Posts Tagged ‘Players Union’

Big O: LeBron Would ‘Excel’ As NBPA Prez

.

LeBron James is said to be “mulling” making a bid for the presidency of the NBA players association.

Oscar Robertson held that post longer than any NBA player in history.

To this day, Robertson remains the biggest name to have served his fellow players in that capacity. And as one of the game’s true Olympian figures, Robertson cannot imagine a better candidate than James, who is on his way to similar heights.

“Yeah, he’d have to think about it — I think he would have an excellent situation,” Robertson said in a phone interview Thursday evening. “I think if he was president of the players [union], he would excel like he does on the basketball court. I guess, maybe now with all the advice and the consultants and things, it would be a different situation.”

Robertson, the NBA’s legendary “Big O” during his Hall of Fame career in Cincinnati and Milwaukee, served as president of the National Basketball Players Association from 1965 to his retirement in 1974. Those were some of the league’s, and the union’s, most tumultuous years, when the two sides hammered out the makings of today’s so-called “player-owner partnership” mostly by colliding repeatedly into each other.

Big O key in early labor battles

Organized by Celtics great Bob Cousy in 1954 and further established by his Boston teammate Tom Heinsohn from 1958-65, the union in 1965 still was fighting for what now would be considered bare essentials: pay for preseason games, better medical care, the concept of an All-Star “break,” modest bumps in meal money and pensions, and a boost in the minimum player salary — out of FOUR figures. All of the strategies and jargon that were in play during the 2011 lockout, like cancelled games and filings with the National Labor Relations Board? Those were in play in the 1960s, too, when the NBPA’s power base was a lot more tenuous.

“Actually, I was naïve when I started,” Robertson said. “I didn’t know anything about it.  Sometimes it’s fate, what happens. So I just got involved. I didn’t know anything about the union whatsoever — I knew what it was because I was in it, but as far as how to run it, it was on-the-job training for me.”

The American Basketball Association (ABA) sprang up in 1967, exacerbating tensions between the NBA’s owners and the players. By 1970, with salaries bid ever higher and the two leagues in merger negotiations, the union filed an antitrust lawsuit to block such a move, given its impact on their employment and freedoms. The players sought to abolish the college draft and the option clause in standard contracts that bound them to their teams in perpetuity. Acrimony spiked, and a lawsuit in the matter soon became known for the union president’s name attached to it: the Oscar Robertson suit.

“I’m glad that I was a star,” Robertson recalled Thursday. “Because if I was a mediocre player, I wouldn’t have lasted very long. Because in those days, the league hated you as a player rep and they wanted to get rid of you.”

Robertson, now 74, wasn’t just a star. He was the LeBron James of his day (or vice versa). Many people know of him as the master of the triple-double — in 1961-62, he famously averaged at least 10 points, 10 rebounds and 10 assists for an entire season. What too many neglect, of course, is that Robertson averaged 30.8 points along with those 12.5 rebounds and 11.4 assists.

Even fewer realize that the 6-foot-5, 205-pound guard averaged a triple-double over his first five seasons in the league: 30.2 ppg, 10.4 rpg and 10.6 apg in 384 appearances from 1960-61 through 1964-65.

Robertson’s game gave him a voice, not unlike James in Houston at All-Star weekend in February. On that Saturday, at the union’s membership meeting at the Hilton, James commanded the room by probing and leading the discussion of NBPA executive director Billy Hunter’s job performance and ethics, outgoing president Derek Fisher’s role, the members of the union’s executive committee and the very future of the association.

James and veteran Jerry Stackhouse, through their comments, questions and actions that afternoon, reportedly imposed order on a group spinning out of control. Stackhouse, who recently told FoxSports.com that the union hopes to name a replacement for Hunter (and acting director Ron Klempner) sometime after Christmas, isn’t expected to be active as a player this season.

But James’ star power as a possible NBPA president could boost the union’s credibility and impact.

Stars have tradition of taking NBPA spotlight

The star-driven NBA has had, for more than a decade, a union driven by role players. What Cousy, Heinsohn and Robertson began, others such as Bob Lanier, Isiah Thomas and Patrick Ewing continued. But since 2001, Michael Curry (2001-05), Antonio Davis (2005-06) and Fisher (2006-present) have headed the NBPA.

Through the union’s first 47 years, 10 players served as president; seven wound up in the Hall of Fame and the 10 combined for 75 All-Star selections. In the past 13 years, Davis’ 2001 All-Star appearance stands alone. None of the last three presidents is headed to Springfield.

That didn’t preclude them from being effective — Fisher worked tirelessly and often thanklessly through the prickly lockout two years ago. But the clout that comes with star status — James has two NBA titles with the Heat, four MVPs, Olympic gold and more — can help immensely, Robertson said.

“I felt I commanded a lot of respect from a lot of different ball players, when you say something to the guys,” Robertson said. “And if you’re friendly with ‘em, other than playing basketball, it will help also.”

Finding NBA stars willing to take on the role, while sacrificing time and outside earning opportunities, has gotten more difficult. Robertson thinks it has something to do with the stakes these days.

“That’s always been [an apathy] problem with some guys,” he said. “But you look at it over the years, with all of the problems they’ve had, a lot of players because they’re making money, they just don’t get involved. They don’t need to — it might hurt you selling a pair of shoes or a headband or something.”

Robertson: NBPA prez a job of ‘sacrifice’

People can debate the merits of a union president who dominates All-NBA teams vs. one who relates (and earns similarly) to the league’s middle class. Either version will wind up logging long hours. “There’s no doubt about it, it’s a sacrifice,” Robertson said. “Especially if you do a good job. If you do the job [the way] they’re going to have confidence in you, sometimes it gets a little lonely. Until something happens.

“I didn’t think about whether it was hard or not [to make time]. It was an opportunity. There was an awful lot going on when I was with the players association, a lot of changes that needed to be done. Some we did right, some we didn’t.”

Robertson is proud of the gains achieved by the NBPA during his tenure. The Robertson lawsuit triggered negotiations that led to free agency, as well as a settlement that paid more than $4 million to then-current players and another $1 million in union legal fees. Pensions improved and the minimum salary tripled on his watch.

Only a handful of his peers or players since have thanked him for his service, Robertson said (“But I didn’t do it for that anyway”). He also said he paid a professional price. Robertson was dropped after one season as color analyst on the NBA’s network telecasts because, legend has it, some owners bristled at such a prominent role for the player who sued them.

On the other side of the ledger, however, Robertson points to the strides they all made. “Look at the money guys are making now,” he said. “Look at the [charter-jet, luxury-hotel] travel. There’s an orthopedic doctor at the games. You get better meal money. You have a right to go to other teams if you don’t have a valid and existing contract with your team.

“There’s no doubt about it — we were there during some [pivotal] years for the NBA.”

So there are some of the pros and cons, in Robertson’s view, as James mulls a potential candidacy: The time commitment, the opportunities skipped, the politics involved, knowing when to delegate and so on. The Hall of Famer said he would be willing to advise James, if asked. Also, Robertson’s old friend Jim Quinn — the attorney who worked on the lawsuit four decades ago and helped broker the lockout settlement 20 months ago — is again working with the NBPA in its search for Hunter’s replacement.

The union’s greatest challenge now? “Getting rid of personality tiffs. That kills you,” Robertson said.

“Somebody gets upset … because somebody doesn’t like what you’re doing, and they start this current going against you. A lot of players, when they start to make millions of dollars and they get agents who also are afraid to have their little nest egg cut off, that’s what happens.”

James, through force of personality and basketball superiority, might be the right choice to stem that.

LeBron James’ Latest MVP: Most Vocal

 

Any doubts that this is LeBron James‘ NBA and the other players currently are just participating in it should have been shelved last weekend. No, not by what the reigning Most Valuable Player and runaway favorite again for the 2012-13 award (sorry, Charles) did in the All-Star Game on Sunday, though his 19 points, five assists and three 3-pointers in 30 minutes weren’t shabby.

James made his greater impact the day before, when he led the discussion – some have referred to it as part interrogation, part rallying cry – of fellow union members at which National Basketball Players Association Billy Hunter was relieved of his duties.

Insiders marveled immediately at how forceful both the Miami Heat supertar and Brooklyn Nets veteran Jerry Stackhouse were, among the 35-40 players in the hotel meeting room, in vetting the recent investigation into Hunter’s nepotism and conflicts of interest and in moving the group toward a cleaner, more player-driven organization.

The vote of team player reps to oust Hunter was unanimous, 24-0 (not all teams were represented). The reconfigured executive committee, several of whom stood behind union president Derek Fisher when the outcome was announced, featured a handful of new members (including Stackhouse) along with some holdovers.

But it wouldn’t have gotten to that point in the span of a couple of hours, if not for James and Stackhouse challenging the business audit conducted by law firm Paul, Weiss, then challenging their peers to take the union back.

The New York Times quoted one person in the room as saying, “It was spectacular.”

“It’s a misperception that we try to fight, that this was the first meeting LeBron has attended or this was the first time LeBron said something,” said Miami teammate James Jones, the NBPA’s secretary-treasurer. “LeBron’s always talking about how we can improve our game and the issues surrounding our game. Because he’s one of this league’s brightest faces and brightest stars.”

Star power matters in situations like this, not just when national media is focused on a lockout and collective-bargaining talks. James and other big names such as Dwyane Wade, Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce made their presence in Manhattan known in the fall of 2011, when the NBA was shut down and sliced from 82 games to 66 in 2011-12 before an agreement was reached.

But dealing with internal strife matters, too, as does the reorganization and the strides that can be made during times of labor peace. It’s not just for the 10th or 12th men on NBA rosters (Chris Paul was the only perennial All-Star on the exec committee.)

“I want to be educated,” James told NBA.com late Thursday night, after the Heat’s drubbing of the Bulls in Chicago. “Not only so I’m educated individually but so I can relate to my teammates and my teammates can relate it to their friends in the league. So we all can be more knowledgeable about it and not be caught off guard – that’s what happened. Everybody asks about [the Hunter crisis] and when you don’t have an answer, that doesn’t look good.”

If others were impressed with him, James said he was impressed with Stackhouse, 38 and 18 years into an NBA career that might not continue beyond this spring. The Nets swingman wasn’t just vocal – he accepted a VP spot on the union board. Stackhouse also was working the visitors dressing room at Barclays Center Friday, along with NBPA attorney Ron Klempner, talking with members of the Houston Rockets.

“That shows a lot,” James said of Stackhouse’s commitment. “He’s almost finished with his career and it’s not about him. It’s about the collective.”

Fisher and the other players took no questions from reporters last week after reading a statement of less than three minutes announcing Hunter’s dismissal. But Jones said the 8-0 vote against Fisher last spring, seeking his resignation, was set aside at the meeting when the case against Hunter was made clear to those players in attendance. “What happened in the past is in the past,” Jones said. “Derek is our president and we’re all behind him.”

The Heat reserve also said that it wasn’t true that most NBA players are ignorant of or disinterested in union business until trouble looms. “It’s not like we’re trying to keep 20,000 members involved,” Jones said. “We’ve got about 450 . It’s a misconception that they’re not involved.”

Still, many critics have cited Fisher and others for allowing Hunter’s questionable decisions – hiring family members, directing NBPA investments, paying certain improper expenses and the limited oversight of his contract extension – to occur on their watch. Even Fisher said after the meeting, “Going forward, we’ll no longer be divided, misled, misinformed. This is our union and we’re taking it back.”

That, James said, was his motivation last weekend.

Hunter, 70, is expected to mount a legal challenge, pending the results of criminal investigations into the matter. Or he may simply seek a settlement of the $10.5 million he says is still owed to him. The union might turn to an executive search firm to find a replacement for Hunter, unless Klempner seeks the position permanently and is a consensus choice.

“We haven’t got to that point yet,” James said. “We cleaned our house with the firing of Billy, releasing him. Right now we are getting things in order. But we are not going to take a step back. We’re going to push forward and make sure we have more of an emphasis on the players.

“We feel like that’s something that should be done – the players’ voices mean something. In the past, it wasn’t the players that we heard so much.”

And there’s no better time, with relative labor peace until at least 2017.

“Yeah, that’s why you get started now,” James said. “So at least you have a plan by the time it’s time to talk again.”

NBA Players Union Ousts Longtime Director Billy Hunter

h

HOUSTON – Calling it “a day of change,” Derek Fisher told a roomful of reporters that the National Basketball Players Association had voted unanimously to terminate the employment of Billy Hunter, the union’s executive director since 1996.

That’s how Fisher, the union president, opened his statement. Moments later – and there weren’t many of those in the brief-statement, no-questions news conference that lasted fewer than three minutes – Fisher added: “We do not doubt that this process will possibly continue in an ugly way.”

Apparently, a day of change doesn’t happen overnight.

A group of NBA players estimated to number somewhere between 35 to 50 – All-Stars, participants in assorted weekend events, team player representatives and other interested union members – gathered Saturday afternoon to hear specifics in the NBPA’s dispute with Hunter and ultimately decide his fate. The roll-call included Miami’s LeBron James, New York’s Tyson Chandler, Chicago’s Joakim Noah, Minnesota’s Kevin Love, the L.A. Lakers’ Steve Blake, Houston’s Chandler Parsons and Cleveland’s Daniel Gibson, among the many.

Battle lines were drawn three weeks ago when an independent business review commissioned by the players was released, citing Hunter for nepotism and conflicts of interest and raising questions about the validity of his most recent contract extension. Hunter countered by saying that none of the incidents reported – including hiring two of his daughters or directing union financial business to an investment firm that employs his son – rose to the level of criminal conduct, though he swiftly instituted “reforms” against such activity. He also maintained that his contract – which pays Hunter an annual salary of about $3 million, with an estimated $10.5 million still due him – did receive proper oversight, per NBPA by-laws.

Friction between Hunter and Fisher sparked during and after the 2011 NBA lockout. The in-fighting led to a unanimous vote by what then was an eight-member executive committee of players seeking Fisher’s resignation. But with report last month from law firm Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison, a newly configured committee voted 5-0 to place Hunter on paid leave of absence.

By announcing Hunter’s dismissal without fielding questions, there was no explanation offered for how an 8-0 committee vote against Fisher got turned around so thoroughly. Or what the veteran NBA guard’s future holds in relation to his union role. Or whether a broader vote by the general membership would be held or needed.

Up at the podium Saturday, Fisher said simply that he would continue as president. San Antonio forward Matt Bonner will serve as vice president and Miami’s James Jones continues as secretary-treasurer.

Brooklyn’s Jerry Stackhouse – who had been urging an NBPA housecleaning that would sweep out Hunter and Fisher – is the first vice president-elect. Chris Paul, Roger Mason Jr., Andre Iguodala, Stephan Curry and Willie Green will serves as vice presidents on the new executive committee.

Fisher’s brief statement did not provide a specific reason for Hunter’s termination or comment on the validity of his contract. Instead, Fisher said: We want to make it clear that we are here to serve only the best interests of the players. No threats, no lies, no distractions will stop us from serving our membership.”

Fisher alluded to “three ongoing government investigations pending” into Hunter’s business practices, including the U.S. Attorney’s office in New York. Some outsiders had speculated that the players might keep Hunter on his paid leave of absence while waiting for those investigations to be completed, perhaps in the hope they would provide “cause” for his firing.

But a union source told NBA.com that bringing the situation to a head now, rather than waiting, would be more helpful to the NBPA if the two sides opt to reach some settlement.

The 70-year-old Hunter, who had held his post since 1996, had wanted to participate in the players’ annual meeting at All-Star Weekend to provide his side of the story but he was told by the union he would not be permitted to attend. Instead, he put his rebuttal on a website, challenging the union’s position on him and handling of the matter.

But Fisher and his peers, as they stood at the front of a mostly empty banquet hall, seemed eager at least for the sounds of closure. “Going forward,” he said, “we’ll no longer be divided, misled, misinformed. This is our union and we’re taking it back.”

Nets’ Stackhouse On Players Union: Hunter, Fisher, Others Must Go

Several NBA players, including Boston’s Paul Pierce and Brooklyn’s Deron Williams, have said that a change is needed atop the National Basketball Players Association’s hierarchy. In other words, Billy Hunter, cited recently for nepotism and conflicts of interest after 16 years as the union’s executive directory, needs to go.

Now, Nets veteran Jerry Stackhouse adds his voice, perhaps the most strident yet, to those seeking reforms that begin but don’t necessarily end with Hunter being replaced. Stackhouse made his views clear to Detroit News reporter Vincent Goodwill after Brooklyn’s victory over the Pistons Wednesday.

“I think we need wholesale changes all the way around,” Stackhouse said. “I think everybody’s pointing the finger at Billy, and rightfully so. He’s made some wrong moves, but at the same time, we’ve sat and allowed those moves to be made.”

In other words, NBA players bear responsibility for whatever has gone on that they might not like. That includes union president Derek Fisher and members of the NBPA’s executive committee.

Stackhouse says Hunter isn’t the only one who needs to be shown the door.

“Derek has stepped up and has really tried to grab the reins but I think he has to go too,” he said. “If you’re not aware of everything that’s happened on your watch for so long, I think the whole system is flawed.”

Stackhouse, a 1995 lottery pick in his 18th NBA season with his eighth franchise, said he will travel to Houston next week for what are expected to be some heavy-duty union meetings at All-Star weekend.

“I plan on going to make my point. I won’t be surprised if Billy was there, with all he’s done he’ll try to show his face and act as if business as usual,” Stackhouse said. “The same thing with Derek. They can’t operate as if business as usual. They’ve shown their flaws too much to still continue in their positions.”

With the current collective bargaining agreement in place for five more years, Stackhouse sees this as a time for the union to get its house in order. For that to happen, though, every NBA player has to show an interest in his and his peers’ business interests, rather than sticking someone in each team’s locker room with the “player rep” role and leaving important work only to them.

Some might note that Stackhouse, 38, wasn’t a familiar face at a lot of the CBA talks during the 2011 lockout. Others might wonder if he’s angling for a post-playing career as a union exec – though that would require him to stop playing, which Stackhouse has show no signs of doing.

Besides, he said, this matter is bigger than one guy’s ire or ambitions.

“It’s not about me,” said Stackhouse, who is likely to retire after this season or the next. “It’s about a league that’s been great to me and great to a lot of other people, to make sure we keep growing. The league is growing and the salaries should grow too.”

Union Chief Hunter Faces More Scrutiny, Acts On Nepotism Claim In Report

All-Star Weekend is the NBA’s de facto annual convention, a mostly happy mix of basketball, brand-building, show biz, sponsorships and celebration, with a little bit of league business thrown in. Things figure to be a little more heavy this year, however, from the players’ side.

The National Basketball Players Association will be faced with serious questions about executive director Billy Hunter’s fitness to continue in his current position, based on reports Tuesday by the New York Times and Bloomberg News. They represent the latest challenges to Hunter’s performance, coming in the wake of the Jan. 17 release of an independent law firm’s findings. That report, commissioned by the players, was strongly critical of the executive director’s business practices.

In the Times’ piece, Arn Tellem, one of the NBA’s most powerful player agents, called for Hunter’s removal and urged that they take action at All-Star Weekend in Houston. The paper obtained a copy of Tellem’s letter to his players.

“N.B.A. players deserve better representation from the union they fund,” Tellem writes in the letter. “I implore you and your fellow players to take control of your union and your future. It’s time for Mr. Hunter to go.”

Tellem suggests that players should make that decision when the players association holds its annual All-Star meeting on the weekend of Feb. 15 to 17. That is also when the players will discuss the recent audit, by the law firm Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison. Representatives of the firm are expected to present the findings and answer questions.

In his letter, Tellem suggests that Hunter should not be allowed to attend that meeting to prevent him from any attempt “to intimidate and manipulate.” Tellem writes: “Hunter is betting that the players — historically passive — will let him slide. I hope you don’t. Clearly, Hunter has violated your trust.”

The Bloomberg story reported that Hunter dismissed family members from union roles after the Paul, Weiss report cited its findings of nepotism and conflict of interest  The moves were disclosed in a Jan. 23 letter Hunter wrote to a special committee of players.

The New York-based union paid almost $4.8 million to Hunter’s family members and their professional firms since 2001, according to public records. Hunter makes $3 million a year as union chief.

“Hopefully this decision will alleviate any concerns raised by their employment,” Hunter wrote in the letter. “These measures are being taken although the report noted that both of them were highly qualified, not overpaid, and were contributing members of the NBPA staff.”

Robyn Hunter, the director’s daughter, ceased working at the union on Jan. 25, according to the letter. Megan Inaba, his daughter-in-law and director of special events and sponsorships, will leave on Feb. 17 after the National Basketball Association’s All-Star weekend.

Hunter, 70, also secured a letter of resignation from Prim Capital, which employs his son, Todd.

Hunter, through union spokesman Dan Wasserman, declined to comment on the letter or his family’s employment changes.

The independent report of two weeks ago focused on Hunter’s ethics and raised questions about the approval process for his current five-year contract as director, worth approximately $15 million. Tellem’s letter was highly critical of Hunter’s performance in leading NBA players through the 2011-12 lockout.

Tellem was one of six agents who, at the height of tensions during the dispute, called for the union to decertify, which would have removed him as a principal in the process. He resisted, only later accepting the players’ strategy to file a “disclaimer of interest” as a less strident – and perhaps less effective – alternative.

More from the Times story:

Tellem devotes a major portion of his letter to criticizing Hunter’s handling of the lockout, saying that the union chief was “tactically, strategically and logistically unprepared” and that Commissioner David Stern “outmaneuvered Mr. Hunter from the get-go.” The decision to reject decertification, Tellem writes, showed that Hunter was “more concerned with saving his job and salary than in making the best deal for the players.”

The procedure for firing Hunter is not entirely clear, although it would presumably begin with the 60 or so player representatives (two from each team). The union also has a nine-player executive board, but that board has seven vacancies because of the union’s failure to hold an election within the last year. An election is scheduled for All-Star weekend.

Last year at this time, parties on both sides – owners and players – were happy just to have salvaged a season that could include a 2012 All-Star Weekend. The 2013 edition figures to be a lot more work and a little more heated.

Hunter, Fisher Not Persuaded By Owners’ Latest Proposal

NEW YORK – Sleeping on it apparently didn’t soften the NBA players’ view of the owners’ latest proposal in their continuing but so far fruitless negotiations of a new collective bargaining agreement. Quite the opposite.

One day after meeting with the owners Tuesday in the latest round of talks to avert a lockout on July 1, Billy Hunter, executive director of the National Basketball Players Association and union president Derek Fisher sounded less persuaded than ever.

For instance, in reference to the owners’ concept of a “flex” salary cap that would replace the current “soft” cap, Fisher did not hold back, according to Brian Mahoney of the Associated Press:

Union president Derek Fisher of the Lakers says that’s a “total distortion of reality,” saying “it’s not a flexible cap, it’s a hard cap.”

Hunter, in talking Wednesday with a few reporters in New York, said of the terms proposed 24 hours earlier: “Their demand is gargantuan.” He said the NBA’s proposal would cost the players $7 billion in compensation over the 10-years of the deal and that it would take until the 10th year for the players to reach the $2.17 billion in salary and benefits they earned in 2010-11.

(more…)

Union upset with rule changes

Union executive director Billy Hunter isn’t pleased with the rules designed to curb player complaining and promised legal action.

“The new unilateral rule changes are an unnecessary and unwarranted overreaction on the league’s behalf,” Hunter said in a statement released Thursday on behalf of the Players Association. “We have not seen any increase in the level of ‘complaining’ to the officials and we believe that players as a whole have demonstrated appropriate behavior toward the officials.

“Worse yet, to the extent the harsher treatment from the referees leads to a stifling of the players’ passion and exuberance for their work, we fear these changes may actually harm our product. The changes were made without proper consultation with the Players Association, and we intend to file an appropriate legal challenge.”

An NBPA official said such legal action would likely take place during the next 20-30 days. Four years ago, the union filed an unfair labor practice charge with the National Labor Relations Board over a similar behavior-related clean-up effort by the league.

NBA officials weren’t immediately available to comment on Hunter’s statement.

League referees are operating under stricter guidelines designed to limit player reaction, both verbal and non-verbal, towards officials. The NBA’s desire to drastically reduce what it deems as excessive complaining falls under its “Respect for the Game” initiative. The league office has said that fan research suggests that NBA players complain too much, especially compared to other pro athletes.

Officials have been briefing teams throughout the preseason on what would constitute a violation, and therefore a technical foul, under the new guidelines. Among the points of emphasis: Players are no longer allowed to excessively question referees and engage in an overt act, such as an air punch or exaggerated clap to protest a call.

The changes were front and center in Wednesday’s New York-Boston game at Madison Square Garden. Four technicals were called in span of 16 seconds of the second quarter, which included the ejection of Celtics star Kevin Garnett.

Technicals are not only easier to get, they’re now twice as costly. Players and coaches are docked $2,000 for each the first five techs of the season, $3,000 each for the next five and $4,000 each for 11-15. After that it’s $5,000 each. Suspensions also start with the 16th technical.