Posts Tagged ‘Steve Aschburner’

Getting out of NBA’s ‘Ringless of Honor’

Steve Nash's teams have been to the playoffs 12 times, but he's never been in The Finals. (Noah Graham/NBAE)

Steve Nash’s teams have been to the playoffs 12 times, but he’s never been in The Finals. (Noah Graham/NBAE)

Rings still are the things, even if it didn’t necessarily seem that way in June.

Because The Finals of 2014 were a rematch of the 2013 Finals, there wasn’t any chatter about stars who needed to win a championship. Both the Miami and San Antonio rosters were full of decorated performers, their “ring” box checked and re-checked through multiple title runs.

That wasn’t the case in many previous postseasons, when LeBron James and Chris Bosh (2011), Dirk Nowitzki and Jason Kidd (2010), Pau Gasol (2009) and Paul Pierce, Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen (2008) chased the validation that seems to matter most in the NBA. Tim Duncan and Kobe Bryant had won nine rings in 12 years, so unless someone was a teammate of one of them — or broke through like the ’08 Celtics, the ’06 Heat (Dwyane Wade on the rise) or the ensemble ’04 Pistons – he had his nose pressed against the window at title time.

The Duncan-Bryant era was a legacy blocker as surely as the Jordan era, back when Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen were winning six titles in eight years with two different supporting casts in Chicago. By dint of competing during one or both of those consecutive eras – the Bulls last won in 1998, the Spurs first won in 1999 – an entire generation of All-Stars and Hall of Famers exited this league without jewelry, including Charles Barkley, Patrick Ewing, Karl Malone, John Stockton, Allen Iverson, Chris Mullin and Reggie Miller.

With 15 of 20 titles hogged by three franchises – and Hakeem Olajuwon‘s Houston teams grabbing two more – vying for the leftovers was a game of musical chairs. Gary Payton and Clyde Drexler managed to grab rings on their way out the door. The old-warhorse-to-the-Spurs-or-Lakers-seeking-his-ring became an annual tale of spring.

Guys like Pierce, Garnett and Nowitzki would be on the brink of joining that club to which no NBA star wants to belong – the Ringless of Honor – if not for the Celtics’ and Mavericks’ one-and-done peaks in 2008 and 2011.

Meanwhile, the waiting list gets refreshed, not erased. Here are the stars who – by virtue of their status and their career trajectories – are most on the clock as the 2014-15 season approaches (with each’s level of urgency noted):

Carmelo Anthony, Nov. 2013

Carmelo Anthony, Nov. 2013
(Michael Bernstein/NBAE )

Steve Nash, Lakers (****) – Nash is about out of time, and might have been before he got to L.A. two years ago. At this point, his best shot at a ring will require a trade by the February deadline because the Lakers will have trouble even qualifying for the tournament next spring. The once-dazzling playmaker left Dallas too soon and got to Bryant too late.

Carmelo Anthony, Knicks (***) – If Anthony’s Hall of Fame career gets discounted for the lack of an NBA championship to bookend his NCAA title splash with Syrcause, he’ll have the man in the mirror to blame. He pushed out of Denver before the Nuggets’ plan had a chance to come to fruition, and he couldn’t capitalize in New York despite the Knicks’ monstrous payroll. Now, rather than choosing as a free agent to contend with Chicago or Houston, Anthony has re-upped for what clearly is a New York rebuild. He’s a strong candidate to find himself facing the Tracy McGrady fate in a few years, the scoring star latching on in twilight for a final shot or two.

Kevin Durant (**) – He’s young, so the ticking of the clock still is muted. But Durant has accomplished almost everything else he can – scoring titles, an MVP – which makes the open space on his trophy shelf more conspicuous. He doesn’t want to become Garnett, the constant around whom insufficient parts get haphazardly placed. Russell Westbrook fits in here, too, by association, though he still has individual awards to conquer.

Dwight Howard, Rockets (***) – The big fella seems destined to head into the sunset and five years later to Springfield with a big smile and no Larry O’Brien trophy. He plays at the mercy of his coaches and his point guards, yes, but Howard has yet to show the leadership skills or the passion – as in downright, focused orneriness – to carry his team when it matters most. James Harden is younger but he’s facing the same onus, especially with Houston’s relative whiff in free agency this summer.

Chris Paul, Clippers (***) – The Clippers’ playmaker might be in the most urgent now-or-never situation of all on this list. He has the coach, the teammates, the reset ownership and his best opportunity yet to be on a podium shaking Adam Silver‘s hand in mid-June. Injuries are always a concern with Paul, however, and at 29, so is the clock.

Joakim Noah, Bulls (**) – Noah is here because he’s older than his oft-injured and more esteemed teammate Derrick Rose. Rose’s overarching storyline is all about health, with championships way down the list. Noah had a breakthrough individual season in 2013-14, though, and has been the guy enduring all the comings and goings in Chicago (coaches, Rose’s layoffs, Luol Deng‘s ouster). A dervish of emotions on the court, Noah doesn’t hide how important winning is to him. But he hasn’t been able to achieve it yet, largely because of James in Miami and now, again, in Cleveland.

Zach Randolph, Al Jefferson, David West, LaMarcus Aldridge (*) – These are all top-tier NBA power forwards for the Grizzlies, Hornets, Pacers and Trail Blazers, respectively, still seeking their first rings. With the exception of Aldridge, who still has time, they’re not quite at the marquee level of the other names on this list. They’ll need help chasing down hardware.

Deron Williams, Joe Johnson (**) – It’s not so much that fans notice the holes in these Brooklyn stars’ resumes; they haven’t achieved that level of reverence yet. In fact, it’s more what a ring would do for each of them, perhaps elevating opinions and removing criticism.

Blogtable: Worried about Rose yet?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Rose’s comeback | The U.S. vs. the world | The NBA’s offseason


Derrick Rose shot only 25.4 percent during his World Cup run. (Jesse D. Garrabrant/NBAE)

Derrick Rose shot only 25.4 percent during his World Cup run. (Jesse D. Garrabrant/NBAE)

> Nobody seems all that worried about Derrick Rose, even after an abysmal (statistically speaking) FIBA World Cup tournament. Are you? Why or why not?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: I’m based in Chicago, so yeah, I’m worried. Or rather, I’m surrounded by worry. Bulls fans legitimately wonder if Rose will be able to withstand a full schedule, if he’ll be his old self on the court (or 96 percent, anyway) and – gasp! – what the contingency plan is if he can’t or isn’t. They worry they’ll end up commiserating with Washington NFL fans over their own Robert Griffin III — a meteor-like star who flashes across their sky but falls to Earth too soon. Then again, there is a “rust” factor in play and Rose didn’t stick around long enough last season to entirely work through it. There, is my brow sufficiently unfurrowed?

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: You have heard of rust, right? The guy was rusty. He didn’t have his shot. He’s spent practically two years rehabbing two separate knee injuries instead of playing. Check back around the All-Star break and let’s see where he’s at. The biggest positive was that he seemed to be moving well, had a burst, and that’s what’s key. He played, as far as I could tell, with relative abandon, he wasn’t hesitant to cut or jump. So, again, hit me up around the All-Star break.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Whatever worry I have — and I don’t think “worry” is the right word — has nothing to do with the World Cup statistics. I don’t care about his shooting percentage in September. This is a guy coming back after missing a majority of games two seasons in a row. How does the knee feel? How does it respond to playing two games in a row? Is Rose able to burst to the rim? That’s what matters. And that’s why the World Cup, including the exhibitions in North America and the practices along the way, should be viewed as a positive, not a worry.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: I don’t buy the theory that the FIBA ball was the primary reason he shot 1-for-19 from 3-point range, but I still wouldn’t be concerned about his numbers. Playing limited minutes as the back-up point guard, he didn’t have much of a chance to get into a rhythm in any of those games. And he knew that running the offense and playing aggressive on-the-ball defense were his primary duties. The key takeaway is that he got some full-speed games under his belt and moved further along in the process of getting back to being All-Star Derrick Rose than he would have if he didn’t play with the national team.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: The first thing you have to do is ignore those statistics from the FIBA World Cup. They don’t translate to the NBA for a number of reasons, the most important being the fact that playing that limited time we saw from Rose in Spain is completely out of the question in Chicago. That rust Rose was working to knock off during the World Cup will go into hyperdrive once the Bulls kick off training camp. Rose wasn’t in Spain to show off or to try to get it all back at once. He was playing a role, nothing more and nothing less, and using his time there to round into game ready NBA shape. So no, I’m not particularly worried about Rose based on what I saw from him in Spain. If anything, he looks at least physically ready to return to form. He has plenty of time to sharpen his touch and get his timing down with his Bulls teammates. Plus, Tom Thibodeau was there every step of the way as a U.S. assistant and spoke to us regularly about Rose. If he’s not worried, I’m not worried.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: Considering how much time he’s missed the last two seasons, I’m not worried about Rose’s timing being while off playing with people he’s never played with before, or shots that usually go down not going in, or his aggressiveness wavering throughout the tournament. What I was more focused on were those flashes of the old D-Rose — him tipping passes on defense, leading fast breaks, storming his way through traffic to the rim. I suppose it’s a half-full, half-empty type of thing. Call me an optimist, but I think he’s still on the way back, and he’ll get there if we give him time.

Simon Legg, NBA Australia: I’m not worried, the main thing is that he made it through unscathed. There’s going to be some growing pains with this recovery period and I’m sure Bulls fans are pleased that the majority of those were on display for Team USA. Yes, he averaged just 5.4 points on 27.3 percent shooting, including 1-for-17 from 3-point range, but he wasn’t playing the pivotal role that he will with the Bulls. The guy hasn’t suddenly lost the ability to play, he’s just dealing with a few minor issues as he works his way back to full confidence. There were enough little highlights in there to show that he hasn’t lost any of his athleticism, don’t worry Bulls fans, things will be OK.

Adriano Albuquerque, NBA Brasil: FIBA and NBA are two very different games, and Rose’s job description with the Bulls is also a lot different from his duties with Team USA. I’m optimistic his time with the national team was a step in the right direction. Not losing any more games is the goal with him.

Karan Madhok, NBA India: Let me answer this one by taking us back to 2010, when Derrick Rose played in the 2010 FIBA World Championship, and statistically speaking, wasn’t anything amazing, even though the USA won the tournament. A few months later, he began the season that eventually became his finest, and by the time the 2010-11 calender concluded, he had become the NBA’s youngest-ever MVP. Now, I’m not saying that a tough World Cup performance equals an impressive NBA season, and circumstances are obviously different now since Rose is starting the 2013-14 season coming off of two lost years. But I am saying that we shouldn’t judge a player like Rose from the World Cup. This was true in 2010, and this is especially true now, since unlike his other USA teammates, he used the tournament as a way to get back into the shape and rhythm required for high-level basketball. I’m not worried about Rose — on the contrary, I’m optimistic that he made it out of the World Cup without breaking down and will now head into the regular season with much-needed basketball exposure.

Stefanos Triantafyllos, NBA Greece: It’s true that Derrick Rose didn’t have a solid overall tournament and only showcased glimpses of his talent. But, he didn’t have either the role or the space to do more for his team. In Chicago he will have the ball in his hands and can then remind us more of his old self. I’m not worried about his peaks, I’m worried about his valleys, as John Wooden used to say. The knee injuries may not affect his game, but they have affected the time he needs to rest after matches. So, stability is the real test for him.

Max Marbeiter, NBA Germany: Worried? Not at all! You have to keep in mind that the guy has been out for almost two seasons. So there is a lot of catching up to do. I think what really mattered in Spain was not the way he played, it was the fact that he played. Every single game. For a guy with Rose’s injury history the schedule was tough, nevertheless he did not sit out one single contest and played without any sign of soreness or problems with his knees. That should be encouraging. And it is.  Of course Rose’s game needs a lot of polishing before the playoffs start. Yes: the playoffs. Because you can be sure, he won’t be there from day one of the regular season. He has not found his rhythm yet, is not really capable of controlling the pace. Offensively he made some wrong decisions; the shot selection was not too good either. But I guess, after two years of absence, that doesn’t come as a surprise. The two weeks in Spain allowed Rose to regain confidence in his body, to get used to serious competition again. I think that’s everything anybody could ask for. So again: I‘m not worried at all.

Guillermo García, NBA Mexico: I believe that he will reach his best level by the start of the season.

Juan Carlos Campos Rodriguez, NBA Mexico: For me, doubts about Derrick Rose’s performance continue. It seems the Bulls player still has a certain fear about his physical potential, and thus limits his own talent — the talent that once led him to become an MVP. During the tournament, he wasn’t the player we knew. The old Rose never hesitated when attacking the rim and, above all, used to be explosive and aggressive whenever he touched with the ball. And we did get a couple hints that Rose wasn’t quite himself (yet), when Coach K did not want to overwork or overexpose the Bulls star too early in USAB camp. This provokes great doubts for me in a season where the Bulls have invested so heavily to surround him with talent. However, if he fails to regain that confidence and hasn’t fully recuperated from his injury, it’s tough to see great times ahead.

 

Blogtable: The U.S. vs. the World

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Rose’s comeback | The U.S. vs. the world | The NBA’s offseason



VIDEO: The Starters discuss whether or not U.S. players are too dominant on the international stage

> What’s your takeaway from the whooping the U.S. put on the rest of the world at the FIBA World Cup? Is the gap widening again? Time for America to call off the dogs, let even younger guys play? Other thoughts?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: To heck with global supremacy and to heck with calling off the dogs. I favor a young-player Team USA and FIBA tournament in general so as to not expose franchise stars to undue risk of injury or fatigue. Basketball is a worldwide sport, the NBA is a league of nations, and it doesn’t turn on which country in a given year puts together the winningest roster. The Olympics doesn’t even move my needle on this. I’m a big believer in putting the day job first, and the NBA’s investment all around — for owners, for fans, for players — ought to be the 800-pound priority.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: The gap has always been wide and likely will be for many years to come just as the U.S. men’s national soccer team remains miles away from contending for the World Cup despite making obvious gains. As for allowing the younger guys to play, I’ve always taken this side. To me it makes little sense for the NBA’s elite players to risk injury in a tournament that, frankly, holds little meaning in this country. Look, the World Cup championship game went up against Sunday NFL games. I haven’t seen the ratings, but I’m guessing they weren’t pretty. Now, having talked recently to Chandler Parsons and hearing his real disappointment at not making the team, I’m not here to tell anyone they can’t participate if they want to. But outside of the Olympics — and even then I’m not beholden to the drum beat that our best players must compete so the U.S. is guaranteed of winning gold — we should open the field to a much wider pool of players who can proudly represent the U.S.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: No calling off. Send the best team possible and see who wins. It’s the world championships or the Olympics, not AYSO. If the United States wins for the next 20 years, then the event has served its purpose to determine the best. If someone else wins, the victory will have much more meaning than if it came against the D-League All-Stars or a mix of college players.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: It just seems that way. There are a lot of reasons why USA never got challenged. The next four or five best teams were all on the other side of the bracket. Spain would have provided a tougher matchup, but crumbled under the pressure of a close game in the quarterfinals. While Serbia was a good team, it had never played the U.S., so that was the first time most of its players had faced that kind of speed and athleticism. And finally, the gold medal game would have been more competitive had the U.S. not shot ridiculously well from 3-point range on that particular night. There’s still a gap in regard to both top-line talent and depth of talent, and Jerry Colangelo and Mike Krzyzewski have done a better job of making the most of that talent than previous regimes had. But the rest of the world certainly isn’t getting worse.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: My biggest takeaway is that this rush to judge the team that USA Basketball sent to Spain was as twisted and relentless as anything I’ve seen in two decades in this business. The narrative about this team that was spun before they even left these shores for Spain was pretty comical. No stars = USAB, and more specifically the NBA, Jerry Colangelo and Mike Krzyzewskiall getting their commeuppance from the rest of the world was pretty much the way I read it. Foolishness. Complete foolishness. The U.S. team was clearly better and deeper than anyone else in the field, including Spain. (I said it here last week.). Even the haters have to face the reality that the U.S. program is once again the measuring stick. The same built-in advantage certain nations have when the FIFA World Cup rolls around is the same decided edge the (wrongly stereotyped ugly) Americans have now when the FIBA World Cup or the Olympics pop up on the summer schedule. The pool of human resources at USAB’s disposal is as deep as it gets and arguably as deep as it has ever been. And some of these so-called future NBA stars or guys who have dominated internationally and could and would do whatever in the NBA are getting hype they don’t deserve. And it showed when they faced the U.S. “C-Team” that quite frankly trounced the competition in Spain.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: The more I think about it, the less I understand these international competitions. I get it in soccer, when national teams are assembled every few years for the World Cup, because at least in between in soccer we get the Champion’s League, where we see the world’s best teams all compete against each other. And I think that might be a more interesting concept in basketball than a Basketball World Cup, where the Olympics are still considered the marquee tournament. With that said, just because the US breezed through this tournament without much trouble, using a banged-up roster, it’s probably too soon to say the US is beyond reproach. We never did, for instance, have to play against Spain or France, and we came through the tournament’s easier bracket. If there’s anything we should have learned from recent USA Basketball history, it’s as soon as you start thinking you’re untouchable, watch out.

Simon Legg, NBA Australia: The crazy thing about this World Cup was that this USA team was arguably second or third string and they still cruised. As someone from outside the U.S., representing a country that would receive a beat down if they faced off, I’m not concerned that they cruised through the tournament! I want to see the best players on the planet playing together. LeBron James, Kevin Durant and Kobe Bryant playing together at 2012 Olympics was incredible to see. I don’t want to see younger guys play to level up the playing field, I want to see the best team come together.

Adriano Albuquerque, NBA Brasil: I wrote about this at large for NBA Brasil. The gap is wide again because the rest of the world is in transition from the end of its first true NBA generation to the next wave. Just two years ago, a U.S. team with LeBron, KD, Melo and Kobe took all they could handle from Lithuania and Spain. Guys that have given trouble to the Americans in the past 10 years, like Ginobili, Jasikevicius, Kleiza, Papaloukas and Spanoulis are either retired from their national teams or took the summer off. Also, USA Basketball has done a remarkable job with its program, which sets it apart from everyone else. The rest of the world will come back: France, Serbia, Lithuania, Canada and Australia all have quality generations developing for the next Olympic cycle. But, as long as USAB keeps doing things right, the US will stay on top of it.

Karan Madhok, NBA India: Although I had expected the US to win the tournament, I was genuinely surprised that a young team without so many of America’s best talents were able to sweep through their competition with such ease. The gap has widened between the USA and the rest of the world for sure, but that is no need for alarm; basketball is a cycle and as a new generation of young international talents mature mature and improve, the gap will be narrowed again. The rest of the world is simply going through a phase where the old ranks (Ginobili’s Argentina, Gasol’s Spain, etc.) haven’t yet made room for the new. I don’t agree that America should call off the big dogs; on the contrary, I want USA to send their best players to the World Cup (which is ALL basketball) instead of the Olympics (where basketball is just one of dozens of sports). The more the US invests in the World Cup, the more the rest of the world will care about it.

Stefanos Triantafyllos, NBA Greece: First of all Team USA was lucky not to face Greece, because everybody remembers that “Big in Japan” Greek team back in 2006. Sorry, I had to underline somehow the fact that we were the last country to beat the NBAers. Now, as for the gap-talk, it’s tough to say. On one hand we saw Team USA cruising through the gold medal. On the other hand there is no argument that this was the most FIBA-geared team the Americans have ever assembled. They didn’t thrive playing NBA game style, but they beat the world playing international basketball.  Team USA was so effective because it took bits and pieces from the entire world. These days when international players have become part of the NBA core and more and more European coaches are sitting on NBA benches, we cannot talk about “the gap widening”. The gap is closing in terms of talent, size, coaching and athleticism, but it’s still wide open when referring to administration, planning and management. We really like watching NBA stars on the floor every other summer, so I believe that nothing have to change.

Max Marbeiter, NBA Germany: Well, at first sight, it seems like there is no chance that we will see an international team beat the USA in the near future. And I guess that’s true at second and third sight as well. To me, Team USA simply got underestimated this time. People just saw who did not come to Spain and thought, “Well without all the big stars they might be in trouble.” Unfortunately they forgot that the NBA does not only consist of the LeBrons and Durants of this world. The team Coach K took to Spain was still miles deep and incredibly talented. I mean, James Harden, Steph Curry and Anthony Davis are among the best players on their respective positions. So that was no Team USA Lite even with LeBron, KD, Paul George and Chris Paul missing. But, I guess you have to keep in mind that the draw kind of twisted the facts. Until the final, Slovenia was the toughest opponent Team USA had to face. At least on paper. All the other big nations played in the other half of the bracket. No one knows if the U.S. had beaten Argentina, Brazil or France as convincingly as they beat the Dominican Republic, Finland or Slovenia. I’m not saying they would have lost, but the games might have been closer. And maybe a final against Spain would have come down to the final minutes, although that’s something we’ll never find out. Nevertheless I don’t think the gap is widening. There’s always been a certain gap as soon as the U.S. sent some of their best players. The athletic advantage is huge. But to me it would be the wrong move to stop sending the best players to a world championship or the Olympics. The big tournaments should have the toughest competition possible. And who knows, maybe one day the United States do get beat by a team like Spain.

Guillermo García, NBA Mexico: I think the United States has re-opened the gap and that has been confirmed during this World Cup. I could see them heading into the Olympics with this group from 2014.

Blogtable: Taking some time off

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Rose’s comeback | The U.S. vs. the world | The NBA’s offseason



VIDEO: Isiah Thomas and Steve Smith review some big offseason happenings

> We have a little more than a week until training camps start. The NBA offseason: Too long, too short, just right? Why’s that?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: First, I’ll share a secret: Personally, I like covering this sport in the order we get it, as in, preseason is No. 1, followed by regular season, postseason and offseason. Preseason is best for me because it’s NBA spring training — everyone is undefeated, players and coaches aren’t sick of seeing us yet, storylines are fresh. By contrast, the offseason is too much about rumors, unattributed sources and dollars — and little or no basketball. So you can guess my answer: Too long. Since I don’t want a longer preseason, postseason or regular season, however, the only solution is for everyone involved –- players, coaches, fans, media and most of all agents -– to agree to go completely dark for six weeks. Grab much-needed R&R and otherwise, shutter it.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: Wow, the offseason sure seemed short from the end of The Finals to the Draft, to Summer League to free agency to international competition. I wouldn’t be opposed to at least thinking about moving the start of the season to late November instead of late October, but here we are, so let’s get it on.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: First reaction: What offseason? (Draft, free agency, summer league, free agency, trades, free agency, World Cup.) Actual reaction: Probably just right. There is enough time for players to participate in some events and still get rest, enough time for teams to make important roster decisions and still market.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: I think the length of the offseason is fine, though it might be better if the World Cup was earlier in the summer to give players (and writers!) a little more rest before the start of camp (and to avoid the NFL). I think the schedule itself can be reduced by 10 games (play each team within your conference three times and in the other conference twice) to reduce the number of back-to-backs that each team plays.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Thanks for the reminder wiseguy. Clearly the “offseason” does not exist when you cannot catch a breath between The Finals, NBA Draft, free agency and the neverending spin cycle of summer news. In a summer like this, with an international competition tossed in for good measure … again, the offseason does not exist. But this is the world we live in and the news never seems to stop. I’m old enough to remember the pre-Twitter and Instagram summers when you could go weeks without there being much of a fuss made over NBA players in the offseason. So I remember what it was like when guys weren’t making headlines in August and September for anything other than running afoul of the law. But I’d be lying if I said I didn’t like the way things are now. Basketball truly never stops. Even the horrible headlines (Hawks/Ferry, insert player name sends out nutty Tweet or Instagram post, etc.) aren’t enough to make me want to climb in that DeLorean and go back to the way things used to be.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: Oh man, it is perfect. The Finals end, and there’s a sprint up to the Draft, and then there’s the free agency frenzy, and then the summer leagues. This summer, with the FIBA stuff, there was less down time than normal, but those few weeks give everyone a chance to exhale, to sit on the couch and watch some college football and NFL and baseball pennant races (well, unless you’re a Braves fan), and then all of a sudden the NBA is there in your face again. I still wish the season had fewer games, so the quality of the product would be a little better, but all in all, I can’t complain. The NBA is basically a year-round sport. And it’s almost time to tip again, kids.

Simon Legg, NBA Australia: It’s just right. It’s certainly not too long anyway. With the draft, Summer League, training camp and anything else that comes along the time flies. No need to extend or shorten it. The season is long enough as it is but that’s a debate for another time.

Adriano Albuquerque, NBA Brasil: For basketball fans, it sure worked out great! Just a couple weeks without hoops. For the players, especially the ones that went to the World Cup, though, it’s definitely too short. I wouldn’t mind if the offseason was a little longer, for the sake of players’ health.

Karan Madhok, NBA India: I think the length of the offseason is just right; it just feels shorter because of the 24/7/365 news coverage that closely follows the NBA (which I like) through the lottery, the draft, the summer league, training camp, and everything else. And of course, this being the summer of the World Cup, the offseason felt even shorter. Any more time off will make the resting players too rusty, and any little time off will be asking for too much from the already overplayed athletes. On another related note, I do wish that the actual NBA season was a little shorter — not in length but in number of games played per team. But that is another discussion for another day …

Stefanos Triantafyllos, NBA Greece: Just right! You know “resting is part of the training”. You have to have some days off to take your mind away, to rest, to let your body heal. I am talking about athletes and coaches, not for the fans, who I’m sure would love a 12-month season. But, the players have to rest and the teams to prepare for next season.

Max Marbeiter, NBA Germany: Almost five months. That’s quite some time and I would be lying if I said that I don’t miss the NBA. But as much as we would love to see more NBA-basketball during the summer months, I think the players just need their time off. They have such a tough schedule as it is right now. On the other hand by extending the season without adding extra games it might be possible to get the players more rest during the season which again might prevent some of the wear & tear we have seen in the past. So personally I wouldn’t mind a shorter offseason. But only if there aren’t added any extra games in exchange.

Guillermo García, NBA Mexico: I think it is too long, but it is understood because it is that players arrive on optimum conditions in the regular season.

Happy 80th, Elgin Baylor!


VIDEO: Relive the storied career of Hall of Famer Elgin Baylor

Elgin Baylor turned 80 Tuesday, which means the NBA’s love affair with verticality unofficially is approaching its 56th birthday. The Hall of Fame forward – whom Lakers teammate Jerry West considers the most underrated player in league history – arrived in Minneapolis as the No. 1 pick in the 1958 draft. He brought with him a style Doc Naismith couldn’t have imagined back when he hung up his first peach baskets.

The lineage of acrobatic, balletic, above-the-rim basketball players can be traced back through Michael Jordan and Julius Erving and Connie Hawkins, directly to Elgin Baylor. With shoulder fakes, a rocking dribble and a head twitch that some labeled a tic, the 11-time All-Star forward baffled opponents and invented moves nightly. At 6-5, he snatched rebounds like men a half-foot taller.

“If Julius Erving . . . is a doctor, then Elgin Baylor was a brain surgeon when he played,” teammate Rod Hundley said.

That’s an excerpt from a February 1994 profile of Baylor I wrote for the Minneapolis Star Tribune. The NBA All-Star Game was headed to the Twin Cities that winter, 34 years after Baylor and the Lakers had left town for sunny California. Baylor, then 59, was the last active member of the Minneapolis Lakers when he retired in 1971 and, long before Timberwolves Kevin Garnett and Kevin Love, he remains the greatest NBA star to slip away from the league’s hinterlands.

If only Baylor had logged a couple more seasons in Minnesota, the NBA’s and the Lakers’ futures might have been dramatically different, given his game and his gate appeal:

Baylor played in the second NBA game he ever saw, and scored 25 points in the season opener. He had an uncanny ability to make adjustments in mid-air. He manipulated the ball with one hand at a time when most players still used two and, foreshadowing Moses Malone, he often grabbed his own missed shots for second and third chances. Always he was cool, never revealing his emotions on the court.

“Elgin Baylor has either got three hands or two basketballs out there,” New York’s Richie Guerin griped after a game at old Madison Square Garden. “It’s like guarding a flood.”

The Lakers began the season on financial probation, with the NBA threatening to take over the franchise if it didn’t average $6,600 in home gate receipts. It never happened; the team’s attendance soared from 2,790 the year before to 4,122 in 1958-59. The Lakers’ record improved to 33-39, and they reached the Finals for the first time since 1954. Baylor was Rookie of the Year, averaged 24.9 points and 15 rebounds, scored 55 points in one game and shared the MVP award in the All-Star Game with St. Louis’ Bob Pettit.

In that ’94 interview, Baylor talked about the concept of “hang time,” and how his horizontal might have been more impressive than his vertical:

“I think this: I’ve watched Jordan and Julius and everybody,” Baylor said. “I don’t think anyone stays up in the air longer than anyone else. When you’re driving to the basket, it’s a broad jump instead of a vertical leap. . . . And a lot of times, you get the guy to commit himself and he’s up in the air, and you’re just getting ready to go up. It’s the illusion.”

(more…)

Blogtable: The state of the States

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: The state of the States | Getting untracked | The Hawks



VIDEO: A “turrific” Spain team will not be intimidated by the U.S., says Charles Barkley.

> Charles Barkley is picking Spain at the FIBA World Cup. What if the U.S. doesn’t win gold? What does that say about the state of basketball in the U.S.?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comNo biggie. The whole Dream Team experience 22 years ago was intended, yes, to re-assert U.S. superiority in basketball but also to spread the gospel of the game around the globe. Well, mission accomplished on both fronts: That team shredded the competition but also upped everyone’s game internationally. If Coach K & Co. could just cake-walk over everyone in 2014, the second objective would have been a failure. Let’s not forget, either, Team USA doesn’t have the NBA’s very best participating.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: No time to panic and trade in your passport. It says what we already knew. The basketball world has changed dramatically since the 1992 Dream Team.  The talent gap has shrunk and the “awe factor” of Team USA is gone.  With a Spanish lineup of Pau and Marc Gasol, Serge Ibaka, Ricky Rubio, Rudy Fernandez and Juan Carlos Navarro, to name a few, it means the U.S. needs to put its very best — LeBron, Carmelo, Durant, etc. — to beat a first class Spanish team before a home crowd.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: It says a group of Spaniards came together as a team better than this group of Americans, which, frankly, is our B/C team. These Spanish players are talented and many have played together for quite some time. This young American squad can’t say that. If Spain wins, great for them. The U.S. can begin plotting revenge at the 2016 Games when the American team will feature LeBron, KD, CP3, K-Love, Blake Griffin, Dwight Howard, Russell Westbrook … must I go on?

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: It would say Spain is definitely better than the United States’ backup squad. No LeBron James, no Kevin Durant, no Chris Paul, no Paul George, no Blake Griffin, no Kevin Love — there is no referendum on basketball in the U.S. if the Americans do not win the gold, as much as some people will pull a muscle straining to reach the conclusion. Maybe Spain would beat a Team USA at full strength, but we’ll never know. Based on actual events, if — if — the U.S. misses the gold, it will be more of a statement about the commitment of players to the program than the level of talent.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: It’s no big statement about the state of the game in the U.S. Yes, there needs to be more practicing and less traveling at the AAU level. And yes, there needs to be more focus on the fundamentals, teamwork and passing skills that we see from some of these international teams. But the absence of both LeBron James and Kevin Durant makes such a huge difference that if the U.S. loses, it doesn’t mean that it’s not still the best basketball nation in the world.

Sekou Smith, NBA.comAbsolutely nothing. As good as the 2014 FIBA World Cup team has been, and they are 40 minutes from playing or gold in Madrid on Sunday, the entire planet knows that the A-Team didn’t make the trip. Spain knows it. Lithuania knows it. Everyone knows that to the be the case. Coach K has made it clear that this team is no invincible. He learned that the hard way in 2006 against Greece. That’s why  I would argue that this team winning gold here would be as impressive a feat as any team under the Colangelo-Kryzyewski USA Basketball banner . No one outside of their own locker room expects them to win here. But let’s be real about this, if Kevin Durant, Blake Griffin, LaMarcus Aldridge, Kevin Love, Russell Westbrook and a few other top flight NBA stars were here (I’m not even talking about LeBron, CP3, Carmelo and the guys who won gold in London), this discussion wouldn’t be taking place. And while everyone else is concinved the U.S. contingent cannot win here, I disagree. I think they can. All that said, I think the better question is what does it say about basketball in the rest of the world, and Spanish basketball in particular, if this U.S. team defies the odds and does walk away with gold against a better and more seasoned foe on its home soil?

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: It says we didn’t have our best team on the court. Not to take anything away from Spain or the other teams in the World Cup, but a Team USA with, oh, let’s say some permutation of LeBron James, Kevin Durant, Kobe Bryant, Dwight Howard, Kevin Love, Tim Duncan, Russell Westbrook or even Paul George, I think it’s safe to say we would have a more powerful team. Are other countries catching up to the United States? Yes. Have they caught the United States? No. Not yet, at least.

Blogtable: Ranking the starts

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: The state of the States | Getting untracked | The Hawks


Derrick Rose and Tom Thibodeau are working out in Spain. Will that help? (Jesse D. Garrabrant/NBAE)

Derrick Rose and Tom Thibodeau are working out in Spain. Will that help? (Jesse D. Garrabrant/NBAE)

> Rank, from the roughest to the smoothest, the start that these re-worked teams face this season, and why: Chicago, Cleveland, Golden State, Houston.

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: I’ll go Houston, Golden State, Chicago and Cleveland. The Rockets are dealing with offseason loss and dashed ambitions, a lousy way to open any new season. Golden State faces a learning curve under Steve Kerr and his staff and apparently some bruised feelings for Klay Thompson and David Lee. The Bulls didn’t get Carmelo Anthony or Kevin Love but they’ve done this depth-and-new-parts thing before, assuming Derrick Rose flakes off his rust. The Cavaliers face all sorts of adjustments, but the big-risk, big-reward payoff is so enticing, their growing pains will feel like a brawny chiropractor’s adjustments, well worth it when they’re done.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Depending on the conditioning and the game feel of Derrick Rose after missing virtually two years of NBA play, the Bulls potentially have the roughest start just to get him back in the lineup, up to speed and meshing with everyone else.  I’d slot the Rockets next, because after Dwight Howard and James Harden they have a glaring lack of depth that the addition of Trevor Ariza doesn’t cover.  Houston will be relying on many young faces — Terrence Jones, Donatas Motiejunas, Troy Daniels, Isaiah Canaan, Nick Johnson — to step up and deliver.  The Warriors roster is not re-worked — add Shaun Livingston — but they’ve got a new coach.  It always comes down to the health of Andrew Bogut.  But either way, they’re still likely in the mid to bottom of the West bracket.  Not much changes.  Then comes the Cavs.  A bump here, a loss there and, of course, every time it happens the world will panic.  But LeBron is back in Cleveland and that makes things smoother than a baby’s bottom.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: I put the Rockets at the top of the list. There’s been a ton of turnover and I’m sure the remaining players at some point had to be shaking their heads at what had gone down. I’m not sure the Rockets really ever developed a true identity last year (they sure couldn’t close out a game regardless how big the lead), and now it’s up to Dwight Howard and James Harden to handle the pressure of expectations and lift the team even as it might overall be weaker. Next I’ll go with Chicago because of the Derrick Rose factor. I think he’s got double-duty in the sense that he has to get himself right, regain his confidence, find his shot, etc., while also figuring out his team. Cleveland is next as three All-Stars try to come together under a first-time NBA head coach. As for Golden State, I just see a pretty smooth transition here with Steve Kerr. The core roster is the same and I think Kerr’s style is going to be a fun and quick learn for his players.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Chicago (roughest), Houston, Cleveland, Golden State (smoothest). The Bulls are in the hardest position because so much of their success will depend on a player, Derrick Rose, coming back from a long injury absence. That will take time, even if he is doing well physically. The Warriors are in the best position because they basically return the same roster. New coach, so the system might be different, but Steve Kerr isn’t going to make dramatic adjustments that will cause players to grind gears. He isn’t going to install a slow-down, half-court brand of basketball. The Warriors are not that re-worked. Take Golden State out, and the Cavaliers have the smoothest start. A lot of new players, yes, but veteran players, unselfish players, mature players. There may be an adjustment period in Cleveland, but if you have to go through one, go through it with the best player in the world.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comThe Warriors will have the roughest start, because they hired a guy who has never coached before. The Rockets lost two of their playmakers, so they will take a step back offensively. The Cavs have a new coach and new starting lineup, so it will take some time for them to be the juggernauts that we think they’ll be eventually. Derrick Rose won’t be at his best in October and November, but the Bulls have that defense to fall back on. This is now Year 5 for Tom Thibodeau, who will have his foot on the pedal from the start.

Sekou Smith, NBA.comCleveland should have the toughest time because they have the most change to adjust to from new stars to a new coach who is new to the NBA. Chicago is next with Derrick Rose coming back and Pau Gasol coming into the fold. Houston lost an important piece in Chandler Parsons but replaced him with a guy in Trevor Ariza who has played a similar role in a couple of spots, so his transition should be relatively smooth. Golden State’s major change came in the coaching ranks, so if Steve Kerr is as ready as people think, the Warriors should have the smoothest start of anyone on this list.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogCleveland — They aren’t adding just one new player, they’re adding several starters, as well as a coach with zero NBA head coaching experience, plus expectations will be sky-high, despite LeBron doing his best to tamp those down. Golden State — There may be a moderately difficult adjustment period, but as they’re returning mostly the same roster, the level of familiarity between players will help as they adopt Kerr’s system. Chicago — Adding Pau Gasol may cause a bit of a wrinkle, as they lose Carlos Boozer who’d spent years in Tom Thibodeau’s defensive system. But Gasol is smart and versatile enough that it shouldn’t be a major disruption. Houston — They may be swapping out Chandler Parsons for Trevor Ariza, but it’s essentially that, a swap. Houston pivots on Dwight Howard and James Harden, and as they go, so goes everyone else.

Blogtable: How will the Hawks handle?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: The state of the States | Getting untracked | The Hawks


> As if a stiffer conference isn’t enough: What do you see in store on the court in 2014-15 for the turmoil-ravaged Atlanta Hawks?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: What a mess. This is on all the grown men — owners who allegedly are successful in their other endeavors and a GM who should have red-flagged rather than read that Luol Deng nonsense — who should know better. It won’t sustain the attention, long term, that Donald Sterling and the Clippers did, but it still creates a potentially corrosive atmosphere for the players and even coaches. My hunch: Team leaders such as Paul Millsap, Al Horford and Kyle Korver, along with coach Mike Budenholzer, persevere by turning this into an “us vs. them” thing — with the “them” being the guys in suits. It’s one way to rally, anyway.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: If Al Horford can avoid another season lost to the unusual torn pectoral muscle injury, the front office turmoil doesn’t affect what happens on the court and Mike Budenholzer’s second year in charge of the Hawks has them battling in the 4-6 range in the East race.

Danny Ferry (right) and Mike Budenholzer in London earlier this year (Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE)

Danny Ferry (right) and Mike Budenholzer in London earlier this year
(Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE)

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: What a befuddling mess. But’s that’s ownership and the front office. Hopefully a sale goes through quickly followed by a thorough house-cleaning. Because I actually like the basketball team. Al Horford returns to a squad with Paul Millsap, Jeff Teague, Kyle Korver, Mike Scott, DeMarre Carroll and coach Mike Budenholzer in his second season. I really don’t see the turmoil upstairs affecting the product on the floor.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: They will be good, better than the 38 wins and No. 8 last season. Probably middle of the pack in the East, with a chance at home-court advantage in the first round. That’s not the issue. The issue is what happens after that if Danny Ferry remains as general manager, the future offseasons when he has to convince free agents to play for him and the city or players with the ability to squash trade possibilities. That’s why Ferry does not survive this. At some point, an agent or a player will say, possibly anonymously, that going to the Hawks with Ferry in charge of basketball operations won’t happen.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: This is still a playoff team that didn’t have its best player for most of last season. They have a good coach, an improving point guard, the best shooter in the world, and two All-Star-caliber bigs. That’s the makings of a good team, though there’s still a hole at the shooting guard position (sorry Thabo Sefolosha fans). So, if Al Horford is healthy and gives them a boost on both ends of the floor, the Hawks should be a playoff team again.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Luckily for the Hawks the turmoil resides elswhere. The core group remains intact and will include Al Horford, back frrom injuiry. So the basketball part of the equation for the Hawks should be manageable. It’s the management of the franchise that is at issue. Does Danny Ferry stay or go? Who is the new owner going to be? And will he or she come in and want to make immediate changes to the front office structure of the organization? So many questions have yet to be answered, things that have nothing to do with the fact that Mike Budenholzer and a hungry bunch that tasted some playoff success will be ready to go come the start of training camp. What goes around them, however, is anyone’s guess.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: The Hawks weren’t able to go out and sign a big-name free agent, but that’s nothing new. Their most important off-season addition will be Al Horford, who returns from a pectoral injury and gives an All-Star center to a Hawks team that nearly eliminated Indiana in the first round of the playoffs. I also think Adreian Payne will be a nice fit for the Hawks, as a big perfect suited to pick and pop and help stretch the floor. Will the off-court disaster have an effect on the floor? I can’t see how it doesn’t. But at least this is team filled with veteran players who should be able to weather the storm.

Dooling’s book tells tale of abuse, breakdown and big bounce back

Keyon Dooling, the 10th pick of the 2000 Draft, had a 13-year NBA career. (Rocky Widner/NBAE)

Keyon Dooling, the 10th pick of the 2000 Draft, had a 13-year NBA career. (Rocky Widner/NBAE)

Through his teen years and his entire adult life, Keyon Dooling pushed forward, played basketball and plowed down a secret that stayed alive no matter how many shovels of dirt he threw on it.

Two years ago, that secret seized up on him and brought him to his knees. Yet, from that low point, Dooling managed to look his demons in the eye and stare them down.

This summer, Dooling has shared his troubling yet uplifting story in a book, “What’s Driving You??? How I Overcame Abuse and Learned to Lead in the NBA.” Ultimately, it is a book about the former NBA guard’s healing and his desire to help others heal, too.

“I went through some things in the last two years,” Dooling said on the phone recently. “So I wrote a story. It’s a great story, it’s a basketball story, it’s a life story, it’s a social story. It’s a story of triumph. I just want to make sure I get the message out there.

“I had bottled up so many emotions. I talk about my NBA experiences to connect the audience with the ball-playing side. But the story itself is totally different from the basketball experience. A lot of people don’t talk about this subject.”

whatsdrivingyouPublished last month by TriMark Press, the paperback memoir recounts a life that some NBA fans might recall only from some unnerving headlines a couple years ago. It covers Dooling’s career as a hoops overachiever, from starring in high school in Fort Lauderdale and showing enough in two years at the University of Missouri to be picked 10th in the 2000 Draft, to playing 12-plus seasons for seven NBA teams.

More than that, though, the book traces struggles in his life to the sexual abuse he endured as a boy at the hands, initially, of a teenaged neighborhood friend. Later, there were adult men and women who preyed on him.

“You have to put yourself in a vulnerable place to relive and tell and inspire and motivate. It’s very tough to do,” Dooling said. “I had to get a lot of therapy to have the tools to manage all the different emotions. But I’ve done my work. I’ve dealt with it.

“I’ve packaged up healing in this project. That’s really what my goal is, to allow people to see a piece of themselves in the story so they can find healing.”

This new, healthiest time in Dooling’s life was triggered by an incident in June 2012 in a Seattle restaurant that took him back to his darkest memories. A patron in the men’s room made an inappropriate advance. Dooling had just wrapped up one of the most satisfying seasons of his career, helping the Boston Celtics reach Game 7 of the East finals. But the anger that confrontation uncorked wasn’t going to just blow over, as he writes in the book:

 

At three o’clock in the morning, I decided to go for a walk outside to try to lose the rage. I practiced breathing techniques to calm myself down – when that didn’t do the trick, I tried calling on the Lord to help me. Nothing was working. Finally I called my wife, Natosha (she was back in Florida and probably still asleep) and told her about what happened at the restaurant that night. I still hadn’t told her about what happened to me when I was a child.

I had no words for that.

After talking with ‘Tosha for a while, I started to feel more relaxed. She prayed with me and told me everything would be all right. A little ray of light started growing inside me then thanks to her.

Still, I couldn’t hide what was happening from myself.

An emotional vault that had been locked inside me for years had unexpectedly opened…

 

Dooling’s breakdown landed him in a mental-health facility in Boston. He turned to then-Celtics coach Doc Rivers, who spent long hours with him there, a place that — given the severity of other patients’ mental issues — struck Rivers as unsafe. He and some medical officials enlisted by the National Basketball Players Association helped get Dooling moved to a better environment.

“He was in this emotional state and he kept apologizing about letting the team down,” Rivers told the Boston Globe last year. “I kept saying, ‘We’re going to survive.’ You just knew emotionally, he wasn’t right. I didn’t know what was going on but I just knew emotionally he was in a bad place, and even a dark place. I was concerned for his life.”

The treatment Dooling eventually received put him on his path to recovery. But when he abruptly decided to retire from the NBA (despite a one-year extension with Boston) , family, friends and fans were puzzled, unaware of the secret he harbored.

The story of his abuse came out after Dooling sought and found the therapy he needed. By late 2012, he was comfortable speaking about it, and he and Natosha even appeared on Katie Couric‘s talk show.

But there was no one-and-done to this type of thing, Dooling learned. Any time he had cracked open the lid on his secret previously — he wrote a letter to himself back in 2011, when he was with Milwaukee, full of questions that elicited no answers — he had backed away. Facing and living with his issues was going to come incrementally as well.

“There’s no blueprint to deal with the emotions, because people who survive it usually don’t tell,” Dooling said. “I had people in my family who didn’t believe me, that created one emotion. I had other people who did believe me, that created another emotion of support. I was insecure about some of the things and then, I was angry about some of them as well.

“It took time to learn how to deal with those types of emotions that, as an athlete, I didn’t even allow myself to feel.”

In April 2013, a month shy of 33, Dooling signed with Memphis in hopes of resuming his NBA career. He played in seven regular-season games down the stretch, then averaged just 1.9 points and 8.1 minutes in 14 playoff appearances for the Grizzlies. His game essentially was gone.

His life had changed. It was getting better. So much that Dooling rarely has any what-if reflections.

“At this point, I still would have been able to play if I hadn’t had that breakdown. That was my doom as far as being a player in the NBA,” he said. “Personally, I would have been in a better position if I had gotten my work done earlier. Because I’m such a better person from doing that work.”

Today, back home in South Florida, Dooling is a certified life coach as well as a published author itching for his next project. He works with people of all stripes, including some NBA players, but declines to offer details in deference to sensitivity and confidentiality.

His family — Natosha, daughters Deneal (13), Gabrielle (10) and Jordan (7), and son Keyon Jr. (4), who is on the cover of the book with his dad — are healthy and happy, Dooling says, thanks to many hours of therapy for them all. Some in his extended family still are grappling with the issues he revealed.

His book is the centerpiece of his Web site, www.whatsdrivingyou.net It features artwork that complements his story and provides links to purchase the book and to download music from iTunes that provided the soundtrack of Dooling’s recovery. Portions of the proceeds from the book are donated to the Respect Foundation at www.RespectFoundation55.org.

Once a month, Dooling said, he opens up his Twitter account at @AmbassadorKD to anyone “still in the closet” about being molested or those — particularly men — who need someone with whom they can speak freely (via Twitter’s private DMs), if therapists, clergy or others aren’t current options.

“I knew I had to go through my test to get to this testimony,” he said. “I would be doing an injustice if I didn’t become a witness and help them get through some of their issues.”

Dooling, in time, would like to return to the NBA as a coach. His playing experiences and exposure to multiple systems have him covered on the basketball side. He gained leadership skills as a player and a union vice president. But the life lessons, what he can share in coping with personal pressures and problems, might kick his resume to another level.

“We’ve been treating the symptoms,” Dooling said. “You see it sometimes in guys who get DUIs. You see behavioral issues with guys maybe having multiple children out of wedlock. Guys overspending, overeating, masking with liquor or drugs.

“So often, we’ve been treating the symptoms and not the real issues. My whole thing is, let’s talk about some of these things we went through in our past so it doesn’t affect the future.”

Blogtable: A World Cup celebration

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Loving the Cup | The Bulls’ future | A landing spot for Ray Allen


> What’s been your favorite part of the FIBA Basketball World Cup so far?

Anthony Davis (David Dow/NBAE)

Anthony Davis (David Dow/NBAE)

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Watching Anthony Davis embrace the role of the big dog. He’s making me look forward, even more than I was already, to what he can do this season to lift the Pelicans into the Western Conference playoff mix. Close behind is Kenneth Faried, who most of the experts did not see as having a place on the team, as he keeps on showing that hustle and ferocious hard work always have a place in any game, on any team.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: Honestly, I’ve enjoyed watching the U.S. sans its biggest stars. So many of these players are young and growing in skill and leadership. To that end, I liked seeing Turkey push the U.S. I like seeing our guys with their backs against the wall a bit and having to dig down to find the answer. Especially fun as the tournament moves along will be to see which players lead Team USA when it finds itself in trouble, and then to see if maturity discovered in Spain transfers to the NBA season.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: The atmosphere in the building when the Spanish National Team plays a good team. The crowd was loud for their first two games, but when they met Brazil on Monday, the place was pretty crazy. The team is talented, deep and cohesive. Some of their key players (Gasols, La Bomba) are in their best shape of the last few years, clearly determined to win this thing. And they have a raucous crowd behind them. I don’t want to look past what is a crowded second tier of teams, but the potential of an epic USA-Spain gold medal game is hard to overlook every single time both teams take the floor.

Sekou Smith, NBA.comThe fans. No, really. They make the atmosphere when you are on site. We’ve all seen thousands of games, some in person and some on the TV. But when you’re in the arena and the stands are jumping from the fans pounding their feet and the noisemakers (artificial and organic) are cranked up to the max, there’s nothing like it. Finland has a crew, thousands strong, here in Bilbao that have absolutely taken this city of 350,000 by storm. Everywhere you go around town you see the colors and the flags and the jerseys. It’s an awesome thing to see and it’s something that’s completely different from the NBA.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: I’d say the sustained play of Anthony Davis on this level, which is probably the largest stage of his professional career thus far. New Orleans fans and hardcore NBA fans saw what a great player he developed into last season, but with the Pelicans out of the playoffs hunt for most of the season, I’m not sure if his exploits received the full attention they deserved. Now the world is watching, and Davis has acquitted himself well. I keep going back to a play I saw in person in an exhibition against the Dominican Republic, when a player pump-faked Davis, got him up in the air, drove around him and put up a shot, and Davis reached those long arms way back and still blocked the guy’s shot. Oh, and he’s still just 21 years old. He’s gonna be a great one.