Posts Tagged ‘Scott Howard Cooper’

Unique 2008 draft continues to evolve


VIDEO: GameTime: What’s Next For Chicago?

Derrick Rose, Russell Westbrook and Kevin Love went in the top five, Brook Lopez the top 10, and that makes perfect sense. All were smart picks that at the very least paid a decent return on the investment and in one case, Westbrook to the Thunder, was the direct hit of a prospect with no experience as a point guard becoming a star as a point guard.

But Tim Reynolds was right in his Associated Press story. The 2008 draft has continued to veer toward the strange, most recently with Rose’s knee injury. And that’s beyond the typical perspective of time of some lottery picks going bad (Michael Beasley second to the Heat, Joe Alexander eighth to the Bucks) and later selections building successful careers (several).

Reynolds’ research:

  • Miami’s Mario Chalmers is the only one among the 60 picks on June 26, 2008, inside Madison Square Garden to win a title. He has played in 29 games in June, compared to 28 combined for everyone else in the draft class.
  • Only four first-rounders have even played in the Finals: Courtney Lee when he was with the Magic, Westbrook and Serge Ibaka with the Thunder and Beasley as part of his on-again, off-again (and back-on-again) relationship with the Heat.
  • Rose’s knee problems have become well documented. Lopez was sidelined the better part of two full years with foot issues. Knee problems cost Eric Gordon more than 100 games over two seasons. Danilo Gallinari and his knees. That’s four lottery picks.
  • Only 10 first-round choices have at least 30 starts in 2014-15. Fifteen are averaging double-figures in scoring. Six have not played in the NBA this season, although it is also noted that rate of attrition of 24 in the NBA now is good compared to some other draft classes of the same general time (13 first-rounders from 2006, 18 from 2007 and 22 from 2009).

And there is the uniqueness of the selections that goes beyond the usual hits and misses. With years to go before a final read on 2008, the relatively early storyline is of a draft that has turned out so bottom heavy, with the majority of the best players coming from beyond the lottery and even beyond the first round: Robin Lopez at 15, Roy Hibbert at No. 17, Ryan Anderson at 21, Lee at 22, Ibaka at 24, Nicolas Batum at 25, George Hill at 26, Nikola Pekovic at 31, DeAndre Jordan at 35, and Goran Dragic at 45.

So much for teams putting a premium on size — that’s a lot of starting centers outside the top 14. Nearly seven years later, the NBA world has seen how much Lopez, Hibbert, Ibaka and Jordan in particular can impact on defense alone.

The ultimate analysis is still pending, because a lot of the players have years to go before their careers can be defined. And, yes, because of Rose. How his injury saga turns out will have an impact on how the Class of 2008 is viewed.

Craig Sager targeting March 5 return


VIDEO: Sager interviews Carmelo Anthony

TNT sideline reporter Craig Sager, out since being diagnosed with leukemia last April, is scheduled to return for the March 5 game between the Bulls and Thunder in Chicago, his son announced Wednesday.

The 63-year-old Sager, a longtime presence at NBA games with his trademark flamboyant wardrobe, reportedly went into remission late last year. He made an appearance on TV as part of the Coaches vs. Cancer Classic in November and earlier this month was on “Inside the NBA” during All-Star weekend and on the air targeted “March 1 … if everything goes well in the next two weeks” for a return, as quoted by the New York Post, adding “I think I’m on my road back, and I’m looking forward to being back there healthy in March, April, looking forward to the playoffs.”

The cancer reportedly went into remission after bone marrow and stem cells from his son, Craig Sager Jr., were pumped into the elder Sager.

Craig Jr., who tweeted the news Wednesday, also said his father will work the NCAA tournament — bracket ties and all.

 

 

Rose to undergo another knee surgery


VIDEO: GameTime crew analyzes Derrick Rose injury

Derrick Rose has suffered another knee injury, the Bulls announced Tuesday night, this time a torn cartilage in his right knee that will require surgery.

A timetable for his return will be determined after the procedure that has yet to be scheduled, the team said.

Rose, the 2011 MVP, reported pain in the knee earlier in the day, the Bulls said in a news release. An MRI exam showed a tear of the medial meniscus, the same cartilage in the same knee that required surgery in November 2013. Rose also had surgery on the left knee in May 2012.

Rose, 26, had played in 46 of the 57 Chicago games, averaging 18.4 points and five assists while shooting 40.7 percent. The Bulls are 36-21, good for third place in the Eastern Conference with Toronto, Chicago and Cleveland separated by 2 1/2 games in trying to make up ground on No. 1 Atlanta.

In the 3 games since All-Star Break Rose averaged 10.7 points and 5 assists. The Bulls are 7-4 this season without Rose in the lineup.

Aaron Brooks has been the Bulls’ backup point guard.

 

Report: Dragic won’t re-sign with Suns


VIDEO: David Aldridge on latest trade deadline rumblings

Representatives for Goran Dragic told the Suns on Tuesday that the veteran point guard does not plan to re-sign as an unrestricted free agent, according to a report by Sam Amick of USA Today, putting pressure on Phoenix to deal Dragic by the Thursday trade deadline or likely lose him for nothing in the summer.

The news comes with Dragic having gone from 35.1 minutes a game in 2013-14 to 33.4 this season after the Suns signed another point guard, Isaiah Thomas, as a free agent. That apparently has prompted Dragic to decide he does not want to stay, even if Phoenix were to move Thomas instead before the deadline passes.

From USA Today:

The main issue, according to one of the people [with knowledge of the situation], is that Dragic wants to run his own team with the kind of freedom and support given to someone like Stephen Curry of the Golden State Warriors. The decrease in production this season, as he sees it, is directly tied to the decrease in time spent as the lead-guard with the host of ballhandlers that surround him. Dragic is averaging 16.2 points, 3.6 rebounds, 4.1 assists and 33.4 minutes per game this season.

A team that acquires Dragic now would also have his Bird rights in July, a major bargaining chip in free agency. Several reports say Dragic, through his agent, have given the Suns a list of preferred destinations, but that the Rockets, one of the clubs that had been pursuing him, are not among the places Dragic would stay. That would put Houston in the difficult position of giving up assets for someone who would bolster its playoff hopes, except as a short-term rental who would leave after the season.

The Lakers, Heat and Knicks are among the preferred destinations, according to Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo!

Blogtable: Thankful for a break

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Team that needs a break? | Top Popovich memory? | East’s future title team?



VIDEO: Blake Griffin is expected to miss at least a few weeks as he recovers from surgery

> It’s an extended All-Star break this season, with most teams getting at least 7-8 days off between games. Which team needs this break the most?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comIt’s easy to look at teams’ records over their past 10 games or so and point to the one(s) limping into the break at 3-7 or 2-8. But there’s no assurance stepping away from the court will fix anything. My answer is Sacramento – the Kings look like they’ll have a new, permanent coach in George Karl, clearing their air and bringing changes for what’s left of this regular season. 

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comThe Rockets and Clippers in the Western Conference can use the break just to keep the clock ticking on the rehab times of Dwight Howard and Blake Griffin. But the Rockets have demonstrated all season that they’re still capable of riding James Harden to wins and DeAndre Jordan showed the good things that can happen when he stepped up Monday night. But the team that could benefit most is Miami. The time off will help Dwyane Wade’s hamstring recover and to make sure Hassan Whiteside’s ankle is 100 percent. The Heat will need them both healthy for the stretch drive if they’re going to hold onto a playoff spot.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: The Clippers and Trail Blazers come to mind first. Not because they have hit a bad stretch, although that too, but because of the prominent injuries. Blake Griffin may be back soon and LaMarcus Aldridge gets a few days to rest his injury, too. Being able to heal without missing a game for a week or so is a help. That would be the case anyway, but especially in the cage match that is the Western Conference standings.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: The Clippers. They just finished up a tough Grammy road trip and when they return from the break, 11 of their next 14 games are against teams with winning records. Oh, and did I mention Blake Griffin needs perhaps three weeks to heal from elbow surgery? Done, then. Doc Rivers needs this time to help them regroup, find a system to use in Griffin’s absence, and also to study who might become available at or after the trade deadline to improve the bench.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comWith a lot of guys picking up injuries in the last couple of weeks, there are a lot of teams that could use the break to reduce the number of games those guys miss. And obviously, the most important of those guys is Blake Griffin, not only because he’s a great player, but because the Clippers’ bench is so awful. He’s still going to miss a lot of games after the break, but every little bit helps and seven days off is seven days closer to Griffin’s eventual return.

Sekou Smith, NBA.comThe rest that comes with this extended All-Star break will be enjoyed by all 30 teams. But no one needs the time to fine tune things more than the Oklahoma City Thunder. They need to take a deep breath before making their second half playoff charge. Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook need a little practice time with Mitch McGary, the Thunder’s second-half X-factor, and they need to make sure they get everyone the needed time to recharge their batteries for what is going to be an absolutely wild ride to the finish.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comThere must be a dozen title and/or playoff contenders who are going to benefit. But I’m going to focus on the Thunder, who are fighting with the Pelicans and Suns for the final playoff spot and can use these extra days to renew the health of Kevin Durant.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogUm, all of them? Honestly, I can’t think of a team that doesn’t need a break, except for maybe Atlanta and Golden State, who have been so hot they may not want to disrupt their rhythm. I guess one team that may appreciate a rest more than most is Oklahoma City, which faces an uphill task the rest of the way as they try to fight their way not only toward finally getting everyone healthy but also up and into the postseason. And unlike most teams on the outside looking in, the Thunder will the hunted not the hunters, so they’ll have to do this with a target on their backs. Rest up, Thunder. It’s gonna be a bumpy ride.

Blogtable: Future title team in East

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Team that needs a break? | Top Popovich memory? | East’s future title team?



VIDEOBrandon Knight has proven vital to the Bucks’ revival this season

> If you had to pick which Eastern Conference team will be closer to an NBA title in three years, who would you pick: Bucks, Celtics, Sixers or Knicks?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: Give me Milwaukee. New York will buy stars, Boston has tradition, Philadelphia is rounding up high draft selections, but I’ve seen up close the changes in the Bucks culture with Jason Kidd and his staff on board. Kidd isn’t a great media guy but he apparently clicks with those in his locker room. The Bucks have several boxes already checked if they keep their guys (Giannis Antetokounmpo and Jabari Parker at forward, Brandon Knight in the backcourt), and more depth than the other three. This isn’t the old Milwaukee culture, either; new ownership has lit a fire under this franchise, with grandiose plans that center on a championship-contending team in a sparkling new arena, with retail and residential development and on and on. The Bucks are thinking of themselves as the little franchise that can.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comThis is like asking which three-legged horse is going to win the Kentucky Derby in 2018. Of course, in thoroughbred racing so much is about bloodlines. So without counting in a lottery win by any of the teams this season, I’ll saddle up with a Sixers roster that in three years could include a healthy core of Joel Embiid, Nerlens Noel, Dario Saric and Michael Carter-Williams and have the potential of Secretariat. With a foundation of Jabari Parker and Giannis Antetokounmpo and the continued good work of coach Jason Kidd, the Bucks will have a California Chrome chance. In three years, Danny Ainge’s master plan for the Celtics that began with Brad Stevens as coach could have his team looking like Smarty Jones. And the Knicks, well, that’s why they have glue factories.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Bucks. I don’t know that I would have said that at the start of the season, but Milwaukee has proven that it has the best building blocks. Giannis Antetokounmpo and Jabari Parker showed they are real building blocks, not potential in the distant future. They are both better — based on what we saw from Parker in the court, not on his game at this very moment — than any prospect on the other teams you mention. The Knicks have Carmelo Anthony, but if the topic is three years from now, ‘Melo may be hanging on. Ask again in mid-July. If Joel Embiid looks good in summer league and the 76ers have a good draft and/or add a veteran contributor in trade or free agency, I could see Philly getting close to the front of the line.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: The Bucks, only because I can see more evidence of them turning the corner right now than the Sixers, Celtics and Knicks. The Bucks have at least 2 players with high ceilings, Giannis and Jabari Parker (assuming he returns OK) and a few others with decent ceilings (Khris Middleton, John Henson, Knight). They also own their picks and Jason Kidd seems like he’s made for coaching. Man, if Larry Sanders starts taking his maturity pills … 

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: The Bucks. They have two young stars – Giannis Antetokounmpo and Jabari Parker – with high ceilings, more length and athleticism beyond those guys, and a defense that already ranks in the top five. I do like the potential of all the young guys the Sixers have already acquired (with one more top-seven pick on the way), and coach Brett Brown has proven that he can coach defense, too. But there are still more questions to be answered in Philly than there are in Milwaukee.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: There is so much that could happen between now and the next three years. Milwaukee appears to be closer than the others to the playoffs, but there is no guarantee they will be anywhere close to sniffing a NBA title. Based on history alone and Danny Ainge’s penchant for rolling the dice on smoething big on the trade and free agent front, I’m going with the Celtics. You have to take risks when you’re talking about contending, and no one is more willing to do that than Ainge.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: Based on what we know today? It will be the Bucks. They have a young emerging (and inexpensive) roster with at least two future stars and new owners who are promising to adorn their franchise with the best of everything. The big question is whether the owners will be wise enough to recognize what they have in GM John Hammond – or will they want to hire their “own guy?” (If it turns out to be the latter, then I’ll retroactively change my pick to the Celtics.)

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: Milwaukee. Only because the Celtics, Sixers and Knicks are all rebuilding with no clear direction to where they are going. At least the Bucks have their core of Giannis, Brandon Knight and, when he gets healthy, Jabari Parker. They have a coach who has shown he can communicate with these players, and new ownership committed to raising everyone’s circumstances. One of these other franchises may come across a pot of gold eventually, but right now they’re still searching for the ends of their rainbows.

Blogtable: Memories of Popovich …

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Team that needs a break? | Top Popovich memory? | East’s future title team?



VIDEO: The Spurs’ superstars reflect on what coach Gregg Popovich has meant to them

> He has 1,000 victories, multiple Coach of the Year awards, five NBA Championships … what’s the one thing (listed or otherwise) that stands out most in your mind about Gregg Popovich’s NBA coaching career?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comI’ll count down my top three Popovich thoughts. At No. 3, his maneuver to land Tim Duncan largely has been forgotten,but it was a tank job before people even called it tanking; David Robinson was hurt, so Popovich gassed then-coach Bob Hill and took over the coaching reins to make sure the Spurs had a legit lottery shot at their all-time franchise guy. Second, few coaches intimidated me as much when I first started covering him – I felt his early attack mode was driven at least partly by his own discomfort in those media exchanges – but now that we know each other, I look forward to the conversations (not mere interviews) we can have. And my No. 1 thing is Popovich’s resiliency. He went from defensive grinder to offensive innovator in mid-career to adjust to his roster, and he somehow turned the ultimate defeat in 2013 into the inspiration for yet another title with a group whose window allegedly had slammed shut.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: His unwavering dedication to doing whatever is in the long-term best interest of his players. It has cultivated an atmosphere of belief, loyalty, respect and those five championships.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comNone of the above. Nothing speaks to his greatness more than the accomplishments you listed, but I have ways been struck by the emotional more than the tangible. Pop’s ability to know which players need more maturing and which can handle his fury (Tony Parker) is a quality that brings out the best. He has developed younger players, plugged in veterans, completely changed his team’s style of play and hired great assistants because Gregg Popovich knows people as well as he knows an X or an O.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comWell, it’s hard to ignore his championships or longevity, both of which will be written on his coaching tombstone once he retires. But the other thing that strikes me most is his ability to avoid the relationship issues that hurts so many coaches, even the successful ones. With few exceptions, maybe Stephen Jackson in his second stint with the Spurs, I can’t think of any player who ran afoul of Popovich. That’s hard to pull off for a guy who isn’t afraid to, um, express himself.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Popovich often tells his players, “Get over yourself” and he clearly listens to his own advice, because, though he’s won multiple championships, he’s always been open-minded and willing to adjust as the game and his team have evolved. As Tim Duncan got older Tony Parker got better, the Spurs went from relying more on post-ups to relying more on pick-and-rolls. They picked up things from offenses from Europe and from Mike D’Antoni to eventually evolve into the machine we saw in last year’s Finals. And in the summer of 2012, they took a step back and used analytics to figure out how to get back to being a top-five defensive team, which was the biggest reason they got back to The Finals and, on their second try, won a fifth championship. Popovich is an old-school coach in many ways, but he’s smart enough to know that he’ll never stop learning.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: The thing that stands out most in my mind about Pop is that he has always found a way to get the best out of guys who someone else either never believed in or gave up on. Boris Diaw is one of the best examples. I watched Boris struggle with his first steps in the league when the Hawks could not figure out what to do with him (was he a point guard or not?). The Spurs have gotten the very best out of Boris, thanks to Pop’s no-nonsense/tough-love approach. He’s a master at the most important part of the coaching game, getting you to operate at your absolute best, no matter what.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: He established the standards of teamwork while bridging the NBA toward its ultimate future as an international league. The day will come – many years from now, but it’s definitely on the way – when Americans will account for less than half of the league’s players. Popovich showed that NBA teams could win not in spite of the international players, but because of them.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: That he’s had exactly two head coaching jobs in his life. One at a Division III college, and then the one in the NBA where he’s won five titles and three Coach of the Year awards over two decades. Without naming names, there are coaches who bounce around and get opportunity after opportunity, and sure, sometimes it works and they finally find the right fit. But watching Pop’s success, and that of a guy like his longtime assistant Mike Budenholzer crushing it in his first head coaching gig, it makes me think that maybe there are times when it’s worth it to give the new guy a chance.

Report: Kings nearing deal with Karl

VIDEO: George Karl could be taking the top spot on the Kings’ bench

The Kings appeared to be inching closer to hiring George Karl as coach, with ESPN.com reporting Tuesday that the deal is expected to be finalized for Karl to take over after the All-Star break.

Sacramento has two games left before the break — tonight at Chicago and Wednesday at Milwaukee — and then does not play again until Feb. 20 against the Celtics at Sleep Train Arena, making it the closest thing to the third coach of the season having a chance to get time with the team. Once it became public the Kings were making a hard a hard push for Karl, it always seemed logical  that if he did take the job it would be in that schedule pause.

Karl, who last coached in 2012-13, has been assembling a staff to join him with the Kings, according to ESPN.com, a group that would include son Koby. The elder Karl has for years, since his days with the Nuggets, liked the idea of hiring Koby and working together.

Meanwhile, DeMarcus Cousins, the Kings’ All-Star center, released a statement that denied any role in whether the Kings hire Karl, amid reports his agents made it clear to the Sacramento front office they would be against Karl getting the job. That appeared to have more to do with past issues between Karl and the agency and the state of constant instability surrounding the team than over concerns of  how Karl would fit with Cousins.

“I wasn’t consulted when the decision was made to fire Mike Malone and I’m not being consulted now,” Cousins said in the statement that was released through his agents, not the Kings, as relayed by Yahoo! “I just hope they make a decision soon and stick with it. George Karl is an experienced, proven coach and if that is who they chose to coach this team, I will support it. I do not like all these discussions in the media while we have a coach in place. It is a distraction and not fair to Coach Corbin and this team.”

Cousins is right about the logic — if management was going to give the centerpiece of the roster the power of veto, Malone never would have been fired. But a dissenting voice does not have to come from Cousins himself. Powerful agents are capable of scuttling deals that don’t have anything to do with player contracts or trades, and Cousins’ representative, Dan Fegan, is one of the most powerful in the business.

Blogtable: The Suns should root for …?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Cavs’ resurgence | Phoenix should root for …? | Atlanta’s final destination?



VIDEOA challenging stretch of games lie ahead for the Thunder

> The Thunder and Pelicans play a home-and-home set this week (Wednesday and Friday). If you’re the Phoenix Suns, who you rooting for here?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: You always root for the team that’s closer to you in the standings, so you root for OKC now and, if the Thunder start to make a real move, for New Orleans later. Overall, though, I think OKC poses the greater threat to Phoenix by virtue of its two stars (Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook) vs. one (Anthony Davis) but even more so because of the pressure on and expectations for the Thunder. Desperation is great motivation, and OKC should be desperate to salvage its season lest someone slam its championship window shut.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Definitely the Pelicans. The last thing you want to see if you’re the Suns is for the Thunder to get on a roll. With Durant and Westbrook, OKC has greater firepower and greater potential. We keep thinking that sooner or later the Thunder will rip off a long winning streak. The Suns need to have more weeks on the calendar pass before that happens and hope that OKC just runs out of time. On the other hand, the Pelicans have more weaknesses and inconsistency to their game to believe they can run the table for a long stretch.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comOKC to win one of the games in 12 overtimes followed by a dreadful travel delay for both, then New Orleans to win the other in 14 overtimes followed by travel hassles that are even worse. With fire alarms going off all through the night in the hotels of both road teams. That’s my rooting interest if I’m the Suns. It’s too early to scoreboard watch beyond hoping the competition is as worn out as possible for the second half of the season. I think Thunder when it’s OKC-Phoenix, I think Pelicans when it’s NOLA-Phoenix.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comThe Pelicans must’ve started eating whatever the Hawks were having because suddenly they’re pulling a surprise, beating the Raptors, Mavericks, Clippers and the 19-game-winning Hawks in the last two weeks. That said … if I’m the Suns, I’d take my chances of being chased by Anthony Davis than Russell and Durant. OKC is the more desperate team, in terms of making the playoffs. New Orleans would just be happy to be there.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: The Pelicans. They have a two-game edge in the standings and they’ve been playing a lot better than the Thunder, with seven wins in their last eight games against other teams in the West’s top 10, along with an impressive victory over the Hawks on Monday. But the Thunder are playing solid defense and just can’t seem to put the ball in the basket. With Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook, I think they can figure out how to do that in the next two months. They’ve also won 12 of their last 14 games at home and have the West’s most home-heavy remaining schedule (20 home, 14 away). So, as Tony Montana would say, “C’mon Pelicans!”

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: The Pelicans. The Suns have enough drama in their lives just trying to hold on to that playoff spot that they couldn’t snag last year. They don’t need Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook and the Thunder making things even more difficult. The Pelicans, playing better of late with Tyreke Evans finding his groove, don’t scare you the way the Thunder can when they get rolling. The Suns need to handle their own business, of course. But the Pelicans don’t make you nervous in the same way the Thunder can when they are playing desperation ball down the stretch of the season.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: You are rooting for New Orleans – but in vain, I fear. With more than two months still to play, OKC has plenty of time to get hot and become the most dangerous No. 8 seed in memory. That’s the most likely outcome, so long as the Thunder are healthy, and regardless of their home-and-home vs. Anthony Davis.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogA split? Can both teams lose? The Suns are in a tough spot, with two good teams breathing down their necks with the postseason not all that far away. As great as the Pelicans looked in dismantling the Hawks earlier this week, they’ve struggled to play with that kind of purpose consistently, which to me is mostly a reflection of their youth and inexperience. OKC may be hovering at .500, but they seem oddly calm considering the circumstances, and not really close to hitting the panic button. So if I’m the Suns? I root for the Pelicans to get these two games on the Thunder, then hope that the Pelicans fly closer to earth down the stretch.

 

 

Blogtable: What’s changed for the Cavs?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Cavs’ resurgence | Phoenix should root for …? | Atlanta’s final destination?



VIDEOJason Lloyd of the Akron Beacon Journal discusses the state of the Cavs

> Don’t look now, but the Cavs are on an 11-game streak and seem to have figured out a thing or two about winning in the last few weeks. What has made the difference for this team, and will it last?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comI’m tempted to say sheer time – y’know, the weeks and months many of us talked about that Cleveland would need to get all its who’s, what’s and how’s in order (and then impatiently ignored). Clearly GM David Griffin’s moves to acquire Timofey Mozgov, J.R. Smith and Iman Shumpert have helped. But to me, it was LeBron James’ two-week spa shutdown. James got himself right mentally and physically, while delivering a not-so-subtle message about what life without him might be like again. He came back rejuvenated and the Cavs’ players and coaches closed ranks around him.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: A Healthy LeBron and a healthy defense. In the last nine games of the streak the Cavs have held opponents to under 100 points and shooting no better than 44 percent.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: It’s too easy to say giving Dion Waiters, the Josh Smith of January, an outbound ticket changed everything. As bad a fit as he was in Cleveland, he was not a central figure on the court. But sometimes trades have emotional impact. It can put pressure on the remaining players that they are out of excuses. And other times, it’s simply a matter of time. The Cavaliers had a lot to figure out and needed time. I was surprised how much figuring out was necessary and how bad things got, but thought it was a team still capable of a playoff run. Kyrie Irving and LeBron James are going good while playing together. This isn’t the end result, but it’s a very encouraging midseason progress report for the Cavs.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: Well, the main difference is LeBron. Back from injury, and back with a vengeance. He’s more aggressive, unforgiving and business-like than before. The secondary force, of course, lies from the two trades which may have saved the Cavs’ season. Timofey Mozgov is the big fella they needed, especially defensively, while J.R. Smith is very willing to take big shots (and sometimes makes them). If Iman Shumpert can still D-up, the Cavs might be streaking for a while.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: The improvement has been on both ends of the floor, and it starts with LeBron James. Upon returning from his eight-game absence, he took on a bigger load offensively (his usage rate is up) and made more of an effort defensively. When he’s engaged, he’s still the best player in the world. The addition of Timofey Mozgov has also helped the D (the Cavs have allowed less than 93 points per 100 possessions with both James and Mozgov on the floor), and the subtraction of Dion Waiters (the team’s least efficient scorer) also helped the O.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: The main difference is the tweak the Cavaliers have made to their pick and roll defensive coverages and the way … haha. Come on, you know LeBron James has made the biggest difference for this team in their turnaround. The moment he returned from his injury/rest and rehab hiatus he’s been a different player and the Cavaliers have been a different team. For all the bellyaching folks did about him he appeared to be something other than engaged early on, LeBron is locked in right now. He’s smart enough to know that he can make the difference for a team with aspirations of being a contender (check the rear view for what’s going on in Miami). When he’s plugged in and energized, everything the Cavaliers do looks different and, for the most part, much better. You are welcome David Blatt. Sincerely, LJ.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: Doesn’t it all come down to LeBron’s good health? When fully active he’s able to help everyone else look better, on defense especially. And isn’t it funny how we’re not hearing complaints about David Blatt’s supposed weaknesses anymore …

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogWell, there’s one pretty clear difference that kicked in right around the time this streak started, and his initials are LBJ. But other than being 11-1 since LeBron returned from injury, the main thing I see is that now the Cavs are playing with real speed. After a wobbly start, they’re the running, pace-setting team we expected they would be when they began their extreme makeover this summer. They’ve scored at least 100 points in 11 of their last 13 games and are good enough defensively to have held their last nine opponents under triple figures.