Posts Tagged ‘Paul Millsap’

Morning shootaround — Jan. 24


VIDEO: All the highlights from Friday’s NBA action

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Amazing Klay | Hawks soaring | Here come the Cavs? | Teletovic out for the season

No. 1: Amazing Klay — Last night against the Sacramento Kings, Golden State’s Klay Thompson did something last night nobody in the history of the NBA had ever managed to do: He scored 37 points in one quarter. He was so hot that nothing slowed him down, not double-teams, not timeouts. Thompson didn’t miss a shot in the period and scored 37 of Golden State’s 41 in the third, effectively ending the Kings’ chances with each increasingly improbable three. Diamond Leung, the Warriors’ beat writer from the Bay Area Media Group, writes that after the game, Warriors coach Steve Kerr even compared Thompson to another wing player who was known to get buckets

He delivered the most electrifying game of his career, going 16-for-25 from the field and 11-for-15 from 3-point range in 33 minutes to lift the Warriors to their 35th win of the season at the midway point and a franchise-record 18th straight victory at home.

Thompson was 9-for-9 from 3-point range in the third as the rest of the Warriors kept passing him the ball in a quarter when he scored 37 of their 41 points.

“As many spectacular things as Michael (Jordan) did, which he did nightly, I never saw him do that,” said Warriors coach Steve Kerr, who won three NBA championships playing with Jordan.

“It was reminiscent of Michael because it’s sort of otherworldly.”

The Kings as a team scored 22 in the third, and their hopes for an upset were dashed after Thompson began flicking his wrist.

Thompson made a steal, stepped back and made a 3-pointer to put the Warriors ahead 63-60 before hitting another to make it 66-64.

Stephen Curry fed him on a one-handed alley-oop after which Thompson continued his barrage. He even got a shooter’s roll on one of the 3-pointers.

Thompson brought down the house going it alone against the Kings defense with a jumper that gave the Warriors an 89-70 lead. Another 3-pointer made it 95-71.

“I was taking a lot of bad shots out there, but I was taking one until I missed, and I just got lucky,” Thompson said.

With 4.9 seconds in the third, Thompson hit two free throws that gave him 50 points for the game to become the 12th player in franchise history to score at least that number. His previous career highs were 41 points against the Los Angeles Lakers in November and eight 3-pointers at Sacramento last season.

Thompson hit two free throws in the fourth before checking out of the game to an ovation with 9:28 left.

“He was typical Klay,” Draymond Green said of Thompson on the sideline. “Just sitting there. His favorite line: ‘It’s crazy.’ That’s all he said.”

His third quarter had set the NBA record for points, and falling with it was a significant franchise mark. Wilt Chamberlain in his 100-point game in 1962 held the previous record with 31 points in a quarter.

“It’s that number 37 in a quarter that’s unbelievable. I thought I’d never see that,” Curry said after using his phone to watch video of Thompson’s performance again.

Up until Thompson began hoisting shots into history, the Warriors were struggling to put away Sacramento, which entered the game having lost five in a row.

Kerr was angry at halftime, telling his players he wouldn’t be calling plays in order to let them figure things out themselves. The Warriors had led by 18 points in the first quarter, but the Kings grabbed the lead after halftime.

“Get the ball to Klay, and Klay get the ball,” Kerr said. “Those are the two plays they ran.”

Said Thompson: “They just kept wanting to see the show. That’s what they kept telling me. When your teammates have confidence in you like that, you can do extraordinary things.”

***

No. 2: Hawks Soaring — Meanwhile, on the other coast, the Atlanta Hawks just keep winning. They entered last night’s game against Oklahoma City with a gaudy 35-8 record, winners of 14 in a row and 27 or their last 29. But that streak got put to a serious test last night as they hosted a potent Oklahoma City Thunder team hungry for a win. And through one half, after a dozen turnovers, the Hawks looked like they didn’t mind if their win streak came to an end. But that turned around in the second half, and the Hawks won going away, 103-93, for a franchise-record 15th win in a row

The Atlanta Hawks romped to their 15th straight victory, the longest streak in franchise history.

Don’t expect them to savor it for long.

This team is focused firmly on what’s in front of them.

Paul Millsap scored 22 points, Jeff Teague added 17 and the Hawks broke the record with a 103-93 victory over the Oklahoma City Thunder on Friday night.

“It’s a good accomplishment,” Millsap said, sitting in a rather somber locker room. “But it’s just another win.”

The wins keep piling up for a team that no one expected to be a title contender at the beginning of the season. Before a raucous sellout crowd, the Hawks came out on top for the 29th time in 31 games to extend their Eastern-best record to 36-8.

As usual, pretty much everyone chipped in.

Four starters were in double figures and backup point guard Dennis Schröder led a spurt at the start of the fourth quarter that helped the Hawks pull away. He finished with 13 points and five assists, igniting the arena with a towering finger roll that dropped gently through the net.

“Give me five really good guys,” Millsap said, “and I’ll go out there and win with ‘em.”

Russell Westbrook led the Thunder with 22 points, but it wasn’t enough to extend their four-game winning streak.

Kevin Durant added 21 points, while Serge Ibaka with 13 was the only other Thunder player in double figures.

The Hawks were much more balanced. Al Horford had 14 points and 12 rebounds, while DeMarre Carroll chipped in with 13 points. Kyle Korver was the only starter who didn’t reach double figures, but even he chipped in with a play that had everyone talking: another dunk in the waning seconds of the first half that sent the Hawks to the locker room with a 48-47 lead.

They never trailed again, strolling off the court at the end with the public-address announcer screaming “15 in a row!”

“It’s cool to get your name in the record book,” Carroll said. “At the same time, we’ve got bigger tasks at hand. That’s making it to the playoffs and bringing an NBA championship to Atlanta.”

The crowd of 19,203 marked the third sellout in Atlanta’s last four games. In a sign that the attendance-challenged city is really getting behind its team, most of the crowd came to cheer for the home team rather than to see an out-of-town star.

“They’ve jumped on the bandwagon now,” Durant said. “The crowd was great tonight and really helped them out.”

He’s also impressed with what Atlanta is putting on the court.

“They’re a really good team,” he said – over and over again.

***

No. 3: Here come the Cavs? — It’s been a rough start for the Cleveland Cavaliers, marked by losing streaks, coaching questions, trades and injuries. But last night, with all the principles healthy and on the court together, the Cavaliers swatted the Charlotte Hornets, 129-90. It was Cleveland’s fifth straight win, and exactly the kind of dominant performance LeBron James and the Cavs were looking for when they constructed this team, writes the Northeast Ohio Media Group’s Joe Vardon

That’s five wins in a row for the Cavs after losing six straight. They limited the Hornets to 40 percent shooting and caused 12 turnovers.

“Right now, I feel like this is the team that I envisioned,” James said.

In the middle of a long season, there really isn’t anything more important James could say than that.

It’s been a turbulent return campaign for James in Cleveland, and even with these last five victories the Cavs are only 24-20 and in fifth place in the East.

James admitted his team is just one losing streak from all the progress, all the good feeling, unraveling again. He sounded, and looks, like he plans to guard against that.

A three-minute, 20-second stretch in the second quarter said it all.

Cleveland was already up by 22 when James came charging into the lane before pulling up for a short floater. Thirty-seven seconds later, he drove in for a finger roll and was fouled.

Then, a steal. After that, another layup. Next possession, two free throws.

Oh, there’s more.

James stole the ball again, this time dribbling down for a left-handed windmill dunk that sounds easier than it looked. [Kyrie] Irving drained a three and then he stole the ball. Four seconds later, [J.R.] Smith tossed a half-court alley-oop to James that he might not have even tried to catch a few weeks ago.

Still not done. James stole the ball, again, and the Cavs scored on a lob, again. James passed (from halfcourt, no less) and Kevin Love caught it for a layup.

At the end of that sequence, it was 62-27 with 5:48 to play in the half.

“This is the style of basketball I envisioned,” James said. “Obviously the points we put up I don’t envision that every night, but how we share the ball, how we defend, that should be our staple.”

Charlotte coach Steve Clifford was asked before the game if James looked different on film recently than when the Hornets last played him on Dec. 15. The reason for the question – James’ obvious progress athletically since his two-week rest from nagging injury.

“He always looks pretty good,” Clifford said. “So yesterday when I started, he’s always fun to watch. And then as you get closer to the game time and making decisions about how you’re going to try to stop him, it’s not nearly as much fun.”

***

No. 4: Teletovic out for the season — It hasn’t been a great season for the Brooklyn Nets, who’ve had to deal with injuries to Deron Williams and Brook Lopez, trade rumors, and talk that their owner wants to sell the franchise. And now they’re out another player, as forward Mirza Teletovic has been diagnosed with blood clots in his lungs, ending his season as he seeks treatment, writes Andrew Keh of the New York Times

Teletovic, a 29-year-old forward from Bosnia and Herzegovina, left Thursday’s game in Los Angeles after experiencing a shortness of breath and was transported to the California Medical Center.

The Nets on Friday morning said Teletovic would remain hospitalized to undergo further examination and begin treatment with blood thinners.

“Our first thoughts are with Mirza and his family,” General Manager Billy King said in a statement, praising the team’s medical staff and the emergency room doctors for their work. “I have visited with Mirza this morning and he is in good spirits as he begins his treatment and recovery.”

Blood clots can form for a variety of reasons, with long travel and surgical procedures among the most common risk factors. Blood clots near the lungs carry an increased risk of sudden death, said Dr. Alexis C. Colvin, a sports medicine specialist at Mt. Sinai Hospital, who was speaking generally and not about Teletovic’s specific case.

Teletovic posted a message on Twitter late Thursday night that read, “I had a small problem, but now everything is ok… Thx all fans from Bosnia, Spain and USA for support.”

The struggling Nets will miss Teletovic, who was averaging a career-high 22.3 minutes per game this season. They lost by 39 points to the Clippers, and their record dropped to 18-25. They had already been missing point guard Deron Williams, who fractured a left rib earlier this month.

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: The Lakers and Kobe Bryant should get some clarity regarding the options for his injured shoulder after a meeting with doctors on Monday … Dallas’s Rajon Rondo sat down the stretch last night against Chicago, but Rondo and coach Rick Carlisle say it’s no big dealMark Cuban says the All-Star voting process is “absolutely, positively broken” … The Brandon Jennings/Brandon Knight trade is one of those rare deals that worked out well for both teams … Could the Clippers be free agent Nate Robinson‘s destination? …

Atlanta’s Budenholzer will coach Eastern Conference All-Stars


VIDEO: Mike Budenholzer talks about being named coach of the East All-Stars

The Atlanta Hawks have sparked debate in recent weeks regarding the 2015 All-Star Game in New York next month, with folks wondering if their ensemble style will be sufficiently honored when the East squad’s reserves are chosen by the conference coaches.

So what happens? The Hawks wind up being the first team to nail down a spot for the Feb. 15 showcase at Madison Square Garden. As it turns out, all of the Hawks’ team success means that coach Mike Budenholzer and his staff will work the game on the East sideline.

Budenholzer, in his second season with Atlanta (35-8), earned the honor when the Hawks beat Indiana Wednesday night at Philips Arena. The victory clinched the best record in the conference through games played on Sunday, Feb. 1, the cutoff for determining the All-Star coaches. Joining Budenholzer will be assistants Kenny Atkinson, Darvin Ham, Taylor Jenkins, Charles Lee, Neven Spahija and Ben Sullivan.

“It’s a credit to our players, our front office and our entire organization,” Budenholzer said. “I really feel strongly about our assistant coaches; I think they do an amazing job. It’s a great honor but it’s our players that put us in this position. It’s the players that deserve the credit.”

By beating Indiana, Atlanta stretched its winning streak to 14 games, matching the longest in franchise history, and won for the 28th time in its past 30 games. Six Hawks scored in double figures, as Atlanta shot better from 3-point range (13 of 29, 44.8 percent) than the Pacers managed overall (31 of 78, 39.7 percent). And yet it was marksman Kyle Korver‘s dunk in the first half that had people talking.

The 33-year-old got loose on a break and threw down for the first time since Nov. 16, 2012. That one, at Sacramento, came 199 games ago according to STATS. It was, by their count, Korver’s 16th dunk in 12 NBA seasons.

Korver has a good chance to join Budenholzer in New York, given his reputation among the league’s coaches and his statistically eye-popping season so far in shooting 50 percent, overall, 50 percent from 3-point range and 90 percent on free throws. But then, strong cases can be made as well for point guard Jeff Teague and big men Paul Millsap and Al Horford.

There’s uncertainty, too, in naming Budenholzer’s counterpart as coach of the West All-Stars. The same Feb. 1 cutoff is in play and Golden State’s Steve Kerr began Wednesday as the favorite owing to the Warriors’ 33-6 mark. But four more teams – Portland (Terry Stotts), Memphis (Dave Joerger), Houston (Kevin McHale) and Dallas (Rick Carlisle) – all were in striking distance with 10 days left.


VIDEO: The Starters talk All-Star Hawks

Blogtable: Biggest midseason surprise (and disappointment)?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Midseason surprises? | Texas playoff showdown? | What to do with Austin?



VIDEONBA TV’s crew takes stock of the league at midseason

> We’re halfway through the season. Who or what has been the biggest surprise these first 41 games? And biggest disappointment?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: Anyone around the league who claims they saw the Atlanta Hawks doing this should be selling cars or running for office. No bleeping way. Year 2 under coach Mike Budenholzer, Jeff Teague‘s blossoming, Kyle Korver‘s outlier first half statistically and a pass-first, ensemble approach is one of the NBA’s best stories. As for disappointments, I’m looking at the Brooklyn Nets. Even though they’re reaping what they sowed with big talk, overspending and acquiring some wrong guys, it’s disheartening to see the Brooklyn honeymoon fizzle so fast.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Two words nobody ever expected to be typing before the season began: Atlanta Hawks. Al Horford, Jeff Teague, Paul Millsap, Kyle Korver, et al have risen under the brilliant coaching job of Mike Budenholzer to become a stylistic clone of the defending champion Spurs and the best team in the Eastern Conference. To lift what has been a moribund franchise for more than three decades, is positively breathtaking. When it comes to disappointments, all conversations will begin and end in Cleveland, where LeBron James returned home to acclamation and promptly found himself knee-deep in team-wise cluelessness. But let’s not let Lance Stephenson off the hook for all he hasn’t done in Charlotte. Possibly the worst $27 million anybody has ever spent.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Surprise: Hawks. I thought they would be good. But like fourth-in-the-East good. Capable of winning a series or two, not at the elite level yet. This, though. To be 10-2 against the West along with 17-5 on the road, not to mention the long win streak of the moment, is filled with positives for an organization that really needed good news. Disappointment: Cavaliers. Easy call. I’m also disappointed in the 76ers. That roster should have the fewest wins in the league. Come on, Philly, don’t let the Knicks out-bad you. You worked too hard to be the worst.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: Surprise to the Hawks, disappointment to the Knicks. Well, yeah, I can hear folks now: What about the Cavs? And that’s valid. However, I had a hunch the Cavs would need time (though not this much time) after blending in a new coach and three stars and also losing Anderson Varejao. LeBron said as much last summer. The Knicks are flat-out an embarrassment and, unlike Cleveland, have given up. As for the Hawks, they may be based in the East but they’re beating up good teams from the West. Unreal for a team that won 38 games last season and didn’t add anyone.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: My first answers are the Hawks and Cavs, for obvious reasons. But I’ll add the Bucks and Pelicans to mix things up. Milwaukee has taken advantage of the relative weakness of the Eastern Conference and doesn’t have a lot of quality wins, but I’d assumed that they would be one of the teams being taken advantage of (again). Jason Kidd has taken a young cast without a star and turned it into the most improved defensive team in the league. That was supposed to be New Orleans, with the addition of Omer Asik and development of Anthony Davis. But New Orleans has taken only the smallest step forward on defense and still ranks in the bottom six of that end of the floor. I didn’t think that they would make the playoffs, but with that frontline, I thought they could at least make a big jump defensively.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Until someone slows them down the Hawks remain the obvious and easy answer for the biggest surprise. No one saw this coming. NO ONE! But I think you could make just as strong an argument for the Portland Trail Blazers. Those 19 home wins and the way Damian Lillard and LaMarcus Aldridge both played throughout the first half of the season certainly fueled this team. They have some of my favorite role players (Nic Batum and the ridiculously underrated Wesley Matthews) on their roster, too. They didn’t add any star power over the summer or do anything to suggest they were ready for a leap into the top two or three of the West. Coach Terry Stotts has done a great job, but sustaining this flow becomes the challenge for the second half of the season. It’s tough to get up there to the top of the standings. It’s even tougher to stay there for the long haul. The biggest disappointment … the options are endless. Based on my own internal expectations, it would be hard to top the New York Knicks. Don’t get me wrong, I knew they were going to struggle with the transition. But the worst team in basketball, worse than Philadelphia or Minnesota? I didn’t see this face-plant coming.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: The Hawks are absolutely the biggest surprise, so much so that the other unforeseen performances – by the Warriors, Grizzlies, Rockets and Bucks – don’t seem so surprising by comparison. The biggest disappointment has been the Cavaliers: Not so much for their record as for the way they’ve reacted. I figured by now they would be showing more camaraderie and character and leadership, especially at the defensive end. And if there is any hint that their failure to pull together is the fault of the coach then further shame on them.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: The Atlanta Hawks have been nothing short of shocking. I say that as a native Atlantan and former Hawks season-ticket holder who watches every Hawks game and even wrote the NBA.com Hawks season preview. If I didn’t see a 33-8 start coming I don’t expect anyone else to have suspected it either. On both ends of the floor, night after night, the Hawks have been a total delight to watch, and they deserve every watt of the spotlight they’re receiving. As for the flip side of the coin, it’s not altogether their fault, but the Oklahoma City Thunder’s start to the season has been brutal. And sure, significant injuries to your two best players are always trouble, but the Thunder have to start winning consistently right now just to have a chance at making the playoffs. 20-20 is supposed to be the result of Russell Westbrook‘s fashion glasses, not OKC’s record halfway through the season.

 

Biggest Surprise of 2014-15For more debates, go to #AmexNBA or www.nba.com/homecourtadvantage.

Morning shootaround — Jan. 15


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Jan. 14

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Hawks keep on soaring | Lakers may shut down Kobe | Gortat pokes Bulls fans on Twitter | Report: Clippers closing in on Rivers trade | Shaw: Nuggets not actively shopping Afflalo, Chandler

No. 1: Hawks’ winning ways show now signs of stopping — Atlanta rested Al Horford and Kyle Korver last night in Boston,  yet still beat the Celtics by 14 points. That makes 10 straight wins for the Hawks. Are there still doubts about just how good this team is? Chris Vivlamore of the Atlanta Journa-Constitution breaks down how Atlanta just keeps winning, and winning and winning:

For the second consecutive night Atlanta rested several starters and still won going away. This time it was Boston that was run out of its own arena against a less-than-complete opponent.

The list of accomplishments for the NBA’s hottest team gets more impressive with each victory.

The Hawks (31-8, 15-5 road) have:

  • Won 10 consecutive games for their longest win streak since they started the 1997-98 season with 11 consecutive victories;
  • Won 10 consecutive games on the road, improving on their franchise record;
  • Won for the 24th time in the past 26 games as they have lost just twice since Nov. 28;
  • Won three in a row against the Celtics, including two this season.

“You have to give credit to the bench,” DeMarre Carroll said of the Hawks’ past two victories. “That shows you the beauty of our team. We’ve got a lot of guys who can play. That is what we expect. These guys work just as hard and when their opportunity came they took advantage of it.”

The Eastern Conference-leading Hawks continue make believers of those around the NBA. Boston coach Brad Stevens called the Hawks “elite” prior to the game.

Then the Hawks went out and proved it.

The remaining three starters, all of whom sat out Tuesday’s victory at Philadelphia, carried the Hawks. Carroll (22), Jeff Teague (22) and Paul Millsap (18) combined for 62 points. Millsap also had 10 rebounds for a double-double. Mike Scott added 11 points off the bench.

“They stepped up to the occasion,” Hawks coach Mike Budenholzer said. “When you are feeling fresh and healthy and in attack mode, all three of them, it’s really positive. They can score in different ways and impact the game in different ways.”

“We are happy to grow and develop,” Budenholzer said. “Guys get different opportunities. Different players are put in different situations. To find a way to win on the road is always good. I think where we just want to continue to grow and develop and get better. On a night like tonight, we did that. I think last night we did that. Going forward, we have to continue.”


VIDEO: The Hawks have piled up wins against the NBA’s elite all season long

(more…)

Blogtable: Why doubt the Hawks?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Buy Hawks or Nets? | Who is Atlanta’s All-Star? | Are the Hawks legit?



VIDEOCan the Hawks keep up their immense success once the playoffs begin?

> They’re the top team in the East right now, but they’ve also steamrolled their Western Conference opponents during this recent 23-2 run. This team is legit, isn’t it? Why are there still so many Hawks doubters out there?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comAny team that ranks in the top 10 in both offensive and defensive efficiency this deep into a season is legit in my mind. The Hawks defend without fouling, or at least without giving away a lot of cheap points at the line. They shoot lights-out. They have worker bees to run down those vaunted 50-50 balls. I think any reluctance to give them their full due as a contender stems from three things: Limited history as a power since the ‘Nique years, the absence of an easily accessible marquee name/personality and, most of all, their style. Atlanta went “3-crazy” in the playoffs last spring out of necessity — no Al Horford — and doesn’t hoist ‘em from way deep quite like that now (five of their eight most prolific shooters in the postseason took 45 percent of their FGA from the arc vs. just two now). But the Hawks still score fewer points off 2-pointers than all but four teams and more off 3-pointers than all but six, and that heavy reliance on range doesn’t fit the imagery of grinding, assertive playoff offense.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comYes, they’re legit. Their smackdown of the so-called power teams from the West proves that. The only reason that people doubt the Hawks is the long franchise history of mediocre basketball, early playoff exits, empty arenas and no excitement outside of Dominique Wilkins. They’ll fight their own past until they get a chance to do something about in the 2015 playoffs.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comYes, this team is legit. The doubt comes because of the Hawks’ history, not the Hawks’ present. People are getting caught up in reputations. And the instability in the front office and ownership doesn’t help. But this isn’t this isn’t a sudden flash that needs to stand the test of time. People could see Atlanta coming at least a season ago and maybe longer. Besides, half a season with some of the wins the Hawks have had is a pretty good test of time. That’s a roster with talent and a smart coach who will have a lot of success.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: The doubters exists because (a) the Hawks are guilty by association with regard to the crummy East, and (b) they have no stars, and (c) the Hawks have never won two playoff rounds in their Atlanta history, so folks are waiting to see what happens in April/May. Also, there’s the sense that when the Bulls get it together, it’s their conference to lose.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comI can’t say why other people don’t believe in the Hawks, but I’m pretty convinced. They have the best record (9-3), the best offense (107.4 points per 100 possessions) and the second best defense (101.4) in games played between the league’s 12 best teams (the top 4 in the East, the top 8 in the West). Overall, they’re one of two teams that ranks in the top six on both ends of the floor, and they’ve played a tougher schedule than the other one (Golden State). Though Al Horford has come a long way since the beginning of the season, interior defense is still a bit of a question, so I’ll be curious to see them against Chicago on Saturday if both Pau Gasol and Joakim Noah are (relatively) healthy. Noah missed the first meeting in December.

Sekou Smith, NBA.comThe Hawks are indeed “legit,” and then some. Yet, as a veteran of some of the most diabolically bad basketball ever unleashed on fans in Atlanta (13-69 in 2004-05 was uglier than the numbers indicate), I get the reluctance to buy-in locally. It’s hard to believe in a team with the history the Hawks have acquired over the years is as putrid as we all know it to be. Every glimmer of hope has been met with a door slamming in the face of Hawks fans eager to jump on a bandwagon with no wheels. That said, I don’t believe in the ghosts of basketball past muddying up things for the ghosts of basketball present and the future. And these current Hawks are giving you everything you need to believe that they are destined for something special this season. The Eastern Conference crown is there for the taking … so why not the Hawks?

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: They don’t have anyone known for raising his level of play. That’s what the great players do, and that’s why they win championships. Will the Hawks be able to raise their level in the postseason? But then again, if the Bulls aren’t healthy three or four months from now, there may be no rival in the East capable of forcing the Hawks to achieve that higher level of play. What they’re doing right now may be good enough to earn them a place in the NBA Finals.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogAtlanta sports fans have something I call the hammer of history constantly dangling over their heads. Over the last three decades, there have been so many Atlanta teams with championship aspirations who showed promise and got the city and the fans fired up, and then fell short. The Braves won 14 consecutive division titles and managed one World Series title. The Falcons made it to the Super Bowl in 1998 and got whacked. Georgia Tech made it to the NCAA Basketball championship game in 2004 and getting bumped off by UConn. It’s been all tease and minimal payoff, and Atlanta fans are understandably tired and suspicious of handing over their hearts too soon. So I get it, I do. The thing is? Right now, this Hawks team is for real. There’s still a lot of season to go, and I know it’s hard to embrace anything with that hammer above, but enjoy it Hawks fans. Stuff like this doesn’t come along very often.

Blogtable: Atlanta’s All-Star is …?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Buy Hawks or Nets? | Who is Atlanta’s All-Star? | Are the Hawks legit?



VIDEOPaul Millsap is putting in plenty of hard work off the court

> Assuming the Hawks don’t have a player voted into the starting lineup (and that’s a pretty safe assumption), who on the Atlanta roster should make the All-Star team as a reserve? And why?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: When we bellied up to the blogtable a few weeks ago to bat around All-Star roster spots, I mentioned Kyle Korver, so I’m going to stick with him. He’s not a “star” per se, but his name recognition is as solid as any of the below-the-radar Hawks. Jeff Teague has the gaudier PER (22.7) and Teague, Paul Millsap and Al Horford are averaging more points. Korver, however, is so instrumental to what Atlanta is doing this season that he’d be a great representative for their ensemble contender. If Dan Majerle could make an All-Star Game as a role player, Korver should be able to.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comIt’s taken the Hawks’ sizzling run to get people to finally notice that Jeff Teague has the numbers (19.8 points., 7.2 assists) to go toe-to-toe with the elite point guards. He’s been the steady hand running the Atlanta offense, also is getting the job done on defense. The Hawks have a lot of contributors to what has become a wonderful season, but Teague is the spark who often ignites them. He should be in the MVP conversation.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comJeff Teague with a slight edge over Paul Millsap. Teague takes care of the ball, a big reason the Hawks could break the top five in scoring despite not having a dominant scorer. With Teague, they don’t waste possessions. Plus, he shoots well. One very interesting consideration for an All-Star pick, though: Kyle Korver. That range puts so much pressure on defenses. Korver will obviously be invited to be in the Three-Point Contest, but an argument could be made he deserves consideration for the Sunday main event.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: If we’re only putting one Hawk on the team, then it’s Paul Millsap, who’s a player’s player and Atlanta’s most consistent guy. If we’re putting two, then pencil in Jeff Teague, a top-3 point guard in the NBA over the last month. Coach Mike Budenholzer will be on the bench, it appears. And we know Kyle Korver is winning the Three-Point Contest, right? So it could be a Hawk weekend after all.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: In a league where shooting is more important than ever, there should be a spot for the guy that’s the league’s best shooter by a wide margin. Kyle Korver not only shoots 3-pointers at a ridiculous rate (his threes are worth 1.6 points per shot), but creates open shots and lanes to the basket for his teammates by just being on the floor. The numbers say that the Hawks’ sixth-ranked offense is at its best when Korver is on the court, and it’s easy to understand why. I’d try to find spots for Jeff Teague (the team’s second most efficient scorer and the guy who runs the offense), Paul Millsap (all-around mensch on the floor) and Al Horford (the key to their defensive improvement), in that order, as well. And maybe Cleveland’s slide will allow for more than two Hawks on the East roster.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: The All-Star reserve selections are often about what have you done for me lately. And no one has been better for the Hawks than Jeff Teague, whose run of 20-point scoring games and deft touch running Mike Budenholzer‘s offense has been an absolute revelation for a player who was once viewed as a potential bust (in his early days with the Hawks) by some insiders who are no longer with the organization. In a league filled with stellar point guards, Teague has been one of the best this season and deserves the some All-Star recognition for what he’s done. Paul Millsap deserves a spot, too. And if Budenholzer and his staff end up coaching the Eastern Conference All-Stars next month in New York, don’t be surprised to see a pair of Hawks suit up for the big game.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comJeff Teague has to be an All-Star, doesn’t he? He leads the No. 1 team in points and assists. I don’t see any of the other Hawks making it, which makes sense — it’s because of their selflessness that they’re dominating the East.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogI’ve said all along that Paul Millsap and Jeff Teague deserve to be All-Stars this season. Teague leads the Hawks in scoring (17.4 ppg) and assists (7.4 apg), and he’s a pest defensively (1.8 steals per game). After years of inconsistent play, Teague is having a career year, and in a league dominated by point guards, Teague gives the Hawks a chance to win every night. Meanwhile, even though Al Horford has improved week by week, Millsap has been Atlanta’s best frontcourt player all season. He’s averaging 16.9 ppg and leads them in rebounding (7.9 rpg), and surprisingly he’s tied with Teague in steals (1.8). And on the rare occasions when the Hawks’ pace-and-space offense bogs down, Teague and Millsap are Atlanta’s best options to create a shot for themselves. It’s hard to single out any of the Hawks, as their whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Horford and Kyle Korver certainly deserve All-Star consideration. But without Teague and Millsap, this team wouldn’t be flying nearly as high.

Blogtable: Buy the Hawks or the Nets?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Buy Hawks or Nets? | Who is Atlanta’s All-Star? | Are the Hawks legit?



VIDEOThe Starters discuss the Hawks’ recent surge in the East

> Taking in the whole picture – current roster and contracts, fan base, TV market, arena – which NBA team is the more attractive buy: the Brooklyn Nets or the Atlanta Hawks?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: Location, location, location! I don’t like the Nets’ current roster overall, the fan base can be fickle, the arena felt underbuilt the times I’ve been there and the novelty of an NBA team in Brooklyn has worn off. But it’s still an NBA team in Brooklyn, for cryin’ out loud. The size of the market, the basketball traditions in New York, the attractiveness to free agents – all of that is a big advantage over Atlanta’s tried-and-tried-and-tried-again little franchise. Now if I could just swing a 24-player trade with Danny Ferry‘s empty chair…

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comWhen you’re looking at the whole picture, the obvious overwhelming deciding factor is the TV market. Two words: New York. It trumps everything. The Nets also have a spanking new state of the art arena in the Barclays Center.  The fan base for basketball in the market is also one of the best in the league. Filling out your roster with players is down the list of heavy lifting. If you’re looking in short-term, obviously you reach for the red-hot Hawks and Atlanta. But it’s still a franchise trying to figure it all out. If I’m a prospective owner looking to get into the league for the long term and have my choice of either franchise, it’s a no-brainer for the Nets.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comObviously pending the final total on the bill, the Nets are the more attractive buy. Not the better basketball team, but the better chance to make a lot of money. New York always seems like a limitless market anyway, but especially now with not only the Knicks in full fetal position but a lot of the city’s teams struggling. Grab even a small slice of the NYC fan base and it would be considered a big jump a lot of other places. The turnstiles don’t move much at Hawks games even with a very good start.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comYou can never bet against New York real estate, and that’s essentially where the value lies with the Nets. They’ll always be the No. 2 team in NYC the way the Clippers will always be No. 2 in L.A. Plus, the roster is a mess (along with the loss of future Draft picks from the Joe Johnson trade). While the Hawks are in far better shape basketball-wise, I’m not convinced about the marketplace. Remember, even in the Dominique Wilkins years, the Hawks didn’t always sell out the old Omni. It’s a football town, plain and simple.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comThe Nets are one of the most boring and one of the most disappointing teams in the league, with little hope for a turnaround in the next couple of seasons. The Hawks are not only good and fun to watch, but also have the maneuverability to make upgrades. But Brooklyn’s market and brand trump all that in regard to franchise value. The Nets have a newer and better arena in a much bigger city. They need time to build up their fan base, but in New York, you can always get people, like tourists who have never seen an NBA game before, in the seats. Just ask the 5-35 Knicks.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Conventional business wisdom says Brooklyn, Brooklyn, Brooklyn! The return on your investment in Metropolitan New York, no matter how big or bigger that investment would have to be to purchase a NBA team these days, is certainly going to be greater with the Nets. I’m a risk taker, though, so I’d go with Atlanta and the continued growth of the Mecca of the southeast. If Mark Cuban can make it work in (Cowboys mad) Dallas, why can’t someone make it work in Atlanta? The Hawks’ overall basketball portfolio is far superior to what the Nets are working with. They own the longest playoff streak in the Eastern Conference, have a sound core group that is playing the best basketball of any team in the East and perhaps the entire league as of this moment. And there is a hungry fan base itching for someone to present them with a winner to go crazy over. The Nets will never overtake the Knicks as the top draw in the Big Apple. The top spot in Atlanta is wide open, for an owner willing to take a little risk.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comBrooklyn, by far. Of course there will be a few hard years of rebuilding for the new owner; but the immensity of the New York market and its lush revenue streams will trigger a much higher price for the Nets than for the Hawks.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: As an Atlanta native who has lived in New York City for the last 15 years, I feel like I am uniquely qualified to answer this. And even as someone who rooted for the Hawks for decades, and someone as shocked as the next person at the way the Hawks are playing this season, the Nets are probably the smarter buy. Sure, the Hawks are the better team right now, and are better positioned for both the immediate and long-term future, but there’s one key advantage Brooklyn has over Atlanta: Metropolitan Atlanta has about 5.5 million residents; Brooklyn is part of New York City, which has about 8.5 million people. Brooklyn is part of one of the richest, most densely-populated cities in the world, filled with deep pockets just waiting to be tapped. Even without an owner and an absentee GM, the Hawks are in a better place than the Nets. But the Nets are the smarter buy.

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 185) Featuring Chris Vivlamore

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS – You need theme music when you’re playing as well as the Atlanta Hawks have here recently (they’ve won 23 of their last 25 games after demolishing the Philadelphia 76ers Tuesday night on the road).

The dream is real for long-suffering Hawks fans who have waited for years to see their team atop the Eastern Conference standings and among the league’s truly elite teams. The Hawks sit atop NBA.com’s Power Rankings and have earned the universal approval of those who know the game intimately, and yet there is still a bit of uncertainty surrounding the hottest team in basketball.

Maybe it’s the lack of superstar names on the roster (sorry Jeff Teague, Al Hoford, Paul Millsap, Kyle Korver and others). Or perhaps it’s the long and sordid history of a franchise that, during its Atlanta history, has yet to enjoy that breakthrough season that ends with a trip to the conference finals. Mike Budenholzer and his bunch don’t care about the Hawks’ past. They are only concerned with the present and the future.

That future remains a bit uncertain. New ownership, potentially new management and even a few new faces on the roster could be in the works. No one knows for sure. And that’s why we thought it best to discuss all that and more with Chris Vivlamore of The Atlanta Journal Constitution on Episode 185 of the Hang Time Podcast.

LISTEN HERE:

As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of NBA.com,  Lang Whitaker of NBA.com’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand and the new best sound designer/engineer in the business,  Andrew Merriam.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.


VIDEO: KG head butts Dwight and the chaos ensues

Curry closes on James in final All-Star voting update

HANG TIME BIG CITY — The King is still on top … but just barely.

LeBron James remains the overall leader in voting for the 2015 All-Star Game in the latest results released today, with 971,299 votes. But Golden State’s Stephen Curry is right on his heels with 958,014 total votes. In the third and final 2015 All-Star voting update, James and Curry remain atop their respective conferences, as they have been from the start.

NBA All-Star 2015The top ten vote-getters remain unchanged. Joining James in the East are Carmelo Anthony, Pau Gasol, with a backcourt of John Wall and Dwyane Wade. Along with Curry in the West are Anthony Davis, Blake Griffin, Marc Gasol and Kobe Bryant in the backcourt alongside Curry.

There was some movement in this latest round of results. Toronto guard Kyle Lowry was a big gainer, passing Cleveland’s Kyrie Irving for third among Eastern guards, but with 406,974 votes, Lowry is still over 100,000 votes behind Wade for a starting spot.

Washington’s Marcin Gortat passed Chicago’s Joakim Noah to move into sixth among Eastern Conference big men.

The Eastern Conference leading Atlanta Hawks still don’t have a player in the top ten; Hawks forward Paul Millsap is 13th overall among Eastern Conference forwards.

This is the final voting update before the All-Star starting lineups are announced live on TNT on Thursday, Jan. 22, during a special one-hour edition of TNT NBA Tip-Off presented by Autotrader.com at 7 p.m. ET, featuring Ernie Johnson, Charles Barkley, Shaquille O’Neal, and Kenny Smith. Balloting concludes on Monday, Jan. 19.

This year, for the first time ever, fans have the power to vote for any active player in the NBA using the new online ballot. The 64th NBA All-Star Game will be played in New York City’s iconic Madison Square Garden, home of the New York Knicks, on Sunday, February 15, 2015. The BBVA Rising Stars Challenge, Sprint NBA All-Star Celebrity Game and State Farm All-Star Saturday Night — including the Sears Shooting Stars, Taco Bell Skills Challenge, Foot Locker Three-Point Contest and Sprite Slam Dunk — will be held at Barclays Center, home of the Brooklyn Nets. The recently-debuted uniforms feature nods to all five boroughs of New York City.

Hawks keep whupping up on the West


VIDEO: The Hawks are reaping the rewards of buying into their system

If another team from the East won nine straight against the West, folks would be pushing them as title contenders. Heck, if a team from the West won nine straight against the West, folks would be pushing them as title contenders.

As it is, the Hawks must find satisfaction in delivering impressive whippings now and waiting until the playoffs to convince some of us that they’re true heavyweights.

On Wednesday they closed strong against the Grizzlies and put another thick Western pelt on their wall. Overall, the Hawks are scorching right now. It was their 20th win in their last 22 tries and  they’re starting to get comfortable on top in the East, where they’ve opened a 2 1/2-game lead on the Toronto Raptors and Chicago Bulls. Raise your hand if you had this penciled in a long time ago.

And against the West, well, who saw this coming? The Hawks have now beaten wins against the Houston Rockets, Dallas Mavericks, Portland Trail Blazers and Memphis Grizzlies and swept the L.A. Clippers. If those wins haven’t done wonders for their court credibility — yet — it has positioned them well in terms of confidence and in the standings as mid-season approaches. Suddenly, there’s drama building, thanks to the Hawks. Since the weak East doesn’t appear to have a true super team, who’s to say the Hawks can’t stay on top?

There are two perception forces the Hawks are battling. One is their history: the team has never reached an Eastern Conference fianls and was last in a conference finals in 1970 … when Atlanta was in the Western Division. Even in the Dominique Wilkins years, the best the Hawks could do is win a playoff round. Until they go deeper, you can understand why skeptics are keeping their arms crossed.

The other issue is their lack of stars. The Hawks could cruise into the All-Star break in first place and not have a starter in the All-Star Game and may only have one on the team (at least Mike Budenholzer would be the coach in that situation). But maybe that’s the beauty of the Hawks: they can play so unselfishly and not need one designated player to bail them out — at least not in the regular season.

However, this is the right time to mention Jeff Teague. There’s no point guard playing at a higher level in the East right now, and that includes Kyle Lowry of the Raptors. Teague punished Mike Conley on Wednesday, especially down the stretch, with a back-breaking 3-pointer and another bucket to put Memphis on ice. He has scored 20 or more points in each game of the Hawks’ current six-game win streak. In the last month, he’s had big moments against Conley, Chris Paul, Damian Lillard, Kyrie Irving and Ty Lawson (who shot 1-for-10). Figure that a few of them will make the All-Star team.

“That’s what you want, to be really consistent every day,” said Budenholzer. “That’s what we keep pushing Jeff on. I think he’s made a lot of progress. He’s making some good things happen for himself and his team.”

Teague is scoring on step-backs, slashing to the rim and setting up teammates for shots. He’s a sight for very sore eyes at Philips Arena. For years, the Hawks paid the price for passing up Paul (and also Deron Williams) in the 2005 Draft. They had the second pick and while they needed a point guard, they took Marvin Williams instead. Williams impressed the Hawks and, to be fair, a few other teams on the basis of pre-Draft workouts. He ended up being unspectacular in Atlanta and GM Danny Ferry was applauded for dumping his contract two summers ago on Utah. Meanwhile, the Hawks sifted through a variety of short-term answers at point guard, most famously an old Mike Bibby, before drafting Teague and giving him time and room to grow.

(In an interesting twist, the Hawks also drafted Dennis Schroder in 2013 and his development this season has been a pleasant bonus.)

If Teague keeps this up, then he (and possibly Paul Millsap) could rep the Hawks in New York next month. By the All-Star break, we could also have an even better handle on the Hawks and it could be favorable.

The schedule turns kind as the Hawks close out January with seven straight at home. The good news is with the Falcons done for the year and no other sports competition for a while in Atlanta, Philips Arena is filling up. The building erupted when Kyle Korver drilled Memphis with a late 3-pointer.

The “bad” news? Only three of those games are against teams from the West.


VIDEO: The Hawks handle the Grizzlies at Philips Arena