Posts Tagged ‘Scott Skiles’

Morning Shootaround — July 29


VIDEO: Grizzlies ‘ecstatic’ to have Barnes in Memphis

NEWS OF THE MORNING

New Bucks arena bill passes in Wisconsin | Grizzlies feel Barnes is perfect fit | Orlando’s Gordon working on game

No. 1: New Bucks arena bill passes in Wisconsin New ownership took over the Milwaukee Bucks in 2014, and they began making over the franchise, changing personnel, uniforms, and beginning a campaign to get some public funding for a new arena. After a few months of public posturing and conversation with local and state lawmakers, the state assembly passed a bill yesterday that seems to guarantee the Bucks future in Milwaukee

Almost seven months after Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker proposed public money for the new Milwaukee Bucks arena, the Assembly Tuesday returned a $250 million bill to him, completing the last of the legislative challenges the presidential candidate laid out this year.

The Assembly approved the bill on a bipartisan vote of 52-34, leaving a healthy margin to spare because of absent lawmakers. The measure passed the Senate 21-10 on a bipartisan vote on July 15 and so it now goes to Walker.

While campaigning at two South Philadelphia cheesesteak joints, the governor said he would sign the much-revised measure, calling it a good deal for Wisconsin.

“It’s critical not only for those who love sports, but the main reason I got into it was because it protected state revenues,” Walker said, citing the income taxes Wisconsin would lose if the team leaves the state. “That just creates a big hole for everything else. … This was really about protecting the taxpayers of the state.”

Next up for the team is working out a land sale with Milwaukee County and getting approval for the arena from the Milwaukee Common Council. Speaking at the Capitol after the Assembly vote, Bucks head coach Jason Kidd and team president Peter Feigin praised the deal and said the remaining pieces could be assembled in time for construction to start in the fall.

“I’m not overly confident, but I’m confident,” Feigin said of reaching the land deal and getting city approval.

After months in which the measure struggled to gain support, the Assembly debate was anticlimactic, lasting about an hour and including not even a single floor speech by an opponent. In the end, 35 Republicans and 17 Democrats voted for the measure.

Two lawmakers from the greater Milwaukee area, Democrat Daniel Riemer of Milwaukee and Republican Adam Neylon of Pewaukee, missed the vote Tuesday while they were in Turkey as part of a cultural exchange for legislators but said they would have both voted against it. Regardless of party, most lawmakers from in and around the city voted for the proposal, except Democrats David Bowen and Jonathan Brostoff of Milwaukee and Republicans Chris Kapenga of Delafield and David Craig of Big Bend.

Assembly Speaker Robin Vos (R-Rochester) kicked off the final debate by thanking both Democratic and Republican lawmakers and stressing that he believed that state taxpayers would get a good return on their share of the total subsidy package. Doing nothing would leave the city and state with a “black eye” and the loss of a promising team, he said.

“It is cheaper for us to pass this bill than defeat it and let the team leave,” Vos said.

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No. 2: Grizzlies feel Barnes is perfect fit After a few years of playoff runs but not being able to get past the Conference finals, the Memphis Grizzlies have made moves to strengthen their bench this season. And perhaps the most important addition to the Grizzlies may be forward Matt Barnes, who the Grizz feel is a perfect match for their grit and grind mentality…

“This is a whole – not just team but city – with my ideal, a grind mentality,” Barnes said Tuesday. “I’ve been on teams that run-and-gun and dunk and shoot a lot of 3’s, but I’ve never been on a team that everyone has the same mindset I do. That’s very exciting from a player’s standpoint.”

The Grizzlies acquired Barnes, 35, from the Charlotte Hornets last month in exchange for guard Luke Ridnour.

Charlotte had picked up Barnes along with center Spencer Hawes less than two weeks earlier in a trade that sent guard Lance Stephenson to the Los Angeles Clippers. Barnes averaged 10.1 points, 4 rebounds and 1.5 assists while playing a career-high 29.9 minutes per game with the Clippers last season.

Grizzlies general manager Chris Wallace said the 35-year-old Barnes “wears his heart on his sleeve,” an approach that could make the 6-foot-7 forward an ideal fit for a franchise that relies on hustle and defense.

“If there’s any player that was destined to be a Grizzly, it’s Matt Barnes,” Wallace said. “He’s a guy that we had our dustups with when he was on the other side of the fence – particularly the Clippers – but now he’s one of us and we’re ecstatic to have him.”

The Grizzlies actually drafted Barnes in the second round in 2002, but they immediately traded him to Cleveland in a draft-night deal. Barnes has been moving around ever since. He’s played for both Los Angeles franchises as well as Sacramento, New York, Philadelphia, Golden State, Phoenix and Orlando.

This latest move has his twin sons somewhat confused.

“They’re just like, ‘Daddy, so do you not like DeAndre (Jordan), Chris (Paul) and Blake (Griffin) anymore?’ ” Barnes said. “I’m like, ‘No, they’re still my friends. They’re the enemy when the ball goes up.’ I’m a competitor. I have friends on the other team obviously, but for 48 minutes my only friends are my teammates.”

Barnes irritates opponents with his tenacious defense and fiery personality. The Grizzlies already have one of the league’s top defenders in guard Tony Allen. Having both could make the Grizzlies even peskier.

“The best compliment you can give somebody is that you just don’t like playing against him,” Grizzlies coach Dave Joerger said. “Matt’s a guy we just did not like playing against. … We want those kinds of guys on our team.”

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No. 3: Orlando’s Gordon working on game The Orlando Magic entered a rebuilding campaign a few years ago and have amassed quite a collection of young talent, from Elfrid Payton and Victor Oladipo to Nikola Vucevic and Tobias Harris. Another player showing promise is Aaron Gordon, who followed his rookie season with a big Summer League performance, and is still looking to improve, writes NBA.com’s Fran Blinebury

His rookie season became a virtual washout almost from the moment last November when Gordon fractured a bone in his left foot and missed two months. Despite the first double-double of his career in April, there was plenty of work to be done.

But it was a different, a more comfortable, a more confident Gordon who took the floor for the Magic at the Orlando Summer League and began to show why he was the No. 4 overall pick in the 2014 draft.

Gordon beat defenders off the dribble and finished with power dunks. He pulled up off the dribble and stroked jumpers like they were his calling card. He even nailed 3-pointers.

Put all those newfound skills together with the 6-foot-9, 230-pound body, explosive leaping ability and assorted athletic moves and Gordon is a candidate to make big strides next season.

“Last year there was a lot of being uncomfortable,” Gordon said. “This year I’m a lot more comfortable. So it’s easy for me.”

The transformation was only “easy” because Gordon has logged countless hours of hard work inside the Magic practice gym at Amway Center and on the West Coast near his home in San Jose, Calif.

“A lot of people don’t see the work that Aaron puts in,” said Mario Elie, one of the new members of Scott Skiles‘ Orlando coaching staff. “When I first came here in June, he’s in the gym working on his shot. I’m in the office all day. He’ll go home and come back to work on his game again and I’m not surprised he was one of the top scorers in the Summer League.

“He’s a young player who wants to be great. He has the right frame of mind, the right attitude,” Elie said. “He’s like a sponge. You tell him to do something, he goes out and does it. He can be a great leader for this young ball club. At 19 years old? This guy It’s fantastic to see.”

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SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: LeBron James answered questions from fans on Twitter … Festus Ezeli moved from Africa to California to become a doctor. Instead he became an NBA champCraig Hodges has been let go as coach of the Knicks’ D-League team … Damien Wilkins is hoping to build off of his experience with the Pan-Am team …

Report: Magic get Napier from Heat for 2nd round pick


VIDEO: Shabazz Napier shares some of the lessons learned from his rookie season in Miami

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Shabazz Napier‘s time with the Miami Heat is up.

He’s headed to Orlando in exchange for a second round pick, as first reported by Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports, ending his brief tenure with the Heat after just one season. A first round Draft pick in 2014, and the player LeBron James declared his favorite heading into that Draft, Napier will join a crowded point guard situation in Orlando.

Orlando already has a budding young talent in starter Elfrid Payton and a veteran backup in C.J. Watson. Napier averaged 5.8 points, 2.5 assists and 2.2 rebounds in just 19.8 minutes per game for the Heat, who have three point guards — Goran Dragic, Mario Chalmers and Tyler Johnson — remaining on their roster.

The Heat wills save money ($1.3 million salary for Napier) and give themselves some roster flexibility by making the move. The Magic, meanwhile, fill out their point guard rotation with yet another first round talent and a young player they can mold in whatever way coach Scott Skiles wants to in his first season on the job.

 

 

Blogtable: Assessing the new coaches

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Under pressure in The Finals? | Could Wade, Heat split up? | Assessing new coaches



VIDEOCan Scott Skiles turn the Magic around after several awful seasons?

> The Bulls, Magic and Pelicans all got new coaches in the last five days. Which of those hires will still be on the bench in five years?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: I’m thinking Fred Hoiberg still will be coaching Chicago in five years. Obviously Scott Skiles has a reputation for flaming out one way or another in shorter time frames, and the Magic might need a different type of coach once they reliably become a different type of team. Alvin Gentry didn’t quite last five seasons with Phoenix and might not in New Orleans, depending on Anthony Davis‘ long-term whereabouts or the bruising he and his Pelicans take in the West. Meanwhile, I expect Hoiberg to do well enough to stick around on his own merits, and I also think Chicago goes from contender to rebuilder on his watch, which will buy him more time. Bulls management has burned through a few good coaches in recent years and might want to show the public it’s them, not them who are at fault.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: I’m going with “Mayor” Fred Holberg. He’s been the apple of Gar Forman and John Paxson’s eye for quite some time and they’ll give him all the time to succeed. Scott Skiles‘ personality tends to have an expiration date of less than five years and I’m not sure Alvin Gentry is going to take the Pelicans to the next level, as is hoped.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Fred Hoiberg in Chicago for sure and Alvin Gentry in New Orleans maybe, but not Scott Skiles in Orlando. Very good basketball mind, but unless his personality has changed, that won’t play for five seasons. It’s easy to see Hoiberg as a very good fit for the Bulls, and Chicago has the roster in place to keep winning for years. Similarly, if Gentry delivers the up-tempo style of play New Orleans wants and he has used in other stops as a head coach and assistant, and if he connects with Anthony Davis, the Pelicans have a lot of potential into the next decade.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: Hoiberg will still be in Chicago. Alvin Gentry‘s time in New Orleans will last as long as Anthony Davis‘ and I suspect Davis will sign his next contract elsewhere. And we all know Scott Skiles comes with an expiration date because that’s his history, wearing out his welcome after roughly 15 wonderfully productive minutes. Well, OK, 20.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Fred Hoiberg. Bulls brass is under a lot of scrutiny for the way they handled the dismissal of a highly regarded coach who brought them, by far, the most success they’ve had since Michael Jordan retired the second time. So, even if Hoiberg struggles at times, they’ll have to be patient, or be forced to admit that they made a mistake by firing Tom Thibodeau. Furthermore, Hoiberg is only 42 years old, nine years younger than Scott Skiles and 18 years younger than Alvin Gentry. He should be in it for the long haul.

Sekou Smith, NBA.comI’d love to see Alvin Gentry, one of my favorite people in the league, have a long and prosperous tenure in New Orleans. But things have never really been stable there for whoever is coaching that team. I wouldn’t bet the kids’ lunch money on Scott Skiles lasting that long in Orlando. So, Fred Hoiberg wins by default. That’s mostly because he was the long-rumored and hand-picked choice of a Bulls front office that just bounced a coach (Tom Thibodeau) who piled up 50-win seasons on the regular. They almost have to give Hoiberg one of those Brad Stevens-like deals, if for no other reason than to justify the move.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: Alvin Gentry has a chance to build the kind of relationship with Anthony Davis that could keep him in New Orleans. He has the experience and the personality to make it work: To be on the same page with both his front office as well as with his best player. Gentry’s potential to build a working rapport with Davis is crucial. The Pelicans made a terrific hire.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: Not Scott Skiles — I think he’ll make the Magic a playoff team but to me he’s clearly a coach who takes a team from point A to point B, but not much further. As affable as Alvin Gentry is, he also has a track record of not being much of a defensive coach, and I’m not sure how that will fly in the Western Conference. Which leaves Fred Hoiberg, a former Bulls player, who has been rumored to be part of the Bulls plans forever and has long-lasting relationships with the Bulls front office. I’m not sure if the Bulls will actually be better under Hoiberg than they were under Tom Thibodeau, but the front office relationship can’t be worse.

Morning shootaround — May 30




VIDEO: NBA TV analysts discuss Scott Skiles return to Orlando

NEWS OF THE MORNING
Wade could test Heat | Hoiberg on tap | Skiles returns to Orlando | Harden wants help | Irving welcomes rest

No. 1: Wade could force Riley’s hand — What price loyalty? Over the years while team president Pat Riley has shuffled the roster to keep the Heat in the championship mix, franchise player Dwyane Wade has frequently made financial sacrifices to make it all work. He gave up money to get LeBron James and Chris Bosh to Miami. He took a shorter deal last summer after James left and the team gave Bosh a big, long-term deal. Now it could be time for Wade to expect his payoff and Ira Winderman of the South Florida Sun-Sentinel says it could prove a challenge to Riley:

Amid the uncertainty of the team’s roster situation last June, Wade opted out of the final two years that was left on that contract. Then, once LeBron James elected to return to the Cleveland Cavaliers in free agency, Wade re-upped with the Heat on a two-year, $31 million deal that included a $16 million salary for 2015-16 at his option. That contract left more than $10 million on the table from what he otherwise would have collected by not opting out last June.

At the same time, Heat center Chris Bosh, who also is represented by Thomas, secured a maximum free-agent offer from the Houston Rockets, which then led to Bosh agreeing to a five-year, $118 million package with the Heat that began this past season.

Now, with James playing for a championship in Cleveland, it appears Wade might be seeking the type of significant deal he did not secure last summer.

“Several guys opted out of their contract last year,” Thomas said. “Obviously Dwyane wasn’t in a position that Chris was in, in terms of having another team offer a maximum deal. But the reality of this is he’s played his entire career for Miami. He’s done wonderful things in terms of the five titles that they played for, winning three of them.

“He’s had a tremendous career, and we’re just trying to see whether or not there’s room to continue that.”

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No. 2: Bulls ready to make Hoiberg coach — In a city known for plenty of political secrets and more than its share of back room dealing, nobody is surprised that the Bulls have Fred Hoiberg lined up to the be their next head coach, replacing the fired Tom Thibodeau. Joe Cowley of the Chicago Sun Times says its only a matter of Hoiberg making things official:

“It’s just when Fred [Hoiberg] says yes to them, not if,’’ the source said. “This is a year in the works.’’

Coaches – both college and at the NBA level – are actually very much dialed into one another, and there weren’t many in either profession that didn’t feel like the Bulls and Hoiberg would be a match “sooner than later.’’

With the NBA Finals between Cleveland and Golden State set to start on Thursday, the Bulls could have the Hoiberg matter signed, sealed and delivered before then.

The only possible hiccup out there seems to be the Minnesota Timberwolves, who also covet Hoiberg. Hoiberg played for the Timberwolves from 2003-05, and then was an assistant general manager for the franchise, seemingly on the fast track to become the general manager. When that never materialized, he went into coaching prior to the 2010 season, and has turned Iowa State into a prominent NCAA program.

According to sources, he’s actually been on the Bulls’ radar since late last year as a Plan B, and as the relationship between now former coach Tom Thibodeau and the front office disintegrated as the year has gone on, he was Plan A with no realistic options following him.

That’s what made the press conference with VP of basketball operations John Paxson and general manager Gar Forman such good theater on Thursday, as the two had to do their best to act like it will be a vast coaching search.

“We’ve got certain criteria that we’re going to be looking for in the next coach,’’ Forman said. “But we’re not going to put ourselves in a box – ‘had to be a head coach, had to be an assistant coach, what level they’ve coached on’ – we’re really going to look for the right fit.

“And I went through some of those things that I’ve talked about. Obviously someone that can lead, but we’ve got to get somebody that can communicate at a high level, that’s got great knowledge of the game, obviously experience is a plus, as far as coaching is concerned. If they’ve been a head coach even more so, but we’re not going to limit our search in any way.’’

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No. 3: Skiles hopes to make more Magic in Orlando — It took Scott Skiles and Magic president Alex Martins some time to make sure they were getting back together for all the right reasons, but the former point guard made his return to Orlando official and now he picks up the rebuilding process, says Josh Robbins of the Orlando Sentinel:

In reality, however, the Magic first had to overcome a significant obstacle, a hurdle in Skiles’ mind.

“I wanted to make sure I was being hired because they thought I could coach, not because I was someone that was affiliated with the organization in the past,” Skiles said.

That concern, Skiles explained, started to fade away once he and the team’s general manager, Rob Hennigan, held a seven-hour talk in Skiles’ suburban Orlando home in recent weeks.

“The first conversation I had with him, I made it very clear that our first priority was to get to know each other on a personal level,” Hennigan said. “The conversation really sort of cascaded from there. I didn’t bring up one time that it was a bonus that he played here or has familiarity with the area and the fan base. That was truly just gravy.”

Throughout a press conference late Friday afternoon, Hennigan and Martins sought to combat the widespread perception that the team hired Skiles because of his past ties to the franchise.

Martins said Hennigan provided him with a list of potential hires shortly after the season ended, and Hennigan started to go through each name one-by-one. When Hennigan arrived at Skiles’ name and started to speak, Martins stopped Hennigan and told him that Hennigan had to arrive at his own conclusions.

Martins added that he spoke with Skiles just twice between the end of the regular season and Friday. The first time lasted just several minutes and was meant to inform Skiles that Hennigan would be in contact. The second time occurred Thursday, when Skiles, Martins and Hennigan traveled to Grand Rapids, Mich., to speak with the DeVos family.

“I truly wanted this to be an objective decision about his coaching ability,” Martins said Friday. “I didn’t want my personal past with Scott and my experience with him of having been a player here and our relationship to enter into that. We truly had to find the right coach for this team.”

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No. 4: Harden would welcome playmaker — One look at a worn-away, worn-down, worn-out James Harden at the end of the Western Conference finals was all that was needed to tell you that the MVP candidate could not be expected to carry so much of the load if he is going to carry the Rockets to their goal of winning a championship. At the team’s exit interviews on Friday, Harden confirmed that he would welcome the offseason acquisition of a playmaking point guard so the Rockets can take the next step forward. Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle has the details:

He said he “definitely” would like to see the Rockets add another playmaker to take some of that responsibility out of his hands.
“That’s one of the conversations me and Daryl are going to have (and) the coaches,” Harden said. “That’s one of the pieces to add, but that’s later conversations. We’ll be all right. We’re very confident in the group we have. This summer we have to work hard and be ready for next year.”

Still, Harden said the Rockets could benefit from keeping more of their core together. Of the 15 players on the Rockets final 2013-14 roster, seven were gone by the start of the next season. Just five players on roster that faced the Trail Blazers were around by the start of this season’s playoffs.

He called keeping the Rockets’ nucleus together “very important” and spoke of the benefits of growing together.

“If we get Pat (Beverley) and D-Mo (Donatas Motiejunas) back healthy, we’re a really good team, a really deep team,” Harden said.

“We’re pretty good with what we have, maybe add a piece or so. But we made it this far with a couple of our guys injured and banged up. Put those guys together and we’ll be a lot better.”

Harden said he intends to work on his “entire game,” and cited “different aspects of shooting, coming off pin-downs, my ball-handling, not turning the basketball over so much.  Post-up game.”

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No. 5: Break before Finals suits Irving — The rest of basketball world may not be happy with more than a week break before the start of the NBA Finals. But Cavs mending point guard Kyrie Irving says the break before taking on the Warriors is just what the doctor ordered, according to our own Steve Aschburner:

“I’m participating in everything,” Irving said after the Cavaliers’ workout Friday. “We just had a light practice today. The next few days, we’ll definitely ramp it up, I assume. I’m in everything. So I’m ready to go.”

That’s a departure from the previous three rounds. Irving sprained his right foot early in the first round against Boston, which, as he continued to play on it, led to a compensating injury in his left knee. That tendinitis limited him against Chicago and caused him to skip Games 2 and 3 against Atlanta in the East finals.

The three-time All Star, 23, did at least travel with the Cavs to Atlanta to start the series, then took a side trip to Florida with Cleveland team physician Dr. Richard Parker to consult with noted sports orthopedist Dr. James Andrews. They came back with a tweaked treatment plan, which Irving credited for helping him play in the Game 4 clincher Tuesday. He scored 16 points in 22 minutes in the 30-point blowout.

Irving’s production hasn’t dropped off entirely, even though he has lacked his signature turbocharged quickness, along with the trust in his body. In 12 games, he has averaged 18.7 points, 3.3 rebounds and 3.7 assists, and his player-efficiency rating of 20.3 is within his PER range of 20.1 to 21.5 through his first four NBA seasons.

But going through the “will he or won’t he?” uncertainty with the knee (the foot isn’t much of an issue anymore) took a mental toll on Irving. So did the layers of treatment, even as he was trying to properly prepare in case he did play.

“You know, being hurt sucks. Especially in a time like that,” Irving said. “So it was just a learning experience, to say the least. But it was a test of my will. I was very resilient in what I was doing. Hopefully going forward I don’t have any relapse.”

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SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Klay Thompson could miss at least several days of practice before The Finals after diagnosis of a concussion….Dwight Howard will miss the 2015-16 season opener after getting upgraded to a flagrant foul in the Western Conference finals closer…Warriors Bogut says Dwight Howard crosses the line with physical play…Alvin Gentry is the first candidate to get a second interview with the Pelicans…Wes Matthews leaves the door open in Portland….Thabo Sefolosha says New York police have damaged his reputation

Orlando hires original-Magic player Skiles as coach

HANG TIME BIG CITY – The Orlando Magic are going back for the future.

The Magic announced today that they hired former Magic point guard Scott Skiles as their next coach, replacing interim coach James Borrego, who himself replaced fired coach Jacque Vaughn.

According to a release from the Magic, Skiles’ history developing young players was a major factor in his landing the Magic job.

“Scott clearly distinguished himself as a tremendous fit,” Magic GM Rob Hennigan said. “Our young roster will benefit greatly from Scott’s extensive head coaching experience and commitment to teaching smart, physical, unselfish basketball. We believe in Scott’s ability to establish a culture of winning habits and accountability that will help guide our team in a positive direction.”

“As we began our search, our internal discussions centered on finding a head coach with a solid resume of NBA head coaching experience, great leadership qualities, a motivating communication style, and someone with a strong strategic acumen,” Magic CEO Alex Martins said. “We feel Scott brings a balanced approach in all those qualities and we look forward, with great confidence, to him leading our young men in helping us reach our collective goal of sustainable success.”

As 13 seasons as a head coach with the Suns, Bulls and Bucks, Skiles has accumulated a NBA regular-season record of 443-433 (.506), along with six playoff appearances. The same qualities that made Skiles effective as a player have marked his tenures on the sideline: a fiery demeanor, a relentless work ethic. But Skiles’ intensity has also been his gift and his curse – at each stop along the way, his terms have left some in the organizations looking for a breath of fresh air.

In Orlando, Skiles will have one of the NBA’s youngest rosters to mold. Orlando’s dynamic backcourt of Elfrid Payton and Victor Oladipo appears set for years to come, and restricted free agent forward Tobias Harris should be a hot property this summer, although the Magic have plenty of cap room to keep him. Productive big man Nikola Vucevic agreed to a long-term extension, and the Magic also hold the fifth pick in the 2015 Draft.

Skiles helped the Orlando Magic get off the ground in 1989 as their point guard, playing for the Magic for five seasons. Now, as the twelfth head coach in franchise history, Skiles has the chance to mold this group into the kind of teams he’s built at his previous stops – gritty and gutty, and focused on defense.

The rebuilding effort in Orlando has taken a few years to find its footing and get off the ground, but they’re moving in the right direction. Now it’s up to Skiles to push them into a perennial playoff team.

Morning shootaround — May 28


VIDEO: Highlights from Game 5 of the Western Conference finals

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Thompson develops concussion-like symptoms | Reports: Magic, Pelicans interested in Skiles | Report: Bulls mull firing Thibodeau

No. 1: Thompson develops concussion-like symptoms after Game 5 — Golden State Warriors shooting guard Klay Thompson took an accidental knee to the head by Houston’s Trevor Ariza late in Game 5. He suffered a cut, from which blood was coming out of, and had to leave the game, but eventually did return. After the Warriors wrapped up their Finals berth, however, Thompson said he wasn’t feeling well and developed concussion-like symptoms. ESPN.com has more on the story:

Golden State Warriors shooting guard Klay Thompson developed concussion-like symptoms after Wednesday night’s series-clinching Game 5 win over the Houston Rockets, the team announced.

“Klay Thompson was evaluated by the Warriors medical staff immediately after suffering an injury during tonight’s game and was put through a concussion evaluation,” the team said. “At the time he did not show any concussion-like symptoms. After the game he began to not feel well and developed concussion-like symptoms. He will continue to be evaluated by the team’s medical staff tonight.”

Thompson said in a televised postgame interview that he was “feeling a little dizzy,” before adding, “We got a week off — or close to it. I’ll be all right. I’ll get my health back.”

The injury occurred when Ariza, caught in the air on a shot fake, hit the right side of Thompson’s head with his right knee. Ariza was called for a personal foul on the play.

Blood coming out of the cut prevented Thompson from checking back in to the game upon his return to the Warriors’ bench. He ended up needing three stitches to close the wound.

“He was definitely shaken up. We’ll evaluate him tomorrow. It was a bizarre night for him,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said in his postgame news conference before Thompson’s concussion-like symptoms were revealed. “Huge first half that really got us going, and then I left him in too long, he got his fourth foul and I thought I’d buy one possession, see if we could get him a shot, and when he picks up his fifth and when I do bring him back, he immediately gets hurt and out for the rest of the night.

“The break will be good for him. It’ll probably be good for all the guys with the run we’ve been on, but especially for Klay.”

 


VIDEO: Thompson suffers accidental blow to head in Game 5

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Blogtable: Coaching Carousel

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Playoff injuries | Lottery team(s) in 2015-16 playoffs? | Coaching carousel



VIDEO: Inside the NBA on Monty Williams’ firing

> We have a coaching vacancy in New Orleans (and possibly in Denver and Orlando, too). Who are the best candidates out there, and which job is most attractive?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: I don’t think there’s any big hire just waiting to happen. Our man Sekou Smith is a believer in John Calipari for New Orleans, though I remain skeptical about the college peacocks who try to tackle this league. I think Scott Skiles would be a great fit in Orlando, but the Magic allegedly are waiting to see if they can scoop up Tom Thibodeau if he and Bulls management get divorced (with the Bulls eyeballing Iowa State’s Fred Hoiberg). Monty Williams and Scott Brooks are in some conversations, though they might prefer to get paid to decompress. I’m wondering if we’re ever going to see Jeff Van Gundy coaching again. Let’s not forget top assistant coaches like Cleveland’s Tyronn Lue and Miami’s David Fizdale. As for the best job of the three currently open, that’s a Big Easy – only one offers the privilege of coaching Anthony Davis, the NBA’s Next Big Thing. Fly, Pelicans, fly.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Another layup.  The best job available is coaching Anthony Davis as he moves into the MVP phase of his career.  If the Bulls, as everyone expects, are dumb enough to show Tom Thibodeau the door, he’s just the guy to get the Pelicans to actually play defense and put some sharp edges on A.D.’s game.  The top candidates will be Alvin Gentry, Mike D’Antoni and Michael Malone and probably Fred Hoiberg out of the college ranks.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Since Monty Williams is suddenly, unexpectedly “out there”: Monty Williams. And obviously anyone who works, has worked for or may one day work for the Spurs. Automatic hire, right? Also, the list changes when/if the Bulls break up with Tom Thibodeau. Keep an eye on Scott Brooks, Michael Malone, Tyronn Lue, Alvin Gentry and Adrian Griffin. They are all attractive jobs, a pretty atypical statement for teams changing coaches. Going to New Orleans is walking into a playoff team with an All-Star centerpiece. Denver can be good next season and, depending on the offseason moves, push into the postseason conversation. Orlando has an attractive foundation and the chance to coach in the Eastern Conference with an easier path to the playoffs.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: The Pelicans job comes with The Next Tim Duncan and therefore has that going for it. But: I’m not sold on Anthony Davis re-signing with New Orleans and there are questions about management and ownership. If the Orlando job comes open, that could be the most attractive because there’s growth on the roster, no pressure to win right away, the benefit of playing in the weak East, another lottery pick coming and a smart GM in charge.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comIf Tom Thibodeau’s days in Chicago are over, he should be the No. 1 candidate. Scott Brooks would help a young team (like Orlando) develop, Mike Malone could straighten out a team defensively, and assistants David Fizdale and Tyronn Lue look ready to sit in the big chair. Anthony Davis obviously makes the New Orleans job most attractive. And because the Pelicans ranked 22nd defensively and didn’t get Davis the ball enough, there’s room for immediate improvement.

Sekou Smith, NBA.comThere are dozens of quality candidates for these openings, many of them serving in the same role as the reigning Coach of the Year, Atlanta’s Mike Budenholzer, did for years alongside Gregg Popovich. So it’s not hard for a quality organization to identify good candidates. It’s what they do once they have done so that matters. Too often ownership and management get caught up in the name game when they should do what the Memphis Grizzlies did in identifying a guy like Dave Joerger, a longtime assistant ready to take that next step, and making it happen. The best of the best out there right now would be Cleveland’s Tyronn Lue (he who saved the season over the weekend by doing David Blatt’s job) and the Orlando job is the perfect match. If the college route is your preference, John Calipari and New Orleans is a no-brainer, if you want to keep Anthony Davis in the Big Easy.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: The highly-coachable Anthony Davis makes the Pelicans’ job No. 1. If you’re seeking a proven winner then go with Mike D’Antoni (four seasons of 54 or more wins in Phoenix), who will heighten the market value of your players like no other coach. If it’s a new look you want, then consider Ettore Messina, the Italian winner of four Euroleague championships who served as the Spurs’ lead assistant this season. You should also consider Scott Brooks, Alvin Gentry, Nate McMillan, Scott Skiles and Spurs assistant Jim Boylen. (And Tom Thibodeau, if the imminent rumors turn out to be true.)

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: Well, of course the most attractive candidate is probably the guy still coaching right now that everyone assumes will be a free agent by July. I don’t want to name any names, out of respect for the living, but his name rhymes with Dom Dhibodeau. There’s also the complement of assistants ready for their big shot, like Atlanta’s Kenny Atkinson, or a D-League mastermind like Nate Bjorkgren, or a college coach like Billy Donovan, who already got swept up by the Thunder. The best gig out there? That’s easy: Which team is it that has Anthony Davis? New Orleans? OK, I’ll go with them.

Orlando fires Vaughn, boosts Borrego, considers Skiles?

It’s a lot like your refrigerator when you lose power: if you keep the door closed, most of the stuff inside will last. But open that door a bit too often and …

That’s how it seemed to go with Jacque Vaughn, who worked his last game as head coach of the Orlando Magic Wednesday night in a 110-103 loss at San Antonio. Vaughn’s job status had been bandied about for more than a week, with speculation about the Magic either pulling the trigger quickly or trying to manage the situation until after the All-Star break. But once that happened, the whiff of failure took over and multiple outlets began reporting that Orlando would formally announce Vaughn’s dismissal Thursday afternoon.

The Magic, roused from their inaction, suddenly were acting swiftly:

Leaving only this:

Which led directly to a renewal of this:

Which had been out there dating back to last week, also via multiple outlets. Skiles, who lives in Orlando and had the best years of his 10-season NBA career with the Magic, is interested in the job, a league source told NBA.com. He coached all or parts of 13 seasons for Phoenix, Chicago and Milwaukee, posting a 443-433 record (.506) with six playoff appearances.

Other candidates beyond Borrego and Skiles might merit consideration depending on the direction Magic ownership intends to take. Some possibilities include former NBA head coaches George Karl, Mark Jackson, Nate McMillan and Michael Malone. The Magic are considered to have underachieved, lingering too long in the development phase with talented young players such as Nikola Vucevic, Victor Oladipo, Elfrid Payton, Evan Fournier, Tobias Harris, Mo Harkless, Andrew Nicholson and mostly injured lottery pick Aaron Gordon.

Vaughn, who will turn 40 next Wednesday, was 58-158 (.269) in two-plus seasons as Orlando head coach. In 12 NBA seasons as a 6-foot-1 point guard, the Kansas product averaged 4.5 points, 2.5 assists and 16.3 minutes, mostly as a backup with Utah, Atlanta, Orlando, New Jersey and San Antonio.

At 15-37, the Magic are last in the Southeast Division and only two spots from the bottom of the Eastern Conference, ahead of Philadelphia (11-39) and New York (10-39). Orlando has lost 16 of its last 18 games and 23 of 29 over the past eight weeks after making it to Dec. 10 with a 9-14 mark.

The Magic rank 25th in offensive rating (99.5) and 26th (106.1) in defensive rating, per NBA.com stats. They also rank next-to-last in opposing field-goal percentage (47.1 percent).

‘Free agent’ coaches seek work in ever-shifting job market

One by one, in something approximating inverse order of desirability, the names of NBA free agents have come off the proverbial big board. What began with the likes of LeBron James, Carmelo Anthony, Chris Bosh and Pau Gasol has dwindled now to fellows such as Andray Blatche, Dante Cunningham and Ekpe Udoh.

This game of offseason musical chairs is played for even more blood among coaches. There are fewer jobs to be had in the first place (five or six per team vs. 15 player positions), and it’s not nearly the meritocracy that it is for players. Abilities, work ethic and results matter less than connections or change for its own sake.

There are a lot of coaching free agents still on the board, both former head coaches and notable assistants. Among the former, we have George Karl, Jeff Van Gundy, Scott Skiles, Mike Woodson, Doug Collins, Vinny Del Negro, Mike Brown, Mike D’Antoni, Keith Smart, Avery Johnson, P.J. Carlesimo, Lawrence Frank and Maurice Cheeks.

The latter group, even bigger, includes Jack Sikma, Mario Elie, Terry Porter, T.R. Dunn, Igor Kokoskov, Scott Williams, Bill Peterson, Bernie Bickerstaff, Brian Hill, Bob Ociepka  and, hey, Rasheed Wallace. Actually, you could go dozens deep with solid coaching pros who once were in but now are out, the one place few of them want to be.

“There’s an old expression in the NBA, ‘Never get off the bus. Stay on the bus!’ ” said Jim Boylan, an NBA assistant for most of his 22 years in the league who survived a coaching change in Cleveland this offseason. “We all realize it too — it’s a privilege for us to be involved in the NBA and to coach athletes at this level.”

But it’s fleeting. Coaches face more scrutiny and grab more headlines when they’re fired, but their landings are often cushioned by seven-figure paychecks. Assistant coaches get flushed, and that six-figure salary — while comfy by most folks’ standards — doesn’t go quite so far when you account for the costs of multiple residences or constant moves.

Ociepka, who entered the league in the 1980s as a part-time volunteer scout after a storied career as a high school coach in the Chicago area, scrambled through five NBA teams in five years in the ’90s. Boylan and his wife, Jane, counted recently and realized they have owned or lived in 25 homes during his basketball career.

“It’s not a surprise when you’re an assistant coach in the NBA,” Sikma, the former Seattle and Milwaukee center, said recently. “You look at the number of staffs that have turned over in the last few years — it’s more of a constant than not. You know you’re probably going to have to bounce around a little bit.”

There are a multitude of factors for the turnover, most obvious the turnover at the top. When a coach gets fired, some or all of his staff typically gets shown the door with him. And there has been a LOT of turnover lately — nine new NBA coaches this summer, 13 such changes a year ago. Going back just five years, to the start of the 2009-10 season, only San Antonio (Gregg Popovich), Miami (Erik Spoelstra) and Dallas (Rick Carlisle) now have the same coaches. And both the Spurs’ and Mavericks’ staffs have changed considerably.

“Most people who are making the decisions probably have a narrow list going on, from relationships or what they’re looking for,” Sikma said. “It’s a transient line of work for sure. So you have to be quick on your feet.”

Here are glimpses of three assistant coaches whose dance cards are filled to varying degrees. Sikma would like very much to get back in after spending the past seven seasons working with now-retired Rick Adelman. Boylan beat the odds by surviving a coaching change in Cleveland, then beat them again when LeBron James’ yearning for home rocked the Cavaliers’ landscape. And Ociepka is at the point, after so many hirings and firings, where he might prefer more stable options. (more…)

Bucks Tunneling Way Out Of Mediocrity

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HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — When Milwaukee fans finish flipping through their “Half-Season In Review: 2012-13″ to relive their favorite J.J. Redick moments with the Bucks – it won’t take long – they can start calculating the true haul from trading away promising young forward Tobias Harris, guards Doron Lamb and Beno Udrih along with cash to Orlando not quite 4 1/2 months ago.

That won’t take long, either. With Redick headed to the Los Angeles Clippers along with Phoenix’s Jared Dudley, per Yahoo! Sports’ report Tuesday afternoon, and the Suns acquiring Clippers guard Eric Bledsoe and forward Caron Butler in the deal, the Bucks’ participation in the sign-and-trade portion with Redick earned them two second-round picks.

That’s it.

Which means that the package of players and money sent to Orlando in the deal that delivered Redick leaves Milwaukee now with guard Ish Smith, forward Gustavo Ayon and 28 games in which Redick, employed for his shooting, was about as inaccurate as at any point in his career.

He shot 40.3 percent for the Bucks, second only to his 39.1 in 2008-09 with Orlando, and his 31.8 percent from 3-point range dragged his career mark down to 39.0. Never getting into rhythm in a backcourt that already had issues with Brandon Jennings and Monta Ellis, Redick’s game slipped across the board. He also chafed with Bucks interim coach Jim Boylan near the end of the eighth-seeded team’s odd spit-out-the-bit season (4-16 after March 19, including the first-round sweep by Miami).

Even if Redick had thrived, he wasn’t returning to the Bucks. He wanted more money, and more opportunity to win, than they would or could offer. So salvaging two second-round picks was, well, something.

But it continued a week in which the Bucks are waving a white flag on their recent history of plucky mediocrity. The Jennings-Ellis backcourt is kaput; one or both of the shoot-first guards will be gone via free agency, Ellis after opting out of an $11 million deal for next season, Jennings if the offer sheet he signs runs too rich for Milwaukee’s blood.

Also, general manager John Hammond just took the youngest player in last week’s Draft, grabbing 18-year-old Greek forward Giannis Antetokounmpo at No. 15. Hammond raved about Big G’s almost limitless upside but no one expects him to help much on the floor next season. Center Samuel Dalembert will play elsewhere next season – he was in coach Scott Skiles’ doghouse before Skiles exited in January – and so will swingman Mike Dunleavy, a veteran backup who hit almost 43 percent of his 3-pointers in 2012-13 but is headed to the Bulls.

In drafting Antetokounmpo, Hammond talked of what really is a reality check for a team such as Milwaukee. “How are we going to get our next All-Star?” the GM said. The implication was that, no, the Bucks aren’t going to land marquee free agents. So they’ve got to rely on drafts and trades.

Or maybe just drafts, because this trade stuff – Harris was given all of 70 games to develop and still won’t turn 21 until July 15 – is looking a little shaky now too. The level-headed product of Tennessee averaged 17.3 points and 8.5 rebounds in 36.1 minutes in 27 games for the Magic.

If there’s a silver lining in Milwaukee aligning itself with Philadelphia, Boston and others already focused on the 2014 draft, it is this: Those rumors over the weekend about the Bucks’ interest in New York free agent J.R. Smith should stay mere rumors. Even if Milwaukee were ready to challenge for a top seed in the East, Smith would be a bad idea, a flashback through John Salmons, Corey Maggette, Stephen Jackson and even Bobby Simmons rolled into one.

For a fellow such as Smith, Milwaukee surely holds no appeal, either for where it is located or for where it is headed.