Posts Tagged ‘Philadelphia 76ers’

Morning shootaround — Dec. 11


VIDEO:
Highlights from games played Dec. 10

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Nets move Kirilenko | Knicks project united front | Rondo, Stephenson get physical | Warriors introduce new arena redesign

No. 1: Nets move Kirilenko — It’s not a member of their core, but the Nets have agreed to a trade that clears a bit of cap space. Forward Andrei Kirilenko goes from Brooklyn to Philadelphia, saving the Nets some cash, and the Nets add forward Brandon Davies and his non-guaranteed contract. As our John Schuhmann writes, it sure looks like neither player may be long for his new team…

Brandon Davies isn’t completely awful, but his contract is non-guaranteed, so the Nets could waive him and not have to pay him anything. Assuming they do, the trade would save them about $6.6 million in luxury tax payments, in addition to about $2.6 million of Kirilenko’s salary. If they include another player in the deal, they save more.

The deal will also give them a trade exception and an open roster spot. Both of those give them a little more flexibility in making future trades.

The Sixers get a little closer to the salary floor, not that it matters. They probably won’t keep Kirilenko, who hasn’t played since Nov. 13, hasn’t made a shot (or been in the Nets’ rotation) all season, and is dealing with a personal issue that has kept him away from the team.

***

No. 2: Knicks project united front — The Knicks have only won four games this season, but that hasn’t kept them from making headlines early on. According to a report yesterday from ESPN’s Chris Broussard, things behind the scenes with the Knicks have been as calamitous as their play on the court has been. Writes Broussard…

The New York Knicks were en route to their fifth straight loss last week against Brooklyn when a frustrated Tim Hardaway Jr. screamed angrily, “Get the rebound!”

Certain his second-year teammate was speaking to him, Carmelo Anthony approached Hardaway on the way down the court and used an expletive to ask Hardaway who in the world he thought he was talking to.

Anthony, according to sources, used another expletive in telling Hardaway he was going to beat him up when they got into the locker room after the game.

While the two players never wound up fighting, the episode was emblematic of the volatile state of the Knicks. Off to their worst start in franchise history at 4-19, the Knicks are a team full of discord, defiance and doubt, according to sources with knowledge of the situation.

“Nobody’s taken a swing at anybody, but there’s a lot of arguing and cursing each other out after games,” one source said.

In addition to the Knicks’ lack of chemistry, sources say the players believe coach Derek Fisher’s insistence on running the triangle offense is another key reason for New York’s struggles.

After the ESPN report was published, the Knicks players met with the media while on the road in San Antonio and said things were not as bad as they sounded, noting that they had recently held a player’s-only meeting to help get everyone on the same page…

The Knicks started the day tied for the most losses in the league — seemingly ripe conditions for a story to emerge about internal discord. The article said that Anthony had a verbal spat with teammate Tim Hardaway Jr. during a game last week against the Nets. The report also said that Knicks players told Anthony that they were unhappy with his style of play — that he was not playing team basketball — and also that many players were displeased with Coach Derek Fisher’s systems.

Neither Anthony nor Hardaway denied on Wednesday that they had clashed on the court, but both men said the issue was behind them and described a fruitful mentor-student relationship. Anthony, meanwhile, reiterated his commitment to the team and to perfecting Fisher’s system, including the triangle offense.

As far as hearing criticism from his teammates, Anthony revealed that there was a players-only meeting on Saturday at the team’s practice facility in which various concerns were raised, but he denied it had become particularly contentious.

“Everybody had a platform to speak their piece, and what they felt about what’s going on, and how we can better the situation,” Anthony said. “But it wasn’t no pointing fingers or anything like that, or solely pointing me out to be blamed.”

While reports of relationship issues may be overblown, a 4-20 record doesn’t lie: The Knicks lost big last night to a Spurs team missing Tim Duncan, Tony Parker, Manu Ginobili and Kawhi Leonard.

***

No. 3: Rondo, Stephenson get physical — During last night’s Celtics/Hornets game, with both teams desperate for a win, two of the NBA’s more competitive players found themselves in a battle neither could really win. Boston’s Rajon Rondo and Charlotte’s Lance Stephenson ended up banging into each other more than once, and as Jay King writes, to hear Rondo tell it, there may have been some flopping involved…

About five minutes into the third quarter of a 96-87 Boston Celtics loss, Rondo threw a high elbow that sent Stephenson tumbling to the court. The Charlette Hornets wing stood up and got in Rondo’s face; later in the same possession, after what looked like some jawing, both players were hit with technical fouls.

Asked about what happened, Rondo initially said, “Nothing at all. I said something to him and I didn’t know what I said could get a tech.”

Pressed on the elbow, the Celtics guard obviously implied Stephenson took a dive.

“He weighs about 60 more pounds than me, but that’s part of his game,” Rondo said.

“The game is contact. The game we play is contact. Whatever you saw, I don’t know,” he added. “I am strong. But I don’t think I was that strong on that play in particular to knock him down.”

Rondo notched his third triple-double of the season with 12 points, 10 assists and 10 rebounds, but committed three costly turnovers down the stretch. He also got beaten baseline by Kemba Walker for an and-1 with 3:46 left that pushed Charlotte’s lead to 90-85.

“We did (let an opportunity slip away),” Rondo said. “It started with me. I had some key turnovers in the fourth that I should have been able to take better care of the ball. And Kemba Walker had a backdoor play layup. So we’ve got to do better as a team, as a whole. And it starts with myself.”

***

No. 4: Warriors introduce new arena redesign — A few months ago the Golden State Warriors showed off pictures of their planned arena in San Francisco. It was touted as a step forward for the franchise, which currently has the best record in the NBA and has been based in Oakland’s Oracle Arena since 1971. There was one thing people noticed, however, about the new arena drawings: From above, it seemed to look like a toilet. Rather than sit with those criticisms, yesterday the Warriors dropped new sketches of the planned facility that should streamline the exterior of the new space

Gone is much of the rectangular viewing deck that, when coupled with the oval arena, gave the overhead view of the place the appearance of a giant toilet seat with the lid down. The deck has been shaved down to about half its old size, dropped about 13 feet below the roof line and given a sweeping curve.

“We are trying to flush the toilet bowl forever out of people’s consciousness,” said Warriors arena consultant Jesse Blout.

Instead, it looks more like an old Discman CD player, less likely to be the butt of humor.

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Dwight Howard hopes to return Saturday for the Houston Rockets … Tom Thibodeau says any talk of trust issues in Chicago is “garbage.” Taj Gibson respectfully disagreesByron Scott is thinking about starting Kobe Bryant at point guard … The Mavericks are considering options regarding adding another big man … ABC is developing a sitcom about a foreign-born NBA player and his translator.

Report: Nets unload Kirilenko on Sixers

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – The big three (contracts) are still on the Nets, but Brooklyn has made a trade to unload some salary.

Yahoo’s Adrian Wojnarowski reports that the Nets and Sixers have reached a deal for Andrei Kirilenko that will save Brooklyn some money and add to Philly’s collection of second-round picks.

Brandon Davies isn’t completely awful, but his contract is non-guaranteed, so the Nets could waive him and not have to pay him anything. Assuming they do, the trade would save them about $6.6 million in luxury tax payments, in addition to about $2.6 million of Kirilenko’s salary. If they include another player in the deal, they save more.

The deal will also give them a trade exception and an open roster spot. Both of those give them a little more flexibility in making future trades.

The Sixers get a little closer to the salary floor, not that it matters. They probably won’t keep Kirilenko, who hasn’t played since Nov. 13, hasn’t made a shot (or been in the Nets’ rotation) all season, and is dealing with a personal issue that has kept him away from the team.

Wolves have served as historic skid-busters before

The 1996 Minnesota Timberwolves prevented the then-Vancouver Grizzlies from a 24th straight loss.

The 1996 Minnesota Timberwolves prevented the then-Vancouver Grizzlies from a 24th straight loss.

In case any of you gets caught up in some trivial aspect of life and momentarily loses track of the Philadelphia 76ers’ plight in trying to win a game in 2014-15, there is a handy Twitter account that can keep you informed. It’s @DidTheSixersWin and it features a creative variation of the Sixers’ logo, depicting (what else?) a tank in team colors.

Here is a sampling of the account’s content over the past week:

You get the idea. But the pure and simple consistency of that account’s Tweets will get broken at some point, and it could happen as soon as Wednesday. That’s when the 0-17 Sixers play at Minnesota, facing a banged-up Timberwolves squad that is 4-12 and plugging holes for injured starters Ricky Rubio, Kevin Martin and Nikola Pekovic. Nothing’s assured, of course, and the Wolves are 2-5 at home (where they give up 8.2 fewer points per game) and 3-4 against the East.

Then again, some in Minnesota are flinching because they and their favorite team have been in a situation like this before. On April 3, 1996, the Vancouver Grizzlies had lost 23 games in a row when they faced Minnesota at GM Place. The NBA’s futility record for consecutive defeats at the time was 24, held by the Cleveland Cavaliers (the Cavs had lost their final 19 games in 1981-82, then opened the next season 0-5).

There are people in Minnesota to this day who believe the league powers weren’t eager to have a new pet franchise in Canada smeared with such an ignoble distinction. So what happened that night? The Timberwolves led 84-72 through three quarters, shot 56.5 percent to Vancouver’s 45.9 from the field, sank nine of their 18 3-pointers while the Grizzlies went 3-of-11, and won the boards 36-31.

And yet, Vancouver won 105-103 when Blue Edwards hit a running jumper from out front just before the final buzzer. Yes, Minnesota turned over the ball 24 times, but the real difference came from the foul line. The Grizzlies shot 43 free throws that night to the visitors’ 21 and outscored the Wolves 34-16.

“I think we’d forgotten what it feels like to win,” Edwards said that night.

Losing streak snapped. The 2010-11 Cavaliers and the Sixers last season, perhaps fittingly, would go on to establish and tie a longer mark for consecutive losses (26).

Morning Shootaround — Nov. 28

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Melo the Bull? | East meets West? | Larry Sanders is back

No. 1: Melo the Bull?Carmelo Anthony was one of this summer’s marquee free agents, entertaining offers from teams like Houston and Chicago before eventually re-signing with the New York Knicks. But how close was Anthony to actually leaving the Knicks? According to a new documentary, he was halfway out the door before deciding to stick around. In the upcoming documentary, “Carmelo Anthony: Made In NY,” which will air on the MSG Network, Anthony talks about the choice. As the NY Post reports:

The Post obtained footage of the half-hour program, which was produced by Melo Enterprises Inc. and Tollin Productions, that shows inside conversations between Anthony, his manager, Bay Frazier, who normally keeps a low profile, agent Leon Rose and personal assistant Asani Swann. One person familiar with the program said edits are still being made to the film and it was not the final version.

“It came down to Chicago and New York,” Anthony said during the program. “Chicago was the one from Day 1 [and] was something I was very impressed with. They were looking for someone like me to come in and take them to the next level. So it was perfect.

“It was a perfect setup and perfect fit for me in Chicago. But also I had to think about just living in Chicago. Do I want to live in Chicago? Do I want to take everything I created in New York and move all of that? It came down to that. But there was one point in time I was like — oh, I’m going.”

During one conversation, Anthony and his entourage agreed they would need a sign-and-trade with the Bulls to get the maximum contract. During the show, Frazier states the Bulls could only offer $74 million.

On their plane ride from Chicago to Houston following the get-together with the Bulls, Anthony tells Rose, his agent: “Great meeting. You could see the culture they have over there. The seriousness they have, what they’re about. It comes down to winning to me, and that’s what they’re about. That’s what I like. They hit everything right on the nail. That’s hard to do.”

***

No. 2: East meets West? — During a media interview on Wednesday, Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban floated the idea of realignment. The West has generally been stronger the last few seasons, and Cuban’s plan would help restore some competitive balance between the conferences. As Tim McMahon writes:

In Cuban’s plan, the Mavs, San Antonio Spurs, Houston Rockets and New Orleans Pelicans would move to the Eastern Conference. The Chicago Bulls, Indiana Pacers, Detroit Pistons and Milwaukee Bucks would move to the West.

“It’s not like it’d be the first time we’ve ever realigned,” Cuban said. “It’s happened many times before, so there’s precedent and I just think it shakes things up and makes things interesting.”

Cuban, whose Mavs were the West’s eighth seed with a 49-33 record last season but would have been a No. 3 seed in the East, acknowledged that he had some selfish motivation for the plan. However, he believes the league would benefit as a whole.

“It’s not like you’re reducing competition,” said Cuban, who noted that the teams he suggested moving to the West are approximately the same distance from Portland as Dallas and closer than New Orleans, San Antonio and Houston. “You keep Cleveland, Washington and other good teams in the East. It kind of shakes things up in terms of not just interest but also in terms of how people rebuild.

“It just changes things up and it changes the thought process of a lot of teams. It makes both conferences very competitive, at least for the short term and I think, based on the history of the teams, for the long term as well.”

***

No. 3: Larry Sanders is back — After being one of the NBA’s most promising big men two seasons ago, last season was something of a lost campaign for Milwaukee big man Larry Sanders, who missed over half of the season with injuries and suspensions. But under new Milwaukee coach Jason Kidd, Sanders is reinvigorated, writes Charles Gardner:

Kidd and his staff made Sanders a centerpiece of their efforts from the beginning, working with him in Las Vegas during the summer and continuing during training camp.

“They came in and changed the culture; the (new) owners came in and changed the culture,” Sanders said. “It’s a whole different mind-set than I’ve ever had.

“We’re really trying to build something new here and you could feel it. I’m just happy to be a part of it.”

The 26-year-old Sanders is not playing heavy minutes and that has helped him keep his energy flowing. He played 26 minutes against the Pistons on Tuesday and 28 against the Timberwolves.

Kidd has used him effectively in tandem with veteran Zaza Pachulia, who is adept in the offensive system and can battle bigger centers with his strength.

***

SOME RANDOM LINKS: The Pelicans are aiming to get the ball to Anthony Davis more often … Cuban also took a verbal jab at Knicks coach Derek Fisher … The 76ers appear close to bringing in Turkish big man Furkan Aldemir

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 178) Featuring Greg Anthony

HANG TIME BIG CITY — It’s snowing right now in New York City — big, wet, white flakes falling from the sky.

According to my iPhone, right now in Los Angeles it’s sunny, with a projected high of 81 degrees.

Meanwhile, in Atlanta, again according to my iPhone, it’s 52 and sunny.

The Hang Time Podcast crew may be spread out across the U.S., which means different weather reports for this holiday weekend, but we’ll each spent Thanksgiving with our families, munching on turkey. Which no matter how you cook it, is something worth being thankful for.

That’s more than some NBA teams can say. A few months back, Rick Fox, Sekou Smith and myself went on a road trip and visited with several NBA teams as they prepped for the new season. On this week’s Hang Time Podcast, with Sekou out on the chilling list, Rick and I went back through some of the teams we’d seen and talked turkey about the Bulls and Derrick Rose‘s injuries, about the surprising start from the Pacers, how the 76ers have been epically awful, and how Lance Stephenson and Hornets are still working through issues.

We were also joined by Turner Sports analyst Greg Anthony, as we expanded the conversation and went through some of the contenders out West, as well as what’s happening with the Clippers and the Thunder.

And oh yeah, if you’re looking for bragging rights, you better talk to me!

Finally, it’s a holiday tradition unlike any other: Rick Fox’s Turkey Dynasty call makes its annual appearance.

LISTEN HERE:

As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of NBA.com, Lang Whitaker of NBA.com’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand and the new best sound designer/engineer in the business, Andrew Merriam.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.

Blogtable: Revisiting the Sixers’ plan

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Stumbling in the East | Revisiting the Sixers’ plan | Early season eye-opener


Philadelphia's Michael Carter-Williams and coach Brett Brown. (Glenn James/NBAE)

Philadelphia’s Michael Carter-Williams and coach Brett Brown. (Glenn James/NBAE)

> You knew they would be bad, but this? Are you still on board with the Sixers’ grand rebuilding plan? What would you do as GM?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: On board? ON BOARD? I’ve felt this sink-and-stay-on-the-bottom strategy was an abomination from the get-go. And if I were the Sixers’ GM, I’d plead temporary insanity and throw myself on the mercy of the court, i.e, Julius Erving, Moses Malone, Wilt Chamberlain, Hal Greer, Billy Cunningham, Allen Iverson and all the other Philadelphia greats. This has to be aggravating to those guys, to see the once-great Sixers brand dragged through the NBA mud, all to chase teen-aged help. I didn’t want to see the league’s owners change the lottery system – the worst teams should get the best help in the draft – but in Philadelphia’s case I was ready to make an exception. And frankly, I expected better, as far as an outraged reaction, from the allegedly brassy Philly fans. If they’ve gone soft, all sports hope is lost.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Of course, we knew they would be this bad. They simply don’t have many NBA players. If you were on board last year — and I was — you have to be on board this year. It would be like trying to change your mind after you leapt off the diving board. All Sam Hinkie can do is keep his seat belt fastened and hope that next season he’s putting out a lineup that includes a healthy Joel Embiid and Dario Saric. One area of concern is Michael Carter-Williams. He’s putting out signs that another full season of beat-downs could break him.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comI was not on board in the first place. Looking long term is one thing, but the 76ers are doing a disservice to their fans and anyone else paying to see the product. It’s not just the lack of warm bodies. The Sixers who are healthy and in the United States too often look lost on the court, making them a mess beyond the obvious mess. What would I do as GM? I dangle Dario Saric. If the offers are not good, fine. But that’s the kind of move that could land a decent package, and I’d still have Joel Embiid coming next season plus someone else from high in the lottery.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comSorry to all the traditionalists out there, but I support what Sam Hinkie is doing. He’s trying to sift through as many players as possible to see who stays and who goes. Yes, the downside is the potential for embarrassing nights when the Sixers are barely competitive, and a few wasted seasons. But remember, next summer they’ll have a more experienced Nerlens Noel, a healthy Joel Embiid, Dario Saric, a high pick from the next draft and gobs of cap space. Basically, he’ll have assets to keep or trade and I suspect the turnaround for the Sixers will be steady if not drastic (how could it not be?).

John Schuhmann, NBA.comNothing that’s happened in their first 10 games was unexpected, and I still like the long-term potential of Michael Carter-Williams, Joel Embiid, K.J. McDaniels, Nerlens Noel and Dario Saric. That’s a lot more young talent than some other bad teams have. But I do wonder about morale in that locker room when you’ve been put in a position to fail so miserably, when there are new guys coming in almost every week, and when some of your teammates could be swapped for a second-round pick at any point.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: For a second there I thought you were asking about the Los Angeles Lakers. The Sixers are playing down to the lowly expectations I had for them this season, and then some. I knew they would play some cover-your-eyes basketball this season but they’ve gone above and beyond being awful. I’ve never been “on board” with the scorched earth plan that is underway in Philly. I don’t believe in a process that demands you tear your program down to the ground in order to build it back up. If I were the GM … I’d throw out whatever blueprint we’ve been working with and come up with something new, and fast.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comI would not give up. Now is not the time for surrender. If it is possible to acquire a player for the long term then do so, of course; but you should not give up now that the reality is worse than you may have imagined it would be. So far you have an encouraging rookie-of-the-year point guard in Michael Carter-Williams, a potential dominator in Joel Embiid, and two more promising big men in a league that is starved for size. Get through this year, somehow, and then pounce.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: Do they actually have a GM? I feel like this is what happens in franchise mode in NBA2K when someone gets a little too aggressive with the settings in an effort to have less competition from the CPU-controlled teams. When the Sixers traded for Marquis Teague and then waived him, I knew this kind of result was on the table. And look, we all knew the Sixers were trying to be not good, but right now they aren’t even competitive, which is a whole other thing.

Stefanos Triantafyllos, NBA.com/Greece: You cannot be on board with any team that has an 0-10 next to its logo. Things are not good for the Sixers. They are lousy on offense (worst in the league) and horrible on defense (third from the bottom), so nobody can be optimistic. Perhaps if Carter-Williams gets more games under his belt (has come from the bench in three matches because of injury) he will make a solid duo with Tony Wroten and help the city of brotherly love win a few. What would I do if was a GM? I would try to be patient and built around Carter-Williams, adding some veteran help next to Noel and in the guard position.

Davide Chinellato, NBA.com/Italy: They’ve a very tough path ahead, but I still think the Sixers are exactly what they wanna be: a disastrous team, looking to rebuild via draft. They just got Michael Carter-Williams back, they’re giving Nerlens Noel time to grow and they’re waiting for the potential star Joel Embiid. There’s no coming back from where they’re right now: their only option now is stick with the plan and hope for the best. They probably have at least a couple of tough seasons ahead, but at least they’ve a plan. And it could work.

Karan Madhok, NBA.com/India: I was never on board with the Sixers’ plans — sure, they have figured out a clear loophole in the system where losing could ultimately get them high draft picks, but in the process, they are bringing a culture of negativity around their young building blocks like Michael Carter-Williams, Nerlens Noel, and Joel Embiid. Even if the team has the pieces to start winning in the future, I fear that the bad habits might stick with the franchise and its players long-term. It might be a little too late to change things now, but if I was GM, I would stop trading away important cogs for spare change/picks, fire coach Brett Brown, and rebrand the image of the team as a hard-working unit. The lottery picks might be coming their way anyways: they might as well start learning how to win games, too.

Simon Legg, NBA.com/Australia: I guess you have to stay on board because it’s not even close to being complete. It’s far too early to label the plan unsuccessful because it has only just begun. The measure of success here is clearly not wins and losses, it’s assets acquired and being able to position themselves for top picks. So far, they’ve brought in Nerlens Noel, Michael Carter-Williams, Joel Embiid and Dario Saric and it would be premature to criticize any of those guys. They’ll no doubt bring in more top picks as the next few drafts arrive. If I was GM today I’d continue with the plan. They have the right head coach, they’re slowly building a core of young players and the way to continue building is through the draft.

Marc-Oliver Robbers, NBA.com/Germany: There is no alternative. They’re on their way and have to get it done till the end now. They decided to do it this way. It’s a ugly way, but the Sixers’ fans are on their side. So from their point of view everything is OK. They will get another high draft pick and will get the missing shooting guard. Then they get it on with MCW, maybe Saric, Noel and Embiid. Not so bad. But something should be done about tanking. No one should get in the temptation of being bad.

Marcelo Nogueira, NBA.com/Argentina: The known rebuilding plan or the one managers claim to have is novel because no other franchise has ever contemplated rebuilding in this way. And at the same time, it’s questionable because I’m not even sure the public believes it; they’ve removed their support and their average viewership has suffered. If I were the GM, I wouldn’t have a team with an average age of 24. Youth can win games, but championships are won by veterans.

For more debates, go to #AmexNBA

Morning shootaround — Nov. 15


VIDEO: Highlights from Friday’s NBA action

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Duncan tops 25K, joins Kareem | Close doesn’t count for Sixers | The name is Harris. Joe Harris | Burke’s unlikely buzzer-beating accuracy

No. 1: Duncan tops 25K, joins Kareem — Not to detract from Tim Duncan‘s tremendous milestone evening Friday in Los Angeles, but once again the numbers crunchers and the young’uns who chronicle NBA exploits neglected a little bit of history.

When folks noted that Duncan scored the 25,000th point of his Hall of Fame-bound career and joined some elite company in San Antonio’s 93-80 victory over the Lakers, they were accurate without being exactly right. Yes, Duncan boosted himself onto the same level as the legendary Kareem Abdul-Jabbar in reaching 25,000 points, 14,000 rebounds and 2,500 blocks. But it’s not quite true that the two big men are “the only players in NBA history” to surpass those thresholds.

To put that another way: You can’t blame Wilt Chamberlain for the fact that the NBA didn’t track blocks during his career. Or, for that matter, it’s not Elvin Hayes‘ fault that the league only began toting blocks in 1973-74, in his fifth pro season.

Chamberlain absolutely swatted an average of 179 shots annually over his 14 seasons – the Dipper might have rejected that many in a month in his prime – and that’s all it would have taken for him to reach 2,500. With 31,419 points and 23,924 rebounds, Wilt established thresholds that would take Duncan a while longer to reach (even Kareem, with 17,440 boards, never really got close in rebounds despite playing 20 seasons).

As for Hayes, it seems fair to suggest he would have averaged 145 over his first five seasons, considering he averaged 195 over his next eight. That’s all the Rockets and Bullets Hall of Famer would have needed to get to 2,500 blocks, to go with his 27,313 points and 16,279 rebounds.

None of this more-proper perspective, though, should take anything away from the celebration of Duncan’s sustained excellence, as reported by the San Antonio Express-News’ Dan McCarney. Abdul-Jabbar was even in the house at Staples Center to witness it:

“Unbelievable player,” Duncan said of Abdul-Jabbar, who reacted with clear appreciation to several of Duncan’s baskets during the game. “A way better scorer than I ever was at any point. I did see him; it was great to see him. It’s fun to be in a category with someone like that.”
“It means I’ve been playing for a very long time. It’s fun to hear about, but it’s something I’ll look back at later on.”
Even at 38, with his contract set to expire this summer, that still might not be for some time given how well Duncan continues to play. He had 13 points and 11 rebounds in just 25 minutes against the Lakers, his sixth double-double in seven games to push his career total to 803. Duncan entered Friday’s game ranked third in rebounds per game at 11.5, and fifth in total rebounding percentage at 20.3.

“When you play for 48 seasons…no, the guy is unbelievable,” Manu Ginobili said. “He’s going by some legends, but he’s already a legend. He’s one of the best players to ever play. It’s not that I’m surprised. Sometimes we hear 25,000 points and say, ‘Wow,’ but it’s Tim. So it can happen.”
Said Gregg Popovich, “I told Aron Baynes, ‘It’s no big deal. If you shot as much as Tim, you’d have 25,000 too.’ “

***

No. 2: Close doesn’t count for Sixers — There’s no getting around it: 0-9 is 0-9. And if you’re an NBA fan of a certain age, that links the 2014-15 Philadelphia 76ers to the dreadful 1972-73 version, which also started the season winless through its first nine games. Finishing with an all-time worst 9-73, Philadelphia was winless through most of the rest of their games, too.

For a few fleeting moments Friday night in Houston, though, the Sixers looked to be on the verge of a W that didn’t stand for woeful. They led 87-86 with less than 20 seconds left, only to see second-year guard Michael Carter-Williams lose the ball off his leg on a drive to the basket. Rockets star James Harden shoot free for a layup at the other end and a rare Philadelphia game that featured 16 lead changes and 16 ties ended like the other eight before it this fall.

Keith Pompey of the Philadelphia Inquirer had more:

This is the same Sixers team that was outscored by a combined 85 points in their previous two contests against the Dallas Mavericks (53 points on Thursday) and Toronto Raptors (32 on Sunday).
“Obviously, the win is the thing that we didn’t get and what hurts most,” Sixers coach Brett Brown said. “I think [the outcome] is a fantastic reflection of what they can be. It’s a sign of not feeling sorry for ourselves, and them coming back with fight.
“Those are the things you sort of leave the game with.”

***

No. 3:The name is Harris. Joe Harris — Unheralded is one thing, disrespected is something entirely different.

You can be excused if you never heard of Joe Harris before Friday night because the 6-foot-6 swingman from the University of Virginia was a second-rounder in the Draft in June, the 33rd player picked overall, after averaging 12.6 points in four college seasons. He had more than the usual amount of shade thrown on him first by the clamor over the Cleveland Cavaliers’ first pick, No. 1 phenom Andrew Wiggins, and subsequently by LeBron James‘ return to his home market and the Cavs’ trade for All-Star forward Kevin Love.

Harris’ rookie experience took a significant turn Friday in Boston, however, with his contributions to Cleveland’s comeback victory over the Celtics. He scored six points, played 19 minutes and was good for a plus-24 on a night when the other three subs who played – Tristan Thompson (minus-9), Mike Miller (minus-15) and Dion Waiters (minus-14) – all were in the red.

The night started out with some all-too-familiar dismissiveness directed toward Harris:

But by the end, there were raves about Harris afterward from both inside and outside the locker room, as enumerated by Jason Lloyd of the Akron Beacon Journal in his usual postgame countdown:

1. With the way he is progressing and as well as he is playing, Joe Harris will be the starting shooting guard sooner rather than later. Much sooner. As in within a couple of weeks (or less), one source with knowledge of the team’s thinking said. At least one member of the Cavs’ brain trust is already in favor of the switch.

2. It was the rookie second-round pick – not Dion Waiters or Mike Miller – playing the final six minutes of Friday’s tight game. The Cavs closed the night with Kyrie Irving and Harris in the backcourt, Shawn Marion and LeBron James in the frontcourt and Kevin Love at center. That’s a lineup they could use more and more going forward.

3. Harris plays with high energy. He defends, he keeps the ball moving, he cuts hard to the basket. He does everything the Cavs need him to do, including knocking down open shots. He is a great fit with this starting lineup because he doesn’t need the ball, but he’s more than capable of knocking down open shots.

4. “Joe Harris is going to be a big piece for our team,” James said. “He’s going to have his rookie mistakes, we know that, but mistakes can be covered when you play hard. That’s one thing that kid is doing.”

5. According to the Cavs’ stats, he shot 57 percent on corner 3-pointers one year at Virginia. That shot will be available to him all night on this team, just like the huge corner 3 he made in the closing minutes Friday to pull the Cavs within 116-113.

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No. 4: Burke’s unlikely buzzer-beating accuracy — This season already has produced its early share dramatic, game-winning buzzer beaters (GWBB) that we at Hang Time HQ like to rate according to our Horry Scale. That’s named, fittingly, after the much-journeyed NBA role player who won himself and his teams a total of seven championship rings, building his brand as an amazingly clutch shooter with a flair for postseason dramatics.

We warehouse them over in the All Ball Blog, and the latest one came Friday night from Utah’s Trey Burke, an unlikely source given his 30.7 field-goal percentage prior to the game. Our man Lang Whitaker rated Burke’s GWBB on the Horry Scale, and here’s a glimpse at the Difficulty section. Go check it out in full to see how it ranked in Game Situation, Importance and Celebration:

With 2.3 seconds left on the clock, the Jazz didn’t have to rely on a catch-and-shoot. Two-plus seconds is enough time for at least a dribble, maybe even a pass.

But it looked as if the play wasn’t even drawn up for Burke to get the shot. Burke began in the far corner and set a screen for Gordon Hayward, who already had 33 points on the night. Hayward popped to the top of the key and looked to receive a pass. But Knicks forward Quincy Acy denied the look to Hayward, just as Burke flashed to the ball around the free throw line. Burke caught the ball, dribbled left into the corner, and fired up a fadeaway jumper over J.R. Smith, who was all over Burke and contested the shot well. But Burke cleared just enough space with a step-back move to release the jumper, and he drilled the shot as the buzzer was ringing.

Smith actually defended fine on the play — he went under three separate screens and stuck to Burke on the shot. Burke had to make a perfect play just to clear room for the shot. And Burke played it perfectly.

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: The Pelicans needed those big beaks for all the franchise offensive records they racked up in their blowout of the Timberwolves. … J.J. Redick was scratching his head over both the Clippers’ odd layoff and their recent performances. … Rajon Rondo passed Paul Pierce on the Celtics’ all-time assists list and did it in 644 fewer games. Of course, their job descriptions have been a little different. … Eye-yi-yi: More eye trouble for Spurs’ Kawhi Leonard. He says not to worry. … And you thought it would never end – Houston’s streak of double-digit 3-point field-goal games is over. … Don’t blink: Brandon Jennings played some stalwart defense in Detroit’s overtime victory over OKC.

 

Morning shootaround — Nov. 13


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Nov. 12

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Bulls back Rose’s commitment to game | Scott blasts Lakers’ defense | MCW to make season debut tonight

No. 1: Bulls stand by Rose’s commitment to game — As we pointed out in this space yesterday, Chicago Bulls superstar Derrick Rose told the media on Wednesday that he’s taking a ‘long-term’ approach to both each game and his career. Those comments, though, may have led some to wonder how Rose’s teammates took them. But as Scott Powers of ESPNChicago.com points out, there’s no worries in the locker room about whether or not Rose is thinking championship in Chicago:

“Look, I think that’s a fair concern for everybody,” Bulls forward Mike Dunleavy said after practice on Wednesday. “It’s a big topic now in sports, especially in football with concussions and things like that. It goes the same with basketball. You know different types of injuries and things like that. There’s certainly more to life than it.

“At the end of the day, look, Derrick’s fully committed. I can speak on his behalf. He’s fully committed the way I see him working, the way I see him out there. Nobody should question that. You know it’s a little bit different viewpoint, but as far as his commitment to us, the city, the team, that should never be put in question.”

First-year Bulls forward Pau Gasol hasn’t been around Rose for long, but he also believed from what he had seen Rose was dedicated to the team. Gasol and Dunleavy said they hadn’t personally heard or read Rose’s comments from Tuesday.

“I heard a couple things from people, not directly reading from the outlets, but obviously he’s concerned about his long-term health, which we all are in a way, but we’re in a business, we’re in a sport, where that’s what’s at stake and that’s a commitment that we make, and a price that we pay,” Gasol said. “It’s something that any athlete is exposed to, but I think he’s a guy that works extremely hard. He works hard, and I think he’s 100 percent committed to winning and to this team. But in the make of his mind, he’s had a rough stretch, so you understand that part.”

Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau thought Rose’s comments needed to be put into the context of everything Rose has gone through the past few seasons. Rose also recently sprained both of his ankles and missed time. He sat out two games before returning Monday, putting up 24 points and seven assists in a win over the Detroit Pistons.

“I think this: I know Derrick, and I know he wants to play,” Thibodeau said. “You have to take a look at what he’s just gone through. It’s been 2½ long years, two major injuries. So, there’s a lot going on there. When you sprain both your ankles, you have to do what you think is right.

“As I said, if he’s healthy, he should play. If he’s injured, he should sit. It’s a long time that he’s been off. He’s got to go. And I think he understands that. Derrick wants to win. We’ve got a good group. We’ve got a good opportunity. It’s on us what we do with the opportunity. And the commitment from our entire team has to be special. If we want to do something great, the effort has to be great in all areas. I’ve been around a long time. I understand you can’t shortcut this.”


VIDEO: Bulls.com looks ahead to the looming Chicago-Toronto game tonight

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Morning shootaround — Nov. 1


VIDEO: Top 10 plays from Friday night

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Blatt airs out the Cavs! | Thunder’s Jackson seeks pay and play | Picking at that Chris Paul scab | Rubio gets (over)paid

No. 1: Blatt airs out Cavs! — One of the best things about the first week of the NBA season is that it’s followed quickly by the second week of the NBA season. Contrary to what we’ve just seen over the past four or five days – hands wringing, teeth gnashing, exaggerated expectations of all sorts and an overall whoop-de-doo-ness that no one possibly can sustain – life in and around The Association eventually settles into a less frenetic, more manageable pace. Here’s a perfect example: Just about every team will have some rugged, behind-closed-doors meetings between now and mid-April. But because the Cleveland Cavaliers had theirs Friday, after their Opening Night embarrassment on TNT 12 hours earlier (they celebrated LeBron James‘ return to Cleveland in every way except beating the Knicks), this qualifies as a big deal and a “Eureka!” moment for coach David Blatt and his troops. As you take a peek at Dave McMenamin’s report for ESPN.com, notice how ordinary it all sounds, as far as a new coach and his new team – check out, for instance, Anderson Varejao‘s blistering comment. It’s just that everyone’s sample size is small right now, so everything is bigger!

“He just got on us,” James said when asked about Blatt’s message. “He got on us from the time we started our meeting to the time we left. And it’s great. For a team like us, we need that. I love constructive criticism. I never took it personal. It’s just an opportunity for us to get better, and it definitely put a fire into us.”
After turning the ball over 19 times against the Knicks led to 26 points for New York — turnovers Blatt called “irresponsible” and “borderline inexcusable” — the Cavs cut that number to just 12 against Chicago.
Blatt also told the team he wanted more ball movement, as well as player movement, on offense going forward.
“Fiery and to the point,” one source told ESPN.com when asked to characterize the meeting. “[Blatt] was very direct with the group about the expectations and what we need to do day in and day out.”
The Cavs showed a greater team resolve while playing for the second consecutive night, this time on the road, and outrebounded the Bulls 52-42 after New York had controlled the glass 35-33 the night before.
“Today in our meeting, we said we have to play better than the way we played last night,” Anderson Varejao said. “We have to play harder, tougher, and that’s what we did tonight.”

***

No. 2: Thunder’s Jackson seeks pay and play — Many folks assume that the Oct. 31 deadline for contract extensions for players entering their fourth seasons is all about the money. While that’s often the case, it isn’t an absolute. Consider Oklahoma City guard Reggie Jackson, who didn’t get an extension Friday but could be better off because of it. Jackson and his reps perceive his value to be much higher than he’s been able to show playing behind Russell Westbrook in the Thunder backcourt. Now, with Westbrook hurt and a long season of opportunity in front of him – along with some teams’ opinions already about Jackson’s potential – the Boston College product and No. 24 pick in 2011 might be able to turn restricted free agency next summer not just into a big payday but into freedom to seize a bigger role with his own team. Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports peeled back some curtain on Jackson’s situation in OKC:

As rival teams evaluate restricted free-agency candidates next July, league executives believe Jackson holds a distinct advantage among his peers: The Thunder’s investment into their star players may limit how far the franchise can go to match a rich offer sheet and make Jackson an ideal target to change teams.
“Bottom line,” one NBA general manager told Yahoo Sports, “how much are they willing to pay for Westbrook’s backup?”
The loss of Westbrook to a fractured hand on Thursday night – possibly for a month – will give Jackson a chance to showcase his skills in the near future, a platform that could make Jackson’s case for a free-agent deal. Some teams believe Jackson could command a deal in the $13 million-$14 million-plus annual range – especially because of a belief that investing more into an offer sheet could cripple the Thunder’s chances of matching it.
The Thunder’s past inability to re-sign two key players to rookie extensions – James Harden and Jeff Green – led to the organization trading both players. Oklahoma City general manager Sam Presti has insisted the Thunder would match any offer sheet for Jackson next summer, but skepticism exists throughout the league.
Jackson, 24, is sitting out with a sore ankle, and it is still unclear how soon he’ll be able to return to Oklahoma City’s lineup. Next summer, Jackson would pursue a three-year deal with a player option on a third year that would allow him to move into unrestricted free agency in 2017.

***

No. 3: Picking at that Chris Paul scab — Remember when the Los Angeles Lakers were above it all, that is, too successful and regal to engage in the “what if…” second-guessing common to lesser organizations? First, the Lakers rarely had much to second-guess, life tended to go so well for them. Second, the next great thing in Forum blue-and-gold always was just around the corner, so there was no great urgency to fret. But the Lakers have the time and the inclination now that they’ve dropped in status and in the standings – and let’s face it, Chris Paul plays in the same dang building. So Mike Bresnahan of the Los Angeles Times visited the topic of the Paul-to-the-Lakers trade that wasn’t, as the Lakers re-visited their close miss in landing the All-Star point guard:

Who could forget [former NBA commissioner David Stern] citing “basketball reasons” for vetoing the trade that was supposed to send Paul to the Lakers, Pau Gasol to Houston and Lamar Odom to New Orleans in December 2011?
The Lakers appeared to have acquired their most dynamic point guard since Magic Johnson, but then small-market owners raised a racket, Cleveland’s Dan Gilbert in particular calling the trade a “travesty” in a lengthy letter to the league.
David Stern said no. The deal was off.
“Sometimes you want to say, ‘Dammit, David Stern,'” Lakers Coach Byron Scott said before Friday’s game. “When they made the trade, before David kind of X’d it, I was like, ‘Wow, that’s going to be fantastic.'”
Then again, Scott might never have become the Lakers’ coach, the franchise going down a presumably more optimistic path with Paul than the one that took them through Mike Brown and Mike D’Antoni, not to mention Steve Nash, acquired from Phoenix in July 2012 for two first-round and two second-round picks.

Scott could only dream of Bryant and Paul in the same backcourt.
“Mmm-hmm. I could really imagine that,” he said Friday. “There would be a big smile on my face if that was the case.”

***

No. 4:Rubio gets (over)paid — There have been no David Kahn sightings around Target Center in Minneapolis in recent days, but some who closely watch the Minnesota Timberwolves might suspect that train-wreck of a basketball boss had returned. Kahn’s drafting of and presumed fixation on point guard Ricky Rubio led to Kevin Love‘s departure from that woebegone franchise (the Wolves refused to sign Love to a fifth year on his extension three years ago and instead traded him this offseason in advance of his freedom to leave). And now the Wolves – thanks to rapidly escalating player price tags, yes, but also their need to plant some personnel flags with someone besides youngsters Andrew Wiggins and Zach LaVine – have signed Rubio to a $56 million deal. Despite his troubles putting the ball through the hole. The Associated Press had more details:

About two hours before the midnight Eastern deadline, Rubio signed a four-year contract extension worth $55 million that includes another $1 million in incentives, bringing an end to a long and sometimes tense negotiation between the flashy Spanish point guard and the team that drafted him in 2009.
Rubio averaged 10.1 points, 8.1 assists and 2.3 steals but shot just 37 percent in his first three seasons. The shooting numbers led some to say the Timberwolves would have been better off waiting to see how Rubio performs this season before extending him an offer given that they would have had the ability to match any offer that he received on the open market next summer.
But owner Glen Taylor has long been big on loyalty, and he reached out directly to Rubio earlier this week to make one last push.
“I want to call Minnesota home for a long time,” Rubio said. “That’s why I signed the contract. My mom’s going to get mad at me, but I don’t leave home when I’m here. This is my second home. I really feel very welcome here.”
As salaries stand right now, Rubio’s $13.75 million average annual salary starting next season will be more than high profile point guards like Tony Parker, Steph Curry, Kyle Lowry and Ty Lawson. Rubio’s representatives targeted Phoenix guard Eric Bledsoe’s five-year, $70 million deal to eclipse, and ended up coming very close despite not having the leverage that Bledsoe had as a restricted free agent.

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: The ball’s not in Kyrie Irving‘s hands nearly as much these days, but the Cavaliers’ point guard sounds fine with that. … Three-a-days? former NBA forward Tyrus Thomas allegedly is putting in “at least” two workouts a day in the hopes of making a comeback. … Bulls fans will find out tonight in Minnesota just how “minor” Derrick Rose‘s latest injury (left ankle sprain suffered Friday vs. Clevelaned) really is.  …

 

Morning shootaround — Oct. 31


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Oct. 30

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Westbrook could miss 4-6 weeks | Cavs fall flat vs. Knicks | Smith calls out Faried | Brown rips Sixers’ rebuilding plan | Report: Cavs, Varejao closing in on deal

No. 1: Westbrook could miss 4-6 weeks — All those questions about the depth of the Oklahoma City Thunder? The chatter is about to get even louder. The Thunder’s star point guard, Russell Westbrook, suffered a hand injury and had to leave the game last night against the L.A. Clippers. Our own Scott Howard-Cooper provided some context to what the injury might mean for OKC, and then comes this news: according to Darnell Mayberry of The Oklahoman, Westbrook could miss four to six weeks as he heals up. The loss of Westbrook, combined with Kevin Durant already being out with a foot injury, spells trouble in Oklahoma:

The early indication is that Russell Westbrook could miss four to six weeks after fracturing the second metacarpal in his right hand Thursday against the Los Angeles Clippers.

It could keep the Thunder’s electric point guard sidelined through mid-December and add him to an already ridiculously long list of injured Oklahoma City players who are expected to miss the season’s first month.

The projected recovery time would cost Westbrook 15 games on the low end and as many as 21 contests. He would rejoin the lineup between Nov. 28 and Dec. 12.

Westbrook is scheduled to undergo further tests Friday in Oklahoma City.

“It’s just really pretty unbelievable. You’re kind of just shocked almost,” said Thunder forward Nick Collison of his team’s injury-riddled roster. “It’s not funny at all, but you almost have to laugh about it just because it’s so many guys.”

In all likelihood, the Thunder will go into its home opener Saturday against Denver with just eight healthy players. Only one is a point guard. Joining veteran Sebastian Telfair are Collison, Perry Jones, Serge Ibaka, Andre Roberson, Kendrick Perkins, Steven Adams and Lance Thomas.

Under the league’s hardship rule, however, teams can be granted additional roster spots and exceed the maximum of 15 players if they have been depleted by injuries. At least four players must be injured for at least two weeks and must miss at least three regular season games for a team to qualify.

Oklahoma City, which the league recently denied the hardship exception because it had not yet met the games missed criteria, certainly will be eligible now with Durant, Anthony Morrow, Mitch McGary and Grant Jerrett all set to miss Saturday’s game against the Nuggets.

With Westbrook now out for an extended period, the Thunder could soon add two players to its roster, bringing the team’s total number of players to 17.

Still, the Thunder needs help. Now.

The eight remaining players consist of one borderline All-Star (Ibaka), two defensive-oriented big men (Perkins and Collison), three largely unproven players who possess promise (Adams, Roberson and Jones), one journeyman (Telfair) and one training camp survivor (Thomas).

“It’s unfortunate the way it is right now, but that’s the way it is,” said Thunder coach Scott Brooks. “We have to figure out how we can improve and get better from all of our experiences. And this is going to be a tough one, but the good teams, good players bounce back through adversity.”

Westbrook ironically was the Thunder’s healthiest player before Thursday. Of course, Westbrook missed 36 games last season after undergoing three surgeries on his right knee in 2013.


VIDEO: Russell Westbrook suffers a hand fracture against the Clippers

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