Posts Tagged ‘Sacramento Kings’

Morning shootaround — July 2


VIDEO: What were the best signings from the first day of free agency?

*** FREE AGENCY COVERAGE JULY 2 ON NBA TV: Free Agent Fever: 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET ***

DAY 1: Complete Free Agency Recap

Spending spree marks first day of free agency | Report: Lakers fail to impress Aldridge; Blazers hoping for Aldridge-Monroe combo | Report: Three guards on Kings’ wish list | Clippers hoping Pierce deal leads Jordan to return | West reveals why he’s leaving Indiana

NEWS OF THE MORNING

No. 1: Recapping a busy Day 1 of free agency — The chatter during yesterday’s free-agent period opened, essentially, with Damian Lillard and the Trail Blazers talking about a long-term extension. By the time 1 a.m. or so rolled around today, it’s hard to keep tabs on just how many actual free agents agreed to deals. From the big names (Kevin Love, Paul Pierce, Paul Millsap) to the mid-range ones (DeMarre Carroll, Danny Green, Tristan Thompson) to smaller ones (Kyle Singler, Brandan Wright), moves were happening constantly. Our Steve Aschburner tries to make sense of what was a crazy busy day: 

“Unfinished business” was the term Kevin Love used, more or less kicking off the first day of NBA free agency Wednesday with his announcement, via The Players’ Tribune, that he would be sticking with Cleveland Cavaliers in pursuit of LeBron James-led championships.

“Irrational exuberance,” though, was the label that came to mind as the shopping and the bidding and the spending (pledges of it, anyway, when deals actually can be consummated July 9) spiraled ever higher. That phrase was former Federal Reserve Board chairman Alan Greenspan‘s, used to characterize the overheated stock market during the dot.com bubble of the 1990s.

From Love and Cleveland teammates Tristan Thompson and Iman Shumpert to San Antonio’s Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green, from young franchise cornerstones such as Anthony Davis and Damian Lillard to DeMarre Carroll becoming Toronto’s highest paid player, the frenzy to find, pitch and lock up players at heretofore staggering amounts of money was more than even some players could grasp.

With so much of the NBA’s business focused on the summer of 2016 – when the revenue from broadcast rights increases geometrically, taking the salary cap from about $69 million to an estimated $90 million – owners and general managers dug deep to cut deals at 2015 prices. Or, more accurately, at 2015’s percentage of payroll.

Look at it this way: an $11 million player by 2016-17, for example, will eat up the same amount of cap space as a $7.7 player this past season ($63 million cap). That could turn a number of Wednesday’s personal lottery payoffs into something if not reasonable by an average Joe’s or Jill’s standards, at least into something manageable.

One of the surprises of the day, then, was that so many players were willing to lock in rather than hold off or “gimmick-contract” their way to another bite at the platinum apple in a year or two. Love, perhaps thinking of his own troubling history of injuries, went “all in” with the Cavaliers, grabbing a deal that will still be in effect when James turns 35. Davis dried up the premature drooling in Chicago and probably 28 other markets by teams and fans hoping to pry him loose from New Orleans sooner than 2021.

Here was another surprise: Of the top 15 or so players who agreed to terms Wednesday, 10 or more (depending on your rankings) chose to stay put, re-signing with their current teams. Of those who will be playing elsewhere come autumn, Tyson Chandler‘s four-year, $52 million deal with Phoenix and Carroll’s four-year, $60 million package with the Raptors probably rate as the biggest moves.


VIDEO: What were the under-the-radar moves from Day 1?

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Morning shootaround — July 1


VIDEO: David Aldridge breaks down the state of the unrestricted free agents

*** FREE AGENCY COVERAGE JULY 1 ON NBA TV ***

Free Agent Fever at 8 a.m. ET, 2 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. ET, and again from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. ET 

Report: Aldridge meeting with Lakers went ‘well’ | Kings chasing Lin, Rondo | Report: Lakers plan to meet with Love | Report: Cavs reach out to Prince; Williams hopes for return | Report: Ellis, Pacers in talks | Report: Nets finalizing deals with Lopez, Young

NEWS OF THE MORNING

No. 1: Report: Aldridge’s meeting with Lakers goes ‘really well’  The NBA’s free agency period opened last night with the usual — a lot of talk, a handful of moves and a stage set for an even bigger Day 2 of the chatter. LaMarcus Aldridge of the Trail Blazers is the No. 1 target, of course, and met with the Los Angeles Lakers last night and, according to ESPN.com, the report went as well as it could for both sides:

The Los Angeles Lakers were the first to sit down with LaMarcus Aldridge when free agency opened Tuesday night, and their meeting lasted nearly two hours, sources told ESPN.com.

The meeting went “really well,” a source who was in the room for the Lakers’ presentation told ESPN.com’s Ramona Shelburne.

“LaMarcus seemed completely focused,” a source told Shelburne.

The Lakers’ contingent included Kobe Bryant, president Jeanie Buss and general managerMitch Kupchak.

The Houston Rockets met with Aldridge after the Lakers.

Aldridge also will meet with the San Antonio Spurs, Dallas Mavericks, Phoenix Suns and Toronto Raptors on Wednesday and with the New York Knicks on Thursday, league sources told ESPN.com.

According to one source, the chance of Aldridge staying with the Portland Trail Blazers is “very unlikely.”

ESPN.com reported in May that the Spurs and Mavericks strongly believe they’ll have a great shot to lure Aldridge back to his home state of Texas. But sources said last week that Aldridge is actually thinking more and more about a free-agent jump to the Lakers.

The Lakers, sources added, firmly believe they will now be in the Aldridge hunt. And there is a rising sentiment, sources said, that the Lakers have edged past the Mavericks on Aldridge’s wish list even though he was a high school star in Dallas.

The Spurs, sources say, continue to be Aldridge’s most likely destination if he goes through with the idea of leaving the Blazers to start anew.

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Report: Calipari denies he is in running for Kings’ coaching, front-office gigs

The total number of players any NBA team can have under contract at one time is dictated both by roster limits and the salary cap.

There is no such restriction on coaches, however, or other front-office personnel. And boy, doesn’t Sacramento’s Vivek Ranadive seem to know it.

Despite having Kings head coach George Karl signed up for three more years and about $10 million, the impulsive Sacramento owner reportedly has explored the possibility of having University of Kentucky coach John Calipari take over both on the sidelines and in the front office, Yahoo! Sports’ Adrian Wojnarowski reported.

*** FREE AGENCY COVERAGE JUNE 30 ON NBA TV: The Starters, 6:30 ET | Free Agent Fever, 7 ET & 11:30 ET ***

“Probing” was the verb Wojnarowski used, which meant the whole thing could be disavowed easily from either side. And that’s precisely what began happening almost immediately Tuesday morning, from both sides:

Even if there isn’t fire, there apparently was some smoke. Wojnarowski cited sources claiming it would cost the Kings $10 million annually to pry Calipari loose from the Wildcats. At Kentucky, establishing his successful “one-and-done” program built around the NBA’s draft eligibility rule, Calipari has steered the team to a 190-37 (.837) record with one national title and four trips to the Final Four. In his only previous NBA stint, he lasted two-plus seasons with the Nets, posting a 72-112 mark.

This has been fueled by the recent schism between Karl and All-Star center DeMarcus Cousins, with folks within the team and in the two principals’ camps choosing up sides to exacerbate the situation. What follows is a snippet of the original Yahoo! report. But first, let it be known that the Kings already have had five, count ’em, five different coaches – in reverse chronological order, Karl, Tyrone Corbin, Mike Malone, Keith Smart and Paul Westphal – work their past 306 games:

Calipari coached Cousins at Kentucky for a season in 2009-10, and Ranadive believes Calipari could help serve as a mechanism to convince Cousins to back away from his desire to be traded to the Los Angeles Lakers, sources said. As much as anything, Calipari represents one more potential change of direction, as well as a public-relations splash for Ranadive.

Sacramento ownership, dismayed over Karl’s fractured relationship with Cousins, has had lawyers studying Karl’s contract, trying to determine if there’s a way to terminate him for “cause,” and free themselves of the three years and nearly $10 million left guaranteed on his deal, league sources told Yahoo Sports. If the Kings cannot convince Calipari to come to Sacramento – or never make a formal offer – Karl could simply remain as coach.

Sacramento’s case on trying to get out of paying Karl his contract would be based in part on his involvement in mounting a campaign to get Cousins traded, sources said. The possibility of getting Karl ousted without pay is remote.

Calipari signed a seven-year, $54 million extension a year ago to stay at Kentucky. He turned down an eight-year, $60 million-plus offer to run the Cleveland Cavaliers before LeBron James made his return in free agency last year.

The courtship of Calipari could become one more dramatic turn of events for the Kings, who have struggled under Ranadive to set forth on a direction and stay the course. Around the NBA, senior league officials and confidants of Ranadive have pleaded with him to stop these sharp changes in direction, sources said.

As one league official familiar with Ranadive’s mindset told Yahoo Sports, “He’s trying to find a magic button to push that’ll fix everything.”

Blogtable: Future for Cousins, Kings?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Who’s going No. 1-5? | Future for Cousins, Kings? | Riley’s pitch to Wade?



VIDEODavid Aldridge says a trade of DeMarcus Cousins isn’t likely before the Draft

> You’re the Kings’ front office … on a scale of 1-10, with 10 being most likely, where does the notion of trading DeMarcus Cousins rank? Also, is it too late to fix whatever kind of rift there is between Cousins and coach George Karl?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: I don’t like the idea for the Kings, so I give it a 3. To turn their backs on a player this talented, and still so young, is reckless enough to be considered dereliction of duty. Trouble is, Sacramento has had enough of the big changes – management, coaching, teammates – that ought to have corrected or at least placated Cousins by now, yet he remains a headache. As for Karl, I’m a little surprised he hasn’t bothered to, or been able to, make some sort of peace with the big man. He has dealt with hard cases before (Gary Payton, Sam Cassell). Cousins’ impact on his preferred playing style really must rankle him. Still, Cousins will be putting up 20-10 games long after Karl has his feet up, sipping a cool beverage, visiting Nellie in Maui after coaching his last game.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: I would never have gone as far as the zero chance that is coming from upper management now and probably wouldn’t have rated it more than a 5. But that was before George Karl significantly roiled the water by offering Cousins around the league. With a volatile personality that already had to be handled with kids gloves, the bridge has probably been blown up by this round of events. If the Kings don’t trade him know, things will only explode at the first sign of trouble next season. Just another day, just another rebuild in Sacramento.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: The notion of trading him is a 1. It’s not a move I want to make as the GM. DeMarcus Cousins has a chance to be the best center in the league into the next decade. But the chances of having to do it are more like a 6 or 7 now with the possibility of quickly escalating to a 9. Not before the Draft, though, unless someone blows me away with an offer. (Which should have been the case anyway, regardless of the latest developments.) And as the person in charge of the Kings front office, I will comment on specific trades offers, not the vague question or statement you media jackals use. “Would you trade DeMarcus Cousins?” is a bad way to start. Bring me an offer, then I will tell you if I would do it.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: I’d rate it a 6. I just don’t think it’s easy to move talented big men, even one with warts, and get decent value in return. The Kings aren’t in position to make any bold move without some rather safe assurances that a Boogie trade will help, not hurt, them. Also, I’m not so sure it’s too late to fix anything between Cousins and Karl. The season’s a long ways off. Besides, Cousins is under contract for a few more years and therefore doesn’t have much leverage, at least not right now.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com It’s 5 for me. Let’s not pretend that Cousins is Tim Duncan, in regard to coachability or leadership. And I don’t know that we can make the playoffs in the Western Conference with him as our best player. Still, I’m not sure why we’d want to trade our best player unless we’re getting an incredible package in return. I’m not sure how the Cousins/Karl relationship can be irreparable when they’ve only had 30 games together, but Karl doesn’t have a great history when it comes to player relationships.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: I’ll give the notion of trading DeMarcus Cousins a 3 at best, and that’s being generous. We all know how this plays out, George Karl wanting to move someone because they don’t see eye to eye and what not. All this does is serve to completely shred whatever was left of the chance these two stubborn fellas had of mending whatever outstanding issues remain between them. Don’t get me wrong, I love the honesty from both sides. They don’t share the same sensibilities about the fundamental meaning of the words “basketball team.” I think we all get that. Still, this could have been handled better all around. Whatever happens, it’ll be messy when it does end … for whoever must go.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: The answer is 1. They should not trade him. If they choose to do so, then they will regret it for a long time. If they are forced to trade him – if their impulsive changes in leadership have convinced him that he has no future with the Kings – then they will be left to blame themselves. How is small-market Sacramento ever going to come up with a replacement as talented as Cousins?

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog If I’m the Kings’ front office? I would go with 0. Cousins is the kind of player you build around long-term. But of course, that makes too much sense — it feels like the Kings’ front office has multiple ideas and can’t decide where they stand on any of this. Too many cooks? Too many cooks. And maybe I’m too much of an optimist, but I feel like it’s never too late to fix a rift, but it does seem suspicious that there are so many stories about people not getting along with George Karl.

Morning shootaround — June 24


VIDEO: Are the Warriors looking to make a trade before Thusday’s draft?

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Report: 90 percent chance Ellis opts out | Divac, Karl address Cousins trade chatter | LeBron staying upbeat after Finals loss

No. 1: Report: 90 percent chance Ellis opts out; Mavs interested in trading him if he opts in — In the two seasons he’s spent in Dallas, Mavericks guard Monta Ellis has done some serious career rehab work. He played in 162 of a possible 164 games in that span, a plus for him after injuries curtailed his career in the past. He meshed nicely with star forward Dirk Nowitzki and was an integral part of two playoff teams in Dallas. Ellis can opt out this summer and pursue free agency, but what if he decides not to do that and stay with the Mavs?

Eddie Sefko of the Dallas Morning News reports that it is 90 percent likely Ellis will opt out and try the free-agent waters:

If he had opted in for the final season of his three-year contract with the Mavericks, there’s a better-than-decent chance he would have been traded, perhaps before Thursday’s draft.

And so, according to a source, Ellis is going to opt out of the final year of his deal and become an unrestricted free agent July 1. The Mavericks are not expected to make a serious run at re-signing him.

Ellis had until Wednesday night to make a decision on his option, to either take the third year of his contract at $8.7 million, or turn that down and try his luck on the open market.

The decision apparently was made late Tuesday night after news broke that the Mavericks were considering trade options if Ellis were to take the final season of his original $25 million deal signed before the 2013-14 season.

Nothing is official until Ellis declares his intentions. But the source said it is 90 percent certain that Ellis will opt out.

Could he change his mind? Possibly. But that would reopen the chance of the Mavericks finding a trade partner and perhaps pairing Ellis with the No. 21 pick they have in Thursday’s draft to try to move up.

Earlier on Tuesday, it appeared the Mavericks were angling to trade Ellis and their draft pick.

Numerous teams have had interest in Ellis in the past.

The New York Knicks have had an affinity for Ellis. Other teams, such as Denver, Indiana, the LA Lakers and Sacramento, would seem to be logical fits for Ellis. Those teams all have higher draft picks than the Mavericks.

ESPN.com’s Tim MacMahon reports that the Mavs would definitely look to move Ellis should he opt in so as to free up salary cap space to chase LaMarcus Aldridge and DeAndre Jordan:

The Dallas Mavericks will explore trade scenarios for shooting guard Monta Ellis if he exercises his player option for next season, sources told ESPN.com.

If Ellis opts in, Dallas would attempt to trade him for a draft pick, a source said, allowing the Mavs to maximize their cap space entering free agency.

Dallas intends to pursue All-Star power forward LaMarcus Aldridge and third-team All-NBA center DeAndre Jordan in free agency, hoping to sign one of them to a max contract. If Ellis’ salary isn’t on the books, the Mavs likely will have enough cap space to re-sign center Tyson Chandler to pair with Aldridge or a shooting guard who is a better fit with small forward Chandler Parsons if Jordan comes to Dallas.

The 6-foot-3 Ellis, an undersized shooting guard who is one of the league’s most dynamic off-the-dribble threats, played a key role in the Mavs winning a total of 99 games and advancing to the playoffs in each of the past two seasons after Dallas’ one-year postseason absence.

But Dallas doesn’t intend to give Ellis the raise he’d want if he tests free agency, sources said. The Mavs, who plan to use Parsons as more of a point forward in the second season of his three-year, $46 million deal, want to have a bigger shooting guard who is a better defender and 3-point threat than Ellis. Potential fits in free agency include Danny Green and Wesley Matthews.

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No. 2: Karl responds to Cousins rumors; Divac says no deal imminent Whether or not the Sacramento Kings end up trading their All-Star center, DeMarcus Cousins, before the start of 2015-16 remains to be seen. Coach George Karl responded to the rumors yesterday during a kids golf clinic at the U.S. Senior Open at Del Paso Country Club, (the transcript is below) and Jason Jones of the Sacramento Bee has more details on the relationship between Cousins and Karl:

Q: There’s so much flying around your team right now. Will you set the record straight where you and DeMarcus are at this point.

George Karl: I think its just a lot of crazy, crazy fibs and lies. It’s a situation where we won 29 games last year. For us as a basketball organization we want to get better. Cousins is our best player, we know that. We want him committed and dedicated to playing in Sacramento and leading us to the first playoffs in Sacramento in six, seven, eight, nine years.

Q: You are not interested in trading DeMarcus Cousins?

George Karl: My interest is commitment, trust and building a team that’s excited about being in Sacramento and excited and committed to being a good basketball team and representing the city of Sacramento.

Q: That includes, in your mind, Cousins staying here?

George Karl: If he comes committed, I’m 120 percent into making him the best basketball player he could ever be.

Q: Do you have some question about his commitment?

George Karl: Well no. In the 30 games I coached him we were all frustrated with losing. I was here for 30 games and so the frustration, I’m sure, was double that for Cuz and all the players here for the whole season.

Additionally, Ailene Voison of the Sacramento Bee caught up with vice president of basketball and franchise operations Vlade Divac and Karl, who both seem committed to keeping Cousins in town and happy:

Owner Vivek Ranadive and Divac, the vice president of basketball and franchise operations, continue to insist Cousins will not be traded. Distracted from his preparation for Thursday’s NBA draft, an irritated Divac responded to reports from ESPN and Yahoo early Tuesday by forcefully saying, “It is not happening. I don’t care what the agents or the media people are saying. I don’t know why we are wasting time talking about something that is not going to happen.”

For now, Cousins stays put. Ranadive is holding firm to the final three years of his contract. Divac is similarly intent on building around his gifted big man. In a meeting with Cousins’ agents a few weeks ago in Los Angeles, the Kings’ top basketball executive struck right at the heart of the matter: Karl is the coach, and he isn’t going anywhere.

While Cousins has complained he has not heard from his coach, in an ominous sign, Karl said he has sent an estimated 10 texts or phone calls since the season ended, none of which has initiated a response. In a brief conversation Tuesday, Karl sounded as exasperated as Divac.

“I want to get better,” Karl said. “I’ve had more conversations with my staff about ‘How we are going to coach him (Cousins), how we are going to motivate him, connect with him?’ than anything else.”

Asked about speculation he has been pressuring management to trade the All-Star center, Karl replied, “We won 29 games last year. Cuz is our best player. We know that, and we want him committed. My interest right now is commitment, trust and building a team that’s excited about being in Sacramento, excited and committed to being a good basketball team. Rudy (Gay) is just like Cuz. They’re our two best basketball players, and 99, 95 percent of this (trade) stuff is just a bunch of innuendo, gossip and somebody putting two and two together until it becomes six. But two and two comes out four, and they’re going to be on our basketball team.”


VIDEO: How likely are the Kings to trade DeMarcus Cousins?

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No. 3: LeBron staying upbeat, even after Finals loss The Cleveland Cavaliers are about a week removed from their loss in Game 6 of The Finals that clinched the title for the Golden State Warriors. LeBron James was otherworldly in the series, but his play wasn’t enough to get Cleveland a title and while that all still stings for him, he’s keeping a good perspective on the defeat. ESPN.com has more from James, who shared his post-Finals thoughts on Facebook:

LeBron James vowed improvement but said he has been buoyed by the Cleveland Cavaliers’ fans after a disappointing NBA Finals loss to the Golden State Warriors.

“It hurt to lose,” James wrote Tuesday in captioning a Facebook photo of children in his LeBron James Family Foundation at the Cedar Point amusement park. “I’ve been in a funk lately, but this… this is what motivates me to do what I do. How can I ever be down when I know my kids and my fans have my back?

“Being back home and back with my fans is everything that I dreamed of. Thank you for an incredible season. I’m not satisfied… I’m not happy with the way things turned out… I PROMISE to get better. #StriveForGreatness #ILoveTheseKids #GodBlessOurFans.”

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SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Our Scott-Howard Cooper reports the Golden State Warriors are trying to trade up in the Draft … The Boston Celtics are reportedly going to keep pushing for a DeMarcus Cousins trade up through the Draft … Speaking of the Celtics, they reportedly dangled two of their first-round picks and Marcus Smart to the 76ers in hopes of moving up to No. 3 (Philly passed on the deal) … Are the Milwaukee Bucks shopping Michael Carter-Williams in hopes of moving up in the Draft? … Fantastic long read by Joe Posnanski on the impact Dell and Stephen Curry have had in Charlotte …The Sacramento Kings may be interested in trading for JaVale McGee

Morning shootaround — June 23


VIDEO: Draft HQ’s experts discuss the top 3 prospects in the Draft

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Reports: Lakers trying to land Cousins | Report: Wolves shopping Bennett | Conflicting reports on potential Wade-Heat meeting

No. 1: Reports: Lakers interested in trading for Kings’ Cousins; Karl and Cousins on outs? — Guys like Sacramento Kings center DeMarcus Cousins are hard to find in the NBA. He’s an All-Star big man, a legit low-post threat on offense, a solid shot-blocker and a double-double player in three of his five seasons to date. It’s not surprising, then, that teams are interested in prying him away from Sacramento, and as ESPN.com’s Marc Stein and Yahoo Sports’ Adrian Wojnarowski report, the Los Angeles Lakers are at the front of that line.

Stein had the first information on the trade, so here’s his report on what the Lakers are attempting to do (and some other teams interested in Cousins, too):

Sources told ESPN that the Lakers have been actively pursuing trade scenarios in recent weeks in attempt to construct a deal that would convince the Kings to part with Cousins.

The Kings, though, continue to insist that Cousins is not available. The team’s new lead decision-maker, Vlade Divac, told the Sacramento Bee in Sunday’s editions that dealing away his best player “is not happening.”

Sources say that the Lakers, Kings and Orlando Magic have had exploratory dialogue on a three-way Cousins trade that would land the 24-year-old in Los Angeles. All three teams hold top-6 picks in Thursday’s NBA draft, and Orlando has a young top-flight center of its own in Nikola Vucevic, who could theoretically fill the Cousins void.

Yet since assuming control of the Kings’ front office in April, Divac repeatedly has downplayed the idea of parting with Cousins, who has three seasons left on an extension he signed during the summer of 2013.

The Lakers would appear to have limited assets to get into the trade sweepstakes for Cousins — in the event that Sacramento’s stance changes — beyond surrendering prized young big man Julius Randle, young guard Jordan Clarkson and the No. 2 overall pick in Thursday’s draft. The Lakers, furthermore, could not legally trade the No. 2 pick until after making the selection and introducing that player as a Laker, since teams are precluded from trading first-round picks in consecutive drafts and the Lakers’ 2016 first-rounder is already owed to Philadelphia.

Orlando holds the fifth pick in Thursday’s proceedings but would presumably expect a lot to be willing to part with Vucevic, who signed an extension of his own last October and has become the most consistently productive player from the four-team blockbuster trade in August 2012 that sent Dwight Howard from the Magic to the Lakers.

Wojnarowski’s report digs into how the rocky dynamics between Cousins and coach George Karl may be driving a trade:

Despite Sacramento Kings management’s public insistence that DeMarcus Cousins is unavailable in deals, coach George Karl’s intense desire to trade the All-Star center has made it increasingly unlikely this coach-star partnership can peacefully co-exist next season, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

Karl has been recruiting Kings vice president of basketball operations Vlade Divac and multiple players on the Kings’ roster to unite with him in making the case to owner Vivek Ranadive that Cousins needs to be traded, league sources said.

Since the end of the 2014-15 season, Cousins has become aware of Karl’s campaign to move him – including teammates telling Cousins, sources said. All around the Kings and Cousins, there is a growing belief the coach-player relationship is irreparable. Trust is a constant theme with Cousins, and he’s been unable to build any with Karl, sources said.

No one in the Sacramento organization – not coaches, nor players, nor support staff – wants to imagine the combustible scenario awaiting Karl and Cousins should the Kings try to reunite them in training camp.

Ranadive has remained the biggest Kings advocate for holding onto Cousins, and several sources indicate he has become irritated with Karl’s insistence that the coach doesn’t believe he can manage the supremely skilled and strong-minded star. Cousins has held a firm loyalty to former Kings coach Michael Malone, whom Ranadive fired shortly into last season. Under Karl, that relationship couldn’t begin to be duplicated in the final weeks of the season.

For now, the Kings are pursuing trade scenarios for everyone on the roster, including talented forward Rudy Gay, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

Sacramento officials believe it will be difficult to find a trade partner that can give the Kings the value it wants for Cousins – and has a better chance to find a deal for Gay, sources said.


Sacramento is motivated to find a way to create more salary-cap space with possible deals, something that the Kings will need to pursue Dallas Mavericks free-agent point guard Rajon Rondo, league sources said. The Kings and Rondo have a mutual interest, with Rondo intrigued with the idea of a potential one-year deal in Sacramento that could help to rebuild his league-wide value, sources said.

Cousins took to Twitter late last night to respond to the talks with a simple message some are implying as meaning a snake in the grass:

And one more Kings thing to note: they may be interested in working a trade with the Denver Nuggets …

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No. 2: Report: Wolves shopping Bennett — The Minnesota Timberwolves have reason to be excited about Thursday night’s NBA Draft. They have the No. 1 overall pick, and whoever they choose will play alongside the reigning Kia Rookie of the Year, Andrew Wiggins. But as they ready to make the top choice in the Draft, is another former No. 1 overall pick on their roster about to be moved? According to ESPN.com’s Marc Stein, power forward Anthony Bennett — the No. 1 overall pick in 2013 by the Cleveland Cavaliers — is being shopped about:

The Minnesota Timberwolves have made former No. 1 overall pick Anthony Bennett available via trade in advance of Thursday’s NBA draft, according to league sources.

Sources told ESPN that the Timberwolves, who are widely expected to make Kentucky’s Karl-Anthony Towns the No. 1 overall selection Thursday night, are trying to find a new home via trade from Bennett, who unexpectedly went No. 1 overall in 2013 and was acquired by Minnesota last summer from Cleveland in the Kevin Love trade.

The Cavaliers sent Andrew Wiggins and Bennett to Minnesota for Love while also surrendering a future first-round pick to the Philadelphia 76ers, which landed then-Sixer Thaddeus Young with the Wolves as well.

In February, Minnesota swapped Young for Kevin Garnett to bring home the most famous player in franchise history.

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No. 3: Conflicting reports that Wade, Heat have meeting set — Miami Heat star Dwyane Wade has a player option on his contract this summer and his decision must be made, per NBA rules, by next week. Of late, there has been talk of he and the Los Angeles Lakers having mutual interest in each other, and more things have cropped up since then.

According to ESPN.com’s Ramona Shelburne and Brian Windhorst, Wade and the Heat are supposed to meet next week to discuss his contract:

Wade has until next Monday to decide on whether he’s going to opt in for next season and earn $16.1 million or become an unrestricted free agent.

Wade and the Heat sit far apart on their desires; the Heat would prefer for Wade to opt into the deal and Wade would prefer a new, richer and longer-term contract, sources said.

The sides have not formally spoken in some time. They had discussed a new contract for around $10 million per year for up to three years beyond his current deal, sources said.

Wade, who took a pay cut in 2010 when LeBron James and Chris Boshsigned and again last summer to help make cap space to sign Luol Deng, is interested in a pay raise and not a pay cut.

It is Wade’s desire to stay in Miami and finish his career with the Heat, sources said. However, the gulf between the sides has led to acrimony in recent weeks and cast doubt on Wade’s future. Wade has been disappointed at the team’s initial overtures considering the money he has left on the table in his past two free agencies, sources said.

James, who is Wade’s close friend, has expressed an interest in reuniting with him. However, that scenario is unlikely with the Cleveland Cavaliers. The Cavs will not have salary-cap space this summer and could offer Wade only a maximum of a $3.4 million from the taxpayer midlevel exception.

Wade also is interested in the Los Angeles Clippers, sources said, but they are as limited by their commitments and the salary-cap rules as the Cavs. Getting to the Clippers would take either a massive pay cut or the Heat’s unlikely cooperation in a sign-and-trade.

As for the Heat, they have several other roster issues they have to deal with before they might be able to make their best offer to Wade. One is Deng, who has his own opt-in option on next season for $10.1 million that he must decide on by the end of the month.

According to multiple league sources, the Heat are attempting to trade guard Mario Chalmers and big man Chris Andersen to help free up some salary that could ultimately be diverted to Wade. Both going into the final years of their contracts, Andersen and Chalmers are contracted to make a combined $9.3 million next season.

Ira Winderman of the Sun-Sentinel reports, however, that there is no scheduled meeting between Wade and Miami’s brass:

Despite reports to the contrary, a source familiar with the situation told the Sun Sentinel on Monday night that there currently is no meeting scheduled between Dwyane Wade and the Miami Heat as the clock ticks toward Wade’s Monday opt-in deadline.

In the wake of a previous ESPN report of such a meeting, a source close to the process said no such meeting between Wade and Pat Riley or other members of the Heat front office has been set.

The source said any meeting with Wade would be more likely to come after the July 1 start of free agency, since the Heat are not allowed to discuss contract parameters until then.

For Wade’s part, his representatives said he will bypass his annual media sessions at the adult basketball camp he is hosting this week at the Westin Diplomat Resort and Spa in Hollywood.

The Heat have remained mum on their personnel issues to the point of bypassing their annual pre-draft media session, with no one from the team’s scouting department scheduled to be made available in advance of Thursday’s NBA Draft, with the Heat holding the No. 10 selection.

Agent Henry Thomas told the Sun Sentinel three weeks ago that he expected upcoming contract discussions with the Heat in advance of Wade’s option deadline.

“We’ll just have to see how things continue to develop with the Heat,” he said.

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Detroit Pistons coach/team president Stan Van Gundy shot down rumors the team is trying to trade for New York Knicks guard Tim Hardaway Jr. … According to a report, the Oklahoma City Thunder have shopped Perry Jones and Jeremy Lamb in hopes of moving up in the Draft … Top prospect D’Angelo Russell recently made his pitch to the Los Angeles Lakers for them to take him No. 2 overall … Brooklyn Nets small forward Thaddeus Young is opting out of his deal to test free agency this summer … Dallas Mavericks guard Raymond Felton opted in with the team for 2015-16

Morning shootaround — June 16


VIDEO: Should the Cavs go to their big men more in Game 6?

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Durant motivated by Curry, LeBron in Finals | Malone gets his chance in Denver | More moves ahead for Clippers? | Report: Embiid could miss all of 2015-16

No. 1: Durant motivated by Curry, LeBron in Finals — For five games through these NBA Finals, reigning MVP Stephen Curry and four-time former MVP LeBron James have keyed an epic series. Yet as the Golden State Warriors and Cleveland Cavaliers ready for Game 6 tonight (9 ET, ABC), one former MVP is keeping an eye on things as he recovers from injury. Oklahoma City Thunder star Kevin Durant tells ESPN.com’s Royce Young he can’t wait to get back on the court and have a shot at the 2016 Finals:

Once upon a time — as in a little more than a year ago — Kevin Durant was probably the only player worthy of being included in any discussion alongside LeBron James for title of best player in the game.

But after three surgeries to repair a fracture in his right foot that caused him to miss 55 games this past season, the 2014 MVP understands why his name has slipped from a lot of minds as fans marvel at James’ and Stephen Curry’s electrifying performances in the NBA Finals.

“It used to piss me off, but I love it now,” Durant told ESPN.com. “Just gotta show and prove. I don’t deserve to be up there with them this year. Next year is a different story.”

In ESPN.com’s 2014 NBA Rank project, Durant finished a stunning eighth overall, after coming in No. 2 overall in 2012 and 2013. With his season clouded by foot surgery, the reason for the drop was obvious. But that doesn’t mean Durant isn’t using being overlooked as motivation.

“Sometimes you gotta remind people what you do,” Durant said last season. “They tend to forget.”

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Morning shootaround — June 11


VIDEO: The Starters preview Game 4 of The Finals

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Lee ready for his Finals opportunity | Green: Warriors need to play with more desperation in Finals | Why Kings, D’Alessandro parted ways

No. 1: Lee ready for his opportunity in Game 4 — There’s no doubt LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers have taken control of the last two games of these NBA Finals. Yet even as the Cavs were wrapping up their Game 3 win on Tuesday, though, the opposing Golden State Warriors found a reason for some Game 4 hope in the person of David Lee. The little-used power forward sparked the Warriors’ mini-rally late in Game 3 and is due for a bigger role tonight, writes Tim Kawakami of the San Jose Mercury News:

Who else could pull this off so calmly? Who else could be this ready after being such a tiny part of the team’s rotation… until Game 3 of the NBA finals on Tuesday?

Who else could tie all of this together so surprisingly, neatly and completely—all while knowing he could be traded this summer?

Nobody except Lee, who has risen and fallen in his four seasons as a Warrior and now is rising out of nowhere again.

Yes, with the Warriors down 2-1 to Cleveland and Thursday’s Game 4 set up as a stand-or-fall championship moment, the biggest Warriors wild-card is none other than their former All-Star power forward.

Who was that playing center and working the pick-and-roll so effortlessly with Stephen Curry during the Warriors’ mad and ultimately failed fourth-quarter rally on Tuesday?

The same guy the Warriors are now counting on to keep triggering the pick-and-roll, to keep freeing up Curry and to help keep this season alive.

“I’d love to say this is some big comeback story or something like that,” Lee said Wednesday of his remarkable 13-minute stint in Game 2.

Steve Kerr has left little doubt that Lee has earned more playing time in this series, which comes after Lee didn’t play a single minute in Games 1 and 2 and only 12 total minutes in the five-game Western Conference finals.

And Lee’s teammates, who watched Lee gracefully accept losing his job to Draymond Green early this season, absolutely want to see what Lee can do with his last second chance.

“He’s a pro; he’s a true pro,” Green said. “To come in—haven’t played the entire series, I don’t think he’d played against Game 3 or 2 against Houston… to come in and have the impact on the game the way he did was huge.

“I’m sure he’ll continue to play now, because he gave us a huge spark.”

“Thankfully, he’s stayed professional, said the right things, done the right things, and was ready in a big moment for us,” general
manager Bob Myers said. “And probably will see some more time as a result of how he performed.

“It’s really a testament to him. A lot of times players can go in the other direction and he certainly didn’t.”

So, David, is this a nice way to wrap up such a mixed-up season—mostly sitting on the sidelines watching the greatest run the franchise has made in 40 years?

“We’ll see what happens,” Lee said. “All I can really do is bring the same attitude.

“With all I’ve been through this year, I really felt last night that if I got my opportunity, that good things were going to happen. And I had that confidence, and fortunately they did.

“We weren’t able to get a win, which is the most important thing, but hopefully some of the momentum we created last night can carry over into this next game and we can get one on the road here.”


VIDEO: Can David Lee change the direction of the NBA Finals?

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Blogtable: Best arena atmosphere you’ve ever been in?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Thoughts on these Finals? | Best arena atmosphere? | Next player-turned-analyst?



VIDEOVIDEO: Trey Kerby of The Starters sees just how loud Warriors fans can be

> A lot has been made about the crowds at Oracle and Quicken Loans arenas. What’s the best NBA arena atmosphere you’ve ever experienced in all your years covering the league?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com It’s not always about cheering and celebrating, you know. That’s why I’m going with Game 6 of the 1998 Finals at the then-Delta Center in Salt Lake City. There was a desperation in the stands that day from the Utah Jazz fans, facing elimination by the Chicago Bulls – again. And for a lot of others, there was a real sense that the Bulls’ championship run and, once more, Michael Jordan’s career might be ending. So as Jordan stole the ball away from Karl Malone late, followed by the play that became The Shot (push of Bryon Russell included), that was like the air being sucked right out of that building. It was excellence personified, the classic ending … if not of Jordan’s career, of the very best and most memorable part of it.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com I’m planting the flag in two old places that no longer exist — Boston Garden and Chicago Stadium. Boston Garden, with its upper deck that practically hung out over the court, had an intimate, we’re-in-this-with-you feel, a rousing, knowledgeable fan base, and was almost a living, breathing organism during the Larry Bird era. Chicago Stadium seemed to have the broad shoulders of Chicago, felt vast and overpowering and was absolutely, positively the loudest arena ever and nobody is in second place. During the first three-peat when the starting lineups were introduced, the PA announcer barely got out the first syllables of “From North Carolina …” and the roof (and your head) would rattle. I’ve been to Oracle, The Q, OKC and they just can’t touch it.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com It’s so hard to pick one. Chicago Stadium was deafening when Michael Jordan was introduced before games, Boston Garden had a magnet that pulled people to the front of their seat as Larry Bird released from the perimeter, and there wasn’t a night of leaving Oracle Arena without your ears buzzing in the 2007 playoffs as the Warriors shocked the Mavericks in the first round and Baron Davis demolished Andrei Kirilenko with a dunk in the West semifinals. But nothing beats Arco Arena in the 2002 Western Conference finals, Sacramento Kings vs. Los Angeles Lakers, ear plugs mandatory. It was the noise, of course, from voices to cow bells, but the building itself made a big difference. Arco — now Sleep Train Arena — was a barn, a gym, a comfortable corner hangout. The intensity of the Lakers-Kings relationship and the hellacious energy from fans is still unforgettable. The outcome was not a good one for Sacramento, but the atmosphere was perfect.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com Hard to beat the old Chicago Stadium during the Michael Jordan years. The rickety place had stairwells that led nowhere, the concourses were narrow and outdated and the smell of stale beer and hot sausage on the fryer filled the air, but the place shook. I thought it might crumble from the noise when Jordan hit those 3-pointers in Game 1 of the 1992 Finals against the Blazers and gave “The Shrug.” Honorable mention: The original “Hive” in Charlotte, the Charlotte Coliseum.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com The craziest NBA atmosphere I’ve been in was Game 7 of last year’s first round at the Air Canada Centre. That was a loud building in the first place, but when the Raptors came back from 10 points down with less than six minutes to go to pull within one, and then forced a turnover in the final seconds to give themselves a chance to win, I think I heard the noise in my deaf ear. One other cool atmosphere was at the Meadowlands (really) for the Nets vs. Knicks first-round series in 2004. The crowd was 50-50, which mean there was cheering for every basket and a lot of back-and-forth between fans of the two teams.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: That’s an extremely difficult question. There are so many games to choose from. But the one that sticks out for me is Game 4 of a 2011 first-round playoff series between the eventual champion Dallas Mavericks and Portland Trail Blazers at the Rose Garden. Brandon Roy put on a show for the ages to rally the Blazers to an 84-82 win that saw the home team outscore Dirk Nowitzki and the Mavs 35-15 in the fourth quarter. Portland rallied from an 18-point hole early in the fourth quarter to tie the series at 2-2. The wave of energy going through the building in that fourth quarter is like nothing I ever experienced before that or anything I’ve felt since. It was unreal. I woke up the next morning and my ears were still ringing.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com The atmosphere in Boston, in both the old Garden and the new Garden, has been consistently intimidating in the playoffs. The feeling in the old place helped create a mystique for Larry Bird‘s Celtics, and in the new building the fans fed off the energy of Kevin Garnett. It is the consistency of the support that stands out: We’re talking about a span from the 1980s to 2010 and yet it has felt as if nothing changed.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog The Cleveland crowd tonight for Game 3 was pretty great, but there are two instances that I’ll never forget:

1. The Detroit Pistons crowds in 2005 were LOUD, and then they went completely silent when Robert Horry went crazy from the perimeter in Game 5 of The Finals. That silence was deafening.

2. I know Miami fans were criticized for leaving early during Game 6 of the 2013 Finals, but the majority of them stayed in place, and when Ray Allen stepped back and knocked in the three to tie the game with seconds left, a buzz went through the American Airlines Arena unlike anything I’ve felt before in an NBA arena.

Blogtable: Lottery team that must get it right at the 2015 Draft?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Who wins it all (and why)? | Advice for Doc Rivers? | Lottery team that must get it right?



VIDEORelive the 2015 Draft lottery

> Which lottery team is under the most pressure to nail it on Draft night?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com No reason to scan the list or break a sweat on this one. It’s Minnesota. Whoever they pick – Jahlil Okafor or Karl-Anthony Towns – has to be a hit, a star, eventually an All-Star. This franchise can’t afford a Michael Olowokandi, Kwame Brown, Greg Oden or Anthony Bennett at No. 1, not after waiting the entire 27-season history of the franchise for the right to select first in the Draft, not after a playoff drought dating back to 2004. And whichever of the two the Timberwolves select, he needs to be as good or better than the guy they don’t, because second-guesses have piled up higher than snow drifts at Target Center through the years. After having only two No. 1 picks even play for the franchise (Joe Smith and Olowokandi) Minnesota will have the top guys from the past three drafts — Bennett (2013), Andrew Wiggins (2014) and this year’s choice — on its roster come October. Time to howl for the right reasons, Wolves.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com The Lakers. Nobody really wants to see Kobe Bryant‘s head literally explode from another losing season.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com Like it’s possible to pick one. I could barely narrow it down to half the lottery. The Timberwolves have to nail it because picking No. 1 comes with a scrutiny that will never go away. The Lakers have to nail it because they have so little to build on heading to the future. The Knicks have to nail it because they have even less than the Lakers. The Kings have to nail it because it’s the first big decision for Vlade Divac as head of basketball operations. The Pistons have to nail it because it’s time to make a move up the East standings. The Hornets have to nail it because this season was a step backward and must be fixed. Against that backdrop, the 76ers already have a future even without knowing how the 2015 pick develops. Talk about strange.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comUh, is this a trick question? After getting squeezed out of the top three, and out of the Big Man Sweepstakes, the Knicks need to make this one count if only to justify such a stinky season. At No. 4 there’s really not much of a decision to make. Just take whomever’s left over between D’Angelo Russell and Emmanuel Mudiay, because the Sixers at No. 3 will take one of them. Phil Jackson doesn’t need to overthink it unless he gets a sweet trade offer. Then it gets dicey.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comThe Lakers have Julius Randle and, at the No. 2 pick, the easiest choice in the Draft. The Knicks don’t have any serious talent under the age of 30 on their roster, and, at No. 4, might have a difficult decision. It seems like Emmanuel Mudiay could be the best player available when they draft, but it’s not clear that he’d be a good fit for the triangle offense. This is the first top-five pick the Knicks have had in 29 years and Phil Jackson‘s record as team president doesn’t look so hot right now. That’s some pressure.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: The Los Angeles Lakers are off the hook with that No. 2 pick. You simply sit there and let the stud big man the Minnesota Timberwolves pass up fall into your lap. So that leaves the New York Knicks at No. 4 with all of the pressure on Draft night. They’ll have their pick of talented players but not necessarily any transcendent talent. The Knicks don’t have the luxury of just selecting the best available basketball talent at No. 4. They need to identify the one player who projects as both a true difference-maker and one who can come in and pay immediate dividends alongside whatever free-agent haul Phil Jackson is able to round up. But finding a role player at No. 4 won’t do it. The Knicks need to find a future star, an All-Star even, with this lottery pick.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: It’s the Lakers, because they’re used to winning, they expect to win again, and they absolutely need a transformational player to emerge from this pick. The other teams at the top of the lottery are not faced with such high expectations.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: I can’t believe we’re here again, but right now, the answer to this question is the Knicks. They’re rebuilding, sure, but they’ve traded away some good assets — Tyson Chandler, Iman Shumpert, J.R. Smith — and haven’t really gotten much in return. They needed a home run in this Draft, with two potential franchise centers available, and now it looks as though they won’t get either one. Who can they get at the four spot? There are potentially terrific selections available, but the stakes are much higher. Considering this is their only first-round pick in the next two years, they need to get this right.