Posts Tagged ‘Pacers’

Rehabbing Paul George looks to Rio


VIDEO: Pacers coach Frank Vogel talks on Paul George’s injury, team’s future

Nobody knows better the extra hours of work and dedication that go into pursuing the Olympic goal. Nobody understands more than Paul George the risk that goes into such a decision.

But nearly a year after gruesomely snapping his right leg during a warmup game in Las Vegas and missing almost all of the 2014-15 season, the Pacers star says he wants to be back with Team USA for the 2016 Olympics in Rio.

George also says he has the full support of original Dream Team member Larry Bird, Pacers president of basketball operations, and the entire franchise, according to ESPN.com.

“Larry, of all people, knows how important it is to play and represent your country. So he’s got my back on that one, and it’s a personal goal,” George said. “Coach (Mike) Krzyzewski knows I’m on board.”

George, however, said he won’t be in attendance at Team USA’s minicamp next month in Las Vegas, according to the Indianapolis Star.
He was speaking from the Kroger Unplug and Play Paul George Basketball ProCamp at Avon High School on Indianapolis’ west side, where he was helping to teach 250 youngsters the finer points of the game.

He said he can’t wait to put the injury behind him.

“I feel great,” George said. “I still notice some things that are not Paul George characteristic yet, but I feel good and the good thing is we’re still in mid-summer. By training camp, I’ll be ready to go.”

Ten players who made impression at Orlando Summer League


VIDEO: Stanley Johnson discusses his Summer League play

ORLANDO — Seven days, 25 games and so many different stories at the Orlando Pro Summer League. Here are 10 players that made an impression:

Aaron Gordon, F, Magic — The No. 4 overall pick in the 2014 Draft brought a reputation as an athletic, high-energy player into his rookie season in Orlando, but one who struggled with his shot and that was born out. But Gordon has spent time working with Magic shooting coach Dave Love to change the mechanics of his shot and it seems to have paid off. He looked comfortable in the three games he played, leading the league in scoring at 21.7 points per game and even hit 50 percent (6-for-12) on 3s.

Stanley Johnson, F, Pistons — From the enthusiasm that he brought to the court every day, you might have thought Johnson was on a trip to Disney World. It’s not cocky when you can do it and the Pistons’ No. 8 draft pick has all the skills and talent in his bag of tricks to excel in the NBA as soon as coach Stan Van Gundy turns him loose in the rotation. Johnson says he’s not trying to prove anything to the folks who thought the Pistons made a mistake by not taking Justise Winslow. But it sure looks that way and that’s good for Detroit.

Myles Turner, C, Pacers — The knock on the tall, skinny kid out of the University of Texas is just that. He’s skinny. But that didn’t stop him from taking advantage of his size to block more than four shots a game and protect the rim. It’s a new day and a new style in Indy with the plodding Roy Hibbert gone to the Lakers and veteran David West to the Spurs. The No. 11 pick in the draft will be thrown right into the lineup and could get a chance to shine immediately. He shot 60.5 percent from the field and the big guy can knock down the jumper.

Mario Hezonja, G-F, Magic — After completing a full European season in Barcelona, the No. 5 pick in the draft jetted to the U.S. and played in just two games at the summer league. He struggled with his shot, through he did knock down a game-winning 3-pointer at the buzzer in his debut. He’s also got off-the-charts athleticism, which he showed off with a ferocious one-handed drive and dunk. Though he’s only 20, Hezonja has been a professional for years and will force his way onto the floor for the Magic soon.

Willie Reed, F-C, Nets — Undrafted out of Saint Louis in 2001, he’s spent four seasons trying to prove himself with four different D-League teams before spending last season playing in the Dominican Republic. He came to Orlando with the Heat and immediately drew comparisons to Hassan Whiteside for his ability to play defense and gather rebounds. Reed impressed enough at the summer league for Brooklyn to sign him to a contract.

Frank Kaminsky, F-C, Hornets — The college basketball player of the year had trouble finding a rhythm on his shot in the early games, but the Hornets know that’s an area they don’t have to be concerned about it. He showed an ability to put the ball on the floor and get to the basket and did a solid job rebounding. He needs work at the defensive end, but appeared comfortable and confident enough moving ahead toward training camp.

Troy Daniels, G, Hornets — What’s the old saying? You can never have enough shooting. Daniels keeps trying to prove that to different teams as he moves about the league trying to find a permanent home. He lit up from the outside this week, hitting at a 55 percent clip from behind the 3-point line and a team like Charlotte that needs shooters could finally be the place where he sticks.

Joe Young, G, Pacers — The second-round draft pick of the Pacers was recovering from a stomach illness all week and still managed to stand out as one of the top rookies. The 2015 Pac-12 Player of the Year can fill up the basket has the kind of demeanor you want in a point guard — authoritative and vocal. He’s arriving in Indy at the perfect time as the Pacers will look to play an up-tempo game and he has a nose for pushing the ball up court. He’s a keeper.

Justise Winslow, F, Heat — Getting the ball to go into the basket was a problem for Winslow right from the start, but it didn’t keep him from attacking every game with confidence and doing enough other things to help his team. He knows that he belongs at the NBA level and goes at the basket relentlessly, drawing fouls and getting more free throws than anybody else in the league. Given the Heat no reason to think they didn’t get very lucky having him fall into their laps at the No. 10 spot.

Branden Dawson, F, Clippers — For all the back-patting for getting DeAndre Jordan to change his mind, the Clippers still have a serious lack of depth. The 6-foot-6 forward showed a nose for rebounding and putting the ball in the bucket all week and has just the right kind of overachiever attitude that comes from being picked No. 56 in the draft and could eventually find its way onto the NBA roster. He put up three double-doubles four games played. One drawback is he could make Jordan look good at the line, making just 3-for-9 on free throws.

Pacers’ Young is hungry at the point


VIDEO: Joe Young breaks down his Thursday performance

ORLANDO — Just say Joe Young showed up hungry for the start of Summer League. He’ll pretty much leave that way, too.

But in between, the 6-foot-2 point guard has given the Pacers a steady diet of the things they want him to do. Speed, smarts and a desire to learn.

A stomach ailment prevented Young from working out with his teammates back in Indianapolis last week, but he hit the ground running and hasn’t missed a game at the Orlando Pro Summer League.

With their big man Myles Turner getting a rest on Thursday, it was Young who led the Pacers to their first win by putting up 28 points, shooting 5-for-9 on 3-pointers, and adding three assists and three rebounds.

“To watch him go from that first game where I thought he was still sick and just too frantic and a little too wild, which is natural, to playing a game like this, was very satisfying to see,” said Pacers summer league coach Dan Burke.

“In that first game you could tell the adrenaline was running and he was so stoked. Today’s game I thought he looked more controlled. His eyes were up. He was seeing shooters in pick-and-roll. He was seeing the roll man. I thought that was a quick progression. So I was excited. It’s the kind of play we expected when we drafted him.”

Young was a second-round draft pick, 43rd overall, after playing four years of college ball, two at Houston before transferring to Oregon. He was the Pac-12 Player of the Year in 2015 and comes with the basketball DNA of his father, Michael Young, who was a member of the famous Phi Slama Jama teams at Houston.

What also lit up Burke’s face was the commitment that Young showed when he was ill and couldn’t be on the practice floor with his teammates.

“He’s a sponge. He’s an eager learner,” Burke said. “And he took it upon himself to catch up as quick as he could. He was in there drawing up the plays that we wanted him to learn for himself. He was studying constantly. Then when we got down here to Florida, he met with (fellow rookie) Myles Turner in the lobby of the hotel and was going over plays. That’s the kind of kid you love to have on your team.”

Young’s week was an uphill climb as he took the floor for the first game on Sunday barely able to keep any food in his stomach.

“I’m still not necessarily 100 percent, but I’m tough,” Young said. “I don’t want no red flags saying, ‘Oh, he gets sick and can’t play.’ I’m just trying to be a warrior. I thought each game I got better and the team took a step. It wasn’t me by myself. I couldn’t have done stuff I did without my team.”

Everybody is a virtual stranger in summer league, which is what makes play often ragged and doesn’t lend itself to teamwork. It’s trickier even for a point guard to be making something out of the chaos.

“But that’s part of a being a point guard,” Young said. “You take control. You’ve got to be vocal. You’ve got to put the teammates where they’re supposed to go.”

Young showed that he could feed the 6-foot-11 Turner in the post when they played together, get the ball to his shooters and also create his own shot.

“For one, he’s a smart guy and that helps,” Burke said. “He’s also vocal and we haven’t had too many vocal point guards the last couple of years. He’s not afraid to take charge and once he gets comfortable with our system and around our guys, where he knows exactly where he’s telling a guy to go, he’ll probably even be more vocal.”

Young also looks like a good fit for the more up-tempo style that team president Larry Bird and head coach Frank Vogel want the Pacers to play next season.


VIDEO: Larry Bird on what he sees for Pacers in 2015-16

“We don’t want to go helter-skelter,” Burke said. “But get it up quick and get into our stuff quick. Look to score in the first eight seconds. If you don’t, then you’ve got to score in the last eight seconds and execute. Joe’s that kind of guy.

“I think we’ve had good defensive teams. So we need more stops and continue to get those stops and shots and runs. Joe’s about the best I’ve seen that we’ve had in the last couple of years in getting it up the court. C.J. Watson wasn’t really a push guy like that. Donald Sloan wasn’t that fast. And George Hill can be fast, but he’s more comfortable just getting up at a decent tempo. He’s going to be an interesting player to watch. Joe’s fast, aggressive, confident.”

And still hungry.

It’s Turner’s time already in Indy

VIDEO: Myles Turner finishes off a nice feed from Joe Young for the Pacers.

ORLANDO — At one end of the floor Myles Turner was a flash of summer lightning, coming across the court crackling to get a long arm up and block a driving shot along the baseline. A few seconds and a few long strides later at the other end, he took in a pass, made a jab fake and then rose up to hit a step-back turnaround.

With the hulking, plodding Roy Hibbert on his way to the Lakers, it’s a new day and a new style of play for the Pacers and that’s where the rookie center says he’s ready to fit in.

“I’m very excited about it,” said the 19-year-old who was the No. 11 pick in the draft. “I’m ready for anything. I joined this team. They selected me to come in here to play right away, I guess. So if that’s what is required of me, I’m gonna go out there and do it.”

The 6-11 center is young and green and doesn’t exactly have a body type that will inspire fear in opponents when he first hits the floor in the NBA. But nearly a week of work in the Orlando Pro Summer League has shown that Turner is willing and able to do lot of different things.

He put up 23 points, eight rebounds and four blocked shot on in a loss to the Pistons on Wednesday and Turner is looking more comfortable in each day.

“The week of practice with two-a-days definitely helped,” he said. “I’ve been acclimated to the plays and feeling better. We haven’t won anything yet, but I feel better individually.”

It has helped that point guard Joe Young, the Pacers’ second round draft pick, has been able to get back onto the floor and play after missing time with stomach problems.

“Joe is a real scorer for us, a threat and he knows what he’s doing running the point and I think having him back has given me a level of comfort playing,” Turner said.

In his one college season at Texas, Turner was the Big 12 Freshman of the Year and was known as a shot blocker at one end and guy who likes to shoot from the outside at the other end. He averaged 2.6 blocks per game at Texas and had five blocks on nine different occasions. In three summer league games he’s averaging 18.7 points, 8.3 rebounds and 4.3 blocks.

“The blocks are something I’ve always done,” Turner said. “Just protect the rim. It makes me very useful and valuable on the defensive end. It’s one thing I want to even increase as I get into my NBA career.

“I’ve always had a shooting touch. It’s something I enjoy doing. But I’ll work in the post as well. I’m seven-foot tall. So I’ve got to be able to go down there and mix it up.

“You’ve got to definitely be versatile to survive in this league. If you’re weak on one end, they’re gonna expose you. So my versatility is key.”

Pacers coach Frank Vogel has been observing while assistants Dan Burke and Popeye Jones work the bench during the summer league and likes what he’s seen from Turner’s early work.

“He’s got such a unique combination of skills with the ability to shoot with range, but also you’ve seen him dominate the game on the defensive end with his shot-blocking,” Vogel said. “We’re really high on him.”

With Hibbert gone, Paul George fully recovered from his broken leg and the addition of Monta Ellis, the Pacers will have a new look.

“We’re going to be a different team than we’ve been in the past, and that’s something I’m really excited about,” Vogel said. “We’re going to try to get up and down the floor a lot more than we have, be more of a running team, play with more pace. But also playing Paul George at the 4 some, maybe a lot, could give us an entirely different look, with the ability to just space the floor and not always play with two bigs the way we have in the past. And I think it’s going to open up a lot of things for a lot of guys.”

Turner sees the opening.

“I’ve got work to do, plenty of things to get better at doing,” he said. “But I’m here to play and if they’re going to give me the chance to do it right away, I’m gonna be ready.”

Report: West agrees to deal with Spurs

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — David West said his next move would be about winning above all things. The veteran power forward meant what he said.

West has agreed to a deal for the veteran’s minimum, of $1.4 million, to join the San Antonio Spurs, a deal first reported by TNT’s David Aldridge. West turned his back on a $12 million deal with the Indiana Pacers to join the summer renaissance in San Antonio.

The Spurs have already agreed to deals with LaMarcus Aldridge and to re-sign both Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green. They also got confirmation earlier today from veteran sixth-man Manu Ginobili that he will return for the 2015–16 season alongside Tim Duncan and coach Gregg Popovich.

West had grown disenchanted with the franchise meltdown he felt occurred in Indiana the past two seasons, when the Pacers went from back-to-back Eastern Conference finalists and one of the top teams in the league to a lottery team. He opted out of the final year of his deal with the Pacers and vowed that his next opportunity would be one that gave him the best chance to win a title and delivered with his decision today.

 

Report: Lakers, Pacers finalizing Hibbert deal

The Lakers and Pacers were deep into discussions Saturday on a deal that would send center Roy Hibbert to Los Angeles and at least temporarily solve a problem for both, Marc Stein of ESPN.com reported.

Whether other players would be involved was not immediately clear. The Lakers would be able to absorb the $15.5 million on the final season of Hibbert’s contract into available cap space — room that had been set aside for failed attempts to land a marquee free agent — making it possible they would only be sending draft picks to Indiana in return.

Hibbert fell out of favor with the Pacers last season after years of undependable play, including in the playoffs, that left the front office unusually outspoken about wanting to move forward with him in at least a reduced role and possibly completely gone. Larry Bird, the head of basketball operations, essentially encouraged Hibbert to exercise a clause in his contract to become a free agent.

When Hibbert instead chose to stay in the deal, understandable with $15.5 million on the table, he instantly became an obvious trade candidate, even more after Indiana draft Texas center-power forward Myles Turner in the lottery. Since the free-agent market opened July 1, Hibbert had been linked as the fallback plan to most every team that might miss out on LaMarcus Aldridge or Kevin Love. When the Lakers officially made that list, and with Jordan Hill a free agent and Robert Sacre and Tarik Black the returning centers, their search led to Indiana.

 

Report: West opts out on Pacers

It was an up-and-down, injury-filled season of inconsistency in Indiana, but the one thing the Pacers could always count on through the 2014-15 schedule was the solid play and locker room strength of veteran David West.

Now the Pacers are likely losing their “rock” as the 35-year-old power forward has chosen to opt out of his $12.6 million player option for next season to become a free agent, according to Candace Buckner of the Indianapolis Star.

“He has the passion for (basketball),” a source responded when asked about West’s wish list for his next destination. “He wants to play. … It’s going to be an intellectual decision.”

West made up his mind Tuesday, according to a source with knowledge of the situation. With the tread of 12 seasons in the league on his body, West will not command the same salary that would’ve been waiting for him next season with the Pacers. The choice appears to be more about finding a new fit. West did not want to simply “stay for the money,” a source revealed.

Veteran center Roy Hibbert also has a player option for next season and if he chooses to also opt out, the Pacers could have $27 million under the salary cap to revamp their roster. They also have All-Star Paul George returning for his first full season since suffering a devastating leg injury last summer.

But for a Pacers team that made back-to-back trips to the Eastern Conference finals in 2013 and 2014, the loss of West as a foundation to the roster could signal the beginning of an end of an era.  At the very least, it leaves the Pacers will a huge void to fill.

George carried off court in finale

VIDEO: Paul George injures leg at Memphis.

It was certainly painful enough for the Pacers to find themselves down by double-digits in the fourth quarter of a do-or-die game for their playoff lives.

But was a different level of scary agony to see franchise player Paul George carried off the court again with a leg injury.

It occurred with 10:37 left in the season finale at Memphis on Wednesday night when George simply pulled up to commit a foul and signaled that he needed to leave the court.

Several teammates helped George from the floor — literally lifting both legs off the ground — and he was examined by the training staff on the bench.

It was not clear where exactly the injury occurred. In the previous minute, George had cut across the lane and bumped his left side against Grizzlies center Kosta Koufos and a short time later he was tangled with Vince Carter while trying for a rebound.

The good news, if there is such a thing, is that it was the left leg that was injured this time. George had suffered a broken right leg in a Team USA scrimmage last August in Las Vegas. The Pacers described this injury as a sore left calf.

“Nothing serious,” Coach Frank Vogel said. “He got kicked pretty strongly in his calf and it caused a calf strain.”

George was playing in just his sixth game following a long rehabilitation, averaging 10.2 points and 3.6 rebound and had played 15 minutes, shot just 1-for-5 and had two points when he left the game and did not return.

Playoff scenarios aplenty in play on final day of 2014-15 season


VIDEO: Celtics coach Brad Stevens and his crew don’t have to sweat out the final night of the season

NEW ORLEANS — It must be nice to be Brad Stevens and the Boston Celtics this morning. Your hard-earned playoff berth, the No. 7 seed, is locked up. You already know you have a date with LeBron James and the No. 2 seed Cleveland Cavaliers in the first round of the playoffs.

The mission, so to speak, is complete, courtesy of a 95-93 win over the Toronto Raptors Tuesday night.

But not everyone slept as soundly the night before the final day of this NBA season.

For plenty of teams on both sides of the conference divide this is the biggest night of the regular season. For teams still fighting to get into the playoffs and jockeying for postseason positioning, it all comes down to these final 48 (or more) minutes.

The constantly changing playoff picture is still a bit fuzzy for much of the field.

For some the math is simple — win and you are in. That’s the scenario the Pelicans are facing here tonight at Smoothie King Center (vs. San Antonio, 8 ET, League Pass). The Pelicans and Oklahoma City Thunder enter tonight 44-37, but New Orleans holds the tie-breaker over OKC. As such, the Pelicans need to at least finish tied with the Thunder record-wise, but a win tonight can secure them the 8th and final spot in the Western Conference.

The Spurs are locked in a fight to the finish for the No. 2 seed in the West behind the No. 1 seed Golden State Warriors, who locked up that top spot weeks ago and have not looked back. Knock off the Pelicans and the Spurs clinch the Southwest Division and secure that No. 2 spot. Lose and they could tumble to the No. 5 or 6 seed.

So much for that maintenance program Spurs coach Gregg Popovich is famous for employing with his veteran stars. There is too much at stake for all of the teams in that 2-through-7 mix.

In the Western Conference, the Warriors (No. 1 seed), Portland Trail Blazers (No. 4, but no home court) and Dallas Mavericks (No. 7) already have their seeds locked in.

In the Eastern Conference, the Atlanta Hawks (1), Cavaliers (2), Washington Wizards (5), Milwaukee Bucks (6) and Celtics (7) are set.

A quick look at what is at stake for teams still caught up in the crosshairs on the final night of the season

Houston (vs. Utah, 8 ET, League Pass): James Harden and the Rockets need a win over an improved Utah Jazz team, plus a loss by the Spurs, to secure the No. 2 seed and the Southwest Division title. The Rockets could finish with 56 wins, third most in franchise history behind the 1993-94 NBA championship team that won 58 games and the 1996-97 team that won 57.

L.A. Clippers (season complete): They’ve handled their business, winning seven straight games to finish the season and 14 of their final 15, only to have to sit and watch tonight to see who they’ll face in the first round. The Clippers can finish as high as No. 2 (if the Rockets and Spurs lose tonight) and no lower than No. 3 and will host their first-round series. Their opponent? It could be Memphis, the Rockets, Spurs or Dallas Mavericks.

Memphis and Indiana (vs. each other, 9:30 ET, ESPN): The Grizzlies face an energized and motivated Pacers team, fresh off of a must-have double overtime win over Washington Tuesday night. While the Grizzlies have a host of complicated scenarios that can move them up to No. 5, the Pacers are playing for their playoff lives. A loss by Brooklyn or a win by Indiana pushes the Pacers in, where they will face the Hawks in a rematch of last season’s first-round matchup (when the Pacers were the No. 1 seed and the Hawks No. 8). A loss by the Pacers plus a Brooklyn win would put an end to Indiana’s season.

Oklahoma City (at Minnesota, 8 ET, League Pass): The Thunder need to knock off Minnesota in their finale and the Spurs to handle their business against the Pelicans to make sure we get at least four more games of Russell Westbrook. (If the Thunder and Pelicans finish the season with 45-37 marks, the Pelicans get in because they won the season series with OKC 3-1.) The Thunder don’t control their own destiny, but that’s not a concern for a team that has been dealt one severe injury blow after another throughout 2014-15. A loss to the Timberwolves (or a Pelicans win) ends their season, literally and figuratively.

Chicago (vs. Atlanta, 8 ET, League Pass): The Bulls are locked in for home-court advantage in the first round and face the Hawks in a game that has ramifications beyond the first round (they are trying to avoid Cleveland in the second round, provided both teams make it through). They need a win over the Hawks to secure the No. 3 seed. A loss sends them to No. 4.

Toronto (vs. Charlotte, 7 ET, ESPN): The Raptors have a clear path. Beat the Hornets and couple that with a Bulls loss to the Hawks and they secure the No. 3 seed. They have home court either way and will try to exploit that much better than they did last season.

Brooklyn (vs. Orlando, 8 ET, League Pass): The Nets need the playoffs in the worst way, but could see their hopes go up in smoke tonight if the Pacers knock off the Grizzlies later in the night. They need to beat Orlando and hope that the Pacers used up all their mojo in that double-OT home win vs. the Wizards Tuesday.

The possibilities are endless tonight, when we close the curtain on a spectacular regular season and prepare for a postseason that should include much more of the same.

Morning Shootaround — April 6


VIDEO: Highlights from games played April 5

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Paul George makes Pacers better right now | James Harden is the ultimate facilitator | Noah, Bulls would love a piece of Cavaliers in the playoffs

No. 1: Paul George makes Pacers better right now — The future can wait. Paul George is back and ready to lift the Indiana Pacers right now. That chase for the 8th and final playoff spot in the Eastern Conference race got a lot more interesting after George made his triumphant return from injury. Will it be enough to lift the Pacers past the crowd and into that last spot? Gregg Doyel of the Indianapolis Star tackles that question and more:

Paul George makes the Indiana Pacers better, not in the future but right now. And not a little better, but a lot better. At both ends. The Paul George that came back Sunday night against the Heat came back a star in full, scoring 13 points in 15 minutes, making a mess of the Miami Heat’s half-court offense, breaking the game open with consecutive 3-pointers early in the fourth quarter.

This game was not going to be easy for the Heat, not without injured center Hassan Whiteside and not playing their second road game in 24 hours and their third in four days, but it wasn’t going to be this ugly. It wasn’t going to be a 112-89 blowout for the Pacers, except for one guy.

And the guy isn’t Luis Scola.

All due respect to Scola. He had 23 points and 12 rebounds in 19 minutes. He was sensational. But he was not the point of this game, not the spark, not the havoc-wreaking agent at both ends that Paul George was in his return after missing 76 games following that gruesome broken leg in August with Team USA in Las Vegas.

The Pacers are better with George, but how much better? Good enough to pass the Boston Celtics, who are a game ahead for the Eastern Conference’s eighth and final playoff spot? I asked Pacers coach Frank Vogel exactly how much better this Paul George, rusty as he may be, makes the Pacers for the final five games.

“Tough to measure,” Vogel said, “but certainly we’re a lot better with him. We missed him on both ends, but what he’s able to do on the defensive end is almost unparalleled in the NBA. Certainly we’re a lot a stronger on that end, and (with) the scoring punch he gives us on the offensive end as well.”

Boston has the tiebreaker on Indiana, so the Pacers have to not only catch the Celtics but pass them to make the playoffs. Each team has five games left. Time is running out. But it’s like Vogel said.

“There’s no bad time to get a Paul George back,” he said.


VIDEO: Paul George’s return was a hit for the Pacers

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