Posts Tagged ‘Shaun Powell’

Blogtable: Best offensive rebounder in NBA today?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Were ’83 Sixers most dominant playoff team ever? | NBA’s best offensive rebounder today? | What you remember most about Malone?

VIDEOMoses Malone’s 30-point, 30-rebound game from 1982 vs. Seattle

> Moses Malone is the NBA’s all-time leader in offensive rebounds, but who is the best offensive rebounder in the NBA right now, today?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comWhen Detroit’s Andre Drummond grabbed 440 offensive rebounds in 2013-14, he was the first player with more than 400 in a season in 16 years (Jayson Williams had 443 in 1997-98). Drummond had 33 percent more than the No. 2 man, DeAndre Jordan. Then last season, Drummond grabbed 437, topping runner-up Jordan by 40. So with all due respect to the Clippers center and to wily Zach Randolph in Memphis, the easy answer here is Drummond.

Scott Howard-Cooper, Andre Drummond. More than five per game last season? That’s how to make a big contribution on offense while not having much of an offensive game, or at least a traditional offensive game.

Shaun Powell, After watching him rip through the playoffs last season I’m tempted to nominate Tristan Thompson. He goes for more second helpings than you at Thanksgiving. But the premier offensive rebounder is Andre Drummond, and he’s still learning how to play the game. Imagine what happens when he develops a post move or a mid-range shot. Until then, the offensive glass is what he does very well, better than most.

John Schuhmann, Andre Drummond was the league leader in offensive rebounding percentage last season, but DeAndre Jordan was second while playing for a coach — Doc Rivers — who doesn’t want to sacrifice transition defense for offensive boards. No team allowed a lower percentage of their opponents’ shots in the first six seconds of the shot clock than the Clippers, who ranked 28th in offensive rebounding percentage as a team. With that context, the case could be made that Jordan is the better offensive rebounder among two similarly long and bouncy bigs.

Sekou Smith, Andre Drummond‘s the only player in the league to average more than five offensive rebounds per game last season, so he has to get the nod. But I love watching DeAndre Jordan (4.8 offensive rpg and a league-leading 15 rpg last season) do his work around the rim for the Los Angeles Clippers. He’s huge, like Drummond, and uses every bit of his size and athleticism to his advantage on the boards. He does it with more flair than Drummond and does it in a dominant fashion on a team where he’s never really been featured on that end of the floor.

Ian Thomsen, Andre Drummond dominated during the regular season, but the big man who made you think of offensive rebounding as a weapon last year was Tristan Thompson. As the Cavaliers’ scorers went down during the playoffs, Thompson tirelessly created second-chances while helping to drive his team within reach of the championship.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blogBy all the stats, Detroit’s Andre Drummond is pretty effective, by a pretty healthy margin, with DeAndre Jordan not far off. But fresh in my mind is the work Tristan Thompson did during the NBA Finals. We always hear from coaches that rebounding is mostly about effort over anything else, and I thought Thompson showed that during The Finals.

Blogtable: What will you remember most about Moses Malone?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Were ’83 Sixers most dominant playoff team ever? | NBA’s best offensive rebounder today? | What you remember most about Malone?

VIDEOMoses Malone career retrospective

> The NBA lost one of its all-time greats when Moses Malone died Sunday at age 60. What will you remember most about the “Chairman of the Boards?”

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comI’ll remember Moses as a man of few words, whose comments took on greater import and pithiness because he wasn’t all that talkative. I’ll remember the pools of sweat he left at both ends of every court on which he played – hardest working and most perspiring man in the game at the time. Unfortunately, though, I think I’ll remember how jarring it was to see Malone play for so many teams in his career. Legendary players aren’t supposed to pack their bags that often – even skipping his ABA stops due to that league’s shoddy finances, Malone changed NBA teams eight times. For a while it almost seemed like a Moses-of-the-month club, with Malone spread around the league so everyone could have him for a stint. Guess that makes him both old-school and very modern, as pro athletes go.

Scott Howard-Cooper, Probably the tenacity. It seemed like if there was a rebound anywhere in the area code, he would grab it. Imagine the number of times an opponent got chewed out by their coach for not sealing Malone off the offensive boards. Coaches must have gone hoarse. Moses had good size, but he wasn’t Shaquille O’Neal or Wilt Chamberlain. But when the ball was coming off the rim, it didn’t matter.

Shaun Powell, Moses wasn’t the most eloquent speaker and was rather reluctant to do interviews, but he came up with a few gems. Of course, there was “fo, fo, and fo” and also the quip about “me and four guys from Petersburg” being able to beat up the Celtics in The Finals. He nicknamed his two young boys “Harvard” and “Yale” because that’s where he said they were going to school (neither did). And finally, Moses remarked how he “learned” Hakeem Olajuwon how to play the game and after getting roasted by a young Hakeem regretted that he “learned him too good.”

John Schuhmann, I don’t know if “underrated” is the right word, but looking back at Malone’s career, he clearly doesn’t get mentioned enough as one of the best big men in NBA history. When you look at his shooting numbers (49 percent for his career, only five seasons at 50 percent or better), he obviously wasn’t as efficient as Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Wilt Chamberlain or Shaquille O’Neal. But by rebounding so many of his own misses (and that he shot free throws better than all of those guys), he kind of made up for that. Really, his numbers are right there with Shaq.

Sekou Smith, In addition to this Air Force 1 poster that hung on the bedroom wall when I was a kid, it’s the fact that Moses was a technician. The polish and proficiency of his game, on both ends of the floor, is what will always stick out to me about him. He dominated with what would classify now as an “old school” style that didn’t rely on his physical prowess as much as it did his pure skill and ability to wear you out by beating you to all the sweet spots on the floor. You don’t score and rebound the way he did, at his size, without being an absolute technician. 

Ian Thomsen, I think about how he was underestimated when the ABA folded in 1976. In the ensuing dispersal draft Malone was chosen second by the Blazers (their first pick was Maurice Lucas) and was then unloaded to the Buffalo Braves for a first-round pick (which turned into Rick Robey). The Blazers already had Bill Walton, who would lead them to the 1976-77 championship — but that doesn’t change the fact that they and the Braves undervalued 21-year-old Malone, who was traded again for a pair of first-rounders (Wesley Cox and Micheal Ray Richardson) to the Rockets. Two years later, Malone would be the NBA’s MVP, and in 1981 he would lead the Rockets to the NBA Finals. The misunderstanding of his potential was stunning.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blog I was in middle school in 1988, when my hometown Atlanta Hawks signed a then 32-year-old Moses Malone to team him with Dominique Wilkins and Reggie Theus and give the Hawks, finally, a potent inside-out attack and make them a presumptive Eastern Conference contender. I may have only been a kid, but I knew enough about the NBA to know that these Hawks had a chance to be special, so I mowed lawns all summer and raised $205 and bought a $5 season ticket for that ’88-89 season. By then Moses wasn’t the dominant glass demon he’d been earlier in his career, but he was still effective and still worthwhile. The main thing I remember was how often he seemed to miss short shots intentionally when nobody was near him, and how through this my friends and I learned what it meant to “pad” one’s stats. Many times after games, we would hang around near the locker rooms and ask for autographs. Moses wasn’t the most enthusiastic autograph giver, but he usually made himself available eventually. One night someone asked him if he had any extra shoes he could give away, and without looking up, Moses said, “Ain’t got no shoe contract.” What made this even better was he was starring in a national Nike commercial at the time.

Blogtable: Were ’83 Sixers most dominant playoff team ever?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Were ’83 Sixers most dominant playoff team ever? | NBA’s best offensive rebounder today? | What you remember most about Malone?

VIDEOThe Sixers sweep away the Lakers in the 1983 Finals

> After winning 65 games in the 1982-83 regular season, Moses Malone’s 76ers went 12-1 in the postseason and swept the Lakers 4-0 in The Finals. Was this the most dominating postseason performance ever?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comThanks to Malone’s “Fo’, fo’, fo'” prediction, the 1983 Sixers’ postseason run might be the easiest to remember in terms of their 12-1 record (only Milwaukee got a game from them, defending home court while down 0-3). But it takes two teams to make for a great series and a succession of them to elevate a playoff run. While Philadelphia’s gauntlet to the title was challenging, it wasn’t as tough as the one the Los Angeles Lakers ran in 2001 while going 15-1 or what the Chicago Bulls faced either in 1996 (15-3) or 1991 (15-2). The ’00-01 Lakers outscored Portland by an average of 14.7 points, Sacramento by 9.2 and San Antonio by 22.2 in starting 11-0. They dropped Game 1 of The Finals against feisty Allen Iverson (48 points) but were far superior to that overmatched Sixers squad as they won the series’ next four.

Scott Howard-Cooper, That team, the 2001 Lakers that went undefeated against three 50-win opponents in the West before beating Philly for the title or the 1996 Bulls that crushed everyone in sight before a brief stumble in The Finals. Maybe the 76ers of 1983 get the edge because they swept a very good Lakers club, the defending champions, for the championship. That was a higher degree of difficulty than the others. L.A. had a lot of talent and couldn’t come close to keeping up.

Shaun Powell, Well, the Shaq-Kobe Lakers of 2000-01 get the nod because they had to play an extra round (under the 16-team playoff format) and their only loss in the postseason was in overtime during The Finals (coincidentally in Game 1 against the Sixers). Also, the Moses-Doc Sixers had a few close calls along the way; winning two against the Knicks by a total of five points and sweating out an OT win against the Bucks. Besides, while that Bucks team was maybe the best in Milwaukee history (they swept the Celtics), the Sixers didn’t have to go through Larry Bird and Kevin McHale, who tormented them the years before.

John Schuhmann, Statistically, the 2000-01 Lakers (15-1) were the most dominant team in the postseason, outscoring their opponents by 13.5 points per 100 possessions. Nine of their 15 wins came by more than 10 points. The ’82-83 Sixers only outscored their opponents by 6.7 points per 100 possessions, winning only two games by more than 10 points. The ’90-91 Bulls (15-2, +12.6 points per 100 possessions) aren’t far behind the Lakers.

Sekou Smith, It was indeed the most dominating postseason performance in my lifetime. The Sixers were loaded and swept the defending champion Lakers in The Finals. How good or great a team was depended on its parts, how dominant it was depended on the quality of the competition. The 1983 Sixers reached The Finals with an 8-1 record and then swept a championship team. That speaks volumes.

Ian Thomsen, I’ve got to go with Michael Jordan’s 1995-96 Bulls. After going 72-10 in the regular season, they won 14 of their first 15 playoff games, including seven straight victories against teams that had won 60 games. Can we forgive them for losing twice in the NBA Finals after seizing a 3-0 lead over the Seattle SuperSonics? We should: That team was unbeatable.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blogJust how old do you think I am? I don’t remember the 1983 Finals, but a 12-1 postseason run, at least on the surface, sure seems dominant. The only other team to me that sticks out as similarly dominant is the 2002 Lakers, who won a title with a 15-4 postseason record.

Blogtable: Taking Mozgov or Thompson?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: New coach with toughest gig? | Best international player today? | Mozgov or Thompson?

VIDEOTimofey Mozgov’s game was sparked by a trade to Cleveland

> Timofey Mozgov or Tristan Thompson? Assuming the Cavs won’t sign both players to lucrative long-term deals, who’s the better choice for the money in Cleveland?

Steve Aschburner, Straight up, I’d prefer Tristan Thompson – five years younger, more vaunted upside, high-revving motor, great disposition, more versatility. But for this Cavaliers team, it’s Mozgov. Those four inches and 20 pounds or so he has over Thompson matter, even in today’s corner-3-crazy game. More than that, LeBron James “plays nice with” and really seems to value traditional big men, from Zydrunas Ilgauskas to Anderson Varejao to Mozgov. He banged the drum for TT as a “lifetime Cav” too, but that team took off after Mozgov’s arrival and James knows it.

Scott Howard-Cooper, It’s Thompson. In the conversation that Thompson will be back this season, Mozgov will cost less, and there is something to be said for that considering the money the Cavs have already pushed to the middle of the table. It will be slightly less if Thompson takes the qualifying offer or a lot less if Thompson and Cleveland do a new contract. Either way, Thompson is the better choice for the money. He has a longer future and more upside, along with the larger contribution now.

Shaun Powell, I’ll go with Timofey Mozgov if only because he’s a natural center, while Tristan Thompson must share the power forward position with a guy who just received a ton of money from the Cavs. Besides, Mozgov brings better offensive skills and a few extra inches in height.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comThompson is five years younger and has missed only six games in his four-year career, but he plays the same position as Kevin Love.  Mozgov, meanwhile, is the more important player right now, because he’s the better rim protector on a team that needs defense more than offense from its role players. If I could keep Mozgov at 2/3 the price of Thompson (giving me more flexibility to build around my core), it would be an easy choice.

Sekou Smith, I’m going with Tristan … until we see another half season, or more, of Mozgov playing the way he did in the playoffs (and specifically The Finals). They are both hugely important to Cleveland’s title chances going forward. And while Kevin Love could easily take those minutes Thompson played during last season’s run to The Finals, I still think the Cavaliers are at their best with Thompson controlling the paint with his rebounding and defense. It’s not an easy choice, but Thompson’s value on and off the floor wins out.

Ian Thomsen, Thompson is more versatile defensively – they can play small around him – and his departure would threaten a rift between the franchise and LeBron James. If they’re going to keep only one of them then it has to be Thompson, in spite of Mozgov’s effectiveness.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blogI thought Mozgov and Thompson were equally impactful in their own ways during the postseason for the Cavs. And while Mozgov has developed into a nice center, particularly when he’s playing alongside LeBron James, if I have to commit to one of these guys long term, I’m going with Tristan Thompson. Not only is Thompson five years younger than Mozgov, but it seems like last season, Thompson realized that hustle will get you everywhere, and he started playing with the pedal floored at all times. Thompson is not a great shooter, but he doesn’t have to be if he’s going to work the boards and take most of his shots from a few feet from the basket. The offensive skills can still be developed. But if he can sustain the hustle, that’s the guy I want on my team for the long haul.

Blogtable: NBA’s best international player?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: New coach with toughest gig? | Best international player today? | Mozgov or Thompson?

VIDEOTop 10 plays from Grizzlies center Marc Gasol

> The NBA had 101 international players on its opening-day rosters last season, and could add another 10-12 this season. Who is the best international player in the NBA right now, today?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comWe’re not talking lifetime achievement (Dirk Nowitzki), right? Nor are we going with the foreign-born guy we’d draft No. 1 for the career he’ll put together (possibly Andrew Wiggins)?  Fine. For today and this season, give me Marc Gasol, the first-team All-NBA center and a top-10 finisher in Kia MVP balloting last season. At 30, he’s at the peak of his power and in his best physical shape ever. He’s got size, he boasts multiple skills and he’s a tremendous teammate and individual.

Scott Howard-Cooper, Marc Gasol. Tony Parker is still in the conversation with his overall shooting and 3-point range plus the intangibles as one of the centerpieces of all that is right in San Antonio (the underwhelming per-game numbers in other categories are misleading because the Spurs don’t assign him a heavy workload). And there were times in the past it seemed that Joakim Noah was ready to make a push up the ranking. Gasol’s 2014-15 earned the top spot, though. Offense, defense, professionalism. That’s deserving of No. 1.

Shaun Powell, Marc Gasol at one point wasn’t even the best foreign-born player in his own family. But now he has squeezed ahead of not only Pau Gasol but Dirk Nowitzki (on the downside of a great career), Tony Parker, Serge Ibaka, etc. In a few years he may pass the baton to Andrew Wiggins. We’ll see.

John Schuhmann, If Tim Duncan counts as an international player, he’s still No. 1, with Marc Gasol a close second. Duncan is still an impact player on both ends of the floor, and his leadership and coachability can’t be discounted. Tony Parker is more important to the Spurs’ offense than Duncan is at this point, but isn’t the two-way player that his teammate is. Dirk Nowitzki, meanwhile, has become a real liability on defense.

Sekou Smith, This is Marc Gasol’s honor and mantle to carry until someone else from the international pool takes it. A physical brute and an absolute technician as the backbone of the Memphis Grizzlies, Marc is no longer playing in the shadow of big brother Pau. The ultimate testament to Marc’s journey is that you don’t have to make a case for him by pointing out the strengths and weaknesses of any of the other candidates. He’s earned his spot at the top of the international heap by working his tail off and becoming an All-Star and All-NBA player without any glaring flaws in his game.

Ian Thomsen, Tony Parker is the best today, and right beside him is teammate Tim Duncan (born and raised in the Virgin Islands) in the present day – in addition to being the undisputed best international NBA player of all time.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blogThe first player to come to mind was Dirk Nowitzki, because he’s been the best international player in the NBA for so long. But with Dirk aging and playing less of a role with the Mavericks, perhaps it’s time to look elsewhere. Al Horford? Andrew Wiggins? Pau Gasol? (Does Kyrie Irving count, since he was born in Australia?) But even considering all of those guys, I think I might have to go with Marc Gasol. It’s easy to forget about him because while he was one of the top free agents this summer, he stayed below the radar and re-signed with the Grizzlies. But at just 30 years old, Marc Gasol is still one of the top centers in the NBA, with one of the most diverse skillsets in the league.

Blogtable: New coach with the most challenging job?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: New coach with toughest gig? | Best international player today? | Mozgov or Thompson?

VIDEOFred Hoiberg talks about the Bulls during Summer League

> Including George Karl — who joined the Kings more than halfway through last season — which of the league’s six new coaches faces the biggest challenge in 2015-16?

Steve Aschburner, It’s tempting to say Karl because gawkers already are buttering their popcorn and pulling up chairs to watch the pyrotechnics between the coach and DeMarcus Cousins, his most talented player. But I think Billy Donovan’s challenge in OKC is greater. He has very little wiggle room in shepherding the Thunder to championship contention, what with his stars dragging considerable injury histories while he lugs the “college guy stepping up to the pros” pressure that will lurk just below the surface all season.

Scott Howard-Cooper, Exactly who you named: George Karl. Fred Hoiberg and Billy Donovan face the most pressure to win big right away, and Donovan has the additional challenge of needing to make a strong connection with free agent-to-be Kevin Durant while winning big right away, Karl is the only “newcomer” who must change the culture as well as the standings. The Kings are expecting to get to respectable this season. They are also expecting to get an emotional stability. George is a linchpin to both.

Shaun Powell, Billy Donovan has the most at stake. I’ll use that as my measuring tool. OKC is primed for a title run and Kevin Durant is staring at free agency next summer. A championship will end most if not all chances of KD bolting. Therefore, Donovan’s importance is twofold. He must show enough as a coach to, at the very least, give OKC some hope and also form a bond with Durant. I’ll go with Donovan just ahead of Fred Hoiberg, who needs to teach Derrick Rose some new tricks.

John Schuhmann, The most pressure is obviously on Billy Donovan, who has to get the Thunder back to the top of the Western Conference and keep Kevin Durant in Oklahoma City beyond this season. But Mike Malone has the toughest task, because there’s no clear path to success on either end of the floor in Denver. Emmanuel Mudiay could eventually be a special player, but as they stand, the Nuggets don’t have much defense on their frontline or much shooting in their backcourt.

Sekou Smith, Billy Donovan and George Karl have a ton at stake in their respective situations, and no one will deal with greater expectations than Donovan will in Oklahoma City this season. But the greatest challenge belongs to Alvin Gentry in New Orleans, where an otherworldly talent (Anthony Davis) has to be nurtured and molded into a player many believe has the potential to soon be the best player in the game. That’s an entirely separate challenge in addition to winning enough games to remain in the Western Conference playoff mix. It’s a huge challenge that I think Gentry is perfectly suited for and will run wild with this season and beyond.

Ian Thomsen, Not only is Billy Donovan facing the biggest challenge, he also has the greatest likelihood for success. One reason why most NCAA coaches fail in the NBA is because their teams lack talent. Donovan’s Thunder rank among the most talented teams in the NBA – and he has the backing of his front office as well as the temperament and intelligence to succeed as efficiently as possible, even amid the complications of Kevin Durant’s comeback and free agency.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blog I am interested to see how things will go for Fred Hoiberg in Chicago. Most of the other new coaches (i.e. Mike Malone, Flip Saunders, Scott Skiles and Karl) have walked into situations with low expectations. If they don’t turn things around immediately, well, one could argue nobody expected anything spectacular, at least right away. Billy Donovan is going to face high expectations in OKC, certainly, but a team with a healthy Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook should at the very least make the postseason, which would be an improvement from last season. But the Bulls are coming off a 50-win season, and they haven’t missed the postseason since 2008. They’ve been good enough for long enough, and fans expect better than they got from the Bulls under Tom Thibodeau. Good luck with that.

Blogtable: Is Kobe the greatest Laker ever?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Favorite Kobe moment? | Should Kobe do Rio? | Greatest Kobe feat? | Greatest Laker ever?

VIDEOPlayers around the league show their appreciation for Kobe Bryant

> Is Kobe the greatest Laker of all time?  Explain.

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comOne’s first duty in answering any question of this sort is to be protective of the predecessors, whether it’s a ’68 Mustang supposedly being eclipsed by the 2015 model or in this case, Kobe Bryant elbowing ahead of Jerry West and Magic Johnson. It’s hard to argue against “The Logo,” one of the best and classiest acts in NBA history, but Bryant – with his rings, his stats totals and his MVP trophy – has climbed higher among the game’s notables, which moves him past West as a swell Laker. I’m holding firm on Johnson, though, as the face of that franchise. We can quibble about the “greatest” definition, but Johnson was remarkable as a 6-foot-9 point guard who helped revive both the Lakers and the league with his team play and his smile. He also is my point guard on any by-position all-time team I put together and Bryant is a backup. So that splits my final hair here.

Fran Blinebury, You can put him in the conversation and I’ll listen. But Kareem and Magic are at the top of my list. One is the all-time leading NBA scorer with six MVPs and the other was the spark that lit the flame on five championship teams, nine Finals appearances in 12 years and began the modern era of the Lakers as the league’s most dominant franchise.

Scott Howard-Cooper, Jerry West is. He was a star as a player and a star as a general manager. It would be hard to find anyone who  impacted any organization in any sport so much. West had massive roles in championships on different levels. He coached the team as well. There is no reason to diminish anything Kobe has accomplished. But “The Logo” is the greatest Laker.

Shaun Powell, Magic Johnson is No. 1. Kareem is No. 2 only because he spent a chunk of his prime in Milwaukee. Then Kobe. By giving Kobe the nod over Jerry West and Elgin Baylor speaks plenty about the brilliance of Kobe’s career, because Elgin and Jerry were certainly no slouches (from what I understand; they were before my time). Kobe got buckets, was clutch and raised his game in the post-season. And aside from injuries, he was all that for two decades.

John Schuhmann, He’s clearly on the short list, but I can’t put him ahead of Magic Johnson, who was the most important player on all five championship teams he played on, had one of the three greatest Finals performances of all-time (1980, Game 6), and was obviously more of a galvanizing force for the Lakers, making his teammates better. I’ll always wonder if Kobe could have won more if he trusted his teammates just a little bit more.

Sekou Smith, NBA.comNo. 1? Wow. That’s a tough one. I can’t go there, though, having lived through the Showtime Lakers era and seeing the impact Magic had on not only Lakers fans, but fans everywhere. Kobe’s right up there among the franchise’s greatest players ever, and perhaps even a 1A to Magic, but I can’t give him that No. 1 spot ahead of Magic.

Ian Thomsen, I’m going to say that Kobe rates No. 1, based on his longevity and the fact that he never had so much talent around him as Magic Johnson had in Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, James Worthy, Bob McAdoo, Byron Scott and the rest. Kobe led from a more vulnerable position, in a league that was more competitive top-to-bottom.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blog: I think he’s top three. To me, the top trio is Kobe, Magic Johnson and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. And within that trio, I’d have Kareem third. Magic and Kobe may each have five titles, but when you consider their places in history, Magic came into the NBA at a time when it was struggling, and he helped transform it into the international behemoth it is today. Purely as a basketball player, Kobe may retire with the better career numbers, but being a Laker isn’t only what happens on the court. And in that sense, to me I don’t know if anyone will ever surpass Magic.

Blogtable: The greater Kobe feat — winning with Shaq or without him?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Favorite Kobe moment? | Should Kobe do Rio? | Greatest Kobe feat? | Greatest Laker ever?

VIDEOThe Lakers’ dominance in the 2000s began with the Kobe-Shaq pairing

> The greater Kobe feat: Winning three in a row with Shaq, or two in a row without him?

Steve Aschburner, The two championships without Shaquille O’Neal are more impressive from a strictly-Kobe perspective. He had lots of help in 2009 and 2010 too, notably Pau Gasol and coach Phil Jackson, but those two Lakers teams also caught lightning in a bottle with the likes of Andrew Bynum, Lamar Odom and Metta World Peace. Let’s put it this way, if Kobe hadn’t led L.A. to those titles and finished his career with two fewer rings, he wouldn’t be in any GOAT or Rushmore conversations outside Lakersland. And Shaq would forever lord it over him.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comIs it easier to run on one leg or two? No brainer. Everything is harder when you don’t have Shaq around to do the heavy lifting.

Scott Howard-Cooper, For a Bryant feat and not necessarily a Laker achievement, it’s the two without O’Neal. As much as Bryant has established himself as a star during the three peat, Shaq was still the player in the league no opponent could straight counter. When Kobe became the unquestioned leader of the best team, on the court and in the locker room, it meant something more because everything was on his shoulders. He had changed personally. His game had changed. And Bryant delivered to earn a credibility boost whether he needed one or not.

Shaun Powell, No doubt, the two without Shaq weigh more in my mind. Understand where Kobe was at in his career. He was blistered (and rightly so to a degree) for being a selfish gunner. He recovered from that and became a better team player and leader. In so many ways, Kobe was more important to the Lakers for those two titles than he was for the three titles.

John Schuhmann, Shaq’s numbers…

’00-02 playoffs (58 games): 29.8 PPG, 14.2 RPG, 2.4 BPG, 55% shooting.
’00-02 Finals (15 games): 35.9 PPG, 15.2 RPG, 2.9 BPG, 60% shooting.

So yeah, the two titles without him were the greater feat.

Sekou Smith, Winning titles without Shaq is easily the most impressive feat of Kobe’s career, in my eyes. Winning back-to-back titles without Shaq seems unfathomable, even after watching Kobe do it. His confidence, will — along with Pau Gasol‘s unbelievable work and Metta World Peace‘s game-saving heroics, among other things — and the joy it gave Kobe to win without the Shaq asterisk were undeniable during those title runs. It changed Kobe’s legacy to win those two other titles without Shaq.

Ian Thomsen, Two in a row without him: Because the NBA was a much more competitive league when Kobe was winning his final two championships. The Shaq-Kobe teams never faced any opponent as talented, experienced and competitive as the 2009-10 Celtics.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blogWithout. I always used to make the argument back then that Shaq should have been the MVP every season, which is no slight to Kobe — Shaq was such a unique combination of size and speed and athleticism that he was virtually unguardable. At the same time, Shaq had plenty of teammates who were not able to win titles with him. To Kobe’s credit, he figured out how to play alongside Shaq and be a potent one-two punch. 

Blogtable: Favorite Kobe moment?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Favorite Kobe moment? | Should Kobe do Rio? | Greatest Kobe feat? | Greatest Laker ever?

VIDEOKobe Bryant’s career top 10 plays

Kobe Bryant turns 37 Sunday and is heading into what could be his final NBA season.  What is your all-time favorite Kobe moment?

Steve Aschburner,“Favorite” unshackles this from any requirement that it be an “important” moment, so Bryant’s 81-point performance against Toronto on Jan. 22, 2006 would seem an easy choice. But I’d be lying because I didn’t see that game – I was covering the big clash that day between mediocre Philadelphia and middling Minnesota that Andre Iguodala won at the buzzer in Minneapolis. I only could watch highlights of Kobe’s explosion the next morning, and watching a succession of scoring plays in replay captures none of the excitement they pack live. So I’m split between Bill Russell handing Bryant his first Finals MVP trophy in 2009 and the precocious 1998 Bryant waving off Karl Malone from an attempted pick-and-roll in the All-Star Game so he could square up against Michael Jordan.

VIDEO: Kobe Bryant accepts the 2009 Finals MVP trophy

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comWhile it’s tempting and certainly valid to say Kobe scoring 81 on the Raptors, I’m going with Aug. 24, 2008. That’s the night at the Beijing Olympics when Kobe and Dwyane Wade led the USA Redeem Team to the gold medal. Bryant was a hungry, fierce, driven leader all through the campaign to put the U.S. back on top of the basketball world and he hit big buckets down the stretch to seal the gold medal. I was in the building and the feeling of accomplishment was palpable and probably as satisfying to Kobe as any of his five NBA titles.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comPicking 10 favorites would be hard enough, let alone a single all-timer, and this is No. 1 for the moment because there will be more candidates to come. But if I have to choose one, let’s go with April 12, 1997, at Utah. (So many historic Laker moments intersected with Salt Lake City and the Jazz.) A rookie Kobe Bryant air-balled four shots late in the fourth quarter and into overtime of Game 5 of the West semifinals of the playoffs. Those misses, one brick after another, clinched the Lakers’ 98-93 OT loss as Utah won the series 4-1. And he was unfazed. Bryant did not flinch, not when he got the ball as the bad misses piled up and not in the visitor’s locker room afterward as he faced the media scrutiny. It may not have been the indication of what was to come on the court, but that was the clear preview of the future of the Black Mamba personality. He would back down from nothing and nobody.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comThis isn’t the 81 points or a playoff moment or a Finals moment. But on the final regular-season game in 2003-04 (against the Portland Trail Blazers), Kobe made a pair of hellacious buzzer-beating 3-pointers that defy logic (they’re plays No. 2 and No. 1 here). The first happened at the end of regulation at the top of the key with Ruben Patterson (the Kobe Stopper) painted all over him. The second was at the end of the second overtime, when Kobe took an inbounds pass with one second left and turned almost completely around and splashed. He ran off the court and was hugged by Shaq, the last time that happened.

VIDEO: Relive Kobe Bryant’s best plays from the 2003-04 season

John Schuhmann, Bryant didn’t play great for most of the 2008 Olympics. LeBron James and Dwyane Wade did the heavy lifting for the U.S. through the first 7 1/2 games in Beijing, with Bryant often showing some frustration with his shooting struggles. But when things were tight down the stretch of the gold medal game against Spain, he hit the two biggest shots for the Americans, including the four-point play that essentially put them on the top of the medal stand. Considering the stakes, that was maybe the best game I’ve seen in person, and Bryant backed up his rep as the best closer in the game.

Sekou Smith, NBA.comThere are so many it’s hard to choose just one. But the 2003 All-Star Game at Philips Arena comes to mind because it illustrated to me what sort of a cut-throat competitor Kobe really was. It was supposed to be a celebratory send off for Michael Jordan, his final All-Star Game appearance and a chance to all of the current stars to bow down one last time to the G.O.A.T. Vince Carter gave up his spot in the Eastern Conference starting lineup and East coach Isiah Thomas had instructed his guys to show MJ the respect he deserved. Kobe, of course, ignored the memo. He wasn’t having it. He went at MJ like it was Game 7 of The Finals and didn’t let up, including knocking down two free throws to tie the game and send it into double-overtime (after Jordan had hit what could have been the game-winner for the East with 4.8 seconds to play). The Western Conference won by 10 in double overtime with Kevin Garnett winning MVP honors. Kobe could have missed one of those free throws on purpose or even decided against pulling up for the potential game-winning 3-pointer (he was fouled by Jermaine O’Neal with a second to play) and let me MJ have the storybook ending. But it’s just not who he was or is … it’s not in his blood.

VIDEO: Kobe vs. MJ in the 2003 All-Star Game

Ian Thomsen, In his second season, in 1998, Sports Illustrated sent me to Los Angeles to report what would be Kobe’s first cover story. He picked me up in a new SUV and we went to an outdoor patio restaurant for an interview that went on for hours. A woman sitting next to us asked if he played for the Lakers: He introduced himself, and she said she would be following his career. Much has changed since then, but not his confidence: That night at age 19 he was predicting basically everything he would go onto accomplish in basketball.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blogI was there at Madison Square Garden in 2009 when the Lakers came to town. It was an early February game, with the All-Star break a few weeks away, and despite it being two marquee franchises — the Lakers! Against the Knicks! — in the world’s most famous arena, there was no great sense of anything special hanging in the balance that night. And then Kobe went for 61 points, scoring from all over the place and setting a Madison Square Garden record. Even as provincial as Knicks fans can be, I’ll never forget the chants of “MVP! MVP!” for Kobe.

VIDEO: Kobe Bryant scores 61 on Knicks

Blogtable: Should Kobe play in the 2016 Olympics?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Favorite Kobe moment? | Should Kobe do Rio? | Greatest Kobe feat? | Greatest Laker ever?

VIDEOKobe Bryant talks after winning Olympic gold in 2012

> USA Basketball’s Jerry Colangelo says Kobe has a spot on the Rio Olympics roster if he wants it.  Should Kobe take it?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comColangelo also told us last week in Las Vegas that Kobe only wants a spot if he “earns it,” and without a mini-camp before the Team USA roster is announced, that suggests he needs to have an All-Star worthy season (not just vote tally). I don’t think he’ll be at or near peak Kobe levels, so I don’t think he should take a spot offered out of reputation or as a lovely parting gift. He already has two gold medals and USA Basketball has a backlog of younger guys who have earned the chance to shine in their primes.

Fran Blinebury, No. If he survives the 2015-16 NBA season healthy — a big if — he’ll be worn out and down. He’d only be a part-time contributor and potentially more of a distraction. The torch can be safely passed to Team USA’s abundance of front line talent that is willing and able to strike gold again.

Scott Howard-Cooper, No. He has earned the ceremonial victory lap, so no big deal if Kobe does take it. It will not be the difference between winning the gold or losing and he will represent the U.S. well. But it’s someone else’s turn. Let a young player with no Olympic experience have the final spot to get a feel for the unique stage as part of another Team USA building block.

Shaun Powell, I’d have no problem with Kobe being grandfathered, so to speak, a spot. He has been a good standing member of USA basketball and besides, being a 12th man on Team USA wouldn’t necessarily be depriving a more deserving player. Only a few players would be treated as such: LeBron James and Kevin Durant come to mind.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comOlympic team selection is about more than talent and even fit. The “equity” that guys have built up over the years means a lot to Jerry Colangelo, and it obviously helps to have a vet with the experience that Kobe has (including his big shots down the stretch of the 2008 gold medal game). But it would still take a serious turn-back-the-clock season for Kobe to deserve a spot on that roster with the talent (and international experience) the U.S. has at the guards and wings. Even if he’s relatively healthy, I have a hard time seeing that happening.

Sekou Smith, No, he should not take it. The only way Kobe should suit up in Rio is if he’s healthy and playing at an elite level when selection time comes. He doesn’t need to be in Rio waving a towel and cheering these guys on. He’s better than taking some hand out, even with all that he’s done over the years for USA Basketball. I totally understand where Jerry Colangelo is coming from where Kobe is concerned, but I remember the role he played on the 2012 team that won gold in London and that was Kobe’s opportunity to pass the torch to LeBron James, Carmelo Anthony, Kevin Durant and the other guys.

Ian Thomsen, If he earns it then yes – of course – he should be there. But you are not going to see Kobe humiliating himself like Willie Mays in the 1973 World Series. He is going to be ruthless in assessing his ability to contribute before he exposes himself at this stage of his career. He has nothing more to prove, and should play only if the Olympics will bring him joy.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blogYes. I understand USA Basketball doesn’t want to give anyone a roster spot based on what they’ve done in the past, but Kobe Bryant isn’t just anyone. Kobe is a two-time gold medalist who is arguably the greatest player of his generation. Does Kobe not taking part in the recent training camp and then being given a spot on the team set a bad precedent? I mean, I guess you can make that argument, as long as you also allow that Kobe is a once-in-a-lifetime player. And for players like that, exceptions need to be made.