Posts Tagged ‘Rockets’

Kerr: “Not worth risk” to play Curry

HOUSTON — Stephen Curry has won most of his battles on the basketball court over the past few seasons, but he lost the debate with the Warriors staff about playing in Friday night’s Game 3 against the Rockets. His sprained right ankle is improving, but not enough to get him back into the lineup.

“We talked to him after shootaround today and he felt pretty good,” said Warriors coach Steve Kerr. “He moved well. He wanted to play. But ultimately we didn’t feel comfortable after four straight days of inactivity throwing him into the middle of a playoff game not knowing how the ankle was going to respond.

“His thought was he would be OK. We just felt a lot more comfortable putting him through 3-on-3 tomorrow, probably a 5-on-5 on Saturday and really seeing if he’s OK or not.

“It wasn’t worth the risk if we put him out there tonight and he re-injured it. It’s too big of a risk. So we’ll see what happens the next couple of days and hopefully he’ll be ready to go for Game 4.”

It was a group consisting of team orthopedist Dr. William J. Maloney, the training staff, general manager Bob Myers, Kerr and Curry that arrived at the consensus despite evidence that the ankle had improved.

“We kind of teamed up on him,” Kerr said. “He wanted to play. But he’s also very practical and he understands the thinking and he understands that it’s better safe than sorry.

“It was a very easy decision. Weighing the pluses and minuses, a very easy decision.”

As for Game 4 on Sunday?

“We’re hoping,” Kerr said. “The biggest thing for him is to play 3-on-3 tomorrow at our practice and see how he feels after that. Again, without having done anything for four days, no conditioning, no rhythm, no actual live contact, it would have been irresponsible, I think, to put him out there.”

Report: Wizards offer job to Brooks

While they may not be in the playoffs, the Wizards are in the thick of the competition for a new head coach and have offered the job to former Oklahoma City boss Scott Brooks.

Wizards general manager Ernie Grunfeld traveled to Southern California on Wednesday to meet with the Brooks, according to Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports.

Grunfeld is hoping to head off the Rockets, who have Brooks as a prime target for the job that is expected to come open as soon as they are eliminated from the playoffs. Houston is still alive in its first round series against Golden State — Game 3 is Thursday night — and that means interim coach J.B. Bickerstaff is still in charge on the Rockets bench.

Brooks has been enthusiastic about reaching an agreement with the Wizards and could complete negotiations on a contract that will pay him in the range of $7 million a season, league sources told The Vertical.

Brooks was fired after the 2015 season in Oklahoma City, where he went 338-207 in seven seasons as coach of the Thunder. He led the Thunder to the 2012 NBA Finals. If Brooks were to go to Houston he would be reunited with James Harden.

In Washington, he’d be taking over a roster with the high-powered backcourt of All-Star point guard John Wall and shooting guard Bradley Beal, who will become a free agent this summer.

Morning Shootaround — April 18




VIDEO: Highlights from Sunday’s games

NEWS OF THE MORNING
Raptors not giving into negativity | Beverley fine with playing the villain | Portland’s Stotts ready to do away with hack-a-strategy | The graduation of Dion Waiters

No. 1: Raptors not giving into the negativity — They know what it looks like, kicking off the postseason for the third straight time with a loss. It would be easy for the Toronto Raptors to give into the narrative, to get lost in the social media swirl surrounding them after their Game 1 loss to the Indiana Pacers. But they’re not going there. Heading into Game 2 tonight (7 p.m. ET, NBA TV) the Raptors still believe it’s “their turn,” as Ryan Wolstat of the Toronto Sun explains:

On his 59th birthday, Dwane Casey quoted Nas, saying sleep is the cousin of death. But the words of another rap legend, Tupac Shakur, sum up how the Raptors are feeling after another Game 1 meltdown — Me against the world.

On the heels of a third dreadful opening game effort in a row and a seventh-straight playoff defeat overall, it would be natural for the Raptors to feel like the walls are closing in around them, that the bandwagon is losing members at a rapid rate, that even the staunchest supporters are wondering whether another all too familiar let-down is on the verge of being delivered.

The players know what the vibe is, what was being said after the wobbly opener and chose to ignore it.

“I definitely didn’t go on social media because I know they were probably talking a lot of trash,” Kyle Lowry said with smile while up at the podium on a sunny Sunday afternoon in downtown Toronto.

Lowry and his teammates are looking at the bright side, honing in on the fact that this series is nowhere close to over, no matter what is being said about the underachieving group.

“I’m not shying away from it. It’s just at that point where it’s like, ‘all right, whatever.’ You know what? I know what everybody’s going to say: ‘Here we go again.’ I read everybody (including the media), there you go right there: That’s what they said,” Lowry said

Lowry insists the uproar and negativity on social media isn’t bothering him.

“No. That’s what it’s for. It’s for people to say their opinions. It’s for people to have an opinion. And that’s the world we live in. So I appreciate it, I love it, I mean I have my own opinion, I always comment on Twitter, I watch games, I say what I want to say. So that’s what it’s for. It’s for people to have a personality and have a voice. And you know, it’s part of the world. And for us, for me, I really just didn’t want to read it.”

Fellow all-star DeMar DeRozan loves the fanbase and having the entire country of Canada as potential backers, but wants the focus in the room to be on the brotherhood between the players and the staff alone.

“I don’t think we have (panicked) this time around,” DeRozan said.

“I think the outside people have. I’ve just been telling our guys, it’s all about us. It’s the guys in this jersey, the coaches, it’s one game. We understand what we have to do. We played terrible and still had a chance. We gave up 19, 20 turnovers, missed 12 free throws, we still had a chance. It’s a game. We’ve got another opportunity on our home floor to even it out. It wasn’t like we were going to go out there and sweep ’em. You know, that’s a tough team over there. Now it’s our turn to bounce back Monday.”

Head coach Dwane Casey said he didn’t tell his players to get off the likes of Twitter and Instragram, but is pretty sure ignoring the noise is a wise call.

“I just said you find out who your friends are, you’re going to find out real quick who your friends are, who’s calling for tickets and that type of thing when you’re backs are against the wall,” Casey said.

“And that’s good, you find out who’s pulling for you, who believes in you and who has your back. What I said is that group in that room is the ones that really have your back and the ones you should trust on the court. I did say that but I don’t know enough about social media to say anything about that.”

*** (more…)

Curry still questionable for Game 2

VIDEO: Curry tweaks ankle.

OAKLAND — The Warriors began to prepare for the possibility of not having Stephen Curry for Game 2 against the Rockets on Monday, with Curry missing practice Sunday to get treatment on the sprained right ankle that limited him to 20 minutes the day before and brought his history with ankle problems back to the forefront.

The reigning MVP and clear frontrunner for a repeat win of the award was hurt in the second quarter Saturday as he changed direction to run down court after missing a short jumper. Curry returned for the start of the third quarter, but was removed by coach Steve Kerr after only 2:47 when it was obvious Curry was not moving well. He returned to the locker room and was back on the bench for the start of the fourth quarter, lobbying Kerr and assistants Luke Walton and Bruce Fraser to no avail to put him in the game.

Curry said Golden State’s easy 104-78 win over the Rockets that “Right now I don’t see a scenario where I’ll be out.” But he did not practice Sunday, or speak with the media, as the Warriors prepped for Game 2 on Monday night at Oracle Arena with Shaun Livingston as the starting point guard.

“It kind of changes things,” Kerr said after practice. “We don’t seem to be as good of a coaching staff when Steph goes out. I don’t know why. But we’ve got a lot of guys who can play. I think Steph missed three or four games this year and we did fine. Obviously we’ve got to find different ways to score, but we’ll prepare for that and see what happens.”

Curry missed three games in 2015-16, March 1 against the Hawks with a bad left ankle and Dec. 30 at Dallas and Dec. 31 at Houston with a bruised lower left leg. The second half of the Texas back-to-back was the one time in the regular-season series the Rockets got close, losing by four points compared to 20 and 13 the other two meetings.

“We were embarrassed by Dallas the night before, so there was kind of a natural competitive reaction to that loss,” Kerr said. “We came out and we were more focused. We did a good job of executing our offense, taking care of the ball. We moved it well. We defended well, which allowed us to get out and run. When Steph’s out our guys understand that he’s not there to count on. They have to execute. If they don’t we’re just not going to score enough points. We did a good job of cutting and screening and all the stuff we talk about every day.”

Livingston has been an important reserve in the two campaigns since he arrived as a free agent, playing a key role in the 2015 championship and following that with another big contribution this regular season. He is experienced and steady with the ball — seventh in the league in assist-to-turnover ratio — but in some ways a direct contrast to Curry in style of play on offense, with Curry obviously a deep threat and Livingston more likely to post up than shoot threes.

 

Morning shootaround — April 17




VIDEO: The Fast Break — April 16

NEWS OF THE MORNING
It’s all about Curry’s ankle | Brooks eyeing Lakers | Familiar Raptors headache | Bradley injury could doom Celtics
No. 1: All eyes are on Stephen Curry’s ankle — Yes, the Warriors dominated, owned, locked up and threw away the key on the Rockets from the moment they walked onto the court at Oracle on Saturday. But after a 104-78 thumping in Game 1 all that anybody in the Bay Area — and all around Dub Nation — could think about was Stephen Curry limping off the court with a “tweaked” right ankle. Our own Scott Howard-Cooper says Curry seems to be the only one not worried about the injury, but Warriors coach Steve Kerr was taking no chances:

It was Stephen Curry and ankles, it was the first 48 minutes of what could be months of playoffs, and it was every bit the rout that could have been expected in a 1-8 matchup. He was lucky the Warriors hadn’t wrapped him in a mass of down pillows and called the cops to escort him home at halftime.

“Well, he saw I was writing the five players’ names on the board who I’m sending out there and he saw his name wasn’t on there and he was incredulous,” Kerr said. “And I said, ‘I don’t like the way you’re moving right now.’ He said, ‘No, I’ll be all right,’ and of course he’s going to say that. He’s a competitor. He wants to play. But we’re not going to let him play if there’s any risk of making it worse. Obviously we’re hoping that we’re going to be in the playoffs for the next couple of months. So we don’t want to make any chances.”

Including in Game 2 on Monday. More will be known as the Warriors gather for a workout Sunday morning at their practice facility, namely whether the joint stiffens and swells overnight, but Kerr is calling him questionable for now with Golden State obviously wanting to avoid an ankle that remains problematic for weeks.

“Right now I don’t see a scenario where I’ll be out,” Curry said after scoring a game-high 24 points despite playing just 20 minutes, making eight of 13 attempts overall and five of seven behind the arc. “Obviously if it’s not right and at risk of further injury and what not, that’s the only thing that I think we have to worry about. Pain tolerance and all that stuff, I kind of know what I can deal with on the court. But you don’t want anything more serious to happen favoring the ankle or what not. So that’s what we’ll pay attention to the next few days.”


VIDEO: Curry tweaks ankle

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Morning shootaround — April 16




VIDEO: Season for the ages for Warriors

NEWS OF THE MORNING
LeBron is ready | Walton could talk to Knicks | Allen bows to Curry | Morey defends McHale firing

No. 1: All business LeBron ready for playoffs — What do you get when perhaps the best all-around player in the NBA zeroes in his focus down the stretch and raises his game to a new level over the final weeks of the regular season? That’s a LeBron James who has tunnel vision on the task at hand and says he’s as prepared as possible for the start of the playoffs, according to Jeff Zillgitt of USA Today:

Since March 20, he has averaged 28.4 points, 8.5 assists and eight rebounds, and his scoring coincides with improved shooting. James – who also boasts of his best health in the past five seasons – has made 62% of his shots, including a much-improved 51.9% on three-pointers, in his past 10 games.

“Going to the gym even more, focusing in, dialing in more on what needs to be done to help us be better (and) for me to be better,” James said as the top-seeded Cavaliers prepare for the Detroit Pistons in the first round of the Eastern Conference playoffs. “I’ve been in this league a long time. I know what I need to do for my game to be even more sharp.

“I’m where I want to be.”

James is trying to join a short list of players, including Boston’s Bill Russell, Sam Jones, K.C. Jones, Tom Heinsohn and Satch Sanders, to appear in six consecutive Finals.

His outstanding play also parallels Cleveland’s increased efficiency. The Cavaliers have scored 120.7 points and allowed 101.2 points per 100 possessions in that span.

“If he plays like this, man, we’re going to be tough to beat,” Cavs coach Tyronn Lue said. “He’s just taken it to a whole other level the last three, four weeks, playing at a very high level, shooting the ball very well, shooting with it with confidence and getting it to the basket. I like the LeBron I see right now.”

***

No. 2: Walton could talk to Knicks during playoffs — Let’s get one thing straight. The first order of business for the Warriors is defending their NBA championship. But since the playoffs could stretch out over two months, it is possible that assistant coach Luke Walton could interview with the Knicks — or any other team — during the postseason, as long as it doesn’t interfere with his Golden State duties. That’s the word from Marc Berman of the New York Post:

If Knicks president Phil Jackson wanted to talk to Warriors stud assistant Luke Walton during their expected long playoff run, Golden State would not stand in the way, according to an NBA source.

Golden State’s position is that an assistant can interview for a head-coaching position “as long as it does not interfere with the team’s preparation during the playoffs,’’ the source said. For instance, an interview would need to happen in the Oakland, Calif., area at a convenient time with the club enjoying a couple of days off.

It’s unclear if Walton will want to grant any interviews as the Warriors embark on defending their title after breaking the record for best overall record with 73 wins, topping Jackson’s 1995-96 Bulls.

Jackson said he soon will embark on a narrow coaching search with coaches he “already knows.” He made a reference the search could go on until July, presumably referring to after Walton is done with The Finals.

***

No. 3: Allen says Curry in a league of his own — When the topic is greatest shooters in NBA history, the conversation usually finds Ray Allen at or near the top of the list. The Spurs, of course, will never forget what he did in the 2013 NBA Finals. But even Allen himself thinks Stephen Curry is taking the whole sharp-shooting thing to an entirely differently level, as he told SLAM online in a wide-ranging Q&A:

Ray Allen: Based on what he’s done, I think he has to be—he’s on his way to being the best ever. It’s always arguable, based on who’s telling the story. One thing I always tell people is, it’s hard to compare generations. Everybody has something or somebody that makes him feel special about the game, or the way they saw and the way they appreciate the game. I’ve sat back and watched a lot, and listened to a lot of people talk. He’s creating a lane all of his own. People comparing him to me, to Reggie [Miller]. But I think Steph is in a category of his own. Just being able to have great handles the way he has with the ball, to be able to score at will by getting to the basket. Myself, Reggie Miller, Kyle Korver, Klay Thompson—we play a different game. We’re shooters. We come off screens, pindowns—Steph can do that, but he’s creating a different lane. Point guards haven’t been able to do what he’s been able to do, because he’s mixing that 2 guard-ish in there with having the great handles of a point guard. When I broke the three-point record, they (Steph and Klay) watched that and it became something they said in their mind, this is what I want to do. Now, there are kids watching him, saying I want to work on these things, I want to be just like Steph.

***

No. 4: Morey defends firing of McHale — Even now after the firing of coach Kevin McHale back in November failed to ignite a fire under the disappointing 41-41 Rockets, general manager Daryl Morey said the move wasn’t fair, but insists it was the right thing to do. He explained in an answer to a question on QUORA:

Daryl Morey, GM Houston Rockets:

“One thing the Rockets have done well over the years under our owner Leslie Alexander is we have had very good coaches. All winning coaches and all have stayed for more than 4 years. Kevin’s long tenure with the Rockets by NBA standards was no exception. He was an amazing coach to work with who did a tremendous job. I believe he is the coach with the best winning percentage in Rockets history. Since owning the team, our owner has had fewer coaches than any team in the league except Utah. Bottom line, we have great coaches at the Rockets and they stay a long time.

Obviously, given this history the decision to change coaches was not taken lightly. Our team was reeling at the time of the change — in just our first 11 games we had lost multiple games to non playoff teams, including two at home, and none of the losses were close, most were double digit losses. In the West, you basically can’t do that for any stretch of the season and still reach our goals for the season. The prior year, for example, we had only 2 losses at home to non-playoff teams the whole season – we had already done it in only 2+ weeks. I believed that if we waited until what would be considered a normal timetable to make a change that it would likely be too late. Our only focus is on winning and I felt a material change was necessary.

Was this decision fair? No. Was it correct? That is unknown as we don’t know what coach McHale would have done if he had stayed. I am comfortable we made the best decision for the team with the information we had at the time. I know this, when Kevin coaches again a team is going to get one hell of a coach.”

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES:   The NBA responds to claims that Jeremy Lin is officiated any differently…The salary cap could jump to $92 million for the 2016-17 season…NBA hopes for change in North Carolina discrimination bill…Raptors hope return of DeMarre Carroll for the playoffs won’t disrupt their chemistry…Dirk Nowitzki doesn’t want a farewell tour like Kobe’s…Nic Batum expects to play in Game 1 vs. Miami.

Report: Yao Ming chosen for Hall of Fame

Yao Ming was far more than just another talented prospect when the Houston Rockets made him the No. 1 pick in the 2002 draft.

The 7-6 center from Shanghai was a bridge for the NBA to make inroads into China and was a key player in the globalization of the game.

Now the former eight-time All-Star has been selected for induction into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame, according to Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports. The official announcement will be made Monday at a news conference in Houston preceding the NCAA championship game.

Yao had been nominated and enters the Hall of Fame under a newly created Direct Elect International Committee.

Yao, 35, is largely responsible for the NBA’s massive reach into China and the Far East. Television ratings and merchandise sales exploded there upon Yao’s rise to stardom in the NBA.

As the No. 1 overall pick in the 2002 NBA draft, Yao made a dramatic and celebrated entrance into the league. After rapidly developing into a dominant force, several lower leg and foot issues severely damaged his durability and shortened his career. Yao averaged 19 points, 9.2 rebounds and 1.9 blocks per game across parts of eight seasons.

In a career cut short because of chronic injuries – including a third left foot fracture in 2010 –Yao retired in 2011. He was twice voted to the All-NBA second team (2007 and ’09) and three times made the All-NBA third team (2004, ’06 and ’08).

Report: No punishment for Howard


VIDEO: Dwight Howard’s incident during Saturday’s game vs. Atlanta

It was a sticky situation, but it looks like Dwight Howard will slide away with no penalty.

The NBA will not fine or suspend the Rockets center for use of an adhesive substance Saturday night in Atlanta, but sent a memo to all 30 teams that its usage is “strictly prohibited,” league sources said, according to Shams Charania of The Vertical.

Howard used a spray on his hands during the first of two Paul Millsap free throws in the first quarter of a 109-97 loss to the Hawks. When Howard touched the basketball and it was bounced to Hawks Millsap at the free-throw line, he noticed the stickiness and the referees replaced the ball.

Following a team practice Monday in Oklahoma City, where the Rockets will face the Thunder Tuesday night, Howard defended his reputation.

“I just think that it’s getting overblown, like I’m doing something crazy,” he said. “But again, I’ve never been a cheater, never been the type of player that has to do something illegal to win. It’s upsetting, but I can’t control it now.”

Howard cooperated with NBA security officials over the past day, and the league advised teams Monday that all equipment used for games must be appropriate for a basketball and any substance that could gain an advantage is not prohibited.

Report: Howard caught using Stickum


VIDEO: Dwight Howard’s ball drama

Rockets center Dwight Howard was caught using Stickum spray on his hands in the first quarter against the Hawks, Chris Vivlamore of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

Wrote Vivlamore:

As Howard was about to check back into the game, he sprayed his hands at the scorer’s table with a can covered in white tape – apparently to hide its contents. He entered the game as Paul Millsap was at the free-throw line and grabbed the ball after a made attempt. When Millsap got the ball back it clearly had a foreign substance on it.

“I’ve never felt the ball like that ever,” Millsap said after the game. “It was sticky. It was like super glue or something was on there. I couldn’t get it off my hands. It was the weirdest thing ever.”

Official Monty McCutchen grabbed the ball and went to each bench to issue a warning, saying ‘Stickum is illegal in the NBA.’ After first going to the Hawks bench he made his way toward the Rockets bench. Rockets coach J.B. Bickerstaff slid in front of the can, still at the scorer’s table. McCutchen noted he knew what Bickerstaff was hiding.

No penalty was enforced. The can was then removed from the scorer’s table by a member of the Rockets’ staff.

The NBA is reviewing the incident, according to the Journal-Constitution.

The Hawks won 109-97 as Howard had 17 rebounds and eight points while missing five of seven shots.

 

Morning shootaround — March 7


VIDEO: Highlight’s from Sunday’s games

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Warriors were due for a game like this | Lebron’s tweets can cause nightmares | Gentry, Pelicans ready to look to the future? | Curry skeptical he could ever score 81

No. 1: The Warriors were due for a game like this Kobe Bryant credited the socks the Lakers wore for their stunning upset victory over the Golden State Warriors Sunday at Staples Center. Warriors coach Steve Kerr said his team got what it deserved, a beat down from the team with the second worst record in the league. But Tim Kawakami of the San Jose Mercury News believes the mighty Warriors, who host the Orlando Magic tonight (10:30 p.m. ET, NBA League Pass), were simply due for a game when they literally could not shoot straight from their normal sweet spots:

Every NBA team is susceptible to the big road clunker, even the Warriors.

Every really good team sometimes plays a really bad game.

Every championship contender will have wobbly focus and heavy legs once in a while, especially when the game is in Los Angeles, when tipoff is before 1 p.m., and when they’re overwhelming favorites over the Lakers.

So yes, the Warriors were due for a loss like they just suffered on Sunday, yes, they deserved it, and yes, I’m sure they were also pretty embarrassed by it.

For the greatest teams, what matters most is what happens next, and for the Warriors that means Monday night at Oracle against Orlando.

If the Warriors lose back-to-back games for the first time this season, well, then there might be cause for emergency sirens to blare and panic to strike throughout the Bay Area.

Not until then, and I doubt any of that will be necessary, anyway.

Every time a great team loses, it seems to come out of nowhere — just as Sunday’s 112-95 Lakers triumph over the Warriors was a tale of shock and astonishment.

But when you look back, you can always figure out the rhyme and reason — just as you can for this Warriors loss, which dropped them to 55-6, still on pace to break whatever record you want them to.

The Warriors lost this game because Curry and Thompson combined to miss 17 of their 18 3-point attempts, because the Lakers attacked the Warriors’ sluggish defense, and because sometimes you’re just due.

Did this game expose glaring weaknesses in the Warriors? No, it did not; they can be beaten by a lot of the same things that can beat everybody else, but it just happens to the Warriors less often.

***

No. 2: LeBron’s tweets can cause nightmares … if you let them: Yes, people are still trying to decipher the meaning of tweets LeBron James sent out last week, the same ones that caused a frenzy (with everyone weighing in on what he meant with those words). And yes, LeBron’s tweets can drive you crazy, if you let them, as Joe Vardon of Cleveland.com makes clear. But wouldn’t this time be better spent focusing on more pressing matters, like the Memphis Grizzlies, who visit Quicken Loans Arena tonight (7 ET, NBA TV)?

LeBron James and that Twitter account of his…together they’re either wreaking havoc and spelling doom for the Cavaliers, or simply messing with us.

Here’s James’ latest blast, to some more than 28.5 million followers, this morning, around the time many are finishing up with church:

We’re not going to speculate here as to whom or what he’s referring.

But there’s been a lot of speculating over the past week, mostly because James has unleashed a string of cryptic, either virtually innocuous or potentially loaded tweets since Tuesday.

James was asked about the first two on Thursday, and didn’t want to talk about it. He’ll be asked again Monday following Cleveland’s shootaround in preparation for the Memphis Grizzlies.

The Cavs are 44-17, lead the Raptors by 2.5 games for first place in the East, and beat their last two opponents by a combined 42 points over the weekend.

So, what’s the problem? Is there one? Is it all a ruse? Motivation tactic?

***

No. 3: Gentry,Pelicans ready to look to the future? The New Orleans Pelicans have already acknowledged that their pursuit of a playoff berth this season is dead. There have been too many injuries, too many missed opportunities for Alvin Gentry‘s bunch, they host the the Sacramento Kings tonight (8 ET, NBA League Pass), to repeat last season’s late-season push that saw the Pelicans punch their postseason ticket in the regular-season finale. So instead of waiting any longer, it’s perhaps time for Gentry and the Pelicans to look to the future, as Justin Verrier of ESPN.com suggests:

“At some stage we have to start thinking about the future, looking at the future,” Gentry said after a 106-94 loss to the Utah Jazz dropped the Pelicans to 3-5 since the All-Star break. “That’s one of the reasons why I stuck Jrue [Holiday] out there to start the second half. We have to start looking at Jrue as a starter some and playing him. And trying to find ways to get Anthony [Davis] the ball more in the flow of the game. Even if they’re double-teaming him, that’s gotta be something as coaches that we try to figure out also.

“At this stage, like I said, it would be a miracle almost for us to make the playoffs. We really have to start looking at developing a culture and how we’re gonna play in the future and figuring out guys on this team, how they fit into the system and if they’re going to be able to fit in a system.”

Despite mounting evidence that the team plays better with Holiday on the floor — his plus-1.0 net rating is best on the team, per NBA.com/Stats — and that Davis, the main cog in the team’s future, is more effective with Holiday alongside him — 5.3 points better in true shooting percentage, to be exact — the Pelicans have brought the 25-year-old guard off the bench since Dec. 4 to give a depleted second unit an extra “punch.” Gentry said he didn’t envision changing the setup as recently as two weeks ago, even though it put their two best players on the court together for only 19.3 minutes a game.

But a lot has changed even in the past two days. In his fourth game back, Eric Gordon refractured the same right ring finger that kept him out of 16 games. With three players (Tyreke EvansQuincy PondexterBryce Dejean-Jones) out for the season, the Pelicans have lost the fourth-most games (183) in the NBA to injuries and illness, according to InStreetClothes.com. And after a fourth straight loss, the Pelicans are now 6 ½ games behind the Rockets for the eighth and final spot in the Western Conference playoffs with 21 still to play. Even the most optimistic would admit that the odds — 0.3 percent entering Saturday’s games, according to ESPN’s Basketball Power Index — are against them.

Holiday hadn’t heard about Gentry’s intentions after the loss to Utah, but when told by reporters his response was tantamount to: Oh, nice.

“Nah, that’s the first I’m hearing about it. I’m cool with it,” Holiday said. “With the lack of bodies I feel like [we] kinda have to. Whatever it is we need to win. Obviously our last three games haven’t gone the way we wanted them to, but we still gonna try to win every game.”

Even with the obstacles the Pelicans have faced, Davis made sure to note that he isn’t ready to concede.

“I’m playing every game,” he said after putting up 29 points on 11-for-31 shooting and 11 rebounds in the loss to the Jazz. “I still got hope for this team, still got faith in these guys. I feel like we still can do it. We just got to believe.”

***

No. 4: Curry skeptical he could ever top Kobe’s 81: For all of the magic Stephen Curry has created this season, he knows his limitations. He knows that even with is seemingly otherworldly ability to shoot the ball from distances and angles few can, he’s skeptical that he could ever reach the 81-point zenith that Kobe Bryant did. Mark Medina of the LA Daily News explains:

The question made Stephen Curry smile and shake his head. He showed the same disbelief many have when they watch him play.

The Golden State Warriors’ guard and defending regular-season MVP has seemingly made any shot at any angle and from any distance. But he cast serious doubts on accomplishing something else even more miraculous.

Could Curry ever break Kobe Bryant’s career-high 81-point game against the Toronto Raptors nearly a decade ago?

“Not a chance,” Curry told Los Angeles News Group. “There’s a reason why people are still talking about that game to this day. It’s so special.”

Yes, Bryant’s career game still represents the NBA’s second-highest scoring performance behind Wilt Chamberlain’s 100-point game in 1962. But Bryant does not consider the milestone special enough to think his record will remain sacred.

Said Bryant: “It’s just a matter of you have to believe it’s possible.”

The Lakers (12-51) enter Sunday’s game against the Golden State Warriors (55-5) at Staples Center with Curry doing what was once considered impossible.

He has averaged a league-leading 30.7 points per game despite playing only 33.9 minutes per contest. He has ranked first this season in posting 30-point games (29), 40-point games (11) and 50-point games (three). He shattered his own single-season three-point record (293) still with 22 games remaining.

According to NBA.com, Curry has made 3-pointers from basically anywhere, including the right corner (53.3%), the left corner (45.3%) and at the top of the key (46.5%). Very few can guard Curry no matter the distance, including shots from 10-14 feet (54.5%), 15-19 feet (39.7%), 20-24 feet (48%), 25-29 feet (45.9%) and 30-34 feet (58.3%).

Could all those numbers add up to what Bryant did on Jan. 22, 2006?

“Steph is a talented enough scorer that you could definitely say it’s a possibility.”said Warriors assistant coach Luke Walton, who played with Bryant during his record-setting night. “But it’s not very realistic. If we’re blowing someone out, he’s going to rest.”

Curry needed all 48 minutes to post a career-high 54 points on Feb. 27, 2013 against New York. Curry logged 36 minutes to score a season-high 53 points on Oct. 31, 2015 against New Orleans. Then there marked six games Curry played under 30 minutes this season amid the Warriors coasting to a double-digit victory. Through swarming double teams or rare off nights, Curry can still dish to Klay Thompson, Draymond Green or Andre Iguodala.

“If there’s one guy in the league that has a chance of doing it, it would be him,” Lakers coach Byron Scott said of Curry. “But they’ve got so many weapons that’s it not needed from him to have that type of game to shoot it 40 times.”

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SOME RANDOM HEADLINES:  It appears that former Atlanta Hawks lottery pick Josh Childress is taking his talents to the D-League … The Los Angeles Clippers stumbled through a Thunder hangover when they fell at home to the Hawks … Erik Spoelstra says Chris Bosh is working out with the Heat staff … Bucks forward Giannis Antetokounmpo has a fan in Kevin Durant … The Rockets fire back at their critics with a big win in Toronto