Posts Tagged ‘Sixth Man of the Year’

Jamal Crawford gets a place in history

By Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com


VIDEO: Jamal Crawford becomes fourth two-time Sixth Man of the Year winner in NBA history

PLAYA VISTA, Calif. — There are the disclaimers that the award was first presented in 1982-83, too late for John Havlicek, the original, and that Michael Cooper won it zero times in what could only have been voters trying hard to not pay attention for six or eight years. The historical perspective is not ideal.

But Jamal Crawford just became the fourth player to win Sixth Man of the Year twice and that means something beyond a formidable 2013-14 as a Clipper and one of the best fourth-quarter scoring closers in the league. Kevin McHale did it, Ricky Pierce did it, Detlef Schrempf did it and now Crawford joins the special list.

Crawford officially becomes one of the best role players of this and a few other generations, in other words. McHale was an All-Star one of the years he earned the hardware and a future Hall of Famer, but also a starter the seasons with the most impact. Schrempf was known as more than a scorer. Pierce, he was known a scorer. That’s Crawford too.

“He’s one of the great sixth men of all-time,” coach Doc Rivers said at the Clippers practice facility Thursday before Crawford was officially presented the award. “I don’t even know because back then they didn’t name them — Havlicek, it should maybe be called the John Havlicek Trophy. The thing I like about it, when you think about John, who I got to know very well in Boston, and when you get to meet Jamal, very similar people in the fact that just really nice people. The fact that they both clearly could start on any team that they play on yet they choose to come off the bench because they think that’s the right thing for the team, I think that speaks volumes for both.”

Crawford won the first time 2009-10 with the Hawks, before the award went to Lamar Odom, James Harden and J.R. Smith. He has become that dependable in the role. He has also become, at 34 years old, the oldest to win and the first to do it with two different teams.

This time, Crawford did it by also changing, becoming more than a scorer at a time when the Clippers were pressed in the backcourt with injuries to starters Chris Paul and J.J. Redick. Rivers said Crawford was one of the best passers on the team when Paul was out and that his defense got better this season, two aspects never before connected to the shot-happy guard.

“I think it’s pretty cool,” Crawford said of the historical significance. “I’m a student of the game and a lot of my teammates are, so we’re always asking if you saw this game or watched this YouTube video from back in the day. I don’t know all-time. I didn’t get a chance to watch all those guys in person. I know Ricky Pierce, Kevin McHale and Detlef Schrempf won it twice and there’s been some great sixth men with (Manu) Ginobili and Jason Terry and guys like that. I don’t know where I rank. I think that’s for you guys to decide when I’m finished. I just hope one day when J.J.’s (his son) old enough to understand he can look back and say, ‘My dad was pretty good.’ “

Bulls’ Gibson adds scoring, flips switch of Sixth-Man chatter

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com


VIDEO: Taj Gibson notches a double-double to help the Bulls defeat the Sixers

CHICAGO – Joakim Noah, who plays at a full-on froth for the Chicago Bulls, works his way to that boiling point with a very personal, specific routine of physical and mental preparation that has him literally bouncing on the court by tipoff.

So he marvels at the on/off switch his friend and teammate Taj Gibson has, coming in cold off the Bulls bench and then – wham! – impacting the game in almost no time at all.

“I’ve never seen anything like that,” Noah said, eyes widening as he leaned back in his chair the other night. “He barely … I mean, I’ve seen Taj barely warm up and then he’s just dunking all over the place. It’s crazy. He’s very lucky to have that. Some people have that unbelievable gift.

“He’ll do things – he’ll lift weights before the game and get prepared, but it’s a lot easier for him than it is for me, I’ll tell you that.”

It’s a legitimate skill, catching up to a game already five, eight, 12 minutes old, stepping in among players already lathered and loose, when you’ve been sitting on the side in warm-up clothes. It’s one of the traits that has thrust Gibson into late-season conversations for the NBA’s Sixth Man of the Year award.

Gibson’s individual development on the offensive end might argue for Most Improved consideration instead, or as well. But it has been the 6-foot-9 power forward’s work in reserve – along with Noah’s ascension and D.J. Augustin‘s makeover – that has helped pushed Chicago beyond the doldrums of the Derrick Rose re-injury and Luol Deng trade.

And in Gibson’s case, it comes from his ability to hit the game balling.

“Oh man, I felt that today,” Gibson said after boosting the Bulls against Philadephia on Saturday with 16 points and 10 rebounds in not quite 29 minutes. “It’s rough. Some days he plays me at the five-minute mark, some days I have to wait till the second quarter.”

This time, Gibson entered with three minutes left in the first and got busy with a rebound and a block. Later, as has been coach Tom Thibodeau‘s practice for a long time, he played the entire fourth quarter, scoring eight points, grabbing three boards and getting another block.

Gibson finishes on most nights because his offense has improved and his defensive versatility makes him invaluable on pick-and-rolls. But starting quickly is what matters most at the game’s front end.

“Luckily I just know my routine,” Gibson said. ” keep a good rhythm going on the sideline. I’m jumping up, I’m cheering, I’m directing, I’m doing a lot of stuff to try to help my teammates from the bench.”

He sits on hot packs, Gibson said, and stretches with every timeout while waiting his turn.

“I just stay active, stay mobile, ’cause you can get real stiff waiting,” said the fifth-year product of USC and Brooklyn, N.Y. “When I get in there, the first look I take, I just take it to get a rhythm right away. That’s what Derrick told me – I’ve got good people giving me good advice. And it works out.”

How well? Gibson has scored in double figures in 26 of his last 31 games, averaging 15.1 points on 47.3 percent shooting, with 7.2 rebounds, 1.3 assists and 1.32 blocks. The Bulls are 20-11 record in that time.

He is averaging career highs in points (13.2, vs. 9.0 in 2009-10), assists (1.3) and minutes (28.7). He has reset his career scoring high to 26 and hit it three times, has scored 20 points or more in 11 games and has 13 double-doubles.

He’s the poster guy for that old coach’s saying: “It doesn’t matter who starts, it matters who finishes.”  Gibson averages 10.1 of his minutes in the fourth quarter. He started 70 games as a rookie in 2009-10 – Chicago’s Tyrus Thomas era hadn’t worked out so well – but has been a reserve in 278 of 310 games since Thibodeau was hired and Carlos Boozer signed in the summer of 2010.

Their early work together earned Gibson a four-year, $33 million contract extension in October 2012. His recent work has earned Thibodeau’s praise and endorsement for that SMOY honor.

“The biggest thing for him is what he’s contributed to us winning,” the Bulls coach said. “I hate to lock into individual awards. I think players are recognized when the team has success. … The things he does for our team are all team-oriented.

“Plays great defense. Challenges shots. Guards everybody. Runs the floor hard. Sets great screens. Does his job. Offensively, gets deep post position. Gets a quality shot up. When a second guy comes, he makes the play. He’s gotten comfortable in pick-and-roll situations.”

You want advanced stats? When Gibson has been on the court, the Bulls’ offensive and defensive ratings have been 103.7 and 100.7 respectively. When he sits, those numbers droop to 99.9 and 101.3.

Gibson’s offense, meanwhile, has benefited from equal parts confidence and patience. He saw what defenses were yielding to him, video of last spring’s playoffs and such, and has begun to consistently take those shots.

The Sixth Man award typically favors guards and wing players, the guys who bring instant offense. Eight of the past nine winners, with the exception of Lamar Odom in 2011, have fit that that description. And the top candidates this year – Reggie Jackson, Markieff Morris, possible repeat winners in Jamal Crawford or Manu Ginobili – all tend to help their teams most at one end.

Still, Gibson, who gives the Bulls both quickie offense and defense, lights up at the idea of the recognition. There’s that on/off switch again.

“It’d mean a lot,” he said. “Coming from a guy that played on the Bench Mob my entire career since we got Carlos, so many different guys coming and going. Just being able to come in, play defense, go from a guy that’s just focused on defense and now my teammates are looking for me on offense, it’s just great. … The coaching staff believing in me, it would be a dream come true.”

Award races head into stretch run

By Fran Blinebury, NBA.com

Four weeks from today the regular season is over. All eyes will be on the playoffs. And that means the final push is on for the 2013-14 awards.

The duel for MVP honors has been a match race all season between Kevin Durant and LeBron James. Michael Carter-Williams jumped out of the pack early as the one to beat for Rookie of the Year. But the other races have been wide open.

Here’s one man’s view as we head into the home stretch:

Most Improved Player

Anthony Davis, Pelicans — This is why the Pelicans were so happy to make him the No. 1 pick in the 2012 Draft. This is what coach Monty Williams says Davis probably could have shown last season if the coach hadn’t kept a tight rein on his prized rookie, limiting his minutes and his exposure to getting overpowered while he built up his slender body. When Davis erupted for 40 points, 21 rebounds, three assists and three steals against the Celtics, it was the culmination of a spectacular sophomore year. He’s been steady and breathtaking at both ends of the court all season, enough to beat out the likes of worthy candidates Goran Dragic and Lance Stephenson in a crowded field of contenders. Also getting votes: DeAndre Jordan, Trevor Ariza.


VIDEO: Anthony Davis was nominated for Kia Player of the Month for March

Sixth Man of the Year

Manu Ginobili, Spurs — Following an injury-plagued 2012-13 season that saw him enter the playoffs last spring looking bedraggled, the player who puts the jolt into the Spurs attack is back playing like a live wire in his 12th season. His field-goal percentage is up and his he’s back to doing all the things at both ends of the floor that make him a disruptive force and a difference maker. Jamal Crawford is the closest contender and has done many of the same things for the Clippers. The deciding factor has to be overall team performance. L.A. is in the top half of the Western Conference standings, but that’s once again the Spurs at the top. The return of Manu to his old form is a prime reason. Also getting votes: Reggie Jackson, Markieff Morris.


VIDEO: Manu Ginobili talks about the Spurs’ season and his play

Rookie of the Year

Michael Carter-Williams, Sixers — He was the sixth guard selected (11th overall) in 2013 and wasted no time showing he never should have lasted that long. He’s put up big numbers even as the Sixers have suffered through what is a historically inept season. If all of general manager Sam Hinkie’s decisions turn out so well, the pain will be worth the price. The fun could just be starting when MCW gets to team up with a healthy Nerlens Noel next season. It’s a long way back to the No. 2 man in the voting for this category, but we’re jumping the more likely pick and going with Tim Hardaway Jr. His hard-charging style has been one of the few reasons to watch the Knicks all year. Also getting votes: Victor Oladipo, Trey Burke. Kia Rookie Ladder


VIDEO: At the All-Star break, Michael Carter-Williams talks about his season

Defensive Player of the Year

Joakim Noah, Bulls — The Pacers spent the early part of the year polishing their reputation as the league’s top defensive team, with center Roy Hibbert starting to clear room on his mantle as the pre-eminent rim protector in the game. But it is no coincidence that the Pacers’ struggles fit with a slippage in Hibbert’s game. The truth is, when you get him just a little bit away from the basket, he’s not so dominant. Meanwhile the Bulls have shrugged off the loss of Derrick Rose and Luol Deng because Noah simply won’t let them stop working and scrapping and competing. He’s the heart and soul of the team, especially that ferocious defense as Chicago charges late and the Pacers try to regain their equilibrium. Also getting votes: Serge Ibaka, Dwight Howard.


VIDEO: Rachel Nichols talks with Joakim Noah about his surge in play of late

Coach of the Year

Gregg Popovich, Spurs — The first instinct is to say that Jeff Hornacek has taken a Suns team that everyone assumed was diving for the lottery — and the Las Vegas wise guys had pegged for 21.5 wins — and turned them into an uplifting story and playoff contender, and that’s worthy of consideration. The next instinct is to say that Tom Thibodeau is like the Black Knight in “Monty Python and the Holy Grail”, virtually getting limbs chopped off and yet ignoring the wounds and keeping right on with the fight. But when you get right down to the meat of things, it’s all about winning games and some how, some way, Popovich keeps doing that better than anybody else. Never mind that Tim Duncan and Manu Ginobili are practically senior citizens. Never mind that an assortment of injuries has forced the Spurs to use two dozen different lineups. Never mind all of those lingering mental scars from The Finals last June. Popovich expects the best and his team keeps producing it. Excellence should be recognized and rewarded. Also getting votes: Frank Vogel, Dwane Casey, Steve Clifford.


VIDEO: GameTime delves into how deeply Gregg Popovich’s influence is felt around the NBA

Most Valuable Player

Kevin Durant, Thunder — It’s been a two-horse race between Durant and LeBron James almost from the opening tip. You can almost never go wrong picking James, who still reigns as the league’s best player with his ability. It looked like James might be making a late charge for an MVP three-peat with his 61 point game a couple of weeks ago. But an ensuing slump by both LeBron and the Heat took the steam out of that charge. Durant responded and has raised his game even higher over the past 1 1/2 weeks. We also have to go back to Durant’s body of work without Russell Westbrook for 30 games — and counting — as he keeps the Thunder in the hunt for best overall record and heads toward what should be the first of multiple MVP wins. Also getting votes: Joakim Noah, Blake Griffin. Kia Race to the MVP Ladder


VIDEO: Chris Webber and Greg Anthony debate and discuss the MVP race