Posts Tagged ‘Stephen Curry’

SportVU: Uncontested Jumpers vs. OKC

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – In our Q and A at All-Star weekend, Oklahoma City Thunder coach Scott Brooks said that when his team is on defense, he’s “concerned about making sure that every shot is contested.”

Contesting every shot is impossible, but Brooks’ team certainly can do a better job. According to SportVU, no team has contested a lower percentage of its opponents’ jump shots than the Thunder . They’ve contested just 24 percent of opponent jumpers, a mark well below the league average of 31 percent.

Perc. of opponent jump shots contested
Rank Team Cont%
1. San Antonio 38.2%
2. L.A. Clippers 36.9%
3. Indiana 35.6%
4. Denver 34.7%
5. Memphis 34.4%
6. Atlanta 34.3%
7. Portland 34.2%
8. Charlotte 34.1%
9. Chicago 33.8%
10. L.A. Lakers 33.7%
11. Golden State 33.1%
12. Orlando 32.2%
13. Toronto 31.8%
14. Boston 31.3%
15. Miami 30.8%
16. Phoenix 30.7%
17. Detroit 30.2%
18. Dallas 29.8%
19. Minnesota 29.6%
20. Washington 29.3%
21. Brooklyn 29.3%
22. Sacramento 28.6%
23. Milwaukee 28.2%
24. New Orleans 27.9%
25. Houston 27.9%
26. Utah 27.1%
27. Cleveland 26.4%
28. Philadelphia 24.9%
29. New York 24.5%
30. Oklahoma City 23.8%
League avg. 30.9%

SportVU defines a jump shot as any shot out outside of 10 feet. It’s contested if a defender is within four feet of the shooter.

There’s a much stronger correlation between defensive efficiency and opponent effective field-goal percentage (EFG%) than between defensive efficiency and any of the other “four factors” (rebounding, forcing turnovers, keeping opponents off the free-throw line).

Here’s the thing, though. The Thunder rank fourth in opponent EFG% and fourth in defensive efficiency. They’ve been a great defensive team — even though they haven’t contested jump shots very well. There is a correlation between the percentage of jumpers a team contests and its opponents’ EFG% (and in turn, their defensive efficiency). The Thunder are an outlier.

They have defended the rim well. They rank fifth in opponent field-goal percentage in the restricted area, with Serge Ibaka ranking among the top individual rim protectors. That’s obviously important.

But, by itself, it doesn’t account for how high the Thunder rank in opponent EFG%. Not only do they not contest jumpers very well, but they don’t really force bad shots. About 61 percent of their opponents’ shots have come from the restricted area or 3-point range, the seventh highest rate in the league.

So how have they been so good defensively? They do rank in the top 10 in defensive rebounding percentage and are slightly above average at forcing turnovers. But you have to wonder if there’s a little luck involved. Take the following numbers into account…

  • Thunder opponents have shot 38.7 percent on uncontested jumpers, the sixth lowest rate in the league.
  • Thunder opponents have shot 30.5 percent on contested jumpers, the second lowest rate in the league.
  • Thunder opponents have shot 72.2 percent from the free-throw line, the second lowest rate in the league. (What goes around comes around; they ranked 28th in free-throw defense last season.)
  • Only one other defense (the Lakers) ranks in the top 10 in each of those three categories. Five other teams rank in the top 10 in two of the three.

Now, the definition of what’s contested (see above) allows for some leeway. It could mean that the defender is six inches from the shooter with his hand in his face, and it could mean that he’s 48 inches away with his hands down. Maybe the Thunder contest to a different degree than other teams. But they don’t contest a lot.

Eliminating the possible “luck” factor, the Thunder are still a good defensive team. If OKC opponents had shot the league average on contested jumpers, uncontested jumpers and free throws, the Thunder would have allowed 86 more points this season (about 1.5 more per 100 possessions) and would rank seventh in defensive efficiency (in part because there’s a dropoff after the top seven).

But they have had trouble slowing down Golden State, one of the league’s best jump-shooting teams, the team that has been the most efficient against the Thunder this season, and a possible first-round playoff opponent. In his three games against the Thunder, only 21 of Stephen Curry‘s 66 field goal attempts have been contested (just three of 22 on Nov. 14).

Some other good jump-shooting teams — Atlanta, Miami and Portland — also have had decent success against the Thunder. Others — Dallas and Phoenix — have not.

In this first full season of player tracking, there are still some things to figure out. And maybe things will be different defensively for the Thunder with a healthy Russell Westbrook. But if Brooks’ goal is to contest every shot, his team has some work to do.

FYI (because some readers have asked): While you can find contested and uncontested shots in the Player Tracking tab of our NBA.com/stats boxscores, we don’t yet have them on the season level. That’s in the works.

Warriors Get Stephen Curry Some Relief


VIDEO: Curry helps Warriors knock off Kings

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – The world changed a little more Wednesday night, when the Lakers of all people officially became a team to circle and peck at, just as L.A. picked off so many other teams’ players in seasons past to gear up for its playoff runs.

That it was the Warriors capitalizing on L.A.’s status was not a surprise. The Lakers wanted to dump salary to get away from the luxury tax, Golden State had exceptions that allowed it to make deals without sending equal salary in return, and the Warriors were going to be aggressive leading to the trade deadline on Thursday. It’s what they do, period, but more than that, this time it’s what they know they had to do coming out of the All-Star break at 31-22 and unexpectedly at the back of the Western Conference playoff pack.

This was a precision strike that would have made the old Lakers proud. The Warriors, not merely making a second deal in a little more than a month to bolster the bench, added an experienced reserve who would benefit a starter most of all.

As if Stephen Curry – expert shooter, improving ball handler leading the league in assists, All-Star, probably the Northern California guy who won the $400-million Powerball drawing Wednesday – doesn’t have enough going for him.

The Warriors acquiring Steve Blake from the Lakers for Kent Bazemore and MarShon Brooks in a Los Angeles salary dump is another projected boost for the bench. It also allows Curry to stay fresh now, which is especially bad news for the rest of the league.

For more than a month, Curry had been alluding to the effects of playing more point guard than before, meaning more ball screen duties, extra running and the increased attention from defenses following Jarrett Jack‘s offseason move to Cleveland via free agency. He was feeling it at 37.7 minutes per game, tied fifth in the league, as the drain began to evolve into an issue that could threaten the Warriors in the playoffs. And still Curry was at 24.6 points and 9.0 assists per game while shooting 46.3 percent overall and 41.5 behind the arc.

The first proposed answer, Toney Douglas in the summer as a free agent, was ineffective and eventually traded as part of a three-team deal that delivered the next proposed answer, Jordan Crawford. Crawford provided 16.8 minutes off the bench, but was mostly a shooting guard stretching to play the point off the bench, just as the Celtics had used him, mostly as a starter, earlier in the season to patchwork the hole until Rajon Rondo came back from a knee injury.

Blake, though, is more a point guard who can play off the ball as well and an experienced, playoff-tested backup. A much better fit behind Curry, in other words, while also being able to play with Curry in a backcourt that would allow Klay Thompson to rest.

“In a specific way, you’re adding a tough, kind of experienced player any team would do, no matter what the position,” general manager Bob Myers said at halftime of what became a 101-92 win over the Kings at Sleep Train Arena, not long after the trade became official in the second quarter. “But certainly Curry’s played a lot of minutes, Klay’s played a lot of minutes. We made a deal for Jordan Crawford. He’s been very good in the time that we’ve had him. We think this just bolsters the bench. It gives us so more options, so more weapons, in a player that you know when you give him the ball you can trust him. We just think it was a chance to improve our roster. That was the justification.”

Right on cue, Curry played 36 minutes Wednesday, making just five of 14 shots but contributing eight assists without a turnover.

“It depends on how coach wants to play the lineups,” Curry said of the new options. “I assume that he’ll (Blake) have that responsibility and we’ll be able to play together in some spots and be able to provide an extra ball handler. Definitely there’s a reason they made that trade, so we’ll see how it works out.”

Additionally, the Warriors are not necessarily done doing business before Thursday’s trade deadline. They were known Wednesday night to still be pursuing options, albeit with the sense that nothing was imminent.

What The Contenders Could Use

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – The trade deadline is Thursday afternoon, the race for the 2014 NBA championship is relatively wide open, and there are plenty of players available for the right price.

So, the league is seemingly ripe for a ton of action at the deadline. But the whole “the right price” thing could limit the number of deals that are made. Buyers may be hesitant to give up first-round picks for players that they’re only “renting” for a few months, and sellers may prefer to keep their guy if they’re not getting the assets they want in return.

But maybe a deal could be made that turns a contender into a favorite or a tier-two team into a contender.

Here’s a look at what those teams could use — from a numbers perspective – to put themselves over the top (in the case of the contenders) or in the mix (in the case of the next group).

OffRtg: Points scored per 100 possessions
DefRtg: Points allowed per 100 possessions
NetRtg: Point differential per 100 possessions

Oklahoma City (43-12)

OffRtg: 107.6 (6), DefRtg: 99.3 (3), NetRtg: +8.3 (2)
The Thunder are the most complete team in the league, the only one that ranks in the top six in both offensive and defensive efficiency. And their bench has been terrific, even with Russell Westbrook‘s knee surgery forcing Reggie Jackson into the starting lineup over the last seven weeks.

The only lineup numbers that look bad are those of their original starting group, which has been outscored by 5.7 points per 100 possessions and which will be back together when Westbrook returns on Thursday. In 280 minutes, the lineup has scored just 97.5 points per 100 possessions, a rate which would rank 29th in the league.

In general, the Thunder have been much better playing small. In fact, they’re a plus-203 in 1,954 minutes with two bigs on the floor and a plus-204 in 694 minutes with less than two. Some added depth on the wings could make them even more potent.

Indiana (41-12)

OffRtg: 102.4 (18), DefRtg: 93.8 (1), NetRtg: +8.6 (1)
The Pacers are, statistically, the best defensive team since the league started counting turnovers in 1977. And that may be enough to win a championship.

But they’re a below-average offensive team and only seven of those have made The Finals in the last 30 years. The Pacers turn the ball over too much, don’t get to the rim enough, and aren’t a great 3-point shooting team.

George Hill is a key cog in that No. 1 defense and the starting lineup scores at a top-10 rate, but Indy could certainly use a more potent point guard, or at least a third guard that can create off the dribble. Their bench is better than it was last season, but it still struggles to score.

Danny Granger has a large expiring contract, but acquiring a player on a deal that goes beyond this season could compromise the Pacers’ ability to re-sign Lance Stephenson this summer.

Miami (38-14)

OffRtg: 109.8 (1), DefRtg: 103.4 (16), NetRtg: +6.4 (5)
Is the Heat’s defensive drop-off a serious problem of just a case of them being in cruise control most of the season? Their ability to flip the switch on that end of the floor will depend on Dwyane Wade‘s health and Shane Battier‘s ability to play more minutes than he has been of late. As much as rebounding is an issue, so is defending the perimeter. And if there was a way they could add another shooter/defender on the wing, it would help.

Rebounding is an issue. The Heat have rebounded better (on both ends) with Greg Oden on the floor, but he’s played just 78 minutes all season and compromises their offense to some degree. So he’s probably not going to neutralize Roy Hibbert in a matchup with the Pacers.

San Antonio (39-15)

OffRtg: 107.5 (7), DefRtg: 100.4 (5), NetRtg: +7.1 (3)
The numbers look good on the surface. Only the Thunder rank higher than the Spurs in both offensive and defensive efficiency. But their defense has failed them, allowing 111.5 points per 100 possessions, as they’ve gone 2-8 in games against the other teams over .600 (every team on this list, except Golden State). Last season, they allowed just 101.8 in 22 games against other teams over .600.

Injuries have played a role in their defensive decline and if the Spurs are healthy, they’re still a great team. But there’s no getting around that, going back to Game 3 of the 2012 conference finals, they’ve lost nine of their last 11 games against Oklahoma City and could certainly use more athleticism up front with that matchup in mind.

Houston (36-17)

OffRtg: 107.7 (5), DefRtg: 102.1 (9), NetRtg: +5.6 (6)
If there’s a fifth contender, it’s the Rockets or the Clippers, two more West teams that rank in the top 10 on both ends of the floor. Houston is actually the only team that ranks in the top five in both effective field goal percentage and opponent effective field goal percentage.

Their defense hasn’t been very consistent though, and it’s allowed 106.1 points per 100 possessions in 22 games against the other eight West teams over .500. And that’s why they might want to hold onto Omer Asik. One of their biggest problems defensively is rebounding, especially when Dwight Howard steps off the floor. Only the Lakers (15.8) have allowed more second-chance points per game than Houston (15.1).

Portland (36-17)

OffRtg: 108.7 (2), DefRtg: 105.7 (23), NetRtg: +3.1 (10)
Diagnosing the Blazers’ issues is pretty easy. You’re simply not a contender if you rank in the bottom 10 defensively. The worst defensive team to make The Finals in the last 30 years was the 2000-01 Lakers, who ranked 19th and who, as defending champs, knew how to flip the switch. They ranked No. 1 in defensive efficiency in the postseason.

Not only are the Blazers bad defensively, but the their bench is (still) relatively weak. Lineups other than their starting group have outscored their opponents by just 0.2 points per 100 possessions, the worst mark among the teams on this list (even Golden State). So they’re going to be tested with LaMarcus Aldridge out with a groin strain. They’ve been outscored by 8.3 points per 100 possessions with Aldridge off the floor.

L.A. Clippers (37-19)

OffRtg: 108.7 (3), DefRtg: 102.2 (10), NetRtg: +6.5 (10)
The Clippers are very similar to the Rockets. They rank in top 10 defensively, but have struggled on that end of the floor against good teams. Furthermore, though Howard and DeAndre Jordan rank in the top four in rebounds per game, their teams rank in the bottom 10 in defensive rebounding percentage.

Blake Griffin and Jordan rank 2nd and 3rd in total minutes played, and the Clippers basically have no other bigs that Doc Rivers can trust for extended stretches in the postseason. Though the Clippers’ injuries have been in the backcourt, they’re more in need of depth up front.

Golden State (31-22)

OffRtg: 104.2 (12), DefRtg: 99.5 (4), NetRtg: +4.7 (7)
The Warriors and not the Suns (31-21) are the last team on this list because they have a much better defense and a higher ceiling. They also have a much easier schedule, which could allow them to get into the 3-5 range in the West, going forward.

Golden State’s issues are pretty simple. Their starting lineup has been terrific on both ends of the floor, but their bench … not so much. Things have been a little better with Jordan Crawford in the mix; They’ve scored 104.5 points per 100 possessions with Stephen Curry off the floor since the Crawford trade, compared to the putrid 86.7 they were scoring without Curry before the deal. But one of their most important defensive players – Andrew Bogut – is banged up and their D falls apart when Andre Iguodala steps off the floor.

Curry Knows Hot Streak Can Begin Once Warriors’ Turnover Woes Dissipate


VIDEO: Steph Curry doles out a fancy assist at the All-Star Game

HANG TIME SOUTHWEST – When it was all over, Steph Curry admitted the butterflies had teased his nervous system heading into his All-Star Game debut Sunday night. They might have been fluttering around during Saturday night’s festivities, too.

The weekend didn’t go quite as he might have dreamed with he and his sweet-shooting dad, Dell, bowing out of the Sears Shooting Stars competition early, and then Steph lobbing a month’s worth of long-range clunkers Sunday as the Western Conference’s starting point guard.

Still, for a first time, the 25-year-old came out of it flashing a smile.

“It was amazing,” Curry said. “A lot of great things happened, a lot of good memories. My family was here to support me. I’m excited to get the first one under my belt and ready to go back to Oakland and rejoin my teammates for the second half of the season.”

Ah yes, the season. It has elicited more scowls than smiles, right up to the break, and unexpectedly so considering the wave of momentum following last year’s postseason breakout and the summer acquisition of veteran two-way star Andre Iguodala.

The heartbreaking, one-point loss to the Miami Heat to end the first half summed up the Warriors’ so-far underachieving season — lost opportunity. LeBron James‘ 3-pointer with less than a second to go handed the Warriors’ a head-scratching 10th home loss. They went 4-4 overall before the break, including 3-3 at home, leaving them 31-22 and uncomfortably in eighth place in the competitive West.

They resume tonight at Sacramento (10 p.m. ET, League Pass) in seventh place after Dallas’ Tuesday night loss to Miami only one game up on improving Memphis in ninth. They trail the No. 4 Clippers by 4 1/2 games and No. 3 Houston and No. 5 Portland by five games.

The Warriors haven’t won more than two in a row since the first week of January, and won consecutive games only once since. Coach Mark Jackson recently had to defend his team’s locker-room cohesion. The Miami loss left players shaking their heads and Curry said several of them had things to say before filing out for the break.

“Yeah, a lot of voices spoke up in the locker room before we left,” Curry said. “Just to understand things didn’t go our way the last two weeks before All-Star break, but we’re still in decent position, we’re a playoff team right now. Win a couple games in a row, you can jump all the way up to fifth. This is how tight the groups are in the Western Conference.

“There’s no need to panic right now.”

No, but time is running short to make a major move into a more palatable playoff spot. Plenty of reasons can be cited for the Warriors’ sub-par first half. But, Curry knows that an imminent hot streak starts with the ball safe and secure in his hands.

The Warriors rank 29th among 30 teams in turnovers, coughing it up nearly 16 times a game. Curry leads the league in the one category he wish he didn’t, averaging 4.1 turnovers a game. James Harden is next at 3.7. Curry has turned it over 204 times, more than any other player.

Defense, the Warriors’ bugaboo of old, isn’t the issue, ranking fourth overall and second in the West in defensive efficiency. But they rank just 12th overall in offensive efficiency and 10th in the West. Too many possessions are carelessly going the other way.

“We do have to come back with a focus and a commitment to not having any slip-ups,” Curry said. “We might lose games, but we can’t do it because we beat ourselves and that’s what’s happened a couple times the last two weeks. It’s kind of unacceptable when you think about the team that we’re supposed to be.”

Time To Step It Up For The Stretch Run


VIDEO: Carmelo Anthony talks about the challenges facing the Knicks

Now that the slam dunking, 3-point shooting and other wretched excess of NBA All-Star weekend is in the rearview mirror, even those of us who aren’t 7-footers can stand on our tip-toes and see the playoffs from here.

There’s jockeying the standings to be done: Races for the No. 1 seeding in both the Eastern and Western Conference, the long-shot hopefuls trying to sneak in at the No. 8 spot and the down-to-the-wire elbowing for home-court advantage in the first round.

While Kobe Bryant continues driving himself to make it back onto the court this season because, well, he’s Kobe Bryant, there are a handful of other players and teams who need to step up their games coming down the homestretch:

Deron Williams — After a slow start a year ago, Williams found his stride and finished strong, averaging 22 points and 10 assists per game in the second half of the season. While the Nets have picked themselves out of the bottom of the garbage heap of the East to climb into the No. 7 spot in the standings thanks to Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett finally starting to come around, the most expensive roster in the league isn’t going anywhere in the playoffs if Williams can’t bounce back again and lead them. Is it the ankles? Is it the lack of confidence that he has mentioned? Or is he simply at the end of the line as an elite level point guard in his ninth season? Williams has scored 20 points just once since Jan. 4 and has only two games of handing out double-digit assists in 2014. He was even challenged to a 1-on-1 duel by coach Jason Kidd at a recent practice to try to light a spark.

Carmelo Anthony — He doesn’t show an interest in defense and, yes, he can turn Knicks games into a circus where he’s in the center ring and everyone else watches him hog the spotlight and the ball. Yet if it weren’t for Anthony carrying the offensive load, New York would be buried deeper in the standings. His PER of 24.61 is the second best of his career. Even at 20-32, the Knicks are within striking range in the East and Anthony is going to have to find a way to lift up his teammates — and save the job of coach Mike Woodson — rather than just outshine them before going into his summer of free agency. Of course, it wouldn’t hurt if J.R. Smith stopped his clown show and got back to playing basketball at least part time.

Timberwolves — The clock is ticking. Not just on another season when the Wolves were supposed become a playoff team that is slipping away. It could — and should — be ticking loudly on the end of Kevin Love in Minnesota. Two more seasons until Mr. Double-Double can fly out of the icy north to a landing some place where they actually do more than just talk about making the playoffs. Healthy again, Love is back to putting up big numbers. Yes, he’s faltered at times down the stretch as the Wolves have lost a ton of close games. But it really is a case of not having a supporting cast around him that has shown much inclination for improvement. That’s you, Ricky Rubio. Reports have said G.M. Flip Saunders is willing to trade anybody on the roster except Love in an attempt to keep him in Minnesota. But as another year comes off the calendar, you have to wonder if it isn’t already too late.

Manu Ginobili — Sidelined since the end of the January with a strained hamstring, the San Antonio firecracker is scheduled to jump back into the lineup this week. He’s not on this list due to underperforming but for how much the Spurs need him back in their lineup to get the fire burning again. Tony Parker got a chance to get a head start on his All-Star break because he has simply looked worn out this season after going all the way to The Finals last June and then playing for the French national team in EuroBasket. Tim Duncan is showing more and more of his age at times and there are rumors that he is thinking of retiring at the end of the season. The Spurs have played miserably against the top contenders in the West — just a single win over a Clippers lineup without Chris Paul. They need Ginobili to come back strong and healthy and durable to be considered real playoff contenders again.

Andre Iguodala — When the Warriors brought him in from Denver, the belief was that he’d upgrade the roster at both ends of the floor. They figured he’d be the slashing, penetrating force of the past, adding another scoring option and helping Stephen Curry distribute the ball and being a solid wing defender. While he’s helped move the ball and been solid on defense, the problem has been a lack of offensive production. He’s scoring just 9.6 points per game, the lowest since his rookie season in Philly. The Warriors don’t need him to challenge Curry or Klay Thompson as a big gun every night, but occasional flashes of firepower will be necessary if the team hopes to climb out of the No. 8 spot in the West and reach the preseason goal of a top four finish. Iguodala has scored 20 points only once since the opening week of the season.

Live From New Orleans … It’s State Farm All-Star Saturday Night!




VIDEO: Distance is never a problem for Stephen Curry and won’t be during All-Star Saturday night

NEW ORLEANS — Showdown Saturday night is here, finally.

We’ve been waiting for days down here in New Orleans for things to get officially started and for years All-Star Saturday served that purpose for the NBA’s showcase weekend. This year is no different, as we come to you live from the Smoothie King Center and State Farm Saturday night well into the wee hours.

This has long been the domain of the league’s best and brightest, from Dr. J, Michael Jordan, Dominique Wilkins, Vince Carter and so many other of the league’s greatest dunkers, not to mention the most prolific 3-point shooters and skilled technicians.

Is there someone in tonight’s field for the Sprite Slam Dunk contest … say someone like this Paul George fella below?



VIDEO: Paul George has all of the tools to become one of the league’s all-time great dunkers

Your All-Star Saturday night schedule can be found here. And we are going to provide you with a non-stop in-arena feel for what’s going on down here in the Big Easy.

First up is the Sears Shooting Stars competition, followed by the Taco Bell Skills Challenge , followed by the Foot Locker Three-Point Contest and, we saved the best for last, the Sprite Slam Dunk contest.

I’m going to go ahead and get my predictions out of the way now. Here are my winners …

– Sears Shooting Stars: Team Curry looks lean and mean. They win this one for the Western Conference.

– Taco Bell Skills Challenge: The West has two wicked teams in this one (Trey Burke and Damian Lillard on Team 1 and Goran Dragic and Reggie Jackson on Team 2). I have to roll with Team 1! Another win for the West.

– Foot Locker Three-Point Contest: The Currys need to adopt me, because in Steph Curry I trust when it comes to a shooting contest. (East coast bias … where?)

– Sprite Slam Dunk: The defending champ, Terrence Ross, and the East will be tough to beat. I’ve been hearing rumblings around town that Ben McLemore has some crazy stuff planned. We shall see. In the meantime, I’m rocking with my man “Ross” and George and John Wall.

Get your popcorn ready …

Sears Shooting Stars

– Team Bosh vs Team Durant in the championship for the Sears Shoot Stars.

– Team Bosh with the repeat thansk to Chris Bosh … ain’t nothing but a winner! Durant finishes second again … unreal.

Swin Cash going all Seattle Seahawks and Doug Baldwin on the TNT crew after Team Bosh was handed the trophy was a most appropriate way to finish off the opening event of the night. Straight Cash homie!

Taco Bell Skills Challenge

– East rookies MCW and Victor Oladipo representing for their side with a 43-second run in their run through the course. Too easy for two youngbucks like that.

– It’s still not the Year of the Dragon. Burke and Lillard come through with a 40.6 second-run on the course and keep my prediction alive.

– 45.3 second run for the rookie team in the finals. Always believe in Burke baby! West delivers a 45.2 to take the title. My dude Burke has mad quicks (not that NBA.com’s John Schuhmann has noticed. He’s too busy hating on the best rookie in the league.)

– A little controversy on All- Star Saturday never hurts! We’ve got to get the replay.

Foot Locker Three-Point Contest

– Redemption time for Steph Curry. This is your night sir. This is your event. Do what you do!

– Chuck picks an upset and goes with Bradley Beal (his mom calls him Bradley, so I’m going with Bradley).

– Great field in this competition. All-Stars in Lillard, Curry, Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love.

– Who jinxed me and the Curry clan tonight? Steph is watching the finals like me. Ugh!

– RapCam turns up shots of Ludacris and Nelly sitting courtside. These young rappers clearly need to step their game up if the vets are getting all of the major Jumbotron play tonight. #whereyouatDrakeand2Chains?

– Nice theme music for Arron Afflalo, Robin Thicke‘s Magic Touch playing as he hits the stage and his 15 is the new score to beat.

Bradley Beal has the high-mark with 21. Kid has wicked range and an absolutely pure shooting stroke.

– The Kendrick Lamar concert/interlude is coming up soon. Just FYI

– Belinelli didn’t smile at all during the final round tale of the tape interview with Nick Cannon and Beal. Not sure how to take that. I know you want to win and everything but have a little fun with this thing fella. His method worked, though. Dropped a 19.

– Beal struggles on his money ball rack but rallies down the stretch for a 19 to tie it and now we get these guys in a 60-second tiebreaker.

Belinelli wins it with a monster effort in the OT. Fantastic showing by both guys.

– Kendrick Lamar’s tearing it up. perfect intro for what I hope will be a spectacular Sprite Slam Dunk contest.

Sprite Slam Dunk

– So I’m 0-for-everything going into this final contest of the night. Somebody on this East team needs to get greasy from the start so I can get back on track. Judges are Dr. J, Dominique and Magic. No worries with those judges.

Kevin Hart and Cannon doing their two-man routine before we get started. Mr. Box Office himself is picking Lillard. And Hart goes with McLemore (who got roasted by Barkley and Hart for his ‘fro … cold blooded).

– East had one day of practice for that routine they turned in for the freestyle portion of their program. Impressive!

– West had a couple of decent dunks but the choreography was way off.

– East wins that freestyle round easy!

– Someone pulled Vanilla Ice out of uh, moth balls … I’ve seen it all now. Bring on the battle round!

– Ross comes out with Drake as an assistant. Battle Round brings out the human props and a cape … and a between-the-legs jam that looks way better on replay after he missed it the first time.

– Lillard’s nights end mercifully without any hardware. The effort was outstanding, though.

Harrison Barnes has some explaining to do after this NBA2k14 dunk …

– McLemore dunking over Shaq and getting crowned had the crowd on its feet. Dunk looked much better on replay, of course. But no one has nailed that all-important first attempt …

– Until now. Thank you JohnWall, the reverse over the mascot and the Nay Nay with George after the dunk. Energy back up just like that. Even the judges agreed on that one. The East wins it. The new format is still being digested as we await the word on the individual champ … well, the dunker of the evening. Wall!

Advanced Stats: West All-Stars

NEW ORLEANS – All-Star weekend marks the one-year anniversary of the new version of NBA.com/stats. This season brought SportVU player tracking to the site and just Thursday night, player tracking stats were added on the boxscore level, so you can see how far a player ran or how many of his shots were contested on any given night.

All-Star weekend also means that it’s time to dive in with statistical nuggets for all 25 All-Stars. Here are the 13 guys representing the Western Conference…

Kobe Bryant, G, L.A. Lakers

Stephen Curry, G, Golden State

Kevin Durant, F, Oklahoma City

Blake Griffin, F, L.A. Clippers

Kevin Love, F, Minnesota

LaMarcus Aldridge, F, Portland

Anthony Davis, F-C, New Orleans

James Harden, G, Houston

Dwight Howard, C, Houston

Damian Lillard, G, Portland

  • Leads the league with six field goals (on just nine attempts) in the final 30 seconds with the score tied or his team behind three points or less.
  • Of 181 players who have attempted at least 100 shots from both in and outside the paint, Lillard is the only one who has shot better from outside the paint (42.5 percent) than from in the paint (42.2 percent).
  • Has attempted only 16.3 percent of his shots from mid-range, the second lowest rate among All-Stars (higher than only that of Howard).
  • Video: Watch Lillard’s six baskets that tied the game or gave his team the lead in the final 30 seconds.

Dirk Nowitzki, F, Dallas

Tony Parker, G, San Antonio

Chris Paul, G, L.A. Clippers

Warriors’ Curry Quite A Playmaker, Too


VIDEO: Steph Curry finds Andrew Bogut with a wonderful assist

NEW ORLEANS – The praise is a curse, the compliment a perception problem, the respect a hurdle.

Stephen Currypoint guard Stephen Curry – is an offensive tour de force for the Warriors and this weekend a starter for the Western Conference All-Stars in a sign of his rise to worldwide popularity. He just isn’t fully appreciated.

As a shooter, absolutely. Curry is a feared threat from the perimeter, at 41.5 percent on 3-pointers, No. 12 in the league, and 46.3 percent overall, a good number from the backcourt. He is a walking migraine for scouting reports trying to counter his attack on the pick-and-roll and the defenses that subsequently usually get shown up. He is fifth in the league in scoring, at 24.6 points per game. All hail one of the great weapons of the game.

But as a distributor, one of the true measures of a point guard? Deafening silence by comparison.

Coaches rave about his scoring. Oracle Arena gets electric as Curry sets his feet behind the arc for a flick release. And USA Basketball welcomes him as part of the future of the program for international competitions. But few realize his standing on the assist-leaders list at the break.

That would be No. 1, in case you hadn’t noticed.

Stephen Curry is averaging more assists per game, 9.0, than anyone who has met the qualifying minimum, with the likelihood that Chris Paul (11.1) will soon re-take the lead now that he has returned to the Clippers from a shoulder injury. The same Stephen Curry who in preseason read the NBA.com surgery of general managers, got to the part that asked about the best shooting guard and saw:

1. James Harden, Houston – 56.7%

2. Kobe Bryant, L.A. Lakers – 20.0%

3. Stephen Curry, Golden State; Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City; Paul George, Indiana – 6.7%

6. Dwyane Wade, Miami – 3.3%

There was obviously some liberal use of the category if Durant is getting votes in the backcourt while also receiving support at small forward and power forward, but still. It struck Curry.

He says now he found it more funny than anything, except that if even people within the game regarded him as impactful off the ball without putting him on a single ballot at point guard, his actual position, being so good at shooting that it overshadows other positives is not such a humorous perception issue.

When asked if he gets enough credit for his point-guard skills, even Curry had to admit “Not really, but it doesn’t really matter. We play the way coach (Mark) Jackson has encouraged me to, with how I see the game, to use my strengths to my advantage. Whatever kind of notoriety comes from me getting the other guys involved, distributing the ball, playing the point guard in a more-traditional way doesn’t really matter to me.”

This season should solve a lot of the problem. While turnovers remain a bugaboo — Curry averages 4.08 as part of a team-wide turnover issue for the Warriors — going from 6.9 assists (in 38.2 mpg last season) to 9.0 (in 37.7 mpg this season) is drawing attention to the damage he can do without shooting.

It’s not like this has come out of nowhere, either. Don Nelson, who coached Steve Nash with the Mavericks and a young Curry with the Warriors, once said Curry had a Nash-like ability to score and pass at an elite level. Curry — like Nash — won’t beat you with athleticism, but is a deadly shooter anywhere within 30 feet of the basket. By midway through Curry’s fifth season, Nelson’s words don’t so bold with the possibility of several 20-10 campaigns ahead.

“I think he’s starting to get the credit he deserves,” said Kings coach Michael Malone, a former assistant with Curry and Golden State. “I’m very happy for him to be named a starter. I sent him a text when I saw that. You talk about a class kid, and I’m sure the whole Warriors organization is thrilled because he’s going to represent that franchise in the right way. But right now, he’s known as Steph the shooter and a shooter only. People don’t realize that his assist numbers this year are off the charts.

“Obviously his turnovers are an area where he has to get those numbers down and he’s aware of that. But he’s much more than just a shooter. By calling Steph just a shooter, I think, is doing him a disservice because he’s got a very high basketball IQ. He is a willing playmaker and he’s not afraid of the moment.”

Said Pacers coach Frank Vogel: “People don’t understand, he’s nine assists a game. That’s Rajon Rondo-level stuff. And on the top of his scoring that he adds to the equation, he’s clearly in the conversation for being the best point guard in the game.”

The free-agent departure of Jarrett Jack, after Curry played off the ball a lot more last season with Jack running the point, has been an obvious factor in the rise in Curry’s assists. He is having to be a true point more than before as the Warriors struggle for backups, first signing Toney Douglas and planning to use Andre Iguodala in the role, then trading Douglas and hoping Jordan Crawford will deliver heading toward the playoffs.

But this has been the progress of Curry, who, based on Nelson’s comments, had it in him all along.


VIDEO: Steph Curry gets in some practice for the Foot Locker Three-Point Contest

MVP Ladder: Spicy Curry Stays Hot!



VIDEO: There was no snubbing Stephen Curry for the Western Conference All-Star team this time around

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The Golden State Warriors entered this season with sky-high expectations, both internal and external. It’s no secret that they have struggled to get a handle on them. But that hasn’t kept Stephen Curry from doing his thing.

The man NBA TV’s Dennis Scott likes to call “Spicy” Curry has been hot even when the Warriors go cold, piling up 14 games in which he has scored 30 or more points. He had 12 all of last season. And there is no All-Star snub to speak of this season with Curry voted in by the fans, rightfully so, as a starter on the Western Conference team. He’s also featured prominently, as he has been all season, on the KIA Race to the MVP Ladder.

Curry was at his very best Thursday night on TNT, when he shredded the Chicago Bulls for 34 points (on 13-for-19 shooting), 9 assists and 3 rebounds in a much-needed win for a Warriors team that had been reeling on its home floor, losing five of their last seven games heading into the game.

Kevin Durant, LeBron James, Blake Griffin, Paul George and LaMarcus Aldridge make up the top five of the Ladder this week. But Curry is pushing to join them at No. 6.

Dive in here for more on who made the cut on this week’s KIA Race To The MVP Ladder!


All-Star Saturday Gets A Makeover

Portland's Damian Lillard will have a busy weekend in New Orleans. (Cameron Browne/NBAE)

Portland’s Damian Lillard will have a busy weekend in New Orleans. (Cameron Browne/NBAE)

There will still be the rim-rattling, mind-bending slam dunks, the barrage of breathtaking 3-pointers and the dazzling array of skills on display when the greatest talent in basketball gathers.

But State Farm All-Star Saturday Night will undergo an extreme makeover this year in New Orleans with rule changes for all four of the events and an overall team competition between the Eastern and Western conferences — led by captains Paul George and Stephen Curry – with $500,000 in charitable contributions on the line.

Perhaps the most familiar name by the end of the extravaganza will be guard Damian Lillard of the Portland Trail Blazers, who will be busier than a trumpet player in a French Quarter brass band. He’s taking part in three of Saturday’s four events — including stints as a dunker, a long-distance shooter and a playmaker in the Taco Bell Skills Challenge. The 2013 Rookie of the Year already has a busy dance card; he’s scheduled to play in the BBVA Compass Rising Stars Challenge on Friday night and in the 63rd NBA All-Star Game on Sunday.

The most dramatic change Saturday is coming in the night’s marquee event, the Sprite Slam Dunk Contest. The competition will feature six dunkers, three from each conference, in a free-wheeling, two-round showdown to determine the best conference. For the first time in the event’s history, no individual dunker will be crowned. Instead, the title will go to the best conference. Complete rules.

Dunking for the Eastern Conference will be the team captain George of the Pacers, 2013 champion Terrence Ross of the Raptors and John Wall of the Wizards.  The Western Conference dunkers will be Lillard, Harrison Barnes of the Warriors and Ben McLemore of the Sacramento Kings.

The 6-foot-3 Lillard will be battling in the land of the giants as the shortest participant in the slam dunk contest.

Highlights: George | Ross | Wall | Lillard | Barnes | McLemore

Before he puts on his dunking shoes, Lillard will be showing off his marksmanship as part of the Foot Locker Three-Point Contest.  The other participants are Kyrie Irving of the Cavaliers, Bradley Beal of the Wizards, Joe Johnson of the Nets and Arron Afflalo of the Magic for the East.  Curry of the Warriors, Marco Belinelli of the Spurs and Kevin Love of the Timberwolves will join Lillard shooting for the West.

The major rule change in the contest is that players will have an entire rack of “money balls,” which count double, that can be placed in any of the five shooting positions around the court. Complete rules.

The Taco Bells Skills challenge has been turned into a relay race this year with each conference fielding two teams consisting of two players each.  Each team will run the course, competing in a relay format for a single overall time. Complete rules.

The ubiquitous Lillard will team with Trey Burke of the Jazz and Reggie Jackson of the Thunder will team with Goran Dragic of the Suns to make up the Western Conference lineup.  The East teams will be Michael Carter-Williams of the Sixers with Victor Oladipo of the Magic and DeMar DeRozan of the Raptors with rookie Giannis Antetokounmpo of the Bucks.

The Sears Shooting Stars will once again team a current NBA player with a WNBA star and an NBA legend in a time competition that will require four shots made from different spots on the court.

Tim Hardaway Jr. of the Knicks and Chris Bosh of the Heat will head up the East teams, while Kevin Durant of the Thunder and Curry will lead the West. Complete rules.

Each conference will be competing for charity. A total of $500,000 will be donated at the end of the night. For each competition, $100,000 will go to the winning conference’s charities, with $25,000 going to the charities of the runner-up.

State Farm All-Star Saturday night will be televised exclusively on TNT on Feb. 15 (8 p.m. ET).

[UPDATE: TNT will hold a fan vote during the Sprite Slam Dunk Contest to determine the Sprite Dunker of the Night. The winner of that vote will be considered the individual champion for the competition.]


Video: 2014 All-Star Saturday Night Participants