s nothing on the table, there’s nothing imminent. We’ve just had a lot of discussions and hope that next week come trade deadline (Feb. 18, 3 p.m. EST) we’re prepared to make the right decisions.”

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No. 3: Report: Bucks willing to deal Carter-Williams, Monroe — The Milwaukee Bucks have been perhaps the most disappointing team of 2015-16, especially given their offseason splash. The Bucks added one of the biggest free-agent fish in the pond, center Greg Monroe, to a squad that surprised many and made the 2015 playoffs. A young core of Monroe, Giannis Antetokounmpo, Jabari Parker and guard Michael Carter-Williams seemed poised for at least a repeat (if not an improvement upon) last season. Yet as the trade deadline nears and the Bucks fall further and further out of the playoff race, Carter-Williams and Monroe could be dealt, writes Gery Woelfel of the Racine Journal Times:

Clearly, Bucks officials are deeply concerned. That’s reflected in their ongoing discussions with other teams about potential trades before the Feb. 18 deadline.

Based on conversations with several NBA execs from the Eastern and Western conferences, the Bucks are more than receptive to playing “Let’s Make a Deal.’’

And that includes possibly moving Michael Carter-Williams, who has been consistently inconsistent since joining the Bucks. Carter-Williams has had some dynamic games this season, like an 18-point, 13-assist outing against Sacramento and a 20-point, 12-assist showing against Chicago.

On the flip side, Carter-Williams had only two assists in 26 minutes against Portland on Wednesday night, one assist in 27 minutes against Memphis last week, and zero assists in 25 minutes against Miami two weeks ago.

But Carter-Williams isn’t the only frontline player the Bucks are apparently willing to move. A much bigger surprise is the Bucks have made it known that center Greg Monroe is available at the right price, according to some NBA officials.

Monroe has been a double-double machine, having recorded 26 this season. That ranks sixth in the league behind Detroit’s Andre Drummond (40), Oklahoma City’s Russell Westbrook (33), Sacramento’s DeMarcus Cousins (28), the Clippers’ DeAndre Jordan (28) and Chicago’s Pau Gasol (27) and just ahead of Washington’s John Wall (25), Minnesota’s Karl-Anthony Towns (25) and New Orleans’ Anthony Davis (24).

But Monroe’s man-to-man and help-defense remain suspect. And he most definitely isn’t the rim protector the Bucks sorely need. He is averaging a mere 0.9 blocks per game this season, which ties him with L.A. Lakers forward Brandon Bass for 46th in the league.

Justified or not, Monroe is being targeted as one of the primary reasons for the Bucks’ defensive deficiencies this season. After being one of the elite defensive teams in the league last season, the Bucks are now one of the worst, giving up 103.3 points per game compared to 97.4 last season.

Clearly, the pieces to the Bucks’ puzzle aren’t fitting. Several league officials said they would be surprised if the Bucks didn’t make a major trade.

“From what I’m hearing is they (the Bucks) are willing to trade anybody not named Parker, Antetokounmpo or Middleton,’’ an NBA executive said. “I even heard they’d listen (to offers) for Parker and Middleton, but it would have to be some crazy offer.

“They want to do something; they know they have to do something. That group they have isn’t working.’’

***

No. 4: Johnson fills in nicely for Pistons — A great number of folks were predicting big things for Detroit Pistons rookie Stanley Johnson after his solid showing at NBA Summer League. He was tops on our Rookie Ladder after Summer League and was a dominant force in the Orlando Summer League. Once 2015-16 got started, though, Johnson was more or less relegated to a reserve role. But an recent injury to third-year guard Kentavious Caldwell-Pope opened the door for Johnson to start last night and he delivered with flying colors, writes Keith Langlois of Pistons.com:

Stan Van Gundy said earlier this week he was looking for ways to get more minutes for Stanley Johnson. Losing Caldwell-Pope to a core muscle strain that will keep him out at least until the resumption of play following the All-Star break on Feb. 19 isn’t the desired method, but Johnson at least proved more than capable of shouldering greater responsibility in the 111-105 win over the Knicks.

“I thought he was tremendous,” Van Gundy said after Johnson logged 44 minutes and led the Pistons with 22 points plus nine rebounds, five assists, two steals and a blocked shot. “Second start of his career. Thought he played real well. We were even going to him down the stretch before Reggie hit the threes. We were running plays for him. Fearless. Getting better all the time. Not afraid to make plays.”

As impressive as it is for a rookie to shoulder 44 minutes and still have enough left to make a handful of the game’s biggest plays in the fourth quarter, Johnson’s play doesn’t really come as a surprise to his teammates. They’ve seen his readiness and his confidence since the early days of training camp.

“It’s awesome. He’s a really good player,” Tolliver said. “We’ve known it the whole season. He’s getting a great opportunity now with KCP out. He’s just really still learning the game. That’s a good thing for him because he’s going to have a bright future, as long as he keeps his head on straight and continues to work hard and play hard like he does.”

Jackson said he and Reggie Johnson discussed strategy on the plane ride back from Boston. What was it? Johnson wouldn’t say, but figures that when Caldwell-Pope comes back, the Pistons now have another tool in their belt to throw at teams.

“What me and Reggie did tonight was different,” Johnson said. “I think it helped a little bit, so I think when (Caldwell-Pope) gets back, having ways for guys who can do stuff like that is going to make it tough for (opponents) to play.”

“Amazing,” Jackson said of Johnson’s contributions. “We talked about it on the plane, the game plan coming in between us two, how we were going to approach this game. He did everything that he told me he was going to do. He’s definitely somebody who has the utmost confidence in himself and he’s one of those, he says he’s going to do it then he’s going to go out and compete. He came up tremendously big.”

Van Gundy sensed some of his veterans feeling the heat as the Knicks took big chunks out of the lead, but not his youngest player.

“We were struggling. I decided to start going to him,” Van Gundy said. “I thought some of our other guys maybe tightened up a little bit and that’s not him. Pretty amazing for a 19-year-old kid.”

Somebody said to Van Gundy, “He relishes the moment.”

“Yeah, he does. He and Reggie both. It’s good to have a couple of guys like that. … I think Stanley’s going to be a really good player. And he handled huge minutes tonight on the fifth game in seven nights, played (44) minutes and played real well. Nine rebounds, made some really good passes. Just played extremely well.”

“I knew I was going to walk into heavy minutes,” Johnson said. “For me going into the game, I was like, ‘How do I keep up (Caldwell-Pope’s) defensive intensity and offensively – we don’t play the same, so I knew I wouldn’t be able to do it in his way, but I thought I could help out on both sides.”

Yeah, you could say he helped out. Just a little.


VIDEO: Balanced Pistons hold off Knicks in Detroit

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SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Indiana Pacers executive and Hall of Famer Larry Bird has some pointed thoughts on the lifespan of NBA big men … ICYMI, a quick rundown of everyone who will be participating in the State Farm All-Star Saturday events, which includes the Verizon Slam Dunk Contest and the Foot Locker Three-Point Contest … NBA commissioner Adam Silver says the ‘Hack-A-‘ rule will soon be changing … The San Antonio Spurs will be without Manu Ginobili after he underwent testicular surgery … President Barack Obama had a lot of fun with the Golden State Warriors yesterday … Kind of a cool photo gallery — re-drafting the 2007 NBA Draft

Forbes: 13 teams worth $1B or more

Thank you, Steve Ballmer. Or maybe, thank you, television networks.

Those are the twin dynamics that recently and somewhat indirectly boosted the value of NBA franchises, to the point where the New York Knicks, who reside in the financial penthouse of the NBA, are oozing with dollars.

According to the new Forbes magazine list of NBA properties, the Knicks are now worth $3 billion. And if that’s not wallet-swelling enough, 13 teams are now worth at least $1 billion (up from 11 last year). Two years ago, only three were worth $1 billion-plus.

Here’s more from Kurt Badenhausen of Forbes:

The New York Knicks reclaim the top spot from the Los Angeles Lakers after a one-year hiatus, thanks to a new cable deal and the highest premium-seating revenue in the league at almost $90 million. The split of the media and sports assets of Madison Square Garden Company in September precipitated a new media rights deal for the Knicks with the MSG regional sports network. The 20-year pact kicks off this season and is worth $100 million in the first year. We value the Knicks at $3 billion, up 20% and fourth most among U.S. sports franchises behind only the Dallas Cowboys ($4 billion), New England Patriots ($3.2 billion) and New York Yankees ($3.2 billion).

The last two seasons rank among the three worst in Lakers history, and the 2015-16 season, which doubles as Kobe Bryant’s retirement tour, is shaping up even worse. Even so, the Lakers are the NBA’s most profitable team thanks to the club’s 20-year, $3.6 billion deal with Time Warner Cable SportsNet LA. Ratings were off more than 50% for Lakers’ games during the 2014-15 season with Bryant sidelined by injuries most of the year, but the average audience size of 122,000 viewers per game was still the second highest in the NBA. Operating profits, in the sense of earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization, were an NBA-record $133 million last season by our count. The Lakers are now worth $2.7 billion.

Rounding out the top five are the Chicago Bulls ($2.3 billion), Boston Celtics ($2.1 billion) and Los Angeles Clippers ($2 billion). Thirteen teams are worth at least $1 billion, up from just three two years ago.

The league’s 30 teams generated $5.2 billion in revenue last season and $900 million in operating profit (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization). Both are records. The NBA’s 2011 collective bargaining agreement, which enhanced revenue sharing for poorer small market teams and cut player costs, means that every team except one—billionaire Mikhail Prokhorov’s Brooklyn Nets—turned an operating profit last season.

The Hawks are a club on the upswing after years of dysfunctional ownership. The new Fox Sports TV deal kicked off this season and is worth triple the prior pact on an annual basis. Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed is backing a renovation of up to $250 million of Philips Arena that would include public funding. The team reached the Eastern Conference finals last year and is led by Coach of the Year Mike Budenholzer. Attendance jumped a league-leading 21% at Philips last year and the number of season ticket holders is up to 9,000 from 3,000. We value the team at $825 million.

The Nets and Hawks transactions reflect the bifurcation of franchise values in recent years, with big market teams carrying significant premiums, particularly the largest markets like Los Angeles, where Steve Ballmer paid $2 billion for the Clippers in 2014. The top five teams are now worth $2.3 billion on average or three-and-a-half times the bottom five teams. Five years ago the multiple was only two times as much.

So, in short, what happened? Ballmer happened.

He purchased the Clippers a few years ago for $2 billion and that suddenly set a new standard. The TV contracts happened, too: ESPN and Turner (which manages NBA.com) ponied up $24 billion over nine years. That’s not counting local TV deals. Essentially, those TV contracts are gold to owners.

But it’s not just that. The league overall is profitable, too, with sponsorship deals and ticket sales and merchandise sales all adding more cha-ching to the cash registers. Also, new arenas are coming for Golden State, Sacramento and Milwaukee. Business is very good for the NBA and the teams are reaping the benefits.

Imagine, that in 1988, when the league added four expansion franchises (Miami, Orlando, Minnesota and Charlotte), those franchises cost $32.5 million each. The Heat is now worth $1.3 billion.

 

Morning Shootaround — Aug. 29


NEWS OF THE MORNING
Leonard ready to lead | Clippers could go streaming | Boozer to wait it out

No. 1: Leonard says he’ll step up for Blazers — After making a commitment to one serious partnership by getting married this summer, now Trail Blazers big man Meyers Leonard says he’s ready to strengthen the bonds with teammate Damian Lillard in order to move the team forward. In the aftermath of LaMarcus Aldridge bolting to San Antonio, Lillard is at the forefront of Portland’s move in a new direction. But Leonard wants to help with the heavy lifting, according to Dwight Jaynes of Comcast SportsNet NW:

“Obviously, Dame and I are the guys who have been here the longest and he’s going to be our leader. But I hope to be right there by his side, kind of a co-leader, right there having his back through the ups and downs,” Leonard said Thursday night in Hillsboro.

I admire Leonard’s willingness to publicly apply for that job on this team. Quality leadership is imperative on all teams, not only the ones trying to win a championship but those just trying to improve and find their way in the league. But as everybody knows, people don’t get to be leaders by proclaiming themselves leaders — it comes from others’ willingness to follow them. Sometimes the most talented players become leaders. Others lead by example — which often stems from hard work, sacrifice and charisma.

***

No. 2: Clippers could choose streaming — As we move deeper into the 21st century, so many of the traditional ways of thinking and acting go out the window. Now the Clippers could be ready to take a new step as they consider the possibility of foregoing the usual method of televising games and streaming them for the 2015-16 season. With Steve Ballmer, the former CEO of Microsoft, now in his second year of owning the club, Dan Woike of the Orange Country Register says it’s being considered:

But could a leap as far as spurning traditional TV distribution for an online-based network happen as soon as 2016? Well, Ballmer’s considering it.

The Clippers recently turned down a $60 million-per-year offer from Fox to remain on Prime Ticket, and while negotiations with the network are ongoing, other options, including a streaming network, are being discussed.

That option was first reported by the New York Post.

No major professional sports team has bypassed cable in favor of Internet distribution of games, and the chance to be on the forefront of the movement would certainly appeal to someone with Ballmer’s tech background.

The Clippers are expected to counter Fox’s $60 million offer, which is a significant increase from the team’s current deal. The Clippers have one year remaining on their contract with Prime Ticket, which is worth $25 million annually.

Fox had exclusive negotiation rights with the Clippers in June, but the window closed without a new deal. A Fox spokesman declined comment Friday.

***

No. 3: Boozer to be patient — Despite the talk that he might be ready to head to China or other parts overseas, veteran free agent forward Carlos Boozer isn’t packing his bags just yet. According to Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports, the ex-Laker is hoping to find a need and an open spot with a playoff team for the 2015-16 season:

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SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Toure Murry is returning to the Wizards … Jazz sign rookie free agent J.J. O’Brien … Finals MVP Andre Iguodala is taking a bite out of Japan … Isaiah Thomas has been working out with Floyd Mayweather and giving him a few lessons on the court … Luol Deng met with President Obama to talk about South Sudan.

Cuban and Ballmer ‘clear the air’

Mark Cuban and Steve Ballmer have apparently buried the hatchet.

And no, not in each other’s back.

According to a message Cuban released on his Cyberdust account Wednesday, the pair of NBA owners straightened things out after last week’s public squabble involving free agent center DeAndre Jordan, when the Mavericks thought they had signed him away from the Clippers.

Cuban said the two team owners met during the league meetings in Las Vegas on Tuesday at the league meetings and “cleared the air.”

Cuban said he is not unhappy with the moratorium period for free agents. The league allows teams to negotiate with free agents starting July 1, but players can’t officially be signed to a contract until over a week later. After DeAndre Jordan told the the Mavericks he would join them, the Clippers were able to put on a late full-court press and change his mind the day before signing day. But not before the whole affair played out like a live soap opera on Twitter, complete with competing emojis.

Cuban’s statement in its entirety:

Hey mavs fans. So I had a nice conversation with Steve Ballmer, owner of the Clippers yesterday during our NBA meetings.

It started off more than a little frigid, but we both cleared the air on a few things.

I told him exactly what I told other owners, I didn’t have a problem with his hail Mary approach to keeping a player. I understood why they did it. And even how they did it. They got their player back. End of story.

There are still a few unresolved issues that the NBA will have to work through but one I don’t feel is an issue is the moratorium.
Nothing that happened with this deal was the result of the moratorium

The thing about the NBA is that you don’t know which deals are the good deals and which arrows you avoided till you start playing the games

My guess is that we open the season against the Clippers. That’s when the real fun will begin.

+letsgomavs

Blogtable, DeAndre Edition: What you’ll remember most is …?

In this special edition of the Blogtable, we’re asking our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the DeAndre Jordan free-agency saga — and give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Impact on Clippers? | Impact on Mavs? | What you’ll remember most?



VIDEOAn emoji battle wages on during the DeAndre Jordan decision

> Emoji wars, Twitter all abuzz, Mavs and Clippers assembling a la The Avengers to sway DeAndre — which of these things (or maybe something else) will you most remember from the DeAndre decision?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comWhat we witnessed wasn’t unprecedented, but it ought to be. Breaking a verbal agreement isn’t honorable, nor is swooping in at the 11th hour to encourage it. Had Jordan told all involved he would mull over his decision until the moratorium ended, fine, he’d have remained in play. But that’s not how this went. This sort of episode encourages cut-throat behavior all around. And unfortunately, there were some marking execs and media types loving it simply because it “had people talking about the NBA” for one more summer day. Yeah, well, carnival geeks get people talking, too. What I’ll likely remember from this is that, instead of teams only lining up at 12:01 a.m. on July 1 to be the first ones in the room with a new free agent, this is what started them mobilizing at 11:59 p.m. at the moratorium’s back end to be the last ones in the room. Just to make sure a deal is a deal is a deal.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Just the thought of Doc Rivers and Blake Grifin barricading the doors of DeAndre’s house with furniture against a possible invasion of desperate Cubanites waving stacks of cash and the image of Chris Paul riding to the rescue on a banana boat. And hoo boy, am I looking forward to the announcement of the 2015-16 schedule with the Clippers at Dallas on Christmas. C’mon, Adam Silver. Show us you get it.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Don’t mention the E word again. I’m doing everything possible to un-see that part of the silliness, although I’m afraid we’ve just seen the start of a trend. The rest of it will be impossible to forget, especially the biggest takeaway of all: How the fate of two franchises changed in one crazy day as the world followed along. The basketball part is the bottom line because that will have implications for years. We may not know the real outcome of Wednesday for years, until seeing how things turned out for the Clippers and Mavericks. DeAndre Jordan showed a lack of maturity and professionalism by not doing the very least he could do and treat Dallas with respect, but that’s for him to sort through. The rest of us will watch the basketball aspect unfold.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comWhat I’ll remember is sitting in my chair for 8 hours reading Twitter, the longest I’ve been locked on that site continuously in like forever. Blake Griffin dropped the Twitter mic with the chair-against-the-door pic. I think he has a future in entertainment.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comBlake Griffin’s tweet of the chair against the front door was my favorite moment. It made me laugh out loud and then have to explain the entire ridiculous situation to my wife.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: The emoji war was epic, with Kobe Bryant and eventually the fine folks from @Jumpman23 dropping the mic on a crazy day that proved to be Twitter gold for all involved. If the Clippers find their way to the conference finals and perhaps beyond during the next five years, then maybe I’ll change my mind. But until then, the mobilization of the Clippers’ entire basketball operation to get to Houston and secure DeAndre’s services will continue to stick out as the most memorable part of this experience for me.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: It will be worth remembering only if Jordan proves to be worthy of the trouble: Can he help lead his team to the NBA Finals? If so, then we’re all going to be looking back on the Clippers’ principals pulling tighter together around Jordan at his house last night, with the focus being on Chris Paul’s emotional plea to his teammate. But if they’re unable to rally, then this little plot twist will have no staying power (apart from possibly leading the NBA to change the timing of the moratorium).

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogSomeone on Twitter noted that this whole saga was tailor-made for the All Ball blog, and I have to agree. Emojis, Blake Griffin making jokes, Mark Cuban allegedly driving aimlessly around Houston while texting furiously, Paul Pierce tweeting out clip art — it was quite an evening. It was one of the most memorable NBA evenings I can recall that didn’t actually have anything to do with basketball. I love this game.

Blogtable, DeAndre Edition: Impact of his decision on the Clippers?

In this special edition of the Blogtable, we’re asking our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the DeAndre Jordan free-agency saga — and give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Impact on Clippers? | Impact on Mavs? | What you’ll remember most?



VIDEODavid Aldridge breaks down the DeAndre Jordan decision

> What does his return do for the Clippers given their other reported offseason moves? Where do they now rank in the West hierarchy?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: The Clippers avoid a drop in the Western Conference standings with this move – they were looking at retreads or minimum-salary types to man the center spot if Jordan had left. But they’re still not cracking the top three out West – Golden State, San Antonio, Memphis – and to me, it’s the latest example of that franchise’s frantic, emotional, not-quite-professional way of doing things. It doesn’t instill new confidence the Clippers can get through tough postseason times.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: What the Clippers avoided was falling like a piano off a roof. They are in the same place they ranked last season, fighting to be in the upper half of the West bracket, a step below Golden State, San Antonio and OKC, duking it out with Houston and Memphis for home-court advantage in the first round of the playoffs.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Obviously it is a dramatic change. It’s a double blow, keeping the Clippers in a prominent place after all while undercutting the Mavericks’ hopes of being in the upper echelon. We have to see how the rest of the summer turns out rather than give daily updates on where teams rank because the situation is so fluid. A lot of teams are still filling out depth charts. But this minute, the Clippers are behind the lead group of Golden State and San Antonio, part of the pack with OKC, Houston and Memphis in some order.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: Obviously this is a game-changer for the Clippers. They went from JaVale McGee to DeAndre. So it’s fair to say they didn’t lose their place in line in the West. That said, the other offseason pieces must deliver in order for the Clippers to go deep into spring. Paul Pierce can’t fall off the cliff just yet. Lance Stephenson must straighten his head and his game in a hurry. And there’s still questions about the depth of the bench especially at point guard.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: The Clippers avoided wasting, in regard to contending for a championship, a season of Chris Paul and Blake Griffin at their best. They’re still gambling on Lance Stephenson and they still need to hope that their big three stays healthy, because they don’t have anyone to back up any of them right now. But they’ll go into the season as a top-six team in the Western Conference, certainly behind Golden State and San Antonio, and in the mix with Houston, Memphis and Oklahoma City. They can truly contend for a title if coach Doc Rivers can somehow get another reliable contributor with what little flexibility he has left (minimum-contract offers and Jamal Crawford‘s tradeable deal) and if they can improve defensively.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: DeAndre’s return keeps the Clippers firmly entrenched in the upper echelon of the Western Conference standings. They are still a top-four or-five team in the West and one of the best teams in the league. I’m more interested in the impact both Paul Pierce and Lance Stephenson will have on this group, on and off the floor, more than I am DeAndre’s return. The Clippers know what they have in their big man. Those other guys remain a mystery.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comThe last couple of years have shown how much injuries and other surprises can influence the outcome – the key is to enter next season with a competitive roster and coaching staff, and the Clippers will be right there. They can excel at both ends, their depth has improved and they should be loaded with hungry players, from their Big Three (who collapsed on the verge of the conference finals) to Lance Stephenson (who should be receptive to Doc Rivers’ coaching after a horrible season with Charlotte). I can also envision them adding another player in midseason to add to their run. This was a big summer for the Clippers, and year three with Rivers should be their culmination.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: With Jordan, I’d still have the Clippers third, behind Golden State and San Antonio. Not sure which version of Lance Stephenson they’ll get, but if they get Indiana Pacers Lance instead of Charlotte Hornets Lance, they might be able to leapfrog those teams. Interestingly, I also think the key there is Jordan, and whether he’s able to continue to develop and be more than a 10 ppg scorer and develop into more of an offensive threat. They still need a bench, of course, but that core of CP3, Blake and DeAndre is going to be what makes the Clips a contender.

Blogtable, DeAndre Edition: Impact of his decision on the Mavericks?

In this special edition of the Blogtable, we’re asking our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the DeAndre Jordan free-agency saga — and give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Impact on Clippers? | Impact on Mavs? | What you’ll remember most?



VIDEODirk Nowitzki talks after the Mavs’ postseason ouster

> How does his change of heart affect the Mavericks, their offseason moves and the upcoming season? Where do they now rank in the West hierarchy?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: This is potentially devastating to Dallas, which won 50 games last season and now will be doing well not to lose 50. The options left among available big men are limited – Amar’e Stoudemire‘s name has come up, but he’s strictly a limited-minutes guy at this point, and neither Kevin Seraphin nor Josh Smith is a center, for those suggesting them. Owner Mark Cuban‘s “David Robinson year” remark might actually play out, and that’s tough to imagine for Dirk Nowitzki, coach Rick Carlisle and a few others. I am looking forward, though, to seeing Dallas sign Rick Mahorn and Charles Oakley to 1-day contracts for the first Clippers-Mavericks meeting this season. Just to dish out reminders to Jordan and a couple of his teammate-rescuers that this episode won’t soon be forgotten.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com The Mavericks are burnt toast for the 2015-16 season, another waste of one of Dirk Nowitzki’s last years and that’s the worst part of the flip-flop. Dallas is in the lottery, up to its 10-gallon hat. But I’m going on the record here as saying Mark Cuban will be thankful this happened in a couple of years. While Jordan is worth the price to the Clippers to keep him as the third wheel with Chris Paul and Blake Griffin, he would have been badly exposed as Cuban’s so-called “franchise player” down the line. It was a bad joke to even mention him in the same breath as Shaquille O’Neal. I think Jordan might even have realized that himself and ran from that burden.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: It’s a brutal outcome for the Mavs. It’s not like DeAndre Jordan turned them down and they implemented the fallback plan. By the time he had finished mishandling the situation at historical levels, they were scrambling for the fallback plan to the fallback plan. The Dallas front office began the offseason with a clear plan, executed it with precision… and then got it fell apart through no fault of anyone there. If Wesley Matthews comes back strong, the Mavericks will be around .500, respectable but not in the playoffs. And they will have a lot of people rooting for them.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: I think there’s a silver lining to losing DeAndre. I always thought the Mavericks with him were nothing special … maybe a No. 6 or 7 team in the West. This way, they can get a jump on rebuilding and stash their millions for next summer and plan to transition from the Dirk Nowitzki era.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Dallas is where the Clippers were 24 hours ago. They have a strong starting lineup, with a huge hole at center. Unlike the Clippers, they have a lot of cap space. But while there are a lot of centers still available, they’re all back-up quality. So I could see them trading for Chris Andersen or Zaza Pachulia. As they stand, they’re in the 8-10 range in the Western Conference, with the health and recovery of Wes Matthews still being a big question.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: This is the strange part for me — I didn’t think adding DeAndre was a gamechanger for the Mavericks. Sure, he would help shore up the middle. But without an elite point guard feeding him, I don’t know that he would have been a consistent force for the Mavericks on both ends of the floor. The Mavericks certainly don’t have any options comparable to DJ now, and that’s a potentially devastating blow for a franchise that is contemplating the dreaded rebuild. I don’t like the idea of Dirk Nowitzki on a lottery team in his twilight years, but in the absence of some miraculous move between now and training camp, that’s the predicament these guys could be in this season.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: The Mavericks are going to miss the playoffs, and they may lose their draft pick to the Celtics (unless it lands among the top seven) by way of the Rondo trade. The silver lining will emerge one year from now if they can turn Jordan’s absence into a superior free agent in 2016. But this interim season is going to be a long one for a team that figures to have no identity at either end of the floor.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog Without DeAndre, I’m not sure that they do rank among the West hierarchy. The Western Conference is so stacked, and if you’re looking for playoff teams that might drop out of the picture to make room for teams like Oklahoma City, Phoenix or Utah, I’d look directly at Portland (after losing LaMarcus Aldridge) and Dallas. Losing Monta Ellis will hurt, and while Wesley Matthews should be a nice addition, he’s still recovering from a torn Achilles. Jordan could have given them a nice frontline alongside Dirk and Chandler Parsons. Now they need Dirk to play like MVP Dirk. And I’m not sure that player still exists.

Blogtable: Advice for Doc Rivers?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Who wins it all (and why)? | Advice for Doc Rivers? | Lottery team that must get it right?



VIDEOAssessing the state of the Clippers after their ouster

> Your nameplate says Doc Rivers, President of Basketball Operations, L.A. Clippers. So tell me Mr. Rivers, what needs to happen this summer for your team to advance past the conference semifinals next season?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: First of all, remember it’s only a nickname, so my prescribed remedies aren’t Hippocratically approved. I already blew the “Do no harm” thing when I signed Spencer Hawes to that four-year deal last summer when I could have had Paul Pierce. Anyway, as much as I like Matt Barnes and J.J. Redick, I know they ought to be coming off the bench rather than starting – maybe then our backups wouldn’t look quite as motley. But we’re capped out with DeAndre Jordan about to get his max deal this summer, so I’ll need to sweet-talk some free agents to consider us on exceptions or minimum contracts, and that’s a hard way to plug two of the skill positions. Hawes? Hey, he’s low mileage, clean, a stretch-four willing and able to help (OK, ya got me. That is my early version of a Craigslist ad, because I’ve got to move him). As for Chris Paul, get out the bubble wrap; no way he’s playing 82 next season, when we need him at his healthiest in May.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: First, I’ve got to convince DeAndre Jordan to take our max contract offer and stick around and I’ve got to beat the bushes somewhere, somehow to get somebody to provide some offense at small forward. I really can’t afford to have my starter (Matt Barnes) go scoreless there in a Game 7.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: I’m seriously out of answers. I think I have to do something bold, but what? I don’t want to trade Chris Paul. I don’t want to trade Blake Griffin. And I don’t think I will do either. I don’t want to let DeAndre Jordan go in free agency. But something has to be done. Playoff meltdowns two years in a row is a screaming sign something is wrong and needs to be addressed, because this wasn’t about the disappointing bench or anything that requires tinkering. This is about an inability to come through in the clutch. My leaders, my best players, have let me down.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: The Clippers just need another crack at it. I know that sounds so routine and so simple, but that’s it, really. They’re a 50-win team in a tough conference that needs a break or two along the way, just like three or four other contenders in the West. They can’t make wholesale changes even if they wanted to. Doc needs to find some cheap talent the way the Rockets did with Josh Smith and Corey Brewer and what they got with Jason Terry  a role player with experience who can add punch off the bench.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: I need Steve Ballmer to tell me focus on coaching and hire somebody else to manage the roster. That person then needs to re-sign DeAndre Jordan and find some way to undo the damage I’ve done to our bench, because we need help in the backcourt and up front. If there’s a chance of getting two or three rotation players (who can shoot and defend) for Blake Griffin, we should explore that. We can still have a top-five offense with shooting around Paul/Jordan pick-and-rolls, and we we need to have more than six players that can be trusted to keep a lead.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: The first thing we have to do is take care of DeAndre Jordan. Get him signed and then lock him in the gym until his free throws roll off his fingertips like butter. He has to improve that part of his game if he’s going to be worth the $109 million deal he’s due to sign this summer. Then, I’m taking the carving knife to this roster and finding better supporting players to make sure we don’t stall out again in the conference semifinals. We ran out of gas physically and emotionally, which tells me we need a different breed of player to fill out the starting lineup and the playing rotation. There are upgrades needed all over the roster and they will be made this summer.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: I’m recognizing, as I’m sure he does, that organizations win. It’s not just a matter of shoring up the bench. There was no way a franchise known for years as the worst in pro sports could instantly become NBA champion. You need everybody along the chain to be pulling in the same direction, and it starts with Rivers in his relatively new role of leadership. The way he responds to the disappointment can show the way forward.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogIt is so tempting to sit there and say the Clippers need to make major changes, in the afterglow of getting ushered out in the second round of the playoffs and half of California making “they’re still the Clippers jokes.” But I honestly don’t think the Clips were that far away. If the regular season ends differently, for instance, and the Clippers don’t have to play the San Antonio Spurs in the first round of the postseason, I’m guessing things would have gone differently against the Rockets. So I think you keep DeAndre, teach him how to shoot free throws, let Blake continue to develop, and maybe swap out Hedo Turkoglu for a more useful body, and then just see how things shake out next season.

Report: Garnett would like to buy Timberwolves one day

Can’t you see it now?

A dapper Kevin Garnett, wearing a designer suit and tie, leaping out of his courtside seat at the Target Center, slapping two hands on the floor and snarling expletive-laden invective at visiting teams.

Call it executive level trash talk, giving a whole new level to the idea of “owning” an opponent.

First though, Garnett wants to actually own his own team, namely the Timberwolves, for whom he toiled his first 12 NBA seasons. That’s what he told Marc Spears of Yahoo Sports!:

“I want to buy the Timberwolves. Put a group together and perhaps some day try to buy the team. That’s what I want,” Garnett said after a 107-99 loss to the Golden State Warriors on Thursday night.

The Timberwolves drafted Garnett with the fifth overall pick in the 1995 NBA draft. The 15-time All-Star played for the Timberwolves for 12 seasons before being traded to Boston, where he led the Celtics to a championship in 2008. Garnett pushed Minnesota to eight consecutive playoff appearances, and the franchise has not been to the postseason since his departure.

The Timberwolves were valued at $430 million in January, according to Forbes Magazine. The next NBA television contract will be extremely lucrative and is expected to raise the price of the franchise. Garnett, the 2004 MVP who averaged 20.5 points and 11.4 rebounds during his tenure with Minnesota, has made $315 million in his NBA career and will make an additional $12 million this season. He also has made millions in endorsements.

Nets general manager Billy King said he wouldn’t be surprised if Garnett were to buy the Timberwolves.

“He would be one of the best owners in the NBA because he understands what the players need and he understands what it takes to be successful in the NBA,” King told Yahoo Sports.

On May 12, Timberwolves owner Glen Taylor told the Associated Press he was looking to add a minority partner who would hold an option to buy him out. Taylor also made it clear he is committed to keeping the team in Minnesota.

Timberwolves president and coach Flip Saunders is Garnett’s former coach with the franchise, which is rebuilding and expected to miss the playoffs once again. But the team does have several young talented players: 2014 No. 1 draft pick Andrew Wiggins, Ricky Rubio, Gorgui Dieng, Nikola Peckovic, Anthony Bennett, Shabazz Muhammad and rookie Zach LaVine.
For Garnett, it’s all about his history with the franchise.

“That is the one that has my interest. I have ties there. Flip’s there,” said Garnett, 38.

The NBA has had its share of colorful owners. The late Larry Miller used to stand on the court with his Jazz players shagging basketballs during pre-game warmups. The late Dr. Jerry Buss exuded all that was cool and Hollywood about the Lakers with his casual fashion and his lifestyle. Just last year Grizzlies owner Robert Pera publicly challenged Michael Jordan to a high-profile game of 1-on-1 to benefit charity.

But you’ve got to admit that the volatile, emotional K.G. could take the role of team owner to a new and most colorful direction.

Would it be in-your-executive-suite, in-your-face? The first owner ever voted to the All-Defense first team?

If Garnett’s dream comes true, we’ll admit to having our fingers crossed for a Western Conference finals matchup one day soon against the Clippers and their loud, screamingly excitable boss man Steve Ballmer.


VIDEO: Relive Kevin Garnett’s top 10 plays from his Timberwolves days


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