Posts Tagged ‘Steve Aschburner’

Dooling’s book tells tale of abuse, breakdown and big bounce back

Keyon Dooling, the 10th pick of the 2000 Draft, had a 13-year NBA career. (Rocky Widner/NBAE)

Keyon Dooling, the 10th pick of the 2000 Draft, had a 13-year NBA career. (Rocky Widner/NBAE)

Through his teen years and his entire adult life, Keyon Dooling pushed forward, played basketball and plowed down a secret that stayed alive no matter how many shovels of dirt he threw on it.

Two years ago, that secret seized up on him and brought him to his knees. Yet, from that low point, Dooling managed to look his demons in the eye and stare them down.

This summer, Dooling has shared his troubling yet uplifting story in a book, “What’s Driving You??? How I Overcame Abuse and Learned to Lead in the NBA.” Ultimately, it is a book about the former NBA guard’s healing and his desire to help others heal, too.

“I went through some things in the last two years,” Dooling said on the phone recently. “So I wrote a story. It’s a great story, it’s a basketball story, it’s a life story, it’s a social story. It’s a story of triumph. I just want to make sure I get the message out there.

“I had bottled up so many emotions. I talk about my NBA experiences to connect the audience with the ball-playing side. But the story itself is totally different from the basketball experience. A lot of people don’t talk about this subject.”

whatsdrivingyouPublished last month by TriMark Press, the paperback memoir recounts a life that some NBA fans might recall only from some unnerving headlines a couple years ago. It covers Dooling’s career as a hoops overachiever, from starring in high school in Fort Lauderdale and showing enough in two years at the University of Missouri to be picked 10th in the 2000 Draft, to playing 12-plus seasons for seven NBA teams.

More than that, though, the book traces struggles in his life to the sexual abuse he endured as a boy at the hands, initially, of a teenaged neighborhood friend. Later, there were adult men and women who preyed on him.

“You have to put yourself in a vulnerable place to relive and tell and inspire and motivate. It’s very tough to do,” Dooling said. “I had to get a lot of therapy to have the tools to manage all the different emotions. But I’ve done my work. I’ve dealt with it.

“I’ve packaged up healing in this project. That’s really what my goal is, to allow people to see a piece of themselves in the story so they can find healing.”

This new, healthiest time in Dooling’s life was triggered by an incident in June 2012 in a Seattle restaurant that took him back to his darkest memories. A patron in the men’s room made an inappropriate advance. Dooling had just wrapped up one of the most satisfying seasons of his career, helping the Boston Celtics reach Game 7 of the East finals. But the anger that confrontation uncorked wasn’t going to just blow over, as he writes in the book:

 

At three o’clock in the morning, I decided to go for a walk outside to try to lose the rage. I practiced breathing techniques to calm myself down – when that didn’t do the trick, I tried calling on the Lord to help me. Nothing was working. Finally I called my wife, Natosha (she was back in Florida and probably still asleep) and told her about what happened at the restaurant that night. I still hadn’t told her about what happened to me when I was a child.

I had no words for that.

After talking with ‘Tosha for a while, I started to feel more relaxed. She prayed with me and told me everything would be all right. A little ray of light started growing inside me then thanks to her.

Still, I couldn’t hide what was happening from myself.

An emotional vault that had been locked inside me for years had unexpectedly opened…

 

Dooling’s breakdown landed him in a mental-health facility in Boston. He turned to then-Celtics coach Doc Rivers, who spent long hours with him there, a place that — given the severity of other patients’ mental issues — struck Rivers as unsafe. He and some medical officials enlisted by the National Basketball Players Association helped get Dooling moved to a better environment.

“He was in this emotional state and he kept apologizing about letting the team down,” Rivers told the Boston Globe last year. “I kept saying, ‘We’re going to survive.’ You just knew emotionally, he wasn’t right. I didn’t know what was going on but I just knew emotionally he was in a bad place, and even a dark place. I was concerned for his life.”

The treatment Dooling eventually received put him on his path to recovery. But when he abruptly decided to retire from the NBA (despite a one-year extension with Boston) , family, friends and fans were puzzled, unaware of the secret he harbored.

The story of his abuse came out after Dooling sought and found the therapy he needed. By late 2012, he was comfortable speaking about it, and he and Natosha even appeared on Katie Couric‘s talk show.

But there was no one-and-done to this type of thing, Dooling learned. Any time he had cracked open the lid on his secret previously — he wrote a letter to himself back in 2011, when he was with Milwaukee, full of questions that elicited no answers — he had backed away. Facing and living with his issues was going to come incrementally as well.

“There’s no blueprint to deal with the emotions, because people who survive it usually don’t tell,” Dooling said. “I had people in my family who didn’t believe me, that created one emotion. I had other people who did believe me, that created another emotion of support. I was insecure about some of the things and then, I was angry about some of them as well.

“It took time to learn how to deal with those types of emotions that, as an athlete, I didn’t even allow myself to feel.”

In April 2013, a month shy of 33, Dooling signed with Memphis in hopes of resuming his NBA career. He played in seven regular-season games down the stretch, then averaged just 1.9 points and 8.1 minutes in 14 playoff appearances for the Grizzlies. His game essentially was gone.

His life had changed. It was getting better. So much that Dooling rarely has any what-if reflections.

“At this point, I still would have been able to play if I hadn’t had that breakdown. That was my doom as far as being a player in the NBA,” he said. “Personally, I would have been in a better position if I had gotten my work done earlier. Because I’m such a better person from doing that work.”

Today, back home in South Florida, Dooling is a certified life coach as well as a published author itching for his next project. He works with people of all stripes, including some NBA players, but declines to offer details in deference to sensitivity and confidentiality.

His family — Natosha, daughters Deneal (13), Gabrielle (10) and Jordan (7), and son Keyon Jr. (4), who is on the cover of the book with his dad — are healthy and happy, Dooling says, thanks to many hours of therapy for them all. Some in his extended family still are grappling with the issues he revealed.

His book is the centerpiece of his Web site, www.whatsdrivingyou.net It features artwork that complements his story and provides links to purchase the book and to download music from iTunes that provided the soundtrack of Dooling’s recovery. Portions of the proceeds from the book are donated to the Respect Foundation at www.RespectFoundation55.org.

Once a month, Dooling said, he opens up his Twitter account at @AmbassadorKD to anyone “still in the closet” about being molested or those — particularly men — who need someone with whom they can speak freely (via Twitter’s private DMs), if therapists, clergy or others aren’t current options.

“I knew I had to go through my test to get to this testimony,” he said. “I would be doing an injustice if I didn’t become a witness and help them get through some of their issues.”

Dooling, in time, would like to return to the NBA as a coach. His playing experiences and exposure to multiple systems have him covered on the basketball side. He gained leadership skills as a player and a union vice president. But the life lessons, what he can share in coping with personal pressures and problems, might kick his resume to another level.

“We’ve been treating the symptoms,” Dooling said. “You see it sometimes in guys who get DUIs. You see behavioral issues with guys maybe having multiple children out of wedlock. Guys overspending, overeating, masking with liquor or drugs.

“So often, we’ve been treating the symptoms and not the real issues. My whole thing is, let’s talk about some of these things we went through in our past so it doesn’t affect the future.”

Blogtable: A World Cup celebration

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Loving the Cup | The Bulls’ future | A landing spot for Ray Allen


> What’s been your favorite part of the FIBA Basketball World Cup so far?

Anthony Davis (David Dow/NBAE)

Anthony Davis (David Dow/NBAE)

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Watching Anthony Davis embrace the role of the big dog. He’s making me look forward, even more than I was already, to what he can do this season to lift the Pelicans into the Western Conference playoff mix. Close behind is Kenneth Faried, who most of the experts did not see as having a place on the team, as he keeps on showing that hustle and ferocious hard work always have a place in any game, on any team.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: Honestly, I’ve enjoyed watching the U.S. sans its biggest stars. So many of these players are young and growing in skill and leadership. To that end, I liked seeing Turkey push the U.S. I like seeing our guys with their backs against the wall a bit and having to dig down to find the answer. Especially fun as the tournament moves along will be to see which players lead Team USA when it finds itself in trouble, and then to see if maturity discovered in Spain transfers to the NBA season.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: The atmosphere in the building when the Spanish National Team plays a good team. The crowd was loud for their first two games, but when they met Brazil on Monday, the place was pretty crazy. The team is talented, deep and cohesive. Some of their key players (Gasols, La Bomba) are in their best shape of the last few years, clearly determined to win this thing. And they have a raucous crowd behind them. I don’t want to look past what is a crowded second tier of teams, but the potential of an epic USA-Spain gold medal game is hard to overlook every single time both teams take the floor.

Sekou Smith, NBA.comThe fans. No, really. They make the atmosphere when you are on site. We’ve all seen thousands of games, some in person and some on the TV. But when you’re in the arena and the stands are jumping from the fans pounding their feet and the noisemakers (artificial and organic) are cranked up to the max, there’s nothing like it. Finland has a crew, thousands strong, here in Bilbao that have absolutely taken this city of 350,000 by storm. Everywhere you go around town you see the colors and the flags and the jerseys. It’s an awesome thing to see and it’s something that’s completely different from the NBA.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: I’d say the sustained play of Anthony Davis on this level, which is probably the largest stage of his professional career thus far. New Orleans fans and hardcore NBA fans saw what a great player he developed into last season, but with the Pelicans out of the playoffs hunt for most of the season, I’m not sure if his exploits received the full attention they deserved. Now the world is watching, and Davis has acquitted himself well. I keep going back to a play I saw in person in an exhibition against the Dominican Republic, when a player pump-faked Davis, got him up in the air, drove around him and put up a shot, and Davis reached those long arms way back and still blocked the guy’s shot. Oh, and he’s still just 21 years old. He’s gonna be a great one.

Blogtable: A crystal ball for Chicago

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Loving the Cup | The Bulls’ future | A landing spot for Ray Allen


Derrick Rose is averaging 5.7 points in 19 minutes a game at the World Cup. (David Dow/NBAE)

Derrick Rose is averaging 5.7 points in 19 minutes a game at the World Cup. (David Dow/NBAE)

> Pau Gasol has played well in the World Cup. Derrick Rose … ehhhh. Thoughts on the Bulls this season if this is how Gasol and Rose look?

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Check your calendar, oh mighty Blogmaster.  Maybe I would be a little worried if it weren’t still summer.  I said in last week’s blogtable that Rose was the player that needed the World Cup most.  To get on the court, start to get his game legs back and just log minutes.  Anybody who expected a whole lot more in Spain has been hitting the sangria too hard.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: I’m not going to judge Derrick Rose by his play in the World Cup. Back during Team USA training camp he was blowing people away. He shouldn’t be in midseason form. Save that for midseason. As for Pau, I’ve been predicting a really healthy year for him, physically and especially mentally, having escaped from the drudgery that had become playing for the Lakers. In the East, the Bulls will be just fine. Still, it will take time for Rose to not only figure out himself, but also his team after so much time off.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Cleveland has a new roster and a new coach, so I thought the Bulls were bound for a better start, which could ultimately lead to a No. 1 seed. But Rose’s struggles have me tempering those thoughts. The key, though, is to play Thibodeau defense and have Rose playing his best in April and May. That’s certainly still a possibility. Even with Rose taking his time to get to full strength, the additions of Gasol and Doug McDermott, the offense shouldn’t rank in the bottom five again.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Well, if Pau plays like 2009-10 Pau and Rose plays like 2013-14 Rose, then Chicago … we have a problem. Rose is shaking off the rust, as expected. So I certainly don’t expect to take much of anything away from the limited National Team minutes he’s playing here. Things will change dramatically for him when he gets back to Chicago. Pau has reminded many of us why he is so highly thought of by coaches and executives around the league. If he’s back to being this Pau, the super-skilled low-post force that he can be, the Bulls have every reason to expect to be a true contender.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: If the way they’ve played through a handful of games is exactly how they would look all season, I’d say they would be OK this season, because no matter what seems to happen in Chicago, the Bulls always manage to turn out at least OK. But let’s be frank: This is not how these guys will look all season, particularly Rose. He’s working his way back from a long absence, and part of that journey back means taking some lumps along the way. He’s coming off the bench for USA Basketball, playing limited minutes, essentially using a high-level international competition as rehab. Meanwhile, Pau, loosed from all the different systems and coaches and changes in LA the last few years, is back to being able to play the kind of ball he likes to play. Overall, if I’m a Bulls fan, I’m encouraged.

Blogtable: Where should Ray Allen go?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Loving the Cup | The Bulls’ future | A landing spot for Ray Allen


Ray Allen has taken more 3-pointers, and made more, than anybody in NBA history. (David Dow/NBAE)

Ray Allen has taken more 3-pointers, and made more, than anybody in NBA history. (David Dow/NBAE)

> If Ray Allen is to play again – and it sounds like even he doesn’t know – where would you like to see him land? Why?

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: San Antonio.  The team that moves the ball better than anyone else in the NBA would get him more free shots than a guy named Kelly in an Irish bar on St. Paddy’s Day.  As the Spurs try to win back-to-back championships for the first time ever, the best pure shooter of his era is the perfect weapon to add to their arsenal.  And, of course, after that Game 6 killer shot in the 2013 Finals, wouldn’t there be some karmic poetry in Ray Allen slipping on the black and silver jersey?

Jeff Caplan, NBA.comOklahoma City. He’s done the LeBron thing. Allen’s demeanor and leadership would be great for the Thunder, and Lord knows they can use his floor spacing and shooting, even at his advanced age.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: The Cavs already have Dion Waiters and Mike Miller. I think he’d a better fit in Washington, backing up (and sometimes playing alongside) Bradley Beal. Martell Webster is recovering from surgery, so the Wizards’ back-up wings are basically Otto Porter and Glen Rice Jr. Allen could come there, join a team that should rank in the top four in the East, and be a needed contributor. He’s got former teammate Paul Pierce there, as well as the point guard – John Wall – who led the league (by a wide margin) in assists on 3-pointers last season.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: I’d like to see him alongside LeBron James in Cleveland for at least one more year, if he’s up to it. That would give the Cavs every conceivable piece they’d need to challenge for a championship this season (instead of this stuff about waiting a season or two for everything to fall into place). LeBron ought to pay him out of his own pocket for one year for that shot Ray made in Game 6 of The Finals in 2013. Plus, he’s worn plenty of different jerseys throughout his career. Why not add one more?

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: How about Oklahoma City? The Thunder have been in the market for an outside shooter for a few years, and ended up last season relying on Derek Fisher to fill that role and play heavy minutes in the postseason. Allen on the Thunder would seem to be a mutually beneficial pairing — he could sit out the first half the season and rest, the Thunder could use that time to develop some of their younger guys, Allen could come in post All-Star and spend the second half of the season learning their system, and then step into that Fisher role in the postseason. And really, who better to have sniping jumpers on kick-outs from Durant and Westbrook than Ray Allen?

Buyers? Bucks to reward ticket ‘users’


VIDEO: Jabari Parker talks with Bucks.com about his off-the-court interests

At first blush, the Milwaukee Bucks’ current ticket promotion, “Cheer The Future,” sounds like an old joke: the prize for first place is one week in Milwaukee! The prize for second place is two weeks in Milwaukee …

The Bucks were so bad last season, so seemingly far from playing competitive basketball, that the sales department’s offer of a steep discount on tickets in 2015-16 – as steep as free! – based on tickets bought and used this season might seem more punitive than generous, going strictly by their 15-67 finish in 2013-14. Milwaukee pulled off what looked to be one of the great shell games in recent NBA history, pledging not to “tank” — then-owner Herb Kohl flatly said so on Media Day — and then outtanking the other league’s bottom feeders to grab the best odds in the Draft lottery.

The move, driven by injuries and underperformance as much as any rebuilding strategy, worked out beautifully. The Bucks landed the No. 2 pick and, in selecting Duke’s Jabari Parker, wound up with a draftee most scouts think can contribute immediately. Parker also has said all the right things about pledging his services to Milwaukee long-term, and he has a built-in fan base 90 miles to the south in his hometown of Chicago.

But all that losing came at a price, and not just in pride or – for coach Larry Drew and his staff – in job security. Milwaukee’s attendance went from an average of 15,348 in the previous seven seasons to 13,511, a drop of 12 percent. After ranking between 22nd and 27th from 2006-07 through 2012-13 in home attendance, the Bucks finished last in 2013-14.

It wasn’t even just a money thing, as bad as the hemorrhaging was. The BMO Harris Bradley Center on too many nights went limp, the empty seats of the upper bowl and the quiet ones down below feeling like a betrayal of the franchise’s headier times: The championship era of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar in the 1970s. Don Nelson’s Marques Johnson-Sidney Moncrief powerhouses of the ’80s. The excitement when Ray Allen, Glenn Robinson and Sam Cassell missed the 2001 Finals by one game. And even the “Fear The Deer” surprise late in 2009-10.

That’s why this “Cheer The Future” season-ticket scheme matters not just as a way to sell tickets but to get those buyers into the building.

“We believe the best way to build our fan base and increase attendance is to show them our young, exciting team,” Ted Loehrke, the Bucks’ senior vice president and chief revenue officer, said by phone Thursday. “The whole concept is to re-introduce the Bucks to Milwaukee and the state of Wisconsin, especially young professionals and college students.”

The prices and seat locations should fit their budgets, especially if they max out the benefits. It works like this: Fans are required to commit to a two-season purchase, with discounts offered on the second year. Those who attend at least 30 games will get their 2015-16 tickets at half price. If they use tickets this season at least 35 times, the discount grows to 75 percent. And those who attend all 40 Milwaukee home games (the team plays a designated home game at London’s O2 Arena on Jan. 15 vs. New York) will get their same tickets next season for free.

The team set aside 500 seats for the promotion, which runs through Sunday. Loehrke said the response has been strong, with the remaining seats and the deadline pretty much in synch.

NBA teams have marketed hard-to-sell seats via various gimmicks. For instance, Minnesota used a “pay the pick” plan in which fans paid a per-ticket price equal to the team’s lottery position (the Wolves drafted fourth, so those seats cost $4 each). Other clubs have offered future discounts. But Loehrke said the Bucks were unaware of any team bundling purchase, attendance and discount together like this.

Milwaukee already has had an eventful offseason, starting with Kohl’s sale of the franchise to billionaire investors Wes Edens and Marc Lasry for a whopping $550 million. Parker’s selection and presentation were well-received, and the startling hire of Jason Kidd as coach – after some un-Milwaukee-like machinations behind GM John Hammond‘s back to oust Drew – generated headlines, too.

The continued development of last season’s lottery pick, Greek phenom Giannis Antetokounmpo, and 2012 first-rounder John Henson, along with some presumed face-saving resurgences by Larry Sanders, O.J. Mayo and Ersan Ilaysova are added reasons for optimism in 2014-15.

“There’s been a buzz around the team this summer unlike any we’ve seen in recent history,” Loehrke said.

Edens and Lasry are eager to energize the Bradley Center, too, to win over local and state officials and the citizens overall to their quest for a new, partially public-financed downtown arena. Sports teams know that seats, like unused hotel rooms, are an expiring asset. The Bucks want those in their aging building to be very expiring.

Mostly, though, they want them filled. This season and next.

‘Free agent’ coaches seek work in ever-shifting job market

One by one, in something approximating inverse order of desirability, the names of NBA free agents have come off the proverbial big board. What began with the likes of LeBron James, Carmelo Anthony, Chris Bosh and Pau Gasol has dwindled now to fellows such as Andray Blatche, Dante Cunningham and Ekpe Udoh.

This game of offseason musical chairs is played for even more blood among coaches. There are fewer jobs to be had in the first place (five or six per team vs. 15 player positions), and it’s not nearly the meritocracy that it is for players. Abilities, work ethic and results matter less than connections or change for its own sake.

There are a lot of coaching free agents still on the board, both former head coaches and notable assistants. Among the former, we have George Karl, Jeff Van Gundy, Scott Skiles, Mike Woodson, Doug Collins, Vinny Del Negro, Mike Brown, Mike D’Antoni, Keith Smart, Avery Johnson, P.J. Carlesimo, Lawrence Frank and Maurice Cheeks.

The latter group, even bigger, includes Jack Sikma, Mario Elie, Terry Porter, T.R. Dunn, Igor Kokoskov, Scott Williams, Bill Peterson, Bernie Bickerstaff, Brian Hill, Bob Ociepka  and, hey, Rasheed Wallace. Actually, you could go dozens deep with solid coaching pros who once were in but now are out, the one place few of them want to be.

“There’s an old expression in the NBA, ‘Never get off the bus. Stay on the bus!’ ” said Jim Boylan, an NBA assistant for most of his 22 years in the league who survived a coaching change in Cleveland this offseason. “We all realize it too — it’s a privilege for us to be involved in the NBA and to coach athletes at this level.”

But it’s fleeting. Coaches face more scrutiny and grab more headlines when they’re fired, but their landings are often cushioned by seven-figure paychecks. Assistant coaches get flushed, and that six-figure salary — while comfy by most folks’ standards — doesn’t go quite so far when you account for the costs of multiple residences or constant moves.

Ociepka, who entered the league in the 1980s as a part-time volunteer scout after a storied career as a high school coach in the Chicago area, scrambled through five NBA teams in five years in the ’90s. Boylan and his wife, Jane, counted recently and realized they have owned or lived in 25 homes during his basketball career.

“It’s not a surprise when you’re an assistant coach in the NBA,” Sikma, the former Seattle and Milwaukee center, said recently. “You look at the number of staffs that have turned over in the last few years — it’s more of a constant than not. You know you’re probably going to have to bounce around a little bit.”

There are a multitude of factors for the turnover, most obvious the turnover at the top. When a coach gets fired, some or all of his staff typically gets shown the door with him. And there has been a LOT of turnover lately — nine new NBA coaches this summer, 13 such changes a year ago. Going back just five years, to the start of the 2009-10 season, only San Antonio (Gregg Popovich), Miami (Erik Spoelstra) and Dallas (Rick Carlisle) now have the same coaches. And both the Spurs’ and Mavericks’ staffs have changed considerably.

“Most people who are making the decisions probably have a narrow list going on, from relationships or what they’re looking for,” Sikma said. “It’s a transient line of work for sure. So you have to be quick on your feet.”

Here are glimpses of three assistant coaches whose dance cards are filled to varying degrees. Sikma would like very much to get back in after spending the past seven seasons working with now-retired Rick Adelman. Boylan beat the odds by surviving a coaching change in Cleveland, then beat them again when LeBron James’ yearning for home rocked the Cavaliers’ landscape. And Ociepka is at the point, after so many hirings and firings, where he might prefer more stable options. (more…)

Blogtable: Heat hate for LBJ’s new team?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Cavs the new Heat? | Whither the Warriors? | Using the FIBA springboard



VIDEO: The GameTime crew discusses the impact Kevin Love will have with the Cavs

> Do you feel the same way about this latest LeBron super team as you did when he formed his last one? Why or why not? (H/T to Ethan Skolnick at B/R)

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: Yeah, it’s exactly the same. Except, y’know, completely different. From the moment of The Decision, what LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh did was more irritating and weenie. Three in-their-prime franchise players were ganging up on the league, preferring the shortcut of buddy ball when they should have been butting heads as rivals. Wade already had a ring, so he seemed greedy. Bosh was gladly accepting a diminished role, so he seemed needy. And James dumped his “hometown” team and their shared quest like some family man wigging out for a Corvette and a blonde. Had James chased a super team this time to L.A. or New York, that might have felt more like 2010 redux. But it’s Cleveland — Cleveland — the puppy-in-a-cage-with-Sarah-McLachlan-music of pro sports cities. James is different, too, a winner who can mentor and boost Kevin Love and Kyrie Irving to their first postseason appearances. So no, I don’t feel about this the way I did about the Heat four years ago. Sounds to me like only cranky Miami partisans would.

This is the first of many magazine covers for the Miami Heat's Big 3!

Is the Cavs’ new Big 3 really any different than the Heat’s old one?

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Yes, I feel all tingly, like soda bubbles going up my nose. Let’s face it. LeBron James could join Pink Floyd and play on the Dark Side of the Moon and everything he does/doesn’t do will draw gross overreaction in the age of Twitter. Of course, a large part of what the 2010-11 Heat perceived as unfair demands on them was self-inflicted. “Not one, not two, not three…” Dwayne Wade had won a championship and been MVP of The Finals. Chris Bosh was already a five-time All-Star. Kevin Love and Kyrie Irving have never played a single playoff game. LeBron, it seems, has learned his lesson and is preaching patience. So should we. But we won’t.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: This is different. There was so much anger toward LeBron over the way he left Cleveland, plus added outrage over these three superstars having planned their South Beach union — Magic Johnson never would have signed on with Larry Bird, by gosh! — that these guys became villains. People wanted to see them lose and watched hoping beyond hope that they would. This time, there’s no hate. LeBron went home to make amends for goodness sake. There’s no collusion. Name one reporter who ever put the names LeBron James and Kevin Love together prior to LeBron announcing his decision to go back to Cleveland. Their union is in the name of fortunate timing. But to the original point, the level of contempt toward LeBron fueled that thing and slowly he was able to reverse that by winning. The new Cavs could become like the old Lakers or Bulls — universally cheered (except by fans in direct rival cities). The “sports hate” element can add some real spice, but there’s just none of it this time around.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Probably better. This doesn’t feel like the same circus as when LeBron went to Miami. There will be a white-hot spotlight and there will be issues along the way, but James is more mature now. He is home. Settled. When those issues come up, it won’t have that “the world is ending” feel.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: No. Even though there was clearly a handshake deal on the Kevin Love trade before LeBron announced that he was “coming home,” this still feels like the “coming home” part was more important than constructing a super team right away. We’ll still evaluate these Cavs like any championship contender and point out their shortcomings when they’re not playing like the best team in the league, but the motivation behind their construction, at least from my perspective, feels different than that of the Heat in 2010. Bringing one championship to Cleveland would mean more for LeBron than bringing two or three more to Miami.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Same way. Like it or not LeBron, this is your life. Wherever you go the enormous expectations are sure to follow. I would argue that the 2010-11 Miami Heat were much better equipped to handle the rigors of the championship chase than a Cleveland Cavaliers team with two stars (Kevin Love and Kyrie Irving) who have never experienced the intense heat that is playoff pressure. I wasn’t convinced the Heat would measure up to the whole “not one, not two, not three” craziness.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogLeBron did a pretty good job, right from the start, of tamping down expectations. He obviously learned from the “Not one, not two…” speech in Miami, which never went away. So in that Sports Illustrated article he set the tone by noting it would take some time, that it wouldn’t happen right away. It reminds me of when college football coaches talk to the media the week before the game, and no matter who they’re playing, whether it’s an SEC powerhouse like UGA or the Sisters of the Poor, the coach always praises the opponent in an over-the-top manner, just to give them an out in case they lose. It was a nice try by ‘Bron, but I ain’t buying it. The Cavs and the Bulls are the class of the East. So yeah, expectations should be high for Cleveland.

Simon Legg, NBA Australia: Not quite, because they don’t have Dwyane Wade. Don’t get me wrong, this Cavs team looks potent and they can certainly win it all this season but I don’t think they’re going to be as good defensively as the Heat were in their strongest years. History tells us that you need to be a top-10 team defensively to make it to the Finals. For the Cavs to challenge the top 10, they need Varejao there when it matters most. If he goes down, who’s their backup center that offers rim protection? The easy argument here is to say that the Heat didn’t have a rim-protecting center either and that is true, but can Kevin Love sacrifice some of his offense in order to play steady defense like Chris Bosh did? It remains to be seen. Also, what LeBron James will we see? He tailed off defensively last season because he had to carry the scoring load without Wade at his best. LeBron won’t have to do as much offensively now he has Kyrie Irving and Love alongside him. If this means that LeBron goes back to his DPOTY type form then this team will be devastating.

Davide Chinellato, NBA Italia: When LeBron took his talents to South Beach, Miami instantly became the favorite for the ring. When he decided to come home, he didn’t turn Cleveland into the favorite. The Cavs are for sure the best in the East with their own Big Three, but I don’t think they’re a lock for the ring as those 2010 Heat were. Even if LeBron-Love-Irving make a scary trio. Maybe it’s the Heat experience talking: 4 straight Finals, 2 rings. Lon-term, though, I think the Cavs’ Big Three can do better.

Stefanos Triantafyllos, NBA Greece: It’s not quite the same. But, to be honest neither is LeBron. Wade and Bosh were more experienced than Love and Irving. They had proven that they can lead their teams to a winning basketball type of play. Love and Irving don’t have playoff experience, although they don’t lack talent or potential. They have the All-Star quality and if we take into consideration the fact that LeBron of 2014 is better than the LeBron of 2010, I am pretty sure that the Cavaliers will be the favorite team to win East.

Marc-Oliver Robbers, NBA Deutschland: It’s more complicated. On the one hand you can say that LeBron has learned from his mistakes, from The Decision and so on. As fans, you revel in the homecoming story. But on the other hand it would be a better feel-good story, if he would have tried it with the young core, with Wiggins and Bennett. Just build up the team from the button as he wrote in his SI letter.

Blogtable: Keeping Klay … now what?

Klay Thompson averaged 18.4 points a game for the Warriors last season. (Andrew D. Bernstein/NBAE)

Klay Thompson averaged 18.4 ppg for the Warriors last season. (Andrew D. Bernstein/NBAE)

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Cavs the new Heat? | Whither the Warriors? | Using the FIBA springboard


> Golden State wouldn’t part with Klay Thompson to get Kevin Love. Where does that leave the Warriors? Are they better off or worse off than they were at summer’s start?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: If you aren’t improving, you’re getting worse. That seems a fair assessment of the Western Conference in particular, where the Warriors — last year’s preseason darlings for many — won’t crack the top 3 for most prognosticators this fall. The Klay Thompson man-crush of Golden State’s front office escapes me, beyond the basketball basics of needing somebody in a Steph Curry backcourt who can guard people. There’s no assurance Steve Kerr as coach will be an upgrade over Mark Jackson (though Kerr’s staff surely will stir up less drama). Improvement from within? Andrew Bogut stays healthy? Swell. But that’s not enough to vault past the Spurs, Thunder and Clippers, or maybe even the Mavericks, Grizzlies and Trail Blazers.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comIt leaves the Warriors toweling down after a spin class, because they haven’t moved an inch. They’re right where last saw them in the spring, stuck in the middle of the deep Western Conference behind the upper crust Spurs, Thunder, Clippers and maybe Grizzlies, naively trying to convince themselves they’re contenders.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: Keep preaching about Klay Thompson’s defense and how crucial it is as long as Steph Curry is the team’s point guard, but I would have dealt Thompson (and David Lee, a player I’ve long admired) for Love without losing sleep. Love turns only 26 prior to the season and he’s simply more versatile than Thompson and Lee put together. He does things no other player does. End of story.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comAnswer C: the same. Shaun Livingston will be a nice pickup if he is healthy enough to play 65-70 games and a full postseason, and the projected return of Festus Ezeli after knee surgery will be a much-needed boost at center if he can offer solid backup minutes. The Thompson/Love decision will obviously be hanging over the Warriors, with how Thompson plays and with how David Lee plays. But it still will not be a surprise if Golden State is solidly in the pack of the second tier in the West with the Trail Blazers, Rockets, Grizzlies and Mavericks. And if there is a worry about an offseason decision, it should be about the coaching change, not the players. Mark Jackson connected with the roster and delivered results. Steve Kerr will be a rookie on the sidelines.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: The only thing that has changed the Warriors’ outlook is the moves of other teams (Dallas and Houston in particular) around them in the West hierarchy. Golden State still has the ability to rank in the top 10 on both ends of the floor. They ranked third defensively last season and still have Andrew Bogut, Andre Iguodala and Klay Thompson. The key will be for Steve Kerr to make better use of the bench and make them more potent offensively. With all their talent, the potential is there. Given the uncertainty of a new coach, it’s impossible to rank the Warriors ahead of the Spurs, Thunder or Clippers. But they shouldn’t be dismissed as a possible conference finalist either.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: The Warriors occupy the same place in the Western Conference standings with or without Love: they are still a few pieces away from the true contender status that I thought they were ready for last season. Toss in a new coach and new system, and they could even take a step back in the 2014-15 season. Klay Thompson is not the man responsible for what happens to the Warriors next season, at least not the only man. His Splash Brothers partner Steph Curry will be the catalyst for the Warriors. Thompson, as good as he has been and will continue to be, should not have to pay that bill.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: Can I vote for the the same? I don’t get not giving up Thompson for Love. Thompson is a really good player, one of the best off guards in the NBA, but Kevin Love is one of the 10 best players in the NBA, and I think if you have a chance to make that move, you make it. I’m just not really sure where the Warriors can look to improve this season. Defensively they were quietly pretty good last season, and we know offensively that they’re dynamic. Love would have given them a rebounding presence and helped stretch the floor even more. Last season they won 51 games in a difficult Western Conference. Steve Kerr will have his hands full in his first year trying to build upon that.

Davide Chinellato, NBA Italia: I think they’re the same. The West isn’t changed a lot this summer and there are at least three teams, Spurs, Thunder and Clippers, better than the Warriors. Golden State can count on Steve Kerr’s great basketball mind, even if he’s a coach with no experience, and I’m sure going to the World Cup with Team USA is going to help a lot Steph Curry and Klay Thompson. I think the Warriors are intriguing, but not a Western Conference powerhouse

Aldo Aviñante, NBA Philippines: It actually depends on how new coach Steve Kerr will implement his system with the tools that the Warriors have in their disposal. But one of the underrated things that goes unnoticed in the NBA most of the time is — continuity. The Spurs have shown throughout the years that their chemistry will always make them contenders and with Golden State’s talented line-up intact their is no way for them to go but up.

Marc-Oliver Robbers, NBA Deutschland: I believe that they are better off in the West. In my opinion a trade Thompson/Lee for Martin/Love or something near it would have been no big upgrade. Thompson has still plenty of upside in his game and with new coach Steve Kerr on his side, he will develop fast. With Kerr on the sideline the team will play more team-basketball and less isolation. That will help Barnes a lot and Iguodala will improve, too.

Karan Madhok, NBA India: The Warriors are going to be exactly as they were when the summer began. Their guards will improve a little (Curry and Thompson) and their big men will probably regress a bit (Bogut and Lee). In the tough West, only a big splash can make a real difference in the standings. Eventually, the Warriors’ fate will be decided by their supporting cast and their intangibles. Will Harrison Barnes bounce back from last year’s dip and finally have his much-awaited breakout year? How is Steve Kerr going to be as a coach? Even in the best-case scenario, I don’t see Golden State finishing any higher than fifth in the West.

Blogtable: The World Cup carryover

Anthony Davis has become the defensive backbone of Team USA. (Jesse D Garrabrant/NBAE)

Anthony Davis has become the defensive backbone of Team USA. (Jesse D Garrabrant/NBAE)

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Cavs the new Heat? | Whither the Warriors? | Using the FIBA springboard


> Which NBA player in the FIBA Basketball World Cup stands to gain the most, in terms of improving his play and carrying it over to the NBA?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comAnthony Davis opened eyes, dropped jaws and sent a shiver through New Orleans’ 2014-15 opponents even before the medal round began. If the league had an official preseason all-NBA team, the New Orleans big man would be on it. I get the same vibe watching him now that I got up-close 17 years or so ago as Kevin Garnett grew into his body and his skills. Of his Team USA mates, Kyrie Irving should benefit greatly from this experience, both on the court and mentally handling new expectations and responsibilities. But people will remember this 2014 FIBA World Cup for Davis’ emergence as a monster in full.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Getting the playing time and on-court experience in game situations that really mean something could be just what the doctor and the rehab therapist and the Bulls coaching staff and front office ordered for Derrick Rose. Physical and mental hurdles should be in his rearview mirror by the time he hits training camp.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: This might be unanimous: DeMarcus Cousins. However, with him, it’s not so much carrying over improved play, it’s carrying over an eye-opening experience of how professionals work, play, interact and lead.

Kenneth Faried (Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE)

Kenneth Faried (Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE)

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Ricky Rubio, Timberwolves/Spain. Rubio has made improving his shooting a focus of the offseason, with good reason, and the World Cup will be the first progress report. The tournament isn’t a full schedule of NBA-level competition, but the games will matter and therefore a better test than the exhibition slate with the Wolves. A good showing from the perimeter in his native Spain will be a confidence boost and build momentum heading back to Minnesota.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Derrick Rose, of course. Playing 20 minutes a game for the USA is a great way for Rose to knock off the rust, regain his feel for the game, and get his body used to playing full speed basketball again. Somebody said the following in the last week and I’d love to credit them, but I forget who it was: The best way to prepare for basketball is to play basketball. The next three weeks could be huge for Rose, the Bulls, and how successful their 2014-15 season will be. Beyond Rose, the World Cup could help some incoming rookiesBojan Bogdanovic, Dante Exum and Kostas Papanikolaou to name a few — hit the ground running when training camp opens.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Great question. I don’t think there is any doubt that Anthony Davis is the player poised for the quantum leap from where he was at the start of the 2014-15 season to where he is now. Davis has a chance to make the transition from All-Star to game-changing superstar with the right kind of results in Spain.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: Kenneth Faried. He finished his rookie year with a flourish, making first-team All-Rookie. But since then, as the Nuggets have rebuilt, Faried’s star has lost a little of its shine, and last year his name started to bubble up in trade talks. But as a member of USA Basketball, Faried seems to have gotten a little of his swagger back. He went from being a bubble invite to the USA camp to earning a starting spot on the squad. When I asked him on Friday night if he felt like he belonged, he quickly shot back, “Ain’t no ‘feel like.’ I know I belong.”

Simon Legg, NBA Australia: It might be obvious to mention Derrick Rose, given what he’s coming back from, or maybe Klay Thompson, who will be having contract negotiations in the not too distant future but I’ve decided to go out of left field a little bit here. I’m also going specific to my region in selecting Aron Baynes. He has been one of the best-performing Boomers in their nine warm-up matches across Europe heading into the FIBA World Cup. He’s been a double-double machine and is a guaranteed starter for the Aussies. The reason I believe he has a lot to gain is because this is his opportunity to show the world what he can do. He’s a role player on the best team in the NBA and he hasn’t established himself as a rotation NBA player yet. His contract situation is an interesting one because he is a restricted free agent and the Spurs have early Bird rights on him and have tendered a qualifying offer worth $1.1 million. Will he take that and come back for an uncertain extra year or could another team swoop and offer a more lucrative deal? Maybe a good showing at the FIBA World Cup could entice someone.

Aldo Aviñante, NBA Philippines: Andray Blatche of the Philippines. I might get some flak for choosing him but you have to hear me out. Team USA will be covered as a whole, although Derrick Rose will garner more attention because of his long layoff. The various NBA players littered among the other countries are already well established. Meanwhile in the Philippines, if Blatche plays well and somehow leads Gilas Pilipians to the second round, he will develop a cult-like following. Still unsigned, if he exemplifies his leadership and shows his adjustment to playing with a new team in a different system he will be an attractive free agent player after the World Cup.

Stefanos Triantafyllos, NBA Greece: Kostas Papanikolaou, who else? He is a rookie for the Houston fans and an unfamiliar face for international basketball. Over the past years he has grown a lot and few 24 years-old players have added in their resume two Euroleague titles. During the back-to-back European titles of Olympiakos he played a significant role as starting small forward, with his streaky shooting, his explosiveness to the rim and his defensive mindset. Last year he grew up as a more versatile offensive player in Barcelona and now in his last few days before the NBA chapter of his career comes along, he demonstrated solid leadership during Greece’s friendly games. He was the top scorer playing at the “3” alongside Giannis Antetokounmpo and managed to check the “constistency” box next to his scouting report.

Karan Madhok, NBA India: Although all eyes will be on Anthony Davis — who is sure to be the best player for the USA — and Derrick Rose, who’ll be making a long-awaited return, I think that the real surprise gem of the FIBA World Cup will be … Kenneth Faried! Through all of Team USA’s practice warm-up games so far, Faried has been the x-factor, and the international style of play seems to suit his game perfectly. Without Durant on the USA side, Faried also seems to have secured a starting spot in the American frontcourt. Despite his talent, Faried has hardly had any experience at higher level competitions so far in his young career. Playing alongside some of the best players and for top coaches like Coach K and Thibodeau will sure give Faried the confidence and experience he needs to become a leader for the Nuggets when he returns.

Wolves opt for litter of Timberpups


VIDEO: Flip Saunders talks about the Minnesota Timberwolves’ new additions

Building a serious contender around one superstar power forward named Kevin wasn’t working for the Minnesota Timberwolves.

It didn’t work with Kevin Garnett ultimately, despite a string of eight consecutive playoff appearances from 1997-2004. And it surely didn’t work with Kevin Love, whose six-season stay in the Twin Cities merely extended the Wolves’ postseason drought from four years to a full decade.

So now Minnesota is trying another way. It’s going to raise a litter of Timberpups and hope there is success in numbers.

By acquiring Andrew Wiggins and Anthony Bennett on Saturday in the long-awaited, two franchise-shifting trade of Love to the Cleveland Cavaliers, and adding him to their own 2014 lottery pick Zach LaVine, a still-young Ricky Rubio (24 in October) and last year’s first-rounders Gorgui Dieng and, er, Shabazz Muhammad (for the moment, tick tock), the Wolves have youth and hope and dreams. But mostly youth.

They have it in numbers, too, as if seeding their organization for a bountiful harvest in a few years. Oh, Flip Saunders, the team’s president of basketball operations and its coach, will talk about excitement and development in the meantime – he is, after all, a masterful amateur magician talented in the sleight of hand.

But the real payoff, if it comes at all, will come between the games as his group of raw, talented players coalesce around each other.

Synchronizing things has always been a problem for Minnesota.

It snagged Garnett in a dice-roll Draft decision 19 years ago and had a dozen years to assemble a championship-caliber team around him, but never managed to fully do so. The initial vision of Garnett and Stephon Marbury as a new-millennial Karl Malone-John Stockton (or at least Shawn Kemp-Gary Payton), with first Tom Gugliotta (and then Joe Smith) as third stars, never achieved full focus. Gugliotta left, Smith was no more than a role player and Marbury torpedoed his own career in one of sports’ many examples of $100 million airport, $10 control tower.

Kevin McHale, the Wolves’ basketball boss, kept patching around Garnett and got them as far as the 2004 Western Conference finals by hiring mercenaries Latrell Sprewell and Sam Cassell. That approach had no better legs than Sprewell and Cassell themselves, though, and after the usual death spiral – coaching changes, contract squabbles, missing the playoffs in Garnett’s last three Minnesota seasons – the big guy participated in the trade to Boston that got him his ring. And left the Wolves as, well, the Wolves.

The Love years were even worse. McHale got the UCLA forward in a Draft night switcheroo with Memphis for O.J. Mayo and seemed to be the perfect mentor for Love.

But McHale’s own tenure in Minnesota was out of sync with his new young big, and when Wolves owner Glen Taylor dumped McHale in favor of David Kahn, bad downshifted to worse. Erratic Draft picks and personnel moves followed, along with an uneasy atmosphere – or creepy culture, if you go by some Wolves insiders – during Kahn’s four lost seasons in charge.

It’s quicker to note what went right in that time than what went wrong – the Wolves didn’t pass on Rubio, Love developed himself into an All-Star and Rick Adelman stabilized the coaching position for a time – but it wasn’t enough. By the time Saunders was brought back 15 months ago to do some serious sweet-talking, Love already had one foot and half of his other out the door.

So now they’ll try it this way: Round up as many young players as possible, fold in a key veteran or three (new acquisition Thad Young, plus current Wolves Nikola Pekovic and Kevin Martin until they can shed the contract), and bake.

“What we’re trying to do is we’re trying to build not an individual, we’re trying to build a team,” Saunders said Saturday. “That’s the thing that we’ve sold to the players or anyone that we bring in here.”

For an outpost franchise like Minnesota, a big part of the plan is that the players – in growing up together – see ways in which their whole can end up greater than the sum of their parts. The risk is that someone feels slighted by being a spot or two down in his own ideal pecking order – if Bennett or LaVine feels stunted because of Wiggins, or if Rubio locks in on max-contract dreams when he hasn’t earned one yet – and blows up the blueprint.

That’s akin to what happened in Oklahoma City, which took a similar approach until James Harden chafed at being neither Batman nor Robin. He wound up with his own team in Houston, but at least the Thunder reached The Finals once and have managed to stabilize the roster since his departure.

Then again, maybe OKC proves that it all eventually comes full circle. And building around a superstar forward named Kevin really is the way to go.