Posts Tagged ‘Steve Aschburner’

Blogtable: Stars in dire need of help

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Best place for Wiggins | Playoff team due for a fall | Superstars without a wingman


> Say Kevin Love joins LeBron in Cleveland. Who’s the NBA superstar (or near-superstar) next in line for a wingman? Anyone in mind who would fit well with him?

Carmelo Anthony is back with the Knicks, but still needs some help.(Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE)

Carmelo Anthony is back with the Knicks, but still needs some help.(Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE)

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: Who’s Kobe got now? It’s looking a little barren on that Lakers roster. Then again, Bryant has been blessed in his career with two of the best sidekicks in recent memory (Shaq and Pau Gasol). So it’s not his turn. As tempting as it is to say Derrick Rose or Carmelo Anthony, neither has ever seemed all that determined to find or recruit a partner/peer. So I’m going with Dirk Nowitzki, who hasn’t had a proper wingman since Steve Nash left. Who’d look good next to him? Michael Carter-Williams. Or a rehabbed Paul George. Or a healthy Rose.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Did I miss something or isn’t Carmelo Anthony still looking like a tall cactus standing all alone in that desert at Madison Square Garden? But he chose the bed. Hope all those Benjamins in the mattress can keep him company.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.comThere’s still that guy Carmelo Anthony, who passed on joining a variety of wing men this summer to re-sign with the Knicks. New York has cap space at its disposal next summer to add big-money free agents. So how about spending on point guard Eric Bledsoe, assuming he signs Phoenix’s qualifying offer and becomes a free agent in ’15, or Rajon Rondo? And why stop there? Melo needs a big man in the middle, too, so how about Greg Monroe (assuming he signs Detroit’s qualifying offer and becomes unrestricted in ’15) or go really big with Marc Gasol?

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: We’re getting into the subjective land of deciding who gets the superstar label, and I like where his team is headed anyway, but Anthony Davis could use a scoring threat in New Orleans. He may have one already, but Ryan Anderson needs to show he is healthy in 2014-15. The Omer Asik acquisition is a nice move — no one scores inside on the Pelicans this season. Maybe Eric Gordon finds his old self. But take Anderson out of the conversation for the moment, and no one on the team averaged more than 15.4 ppg last season.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Carmelo Anthony seems like the obvious answer here, but I’d really like to see Goran Dragic get an All-Star teammate. Dragic and Channing Frye were the most potent pick-and-roll combination last season, so imagine what he could do with an Anthony Davis, a Dirk Nowitzki or a Blake Griffin (not that any of those guys are going anywhere). The Suns are still set up well to add a star via trade or free agency next season, not only because of their payroll, but also because they have a terrific point guard.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: If Carmelo Anthony is ever going to shed his reputation as a great player with the asterisk (killer numbers but no hardware to show for it), he’s going to need a first-class wingman whose games meshes well with his own. Since we’re operating in theory-ville, why not go deep down the rabbit hole? LaMarcus Aldridge and ‘Melo on the same team would be absolutely diabolical. Aldridge can stretch the floor from the post to the wing with his deadly face-up game. And he rebounds well. Melo is a dynamic scorer capable of working inside or out (beyond the 3-point line), stretching the floor in ways that can cause all sorts of problems for opposing teams. The way they both shoot it, you can have them work off of each other, one in the post and the other from outside, and shred teams with their two-man game.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogCarmelo Anthony was the first name that came to mind. I guess the closest thing he’s had to wingman since coming to the Knicks has been Amar’e Stoudemire or maybe J.R. Smith? As solid as younger players like Tim Hardaway Jr. and Iman Shumpert have been, nobody on the Knicks current roster gives me much hope that they will develop into a perennial All-Star. Maybe he gets a running mate in 2015 when guys like Rajon Rondo or LaMarcus Aldridge hit the open market. Unless Phil has some mind tricks up his sleeve for Andrea Bargnani.

MLB strike in ’94 brought Air Jordan back to his familiar day job


VIDEO: Michael Jordan recorded his famous “double-nickel” game in 1995

Michael Jordan didn’t leave baseball. Baseball left him.

Twenty years ago, on Aug. 12, 1994, the owners and players of Major League Baseball tested the patience and allegiance of America’s sports fans with yet another full stop – the eighth work stoppage since 1972, at that point.

Little did they or anyone else know that they inadvertently were doing a great service to the NBA. The MLB strike that brought that sport to its knees, grinding to a halt some of the most exciting team and individual seasons ever, helped propel Jordan out of baseball’s minor leagues and back into uniform with the Chicago Bulls. Once restored to his primary athletic pursuit, Jordan won three more NBA championships in perhaps the most successful comeback in pro sports history and establishing his legacy as the league’s GOAT.

All because the baseball guys couldn’t sort things out in fewer than 232 days.

It was bad enough that the summer game threw itself into winter just as pennant races and statistical chases were heating up. The Montreal Expos were both MLB and the National League’s best team (74-40) on Aug. 12 in their best chance yet at a World Series. In the American League, the New York Yankees, Chicago White Sox and Cleveland Indians all had legitimate shots at 100 wins.

San Diego’s Tony Gwynn was hitting .394 in the latest, greatest shot at .400 since Ted Williams did it in 1941. San Francisco third baseman Matt Williams was going after Roger Maris‘ record of 61 from 1961 four years before Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa staged their performance-enhanced show. Frank Thomas crammed a full season (38 home runs, 101 RBI, 106 runs, .353 BA and 1.217 on-base plus slugging percentage) into two-thirds of the schedule.

Meanwhile, that Jordan guy was plugging along with the Class AA Birmingham Barons in the Southern League. Showing up early, staying late, humbling himself in search of a new (or at least renewed) skill set. Jordan was riding a bus – admittedly a spiffy luxurious one, paid for by revenues he helped generate – and struggling to keep his batting average above .200 for the Barons when the big leaguers walked out. He was 31 years old, spending his days and nights with a crew of recent high school and college kids.

And from many accounts, he was having the time of his life. One of them, anyway.

“When MJ was with us, it was kind of a whirlwind,” said Cleveland Indians manager Terry Francona, who was the Barons’ skipper in 1994. “It had all the makings of turning into a circus, but it never did. I think that was mainly because of the way Michael handled things. He respected the game of baseball so much. He was so eager to learn, even the lingo and how the guys talked. And he understood … what the players weren’t making and how hard they had worked just to get to the Double A level.”

Francona recalled how coachable Jordan was that summer in a video for the Barons’ Web site earlier this season. “I think it’s kind of fashionable to maybe come down on MJ for playing baseball. … And I always wanted to be very protective of him because of how respectful he was of the game.”

Jordan’s so-called dalliance with baseball – or his exile, if you bought into rumors that the NBA had considered an investigation into and possible suspension for Jordan’s gambling associations – was driven in part by his late father, James, and his love of that sport. And it might have continued if only the big leaguers had found labor peace more quickly.

Jordan had batted .202 in 127 games for Birmingham, with 17 doubles, one triple, three home runs, 51 RBI and 30 stolen bases in 48 tries. He committed 11 errors in the outfield. But he went to the Arizona Fall League, where he batted .252 as his long, loping swing evened out and he learned to protect his rather large strike zone.

Jordan reported to spring training a week early in February 1995 ready to resume his grand crossover. Only, the MLB strike persisted. Jordan did not want to cross the players’ picket lines, nor was he willing to be considered as a “replacement player” simply as a way for the owners to sell tickets. (The Barons had shattered their home attendance record, drawing 467, 867 fans at Regions Park and even more (517,318) on the road.)

So on March 10, with no end in sight to the strike, Jordan announced his retirement from baseball.

On March 18, Jordan faxed his now-famous “I’m back” statement, announcing his return to the NBA. He played for Chicago the next day, scoring 19 points on 7-of-28 shooting at Indiana.

Baseball reached a collective bargaining agreement to resume on April 2. Three nights later, Jordan scored 37 points in a 108-101 victory at New Jersey. The Bulls got eliminated by Orlando from the Eastern Conference playoffs, but roared back for a second three-peat of championships. With a renewed, more teammate-oriented Jordan leading them.

“I don’t know if baseball took away from his legacy, but the coming back was so dramatic,” Bulls owner Jerry Reinsdorf told the Chicago Sun-Times in 2013. “[That] caused him to spend the next summer working out like a madman, bringing in players from all over the country to play with him. And if you remember the next season, we were 72-10. He was on a mission to prove something. Maybe playing baseball contributed to that.”

Blogtable: Are the Pacers done?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Risk/reward and the USA | Indy’s dilemma | Pick a center


> You’re Larry Bird. Paul George is out. Lance Stephenson is gone. What are your plans for the Pacers? When can you make them a factor again?

The success of the Pacers next season will rest largely on Roy Hibbert's shoulders. (Ron Hoskins/NBAE)

The success of the Pacers next season will rest largely on Roy Hibbert’s shoulders. (Ron Hoskins/NBAE)

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: The cupboard is too bare, I fear, for the Pacers to be much of a factor this season. The contender that most needed an offensive overhaul has suffered an offensive mugging, losing its starting and shot-creating backcourt. Shawn Marion wouldn’t be any real answer at this stage of his career, C.J. Miles is C.J. Miles, and unless Rodney Stuckey was holding back something brilliant from Pistons fans, he won’t be a savior either. David West is getting long in the tooth and Roy Hibbert remains a 7-foot enigma. On defense and muscle memory, Indiana can grab a lower playoff rung in the East. But that’s about it. Can Reggie Miller suit up again?

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: You take a page out of an old Western movie and circle the wagons. The Pacers don’t have to look outside their own division to see how the Bulls made no excuses and instead made a commitment to defense and team play the past two season. Hello, Roy Hibbert. It’s your time to step up and shoulder the burden. The challenge is to develop a stronger supporting cast for when George does return in 2015-16 and vaults Indy back into the Eastern Conference contender race.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: Unfortunately, I don’t think there’s a lot of choices out there other than going out and playing with the hand they’re dealt. Maybe this can be Indiana’s David Robinson-Tim Duncan moment. Is there a Tim Duncan out there?

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: I’m screwed. There will be the chance to sign someone with the injury exception, but obviously anyone who can make the kind of impact the Pacers need now is gone. And any trade consideration only weakens me at another position (and there is no sense to give up a lot for a small forward if I believe George is back after one season). I can, however, set the tone, along with Frank Vogel, that this changes nothing in the expectation that everyone reports to work every day expecting to win. I’m good at that no-nonsense thing.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Tread water. Seriously. Just tread water in the Eastern Conference and do whatever it takes to try to make the playoffs with a roster that has been greatly reduced since last season. Doubt works as a great motivator. And these Pacers will be doubted by many, so they’ll have all the motivation they need. But Paul George could be out for not only the entire 2014-15 season and beyond, which means the Pacers will spend the next two seasons trying to recover from what has turned out to be a catastrophic summer.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Obviously, they’re not going to be a “factor” until at least the 2015-16 season. So Bird should listen to offers for his older vets, including David West, who turns 34 this month and could help another team (Phoenix?) more than he could help the Pacers. Indiana was already pretty brutal offensively. It got worse when they lost Lance Stephenson and now we may be looking at the worst offense in the league. Even if they can remain a top-10 defense without their best perimeter defender, the Pacers will be lucky if they hover around .500 this season.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: You play to your strengths. You’ve still got Roy Hibbert, David West and Luis Scola, so you slow the tempo as much as you can and pound the ball inside, over and over and over. One of Hibbert’s issues last season was gumming up the offense by wanting the ball in the post. Well, now you can have it as much as you want! The Pacers won’t contend in the East this season, but they can still defend the rim, and with more shots to go around, I wouldn’t be surprised if George Hill steps up and posts big numbers as well. So for now, you try and get by until Paul George is back out there.

Rubens Borges, NBA Brasil: The Indiana Pacers are in a pickle. They have already lost Lance Stephenson, one of the only shot creators in the 23rd best offense of the 2013-14 season, to the Charlotte Hornets. With Paul George hurt, Indiana loses the best weapon it had. Not only that, but the Pacers saw one of its best, if not the best, defenders in the team go down. Indiana has two options: pull a 1996-97 San Antonio Spurs and go for a high lottery pick or toil away at the season, hoping a weaker East can salvage 2014-15.  Option A: trade David West or Roy Hibbert for picks, young assets and hope they can land a high pick. Option B: hope that the East, weaker than the West but improved, can provide them with a playoff berth. If I were Larry Bird I would go with option A. Retool a bad offense without losing their defensive anchor, George, and come back stronger in 2015-16.

Akshay Manwani, NBA India: I think Larry Bird needs to challenge Roy Hibbert. The Indiana big man stumbled dramatically in the 2014 post-season, and with George injured, Hibbert has the opportunity to redeem himself. If Bird can get him to play big for Indiana now, it is a win-win for both. At the same time, Bird has to bring in some manpower and getting Shawn Marion, a proven, versatile forward, with tons of experience, would be a good place to start. As for making them a legitimate factor, Paul George has to return at the earliest.

Blogtable: USA’s backup center

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Risk/reward and the USA | Indy’s dilemma | Pick a center


> Now you’re Mike Krzyzewski. You have to pick a backup center for Team USA. DeMarcus Cousins, Mason Plumlee or Andre Drummond? Why?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: If I’m Coach K, I find myself with a last name that gets misspelled and mispronounced more often than “Aschburner.” Wait, what? Oh, I take Cousins. And it doesn’t even have anything to do with the style of international basketball or World Championship glory. I take Cousins because he could benefit the most from the ultimate-team experience, maturing perhaps into a better NBA citizen and teammate. It’s the least Team USA can do for all that lavish talent at its disposal, a give-back — if “Boogie” were to pay attention and embrace the lesson — that would help the player, his team and the league.

DeMarcus Cousins (Garrett W. Ellwood/NBAE)

DeMarcus Cousins (Garrett W. Ellwood/NBAE)

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: DeMarcus Cousins. Just on all-around skills and innate talent. Cousins is a superstar waiting to break out and this experience could and should be the challenge that keeps him focused and brings out the best in him. If that happens, he’s got the greatest upside for now and for looking ahead to 2016 in Rio.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: I’m pretty sure Andre Drummond is going to get the nod from my colleagues, but I’m picking DeMarcus Cousins as sort of the feel-good story with the most upside. We all know Cousins has tremendous talent. If Western Conference coaches didn’t view him as an immature malcontent he might have been an All-Star last season. So maybe Team USA, and with another year of age, is what makes it all click-in for Cousins. It certainly can’t hurt (I don’t think). And if it doesn’t happen, Colangelo and Coach K can reset next summer in preparation for Brazil in 2016.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Probably Plumlee. Team USA would have wanted to maximize its athletic advantage anyway, but the shortage of bigs increases the need to play fast. Plumlee is best suited for the end-to-end game. The other two have obvious appeals, though. Cousins’ range and passing ability is a great fit for a big in the international game, and Drummond as a rim protector and physical center would be a nice option for Mike Krzysewski against teams with size (Spain, Brazil). Plus, the lineup around Drummond would make up for his lack of offense. Meanwhile, the question of Cousins and his attitude must be factored in, except that we don’t really know how he has been behind closed doors.

Sekou Smith, NBA.comAndre Drummond would be my pick. The U.S. is going to need added size and someone capable of not only protecting the rim but also serving as a bruiser around the basket on offense. Cousins is a more polished offensive performer right now but Drummond gets up and down the floor a little better and doesn’t necessarily need the ball in his hands to make an impact. Coach K needs someone he trusts to fill that role, which is why Plumlee is still in the mix. But when I hear Jerry Colangelo talk about picking the best team and not the best players, it lets me know that anything is possible when it comes to cutting the roster down.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: First of all, I’m waiting until after the next three exhibition games — against Brazil, the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico — so that I can see these guys in some close-to-real FIBA action. And I’d limit Anthony Davis‘ minutes in next Saturday’s game against Brazil, which could tell us a lot about the Cousins-Plumlee debate. If I had to make a decision now though, I’d go with Cousins, who showed enough in last week’s Showcase for me to take talent over fit in this discussion. He still has some work to do to secure that spot and nobody has a bigger spotlight on him in these next couple of weeks, but the talent discrepancy could ultimately be too tough to ignore.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogI take none of them. Cousins needs the ball to be effective, Plumlee doesn’t stand out in any one facet, and Drummond is such a terrible free throw shooter that he’s too much of a liability. So I take none of them and instead keep Kyle Korver. Then if Anthony Davis gets into foul trouble, I go super small and put Kevin Durant at the 5 and try to trade 3 for 2s. And considering the USA is in the weaker bracket, you might only need a true backup center in the Finals against Spain and their monster Pau Gasol/Marc Gasol/Serge Ibaka front line. I’m not sure it’s worth using a roster spot on a guy you might not even have to use.

Ole Frerks, NBA Deutschland: This is a difficult choice. Cousins is the best jump-shooter of the trio, which is important for international basketball, but he also lacks lateral quickness in defending the pick and roll, which is equally essential. Drummond is a more frightening presence at the rim and a beast on the boards, but his poor free throw shooting could hurt the team in late-game situations. Plumlee has the same problem and also lacks experience. Personally, I’d go with Boogie and hope he hustles enough on defense. He has the best skillset for international basketball and should profit from the other guys like Durant or Rose, who should be able to teach him a thing or two about how to carry himself as the highest level.

Akshay Manwani, NBA India: I understand Mason Plumlee probably fits better with Team USA’s fast-paced style, but I would go for DeMarcus Cousins. There is no substitute for talent and Cousins has shown that with the right environment, he can make a huge impact. Cousins finished fourth in Player Impact Estimate (PIE) rankings for 2013-14, just behind the likes of Kevin Durant, LeBron James and Kevin Love. Also, Cousins still hasn’t hit his ceiling in the league. There is a huge upswing that can be leveraged for the future by giving Cousins the experience of playing with Team USA now.

Blogtable: The price of patriotism

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Risk/reward and the USA | Indy’s dilemma | Pick a center


> Paul George’s injury and playing for the USA: Is whatever risk involved worth whatever payoff for the NBA and its fans?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: In a better world for NBA owners, their players would compete for Team USA only when they’re free agents. In a better world for the players, they would participate only when they’re protected with a full-length, maximum salary contract (like George). So that dilemma remains. Meanwhile, forget about any “perfect” world — even going with a 22-and-under format would seem exploitative, exposing players to risk while they’re on their rookie deals, possibly jeopardizing future earning power. I don’t think the risk for either side is worth it — growing the game globally is good for business but filling the stands in Indianapolis 41 times plus playoffs is, too. As for fans, it’s a no-brainer: Give up a few weeks of diversion in alternating summers for greater peace of mind about the guys you enjoy for seven to nine months every year. Bring on the bubble wrap!

ABOVE: Paul George in his Vegas hospital room with boxer Floyd Mayweather Jr.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: You’re not playing for the NBA, but for the United States. I’m not going to set a level of patriotism that anyone else must meet. It is up to the individual. But I don’t see any difference in the Pacers losing Paul George now from the Bulls losing Derrick Rose in the first weeks of the season or Blake Griffin being injured during a preseason game. Injuries happen. They are accidents.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: I’ve had mixed emotions about this for a long time. Yes, I want NBA players to be able to participate. The players have really exhibited genuine exuberance about playing for USA Basketball since Jerry Colangelo’s and Coach K’s sea-change, and the experience can only broaden their horizons as Americans. The players’ involvement is worth it for the NBA, but not so much for its teams when a star player is injured — and at this level it’s always a star player. Even if rules were put in place to where, say, NBA teams were paid for the use of their “borrowed” players, it wouldn’t solve the problem of that team missing a star player during the season.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comDefinitely not for the fans. Most would rather see their team win the first game of the first round of the playoffs instead of the gold medal in the World Cup, and the same probably goes with the Olympics. And it’s obviously not worth it for the teams on the court; Mark Cuban nails it. But it is worth it to the NBA in other ways. Who knows how many future players came/will come to the game because they watched NBA players against their country or maybe even in their country. At the bottom line, the game is better because Team USA is sending stars.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: In the name of Magic, Michael, Charles and Larry and the rest of the Dream Team, I have to say it’s worth the risk. As long as your favorite player comes home healthy, it’s absolutely the right thing to do, representing your country in international competition. The risk of serious injury has certainly been there forever, since the Dream Team. The reality of it didn’t hit home until last Friday night in Las Vegas, when in a flash we finally put a face on that risk. I do understand where Mavericks owner Mark Cuban is coming from, as far as the amount NBA teams invest in their superstars and having to incur all of the risk only to see the IOC and FIBA reap a ton of the benefits during competition summers. But you just cannot ask someone to turn their back on the flag, not in this instance and not ever.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: That’s one serious injury in 23 years of NBA players suiting up for the U.S. National Team. (Pau Gasol missed 22 games after breaking his foot with Spain in 2006.) If basketball players don’t play basketball in the summer, they’re not going to be very good basketball players. The Olympics and World Cup are the highest level of hoops we’ll see in the offseason, and those experiences have often been springboards for big years in the league. So, yeah, before you even get into marketing and the growth of the game, the risk is worth the rewards, though I do agree with Mark Cuban that the league should have a more tangible piece of the pie if it’s supplying the best players in these tournaments.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: I get the outcry over George’s injury — he’s one of the best players in the NBA and somebody who is impossible to replace. But I don’t understand all the questions about the basket stanchion at UNLV being a few inches shorter form the baseline than usual. Nobody had a serious injury playing on the same basket at summer league, right? The hard truth that nobody wants to accept is that injuries are going to happen. Sometimes during the NBA season, sometimes off the court. When Kevin Love broke his hand doing push-ups, I don’t recall anyone suggesting a ban on push-ups. If you can’t risk the injury, don’t play. But I think the majority of guys will still want to play high-level competition while representing their country and be willing to take that risk.

Jalen Rose adds ‘ambassador’ duties, seeks to bond current, retired players

CHICAGO – There’s some irony in Jalen Rose being chosen by the National Basketball Retired Players Association to be its guy in bridging a gap between current NBA players and the league’s older alumni who have shown the most interest in that group.

Rose, after all, is the son of the late Jimmy Walker, the No. 1 draft pick out of Providence in 1967. Yet the two never met.

As heartrending as that (lack of) relationship must have been, Rose always knew who his father was. He studied Walker’s professional history – two All-Star appearances and 16.7 ppg in nine seasons – off the backs of bubble-gum cards. Well into his own 13-year NBA career, Rose spoke and corresponded with the man. But they drifted apart again without a face-to-face and Walker died in July 2007, 10 weeks after Rose played his final NBA game.

So here’s the son now, reaching out with both arms, one to yesterday, one to today, as the NBRPA’s newly appointed “ambassador.” The role, to be announced Tuesday, will enable Rose to shape programs for former players while recruiting and enlisting the help of the younger guys. His goal: seamlessness.

“It’s a family,” Rose told NBA.com last week in a phone interview. “I really don’t see a disconnect between the two. Now there’s always going to be the mentality that, the older you get, the longer the walk looks.

“But for the most part, I think there’s a healthy respect in the current players for the retired players and what they’ve done. Hopefully we can create some awareness, some planning, a decision-making mechanism from top to bottom – whether it’s social, emotional or financial – so you’re prepared for that next step.”

Rose, 41, is being counted on to raise the NBRPA’s profile through his visibility as an NBA analyst and studio host for ESPN/ABC. He’s been famous since he was a teenager as one of Michigan’s “Fab Five” freshmen who brashly took on NCAA basketball protocols. And he remains a familiar face and presence through his TV work with many active and recently retired players. (more…)

Players’ union may name Hunter’s replacement at Las Vegas meetings

The NBA players association’s 18-month search for a permanent executive director could come to an end next week in Las Vegas when members of the NBPA executive committee and other union reps meet with finalists for the position.

As part of the union’s annual summer meetings, the hiring of a replacement for Billy Hunter, ousted at All-Star Weekend in Houston in February 2013 amid allegations of allegations of conflicts of interest and mismanagement, looms as the biggest likely headline. Chris Paul, point guard of the Los Angeles Clippers, was elected NBPA president at last year’s meetings in August after a four-year run as one of several vice presidents.

An executive search overseen by Sacramento Mayor (and former NBA All-Star) Kevin Johnson and conducted by Chicago-based Reilly Partners was in the final stages of winnowing a list of 18 to 20 candidates down to a trio of finalists, league sources told NBA.com. The three candidates will be presented on Monday afternoon, one insider specified, with each scheduled for 45-minute sessions to give their visions and qualifications to the members. Deliberation would take place that evening, with a vote tentatively scheduled for 8 p.m. PDT.

Johnson, who in his most recent NBA incarnation helped broker the deal for his city to keep the Sacramento Kings and thwarting a potential sale and move to Seattle, was enlisted in April to assist in the NBPA search. In May, Johnson met with players and agents in Chicago, synched up to the pre-draft camp held in that city, to update them on the search’s progress.

Prior to Johnson’s involvement, the NBPA had moved slowly in the process. Despite the presence of deputy general counsel Ron Klempner as the acting executive director, the NBA had cited several matters on which it was awaiting Hunter’s permanent replacement, including the possible implementation of testing for human growth hormone (HGH) use.

By All-Star Weekend in New Orleans last February, two leading candidates had emerged: David White, an executive with the Screen Actors Guild, and Michele Roberts, a corporate lawyer from New York.

But more recently, two more names – New York Knicks GM Steve Mills and powerful NBA agent Arn Tellem – have surfaced. Last weekend, longtime basketball writer Peter Vecsey speculated on both men via Twitter, pivoting to Tellem by Monday based on word that Knicks boss Phil Jackson is happy with his working relationship with Mills:

Tellem, 60, is considered to be one of the most influential sports agent in the world. He serves as Vice Chairman on the Wasserman Media Group and, according to his biography on that firm’s Web site, has negotiated NBA and MLB contracts worth more than $3.5 billion since 2008. The basketball site Hoopshype.com ranks Tellem first among NBA agents with a stable of 35 clients and contracts totaling nearly $273 million.

It was Tellem who, in January 2013, wrote a letter to his players calling for Hunter’s firing. He was among a group of powerful agents during the 2011 lockout who called for the union to decertify, which would have removed Hunter from his position then while providing new leverage toward a resolution.

If Tellem is among the NBPA search’s finalists, his client relationships could be an issue for players who haven’t used his services. As one former NBA player knowledgeable in union business put it, “With all of his players and all of his friends who are agents, all those relationships you have, how do you make decisions and judgments in an unbiased way?”

The ex-player added: “Arn is a great negotiator, without a doubt. It would be interesting to see him across the table from Adam Silver in 2016.”

The current collective bargaining agreement between the players and the owners can be re-opened by either side after the 2016-17 season, with talks for a new deal presumably beginning sometime late in 2016. The next round of labor talks will be Silver’s first as NBA commissioner, though he was heavily involved and influential as David Stern‘s deputy during previous negotiations.

In other NBPA news, Bloomberg.com reported this week that the union spent about $5.42 million on the internal audit that resulted in Hunter’s dismissal. That amounts to $12,378 per each of the 438 members, compared to $10,000 annual dues.

NBA doesn’t view state tax disparity as competitive disadvantage

Sometimes it’s the weather. Sometimes it’s the scenery. Sometimes it’s the nightlife or the endorsement potential or spouse-and-family priorities. Sometimes it’s even the basketball, the rest of the roster, the chance to win.

And sometimes it’s the money.

How much does staying in New York cost Carmelo?  (Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE)

How much does staying in New York cost Carmelo? (Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE)

There are a skidload of reasons why NBA free agents choose the destinations they choose and the league can’t do much (beyond the collectively bargained rules already in place) to control them. But money is something the NBA is very good at controlling. From the maximum salary a superstar can earn to the minimum wage paid to some undrafted rookie, from the “floor” that a team must spend on its player payroll to the luxury-tax threshold that acts as a de facto hard salary cap for most owners, the league manages to the dollar its costs, cash outlays and other budgets and expenditures that impact competitive balance.

So what’s up with the state tax disparity?

When Washington free agent Trevor Ariza agreed to a four-year, $32 million deal with Houston earlier this month — accepting essentially the same salary the Wizards offered him — multiple outlets noted a big difference in Ariza’s take-home pay with the Rockets. The lack of a state tax in Texas vs. the local taxes (and higher cost of living) in and around Washington, D.C., meant the veteran wing player would pocket as much as $3 million more by working and living in Houston.

And when Carmelo Anthony was making the VIP rounds on his team-selection tour that landed him right back in New York, SI.com’s Michael McCann and tax expert Robert Raiola painstakingly crunched the numbers to account for federal, state, city and “jock” taxes (most NBA markets require visiting players to pay local taxes on the portion of their income earned within their jurisdiction).

Their findings? The “same” $95.9 million/four years offer to Anthony from Houston, Miami and Chicago would have differed, in what he actually took home, by as much as $1.4 million. Yet because of New York’s high state and city tax rates, a maximum offer from the Knicks – $129.1 million/five years, or $33.2 million more than what those other clubs could have paid him – would have been whittled down to $66.7 million in net wages.

The net gap, thanks to tax liabilities, would have been less than $13 million compared to what the Bulls could have paid him (had Chicago cleared maximum cap space) and about $11.4 million more than the Heat or Rockets would have paid.

Remember, too, that just four summers ago, the decisions by LeBron James and Chris Bosh to join Dwyane Wade in Miami weren’t made in a tax vacuum. Much attention was paid to their willingness to sign for slightly less than maximum salaries, but it was mostly tax experts, academicians and NBA insiders who tracked the actual savings James and Bosh realized by shedding the liabilities of Ohio and Canada, respectively.

So what are teams and fans to do in places such as Milwaukee, Minnesota or Portland, where the highest marginal income tax rates in 2014 are 7.65 percent, 9.85 percent and 9.9 percent respectively? Or in Sacramento, which doesn’t benefit from the glamour factors as the franchises in Los Angeles or the Bay Area but still is saddled with a 13.3 percent tax rate on high earners? A million here, a million there and pretty soon you’re talking real money compared to what the Rockets, Spurs, Mavericks, Heat, Magic and Grizzlies can toss at free agents without state taxes.

Apparently, there’s little interest and no movement at the league’s highest levels to equalize the marketplace.

That’s a departure from what was done about a dozen years ago for the Toronto Raptors, when the NBA took on that franchise’s financial disadvantages, which stemmed not only from Canadian tax rates but an unfavorable (unfavourable?) exchange rate that left Raptors players with less money than their U.S. counterparts.

Shortly after Vancouver moved to Memphis in 2001, and with Toronto’s long-term sustainability in doubt, the NBA provided assistance to the Raptors and their players with a stipend reported at $2 million and other concessions. The exchange rate, however, has evened out since then and Toronto, though it still earns its revenue in Canadian currency, conducts its NBA business – salary cap figures, player payroll – in U.S. dollars. The tax rates for Toronto residents are said to be no better, perhaps, but no worse than for wage earners in many U.S. states.

As for adjusting every team’s cap ($63.065 million for 2014-15), tax level ($76.829 million) and minimum salary ($56.759 million) to factor out state taxes, a league source said the NBA has no such plans.

What might seem to be a simple math exercise grows more complicated when other differences between markets – not just the fuzzy intangibles or “quality of life” preferences – are considered. Property taxes, sales taxes, real estate prices and overall cost-of-living adjustments might cry out for attention, too.

The NBA, already deep into luxury-tax and revenue-sharing policies it says were designed for greater competitive balance, could wind up with a crazy quilt of figures, rules and bottom lines. Instead of point guards and two-way wing players becoming the darlings of the league, it might be a bunch of tax attorneys for whom fans start rooting.

Then there’s this: Do the Lakers and the Knicks really need any sort of cap advantage to be more desirable destinations than they’ve traditionally been?

An NBA in which everyone went ‘home’

lebron

After four years in Miami, LeBron James decided in early July to return to Cleveland.

LeBron James warmed the hearts of Clevelanders, northeast Ohio residents and Moms everywhere when he announced his return to the Cavaliers and ‘fessed up to the lure of his Akron hometown, both for him and the young family he is raising.

Kevin Durant already has been identified by the Washington Wizards as a target in 2016 free agency, which provides context for the team’s recent decision to hire David Adkins, Durant’s old high school coach from Montrose Christian.

And naturally, it’s only a small leap – or click of some ruby-colored shoes – to go from the Wizards to “There’s no place like home,” Dorothy‘s mantra that eventually got her off the yellow-brick road and back to Kansas. That got some of us at the Hang Time HQ thinking about an NBA that tilted entirely toward hometowns and players’ roots.

Remember, in its infancy, the league conferred “territorial rights” on its teams so they could keep promising and already popular college players close to home, to piggyback on the local fame. Dick Garmaker, Tom Gola, Tom Heinsohn, Guy Rodgers, Wilt Chamberlain, Jerry Lucas, Dave DeBusschere and others all entered the league as territorial picks.

What would the NBA look like if rosters were filled only with hometown players? Well, as you might expect, teams in the major population centers – New York, Los Angeles, Chicago – would be fine. Some in smaller markets would wind up scraping for talent, even if their “borders” were artificially extended by another state or three. Then again, there would be a vast talent pool of free agents who weren’t born in proximity to any particular NBA franchise, most obviously those from other nations.

Here’s a glimpse at the starting lineups of a thoroughly “hometown” NBA (based on birth cities & states, via basketball-reference.com):

EASTERN CONFERENCE

ATLANTA
G – Jodie Meeks
G – Kentavious Caldwell-Pope
F – Derrick Favors
F – Josh Smith
C – Dwight Howard

Notes: Some help off the bench, too, from Georgia-born players, including Al-Farouq Aminu, Chris Singleton, Jordan Hill and Toney Douglas.

BOSTON
G – Michael Carter-Williams
G – Ricky Ledo
F – Jeff Adrien
F – ?
C – ?

Notes: Spread the net across New England and you only add Ledo to Carter-Williams and Adrien. (If we’re missing somebody for the Celtics or any other team, post your suggestions in the Comments.)

BROOKLYN
G – Lance Stephenson
G – A.J. Price
F – Kenneth Faried
F – Jason Thompson
C – Taj Gibson

Notes: The Nets’ turf for our purposes was defined as Brooklyn and New Jersey. Decent subs here too, including MarShon Brooks, Earl Clark, Gerald Henderson, Andrew Bynum, J.R. Smith, Chris Copeland and Randy Foye.

CHARLOTTE
G – John Wall
G – Chris Paul
F – P.J. Tucker
F – John Henson
C –Jermaine O’Neal

Notes: Tough to beat a Carolinas backcourt, what with Wall and Paul and Raymond Felton in reserve.

CHICAGO
G – Derrick Rose
G – Dwyane Wade
F – Andre Iguodala
F – Shawn Marion
C – Anthony Davis

Notes: Help in the backcourt could come from Patrick Beverley, Tony Allen, Shaun Livingston, Iman Shumpert and Evan Turner.

CLEVELAND
G – Trey Burke
G – Stephen Curry
F – LeBron James
F – Jared Sullinger
C – Kosta Koufos

Notes: It’s true – Steph Curry was born in Akron. Imagine if he felt the same tug from northeast Ohio that LeBron does.

DETROIT
G – Chris Douglas-Roberts
G – Jordan Crawford
F – Wilson Chandler
F – Draymond Green
C – JaVale McGee

Notes: Chris Kaman comes off the bench among players born in Michigan, and Shane Battier just missed this great honor.

INDIANA
G – Jeff Teague
G – Mike Conley
F – Zach Randolph
F – Gordon Hayward
C – Cody Zeller

Notes: Basketball’s influence in Indiana is evident in the depth here, which includes Eric Gordon, Josh McRoberts, George Hill, Courtney Lee, Mason Plumlee, Miles Plumlee, Robbie Hummel and others.

MIAMI
G – Brandon Knight
G – Tim Hardaway Jr.
F – Trevor Ariza
F – Udonis Haslem
C – Larry Sanders

Notes: The Heat’s impact is apparent with Hardaway Jr. as well as Glen Rice Jr. We considered putting Dwyane Wade on this squad, based on his statement that “home is where the heart is” when he re-signed with Miami. But that wouldn’t have been fair to those who knew him when back in Robbins, Ill.

MILWAUKEE
G – Devin Harris
G – Dwight Buycks
F – Carl Landry
F – Caron Butler
C – Greg Stiemsma

Notes: This Wisconsin group is getting a little long in the tooth. It’s been a while since the Dairyland enjoyed its NBA sweet spot (Terry Porter, Latrell Sprewell, Nick Van Exel all debuting in the mid-1980s).

NEW YORK
G – Kemba Walker
G – Jimmer Fredette
F – Carmelo Anthony
F – Andre Drummond
C – Joakim Noah

Notes: Odd that most of the depth on a New York-born squad would be in the frontcourt (Tobias Harris, Ryan Kelly, Roy Hibbert, Andray Blatche, Charlie Villanueva, Channing Frye and so on). After all, the Big Apple was known for decades for the quality of its point guards.

ORLANDO
G – Nick Calathes
G – Chandler Parsons
F – Alonzo Gee
F – Amar’e Stoudemire
C – Marreese Speights

Notes: Florida required a split of the talent pool, with Miami drawing from South Florida and the Atlantic Coast and Orlando getting pretty much everything else.

PHILADELPHIA
G – Kyle Lowry
G – Kobe Bryant
F – Michael Kidd-Gilchrist
F – Tyrke Evans
C – DeJuan Blair

Notes: And this still leaves the Morris twins, Marcus and Markieff, on the bench, alongside Dion Waiters, Lavoy Allen and veteran influence Jameer Nelson.

TORONTO
G – Steve Nash
G – Andrew Wiggins
F – Anthony Bennett
F – Tristan Thompson
C – Kelly Olynyk

Notes: OK, so we need an asterisk on Nash, who was born in Johannesburg, South Africa. But he’s so identified with the game in Canada, it seemed like an acceptable exception. If you want to be a stickler, substitute Cory Joseph for him.

WASHINGTON
G – Ty Lawson
G – Victor Oladipo
F – Kevin Durant
F – Rudy Gay
C – Patrick Patterson

Notes: Opening this up to Maryland and Virginia brought out numbers at the guard and forward spots (Gary Neal, Jarrett Jack, Delonte West, John Lucas III, Michael Beasley, Ed Davis), though we’d still have to go small in the middle.

 

WESTERN CONFERENCE

DALLAS
G – Phil Pressey
G – C.J. Miles
F – Mike Dunleavy Jr.
F – LaMarcus Aldridge
C – Chris Bosh

Notes: Texas is a big state, but there are three NBA teams to stock and fewer than 40 of the state’s all-time 138 league alumni are active. For distribution purposes, the Mavericks got Dallas and Fort Worth products, the Rockets got their metro area and east from which to draw and the Spurs got dibs on most of the rest.

DENVER
G – Chauncey Billups
G – ?
F – James Johnson
F – Jason Smith
C – ?

Notes: There have been only two NBA players born in Colorado since Jimmy Carter was in the White House – and Billups isn’t one of them (Smith and Nick Fazekas). We had to go to Wyoming to get Johnson.

GOLDEN STATE
G – Damian Lillard
G – Orlando Johnson
F – Paul Pierce
F – ?
C – Drew Gooden

Notes: California is like Texas, only more so. The NBA has had 346 Californians participate through the years but only about a fifth of them are active – and there are four teams to account for.

HOUSTON
G – Gerald Green
G – Jimmy Butler
F – Emeka Okafor
F – DeAndre Jordan
C – Kendrick Perkins

Notes: We took the liberty of the non-specified position slots to go without a point guard here. Could have tabbed Ben Uzoh, if pressed.

L.A. CLIPPERS
G – Russell Westbrook
G – Arron Afflalo
F – Kevin Love
F – Tayshaun Prince
C – Tyson Chandler

Notes: See Lakers notes.

L.A. LAKERS
G – James Harden
G – Klay Thompson
F – Kawhi Leonard
F – DeMar DeRozan
C – Brook Lopez

Notes: Compared to most of the other states/markets, southern California offers an embarrassment of riches in terms of NBA talent. We plugged in these guys randomly and still have a bunch of quality players in reserve, including Amir Johnson, Nick Young, Chris Andersen, Andre Miller, Brandon Jennings and more.

MEMPHIS
G – Rajon Rondo
G – Lou Williams
F – Corey Brewer
F – J.J. Redick
C – Brandan Wright

Notes: Opening this up to include Kentucky as well as Tennessee didn’t yield the expected number of NBA regulars.

MINNESOTA
G – Kirk Hinrich
G – Mike Miller
F – Alan Anderson
F – Harrison Barnes
C – Nick Collison

Notes: Talk about embarrassing – Hang Time opened up Minnesota’s domain to include the Dakotas and Iowa … and four of the five starting spots arguably belong to products of those states. Among the native Minnesotans in reserve: Nate Wolters, Jon Leuer, Cole Aldrich, Kris Humphries and Royce White.

NEW ORLEANS
G – D.J. Augustin
G – Marcus Thornton
F – Thaddeus Young
F – Paul Millsap
C – Greg Monroe

Notes: Not bad depth from down on the bayou, with a second-unit crew that includes Perry Jones, Brandon Bass, Robert Sacre, Garrett Temple, Donald Sloan and old head Danny Granger.

OKLAHOMA CITY
G – Earl Watson
G – Archie Goodwin
F – Joe Johnson
F – Blake Griffin
C – Ekpe Udoh

Notes: It took a sweep of four states, including Kansas, Nebraska and Arkansas, to pull together this starting five. Sorry, Seattle and the state of Washington were off-limits, given how many players that area already donated to OKC.

PHOENIX
G – Jerryd Bayless
G – Carrick Felix
F – Damion James
F – Andre Roberson
C – ?

Notes: Slim pickings even with New Mexico in the mix, which can be explained in part by how many folks settle in the American Southwest past their child-bearing years.

PORTLAND
G – Isaiah Thomas
G – Jamal Crawford
F – Marvin Williams
F – Terrence Jones
C – Spencer Hawes

Notes: This roster took on an entirely reinvigorated look when it was opened up beyond Oregon products to include those from Washington. Now it has a bench including Avery Bradley, Martell Webster, Rodney Stuckey, Aaron Brooks, Nate Robinson and Terrence Ross, among others.

SACRAMENTO
G – Quincy Pondexter
G – Paul George
F – Matt Barnes
F – Ryan Anderson
C – Tyler Zeller

Notes: It’s not easy being fourth among California’s four NBA teams, even if your turf is considered to be everything outside of the Bay Area and the greater L.A. metroplex.

SAN ANTONIO
G – ?
G – Wes Johnson
F – Wesley Matthews
F – Quincy Acy
C – Ivan Johnson

Notes: So we fudged it on Johnson (Corsicana) and Acy (Tyler), who were born closer to Dallas. San Antonio had a run of NBA role players a while back (Michael Doleac, Bo Outlaw, Jeff Foster, David Wesley) but might need the offspring of Tim Duncan, Manu Ginobili and Tony Parker to grow up fast.

UTAH
G – Luke Ridnour
G – C.J. Watson
F – ?
F – ?
C – ?

Notes: Talk about some serious gerrymandering. Watson is from Nevada, Ridnour is from Idaho and we fought off the temptation to go pluck Mario Chalmers from Alaska. There hasn’t been a Utah-born player in the NBA since 2010 (Devin Brown), nor any born there since February 1981.

 

Blogtable: Summer’s most intriguing team

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: The price of Love | New most intriguing team | Sleeper rookie



VIDEO: Glen Rice Jr. impressed for the Wizards at Summer League

> You’ve seen the Draft. You’ve seen some Summer League. Outside of the Cavs, what team most intrigues you now? Why’s that?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comI’m intrigued by Charlotte, with its addition of Lance Stephenson, along with pick-up Marvin Williams. There’s talent there, especially if Cody Zeller and Noah Vonleh can rev up their frontline contributions, and it’s possible the Hornets push for a top-4 spot in the East playoffs. Steve Clifford should be able to prevent them from becoming The Lance Show (in the event Stephenson decides to start playing for his next contract right away). And let’s face it, if an NBA team can’t find a way to move on from the loss of Josh McRoberts, well, then Charlotte becomes watchable in an odd, case-study sort of way.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: In the East, and thank the basketball gods for this, there’s actually several teams of intrigue. Toronto kept its momentum going by re-signing so many of its own starting with Kyle Lowry. Washington is on the come and adding a big-brother figure in Paul Pierce should be great for John Wall and Bradley Beal. And, of course, Chicago with Pau Gasol in the mix and Derrick Rose coming back should be great fun to watch (yes, and post-LeBron Miami). In the West, the Oklahoma City Thunder are my choice. They missed out on Gasol, who would have been an absolute game-changer for that squad, and instead only came away with Sebastian Telfair, an end-of-bench addition, and Anthony Morrow, a 3-point specialist who could fit in quite well. I’m really curious to see how Russell Westbrook‘s game continues to evolve after his powerful postseason, how Kevin Durant comes off his first MVP season (but a bit of an individually disappointing postseason) and if Scott Brooks can add some new wrinkles to one of the most efficient (yet also most criticized) offenses over the last several years. If healthy the last two postseasons, this conversation could be totally different.

Sekou Smith, NBA.comThe Washington Wizards, mostly because they have put together a quality offseason and have a clear path up the Eastern Conference food chain now that the entire field has been thinned out by LeBron’s departure for Cleveland. The Wizards will have an ideal blend of youthful energy and athleticism to go along with a seasoned supporting cast capable of pushing this team over the top a year after making that surprise run to the Eastern Conference semifinals. For whatever was lost in free agency (Trevor Ariza and Trevor Booker), the Wizards more than made up for it by keeping Marcin Gortat and adding Paul Pierce, Kris Humphries and DeJaun Blair. Toss in a ready-to-go Otto Porter Jr. and the Samsung Summer League MVP Glen Rice Jr., and the Wizards have every reason to believe that John Wall and Bradley Beal have a legitimate shot to lead this crew to the top of the Southeast Division and perhaps beyond.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: The Wizards have a chance to be one of the top two or three teams in the East. John Wall and Bradley Beal are getting better every season and could be the clear No. 1 backcourt in the conference by the start of 2015. Marcin Gortat has great pick-and-roll chemistry with Wall, Paul Pierce brings another element to the offense, and they have a ton of depth on their frontline. The only question is if they can maintain a top-10 defense with Pierce (who’s a better defender at the four than the three) replacing Trevor Ariza.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: Washington. They kept Gortat, they did not overpay for Ariza, and then they managed to add Paul Pierce to that mix. Plus, after watching them in Summer League, it seemed clear that Otto Porter and Glen Rice Jr (who was terrific in Vegas) are ready to add perimeter depth off the bench and give them the athleticism that Pierce lacks. Is Randy Wittman the right guy to take them to the next level? To me that’s the bigger question. But after a second-round run last season, all the pieces are in place for the Wiz to continue to grow what they’ve already started.