Posts Tagged ‘Nuggets’

Shaw Tries To Bring Stability To Nuggets

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LAS VEGAS – This is instability?

This?

Give Brian Shaw a minute. He needs to break out laughing.

“There’s instability and there’s dysfunction that I’ve been a part of and through all of that stuff,” he said. “To me, this is nothing. Change happens.”

Well, it’s something. And change may happen, except that this is really a lot of change all at once for the Nuggets. Masai Ujiri is gone as head of basketball operations and replaced by Tim Connelly. Coach George Karl gone after being named Coach of the Year and replaced by Shaw. Lastly, superstar Andre Igoudala is gone from the roster and truly replaced by nobody. Denver has fallen face-first into an unwanted transition in the aftermath of a 57-win season, albeit followed by a first-round playoff loss.

summer-league-logoBut Shaw played for the Lakers when Shaquille O’Neal and Kobe Bryant were standing back to back and counting off 40 paces. He was an assistant coach for the Lakers under Phil Jackson, a man who looked at locker-room tension as a sociology experiment. Shaw knows turbulence.

Whatever Shaw’s primary qualifications to get the Nuggets job, and there are many, it doesn’t hurt that few can rival his experience in dealing with drama. There will be a learning curve as a first-time coach, just not an uncertainty on how to handle the hectic offseason, beginning with Summer League and continuing into a question-filled training camp.

“Life is unpredictable and you just have to be ready for whatever it is that you have to face,” he said. “Nothing is insurmountable and in this business you’re going to see some crazy things. I think for me, I have a steadying hand. I have to be calm. If I’m nervous and I’m looking like I’m not confident about what’s going on, it’s going to trickle down to the team. I’m laid back by nature, so I just want to exhibit that calmness and not get too high or not get too low.”

His background will be a plus, in other words, in more ways than 14 seasons as a player and eight as an assistant with the Lakers and Pacers.

“I don’t think that that happens overnight,” Shaw said of bringing stability. “Naturally they should feel a little shaken because they have a new general manager, a new coach, a new assistant general manager. One of the best players, if not the best player on the team, is gone now as well. So the reality of the situation is there has been a lot of change. But what I think it’s my job to do is to try to simplify everything so that they can just concentrate on playing the game and understand that with all those changes being made, the guys that are here are the guys that are going to be counted on and to give them confidence in that.”

Shaw will also contend with the other roster absence, the knee injury that the Nuggets say is expected to keep Danilo Gallinari out until near midseason. Benjamin Hochman of the Denver Post reported last month Gallinari could be back by December, but Shaw said he has not been given any update by the medical staff.

Billups Agrees To 2-Year Deal With Detroit



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HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS – Brandon Knight is going to finishing school for NBA point guards without ever leaving the Detroit Pistons’ practice facility.

No one should be happier to hear the news that former Pistons star Chauncey Billups, The Finals MVP in 2004, is returning to Detroit on a two-year, $5 million deal, as first reported by Yahoo! Sports.

Billups, a five-time All-Star, was the ringleader of a Pistons crew that was dominant in the Eastern Conference for a five-season stretch from 2004-08. After being traded from Detroit to Denver, he helped guide his hometown Nuggets to the 2009 Western Conference finals alongside Carmelo Anthony. Last season, he helped Chris Paul and Blake Griffin lead the Los Angeles Clippers to the best season in franchise history and their first Pacific Division title.

His return to Detroit, though, represents a homecoming of a different kind. Billups made his name with the Pistons, going from a journeyman existence early in his career to one of the most well-respected players in the entire league.

Pistons boss Joe Dumars has already added Rasheed Wallace, who also starred on those teams with Billups, to the coaching staff. And Billups will not only play a vital role in the backcourt rotation, but perhaps his greatest value will be as a mentor to Knight, a talented young point guard who will learn plenty from a player like Billups.

He’s nearly a decade removed from his greatest moments with the Pistons, but he proved last season that he’s still got plenty left in his tank. He returned from a torn Achilles (suffered in February of 2012) to play in 22 games this season, averaging 8.4 points and 2.2 assists while playing 19 minutes a night.

The Pistons signed Josh Smith to a four-year, $54 million deal Wednesday, solidifying a frontcourt rotation that also includes budding young stars Greg Monroe, Andre Drummond as well as Kyle Singler, Jonas Jerebko and second-round pick Tony Mitchell.

What wasn’t clear until now is what they were going to do to fortify the backcourt rotation after veteran point guard Jose Calderon left for Dallas via free agency. Adding Billups softens that blow and gives the Pistons a significant upgrade in the leadership department.

Projecting The West Playoff Order



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HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS – Adding Dwight Howard to a Los Angeles Lakers team that was one of the top teams in the Western Conference was supposed to vault the Lakers into the championship elite last summer.

It never happened. Howard and Steve Nash failed to move the needle for the Lakers, who had to claw their way to a seventh seed in the playoff chase, only to be swept by the San Antonio Spurs.

So please forgive me for not crowning the Houston Rockets prematurely. They’ve got Howard in the fold now, adding the best big man in basketball to an explosive core that includes All-Star James Harden and a solid supporting cast.

Legitimate playoff outfit?

Absolutely.

But contenders … not so fast my friends.

They should be in the mix. And as coach Kevin McHale told NBA.com’s Fran Blinebury, they should be able to “play with anybody.” Playing with the best and beating the best come playoff time, however, are two very different things. Just ask the Los Angeles Clippers, who thought they had arrived last season and were disposed of in the first round of the playoffs.

We’ve already delivered our projections, based on what we know now, for the Eastern Conference playoff-chasers for the 2013-14 season. These are the projections for the Western Conference:

OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER

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Any suggestions that the Thunder would be better off without Russell Westbrook at the controls were answered in the playoffs. The Inside The NBA crew (above) knows as well as the rest of the NBA-watching masses. OKC was a shell of its regular-season selves without the All-Star point guard, who suffered a knee injury in their first-round series against Houston. Kevin Durant is a behemoth, the second best player in the league behind LeBron James, but no one superstar is going to climb the Western Conference mountain on his own. The Thunder are in a precarious position because all of their competitors seem to be making power moves to catch and surpass them. Without sufficient cap space to deal themselves, they have to rely on a rock-solid core group maintaining their respective positions. That means Serge Ibaka and Kendrick Perkins have to show better than they did in the playoffs. Reggie Jackson has to play a more prominent role this season and appears to be ready for that. And Jeremy Lamb has to move into a regular spot in the rotation as well. Rookie Steven Adams, the 12th pick in the Draft, is more of a project right now. But the Thunder don’t need him to be an impact player. Not if everyone stays healthy and Westbrook returns to form.

SAN ANTONIO SPURS

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When training camp begins, the Spurs will probably still be answering questions about the championship they let slip away. Two 30-second intervals during Games 6 and 7 of The Finals got away from them and cost Tim Duncan title No. 5 and Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili title No. 4. And make no mistake, that trio, and Duncan in particular, is the key to the Spurs getting back to that stage again. If Duncan can crank out another fountain-of-youth, All-NBA-type performance like he did this season, the Spurs have a shot to rule the Western Conference again. Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green emerged during the playoffs as more than just young prospects. Leonard could be a legitimate All-Star candidate himself if he picks up where he left off in The Finals. The Spurs always find a way to mine the Draft and free agency for young talent to incorporate into their system. But they won’t need as much assistance with both Ginobili and Tiago Splitter sticking around in free agency. Keeping their biggest stars healthy and rested, something coach Gregg Popovich paid for dearly last season, is of the utmost importance. As long as they do that, a top-four spot in the playoff chase should be a given.

LOS ANGELES CLIPPERS

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With all apologies to Howard and even Chris Paul, the biggest fish of the free-agent summer of 2013 was coach Doc Rivers — not one of the players projected to be the big prize. The fact that Rivers was under contract for three more years in Boston when the summer began makes what the Clippers did even more remarkable. Not only do the Clippers get one of the best coaches in the game, they got a senior vice president of basketball operations who paid immediate dividends by keeping Paul in free agency and helped them add J.J. Redick and Jared Dudley in trades. They had to move backup Eric Bledsoe and veteran swingman Caron Butler to make it happen, but they replaced him with Darren Collison. And they still have the key component from that explosive bench crew in Jamal Crawford, whose role could increase dramatically without Butler, Chauncey Billups or retired veteran Grant Hill in the mix. The one glaring issue they have is their frontcourt tandem of Blake Griffin and DeAndre Jordan. They weren’t up to the challenge against the Grizzlies and it cost the Clippers in a first-round defeat. Are they willing to accept the challenge Doc will pose to them? He won’t allow them to be outworked on defense and will demand they show the toughness that has eluded them in the past.

HOUSTON ROCKETS

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Welcome to paradise Jeremy Lin. Now you can officially put Linsanity behind you and play the role of facilitator. The real superstars are on the roster now, as both Harden and Howard will be the opposition’s focus every night. Lin, Patrick Beverly and Chandler Parsons have clearly defined roles on this team before they ever hit the floor together in an official capacity. Howard makes life easier on all of the Rockets’ specialists and role players, not to mention his fellow starters. Guys like Terrence Jones, Donatas Motiejunas, Greg Smith and even Omer Asik, should he stick around and back off his trade demand, will find out just how different life can be with a healthy, happy and motivated Howard operating in the middle. Despite two straight down seasons (by his own lofty standards), he still led the league in rebounding and looked like he had shaken off the ill effects of his back surgery. McHale has to pull this all together quickly to ensure these young Rockets don’t get swallowed up by the expectations sure to come with their newfound celebrity.

GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS

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Adding Andre Iguodala essentially at the expense of Carl Landry and Jarrett Jack, two key veterans who gave the Warriors superior bench production and quality locker room leadership, might not seem like a steep price to pay for some. But when you already have Klay Thompson and Harrison Barnes on the roster … let’s just say that is a luxury most teams wouldn’t indulge this early in the process of trying to build a contender. The Warriors showed us some serious flashes of being a big-time player in the Western Conference for years to come with the work they did in the playoffs. They had the Spurs plenty nervous in the conference semifinals. But their shortcomings came back to bite them in the end. And they didn’t solve those issues in the Draft or free agency. Andrew Bogut and David Lee will have loads of work to do this season, provided they both make it to training camp. Both of their names surfaced in trade rumors leading up to the Draft and through the first week of free agency. Lee is an All-Star and, when healthy, an absolute force. But Bogut, due to injuries, has only shown glimpses of what he’s capable of. And at this stage of his career, a $14 million spot starter is certainly not a luxury the Warriors can afford.

MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES

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How important was Lionel Hollins to the Grizzlies during their run to the Western Conference finals? We’re going to find out this season. Because for all of the promise Dave Joerger brings to the position, there is no denying the impact Hollins made on Zach Randolph and reigning Kia Defensive Player of the Year Marc Gasol. And even Hollins couldn’t get them in a comfortable groove against the Spurs. The Thunder proved that nothing is guaranteed from one season to the next, not with injuries and the race for the top spot being as competitive as it has ever been in the rugged Western Conference. Bringing this group — Mike Conley, Tony Allen and Tayshaun Prince, too — back intact might not be sufficient for returning to the Larry O’Brien final four tournament. The Grizzlies didn’t have the flexibility to tinker with the roster in free agency. The one change they could have made that could shake things up was to replace Hollins. By doing so with a guy who is familiar with this roster gives them some advantage that a completely fresh face would not have recognized. It won’t take long to see if Joerger has a handle on those intangibles. And if he does, the Grizzlies will climb this list.

DENVER NUGGETS

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The Nuggets will survive a tumultuous offseason that struck three significant blows to a team that seemed to be on the rise before yet another first-round playoff exit. The NBA’s Executive of the Year, Masai Ujiri, bolted for Toronto. The league’s Coach of the Year, George Karl, was relieved of his duties. And Iguodala is set to be signed and traded after agreeing to terms on that deal with the Warriors. That would normally be enough to knock a top team all the way back down to the lottery. The best move they’ve made so far this summer was hiring Brian Shaw to replace Karl. He’ll bring a steady hand to what was a shaky situation. The Nuggets will have an active and talented frontocurt rotation to work with in Kenneth Faried, JaVale McGee, Darrell Arthur and free-agent pickup J.J. Hickson. Wilson Chandler will step in for Danilo Gallinari, who continues his recovery from knee surgery, and Evan Fournier, Corey Brewer and Randy Foye will provide depth on the wing. Ty Lawson and Andre Miller combined to form one of the league’s best 1-2 punches at point guard and they should be allowed plenty of freedom to operate in the system Shaw will employ. The Nuggets will continue to play at a tempo that suits their talent and home environment. They shouldn’t lose anything defensively either. Shaw isn’t the wild card that some of these other new coaches (Jason Kidd, Brad Stevens) could be in other situations. So don’t expect the Nuggets to crumble just because they’ve lost a few familiar faces.

MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES

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No team endured more maddening injury issues this season than the Timberwolves. A healthy Kevin Love, however, changes their playoff outlook dramatically for the 2013-14 season. With their talent and dept, a legitimate run for the final playoff spot is not as far-fetched as it might seem. Ricky Rubio should be full healthy this season and the Timberwolves retained Chase Budinger, added Kevin Martin and have to do whatever it takes to keep restricted free agent Nikola Pekovic in the fold. Sure, it’s been a professional sports eternity since the Timberwolves last breathed playoff air (Kevin Garnett was still wearing the uniform in 2004). But coach Rick Adelman finally has the horses to make some serious noise. The franchise’s new head man, Flip Saunders, was the coach of that 2004 team that made the Western Conference finals, so he knows exactly what it takes for a Minnesota crew to cash in on its promise. It starts with Love and Rubio, their two biggest stars, staying healthy and playing up to their immense potential, both individually and as a dynamic duo.

JUST MISSED THE CUT: Dallas Mavericks, Los Angeles Lakers, Portland Trail Blazers

Open For Business On Free-Agent Sunday



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HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS – There are still potentially two big fish available in a shrinking free-agent summer pond. And while Sunday saw no concrete offers for either Andrew Bynum or Monta Ellis, the general sentiment is that things could change dramatically at either time for one, if not, both of them.

The Atlanta Hawks and Denver Nuggets are reportedly interested in acquiring Ellis, who can slide into a specific role in either location. The Hawks need to restock their ranks with impact players and Ellis, a legitimate 20-point scorer, could add immediate punch at shooting guard. Denver has a hole to fill where Andre Iguodala worked last season and Ellis could also be a fit there.

The market for Bynum’s services seems to have taken a familiar turn in this wild free-agent summer, and that’s to Texas, where the Dallas Mavericks are looking for a frontcourt anchor to pair with Dirk Nowitzki. They had their sights on Dwight Howard, of course, but since that didn’t work out they’ve had to work down their list. Now Bynum appears to be in their sights, though they are cautious about his knees, as any team would be at this point.

That said, some folks believe a surprise team could win the Bynum sweepstakes.

This one could get really interesting before it’s all over.

Making things even more intriguing is what will happen with incumbent Rockets center Omer Asik, who reportedly wants no part of playing behind Howard and has asked to be traded. The Rockets have no intention of trading him, according to ESPN.com, making for an extremely intriguing next few days for any team desperate for a center.

Free agency is only a week old but there are already tons of wrinkles. As for the other business that went down Sunday, here are some of the highlights:

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Free Agent Tracker

Warriors Take Another Step Forward

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HANG TIME WEST – It was the first two rounds of the playoffs all over again, with the Warriors a blur of action, unpredictability and unspoken statements about the future, only this time with enough crowd noise to blow the lid off more than Oracle Arena. Try the entire Western Conference.

Golden State was going hard after Dwight Howard, weighing trade options, digging for cap space in a final push Friday before his planned decision, planned being the operative word with any Howard expedition. And then: Andre Iguodala.

Brilliant. Better than coming away with Howard, the glitzy result but one that would have reduced the Stephen Curry impact and threatened team chemistry while potentially costing additional players in a sign-and-trade.

Trading Brandon Rush, Richard Jefferson, Andris Biedrins and first-round picks in 2014 and 2017 to the Jazz for Kevin Murphy to clear the cap room to sign Iguodala could become the no-look pass of the 2013-14 season.

The Warriors are coming off a trip to the second round despite injury and inexperience and just added a versatile veteran who makes them better on both sides of the ball. Without costing them anyone from the rotation. And saving about $11 million in salary next season.

The loss statement is misleading – they also had to renounce Jarrett Jack, a major contributor off the bench, and Rush would have had a prominent role if not for tearing two ligaments in the left knee in his second and last game. But still. The Warriors were considering high-risk moves of dealing Andrew Bogut and Klay Thompson or Harrison Barnes, among others, if that’s what it took to land the finicky Howard in a sign-and-trade and instead got a lot better while barely touching the core of a roster that pushed for the Western Conference final without coming close to its potential.

They got better.

The Nuggets, one of the teams that finished ahead of Golden State, got worse by losing Iguodala without compensation.

The Jazz, one of the teams that finished close behind, won’t get better off this deal for at least one season and maybe two.

It probably means a move to the bench for Barnes, impressive showing by a rookie in the playoffs or not, but he should be as visible on the wing as shooting guard Thompson and Iguodala as the successor at small forward. With Iguodala’s versatility, especially as a standout defender, the three could play together.

The Warriors need to find a reserve point guard and a backup center with Festus Ezeli expected to be out until approximately midseason after knee surgery, but David Lee, Curry, Bogut, Iguodala, Thompson and Barnes is a very good first six. Getting Iguodala, while also hitting the Nuggets hard, is another step forward.

Who Should Stay And Who Should Go

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HANG TIME, Texas
— The start of free agency always has plenty of decisions. The most basic are which players should look for greener pastures and who should be smart enough to realize what they’ve already got.

Here’s a quick look at a handful of players that need to find a new address and five more who should stay at home:

FIVE WHO SHOULD GO


Dwight Howard
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Let’s face it. There hasn’t been an NBA marriage this shaky that didn’t involve a Kardashian. Howard went to a team where Kobe Bryant was already firmly entrenched as the alpha dog and then found himself on a leash that included geezers Steve Nash and Metta World Peace. Toss in a coach like Mike D’Antoni who has never favored playing a low post game and it was a recipe for disaster. Another several years of playing in the harsh glare of the Lakers spotlight might be too much for Howard to bear. The overly sensitive must flee to someplace that will give him a big hug before he turns into a pillar of salt.

Josh Smith, F, Hawks

If you were building a 21st century basketball player in a lab — speed, strength, leaping ability, size — chances are you would come up with someone resembling J-Smoove. After nine NBA seasons, he’s got career numbers that rank him among the greats. After nine years in his hometown of Atlanta, he’s about worn out his welcome with all of those wild, late, long shots. In the right situation, with the right coach, he might take a team to the next level or send it over the edge. A man has got to know when it’s time to change the scenery.

Tony Allen, G, Grizzlies

He’s the guy who introduced the grind into the Grindhouse and one of the best perimeter defenders in the league. He can cut to the basket and score, but that’s about all he can do offensively and that hole in his game was badly exposed by the Spurs in the Western Conference finals. The new analytics-driven Grizzlies have Tayshaun Prince to fill the defensive role and they’re not likely to fork over the kind of money Allen wants for a one-dimensional figure. It’s time to take those defensive claws to another contender or wannabe and show the Grizzlies what they’ll be missing.

Tyreke Evans, G, Kings

Was it just three years ago when Evans was a 20-5-5 guy and winning Rookie of the Year honors with the Kings? His fall from grace was like an anvil being tossed off the edge of a cliff. Now that new management was able to reel in shooter Ben McLemore in the draft, it would seem that there’s little room left for Evans. Will the Kings even think about matching four-year, $44 million offer from the Pelicans? This is a separation that’s been that’s been coming for a while.

Monta Ellis, G, Bucks

It just wasn’t a good idea to put together two small guards that need the ball in their hands together in Milwaukee. It’s definitely isn’t a good idea to re-sign both of them as free agents. Brandon Jennings is hardly the model of efficiency, but Ellis makes him look like a Swiss knife in comparison. He needs to find a new home where he can be a designated scorer and not asked to do anything else, because he won’t.

FIVE WHO SHOULD STAY


David West, F, Pacers

He may yearn for one more big pay in another location, but at the end of the day West and the Pacers know that they’re made for each other. He’s a very efficient scorer, a hard-nosed defender and played a big role in Indiana taking the Heat to a seventh game in the Eastern Conference finals. He also has great leadership skills and has always managed to fly below the radar while delivering in a big way almost every time out.

Andre Iguodala, F, Nuggets

He exercised his right to opt out early from his contract and maybe it was only about maximizing his earnings. Or maybe he needed time to digest what the change from George Karl to Brian Shaw as coach could do to the Nuggets’ style of play and how he fits into the attack. At the end of the day, the Nuggets still have plenty of players who can get up and down the floor in transition and it Shaw wants to place even more emphasis on defense, he’s most capable of delivering and thriving.

Chris Andersen, F, Heat

This is a perfect fit in so many ways. The Heat gave Andersen a place where he could continue this career and make a significant contribution. Andersen gives the Heat the kind of rugged, tough guy, free spirit personality that is a nice balance inside a locker room filled with three mega-stars. When you’ve got LeBron, Wade, Bosh and all of the hullaballoo that constantly swirls around them, almost no one even notices the Birdman. Almost. It’s a long grind from October to June and it helps to have an iconoclast like Andersen on the court and in their midst to keep the Heat fresh.

Nikola Pekovic, C, Timberwolves

New Wolves president of basketball operation Flip Saunders is likely to let free agent Andrei Kirilenko walk out the door in order to find someone cheaper and with better shooting range. But the big man Pekovic is a must-keep asset not just for his size, strength, rebounding and scoring efficiently, but also to show Kevin Love that the team is serious about building a team that — barring injury — can jump into the rugged Western Conference playoff race and thrive. Pekovic’s numbers in points, rebounds and blocks have gone up in each of his first three seasons and at 27 he can grow more into a dominant inside force.

Tiago Splitter, F, Spurs

The difference in Splitter from his first to second playoff seasons was a quantum leap. Of course, it also helped that he had a full training camp and was healthy. He’s a quietly efficient scorer who can be trusted to hold down the middle while the Spurs continue to monitor and limit the minutes played by Tim Duncan. He is a perfect complementary part for now and his role can increase in another couple of years. There are lots of teams that would like to have the 28-year-old, but he’s at home with the franchise that patiently waited for him to arrive and there is no reason to think the Spurs would want him to walk out the door.

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 123): Featuring Brad Turner Of The Los Angeles Times

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The 2012-13 season came to a spectacularly thrilling end on the court with the Miami Heat repeating as NBA champions by prevailing over the  San Antonio Spurs in an epic seven-game series, which is exactly the way you want a season to end.

But we are far from finished here at the hideout. Not only do we have to analyze what went on in The Finals (the legacies of LeBron James, Tim Duncan, Dwyane Wade, Tony Parker, Chris Bosh and Manu Ginobili were all on the line, Gregg Popovich and Erik Spoelstra, too) we’ve also got the Draft on tap Thursday night from Brooklyn and the latest twists and turns on the coaching carousel (Doc Rivers from Boston to the LA Clippers as head coach and senior vice president of basketball operations, Brian Shaw from Indiana to Denver and Dave Joerger making the 18-inch move from assistant to head coach in Memphis).

Our main man Brad Turner, a HT fave (that’s him on the intro) and the Clippers beat writer for The Los Angeles Times, has been all over the Rivers/Clippers story and joins us to help break down how it all came together … why getting Doc is so crucial to the Clippers keeping Chris Paul in free agency and how this teams will morph from the talented but suspect group we’ve watched the past two seasons into championship material worthy of a city that recognizes rings and nothing less.

You get all of that and so much more on Episode 123 of the Hang Time Podcast … 

LISTEN HERE:


As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of NBA.com,  Lang Whitaker of NBA.com’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand and the best engineer in the business,  Jarell “I Heart Peyton Manning” Wall.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.

Report: Grizzlies Pick Joerger As Coach

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HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS – The coaching vacancies in the NBA are suddenly filling up fast. Hours after the Denver Nuggets tabbed Brian Shaw as their new coach and the Los Angeles Clippers pried Doc Rivers away from the Boston Celtics with a future first-round Draft pick, the Memphis Grizzlies found their man as well.

They have elevated former assistant Dave Joerger to become their new coach, according to ESPN.com. Joerger takes over for his former boss, Lionel Hollins, who could be at the top of the list to replace Rivers in Boston. The Grizzlies zeroing in on Joerger, however, is a move that has been rumored for weeks:

Joerger, who has spent the past six seasons on the Grizzlies’ bench, will succeed his former boss, Lionel Hollins. Hollins compiled a 196-155 record after taking over for Marc Iavaroni midway through the 2008-09 season.

The 39-year-old Joerger emerged as a favorite for the position after Grizzlies management granted Hollins permission to seek other coaching opportunities. Before turning to their longtime assistant, the Grizzlies formally interviewed former Phoenix Suns head coach Alvin Gentry and Chicago Bulls assistant Ed Pinckney for the post, and also entertained the idea of bringing on high-profile names such as former Denver Nuggets head coach George Karl.

Prior to the 2010-11 season, Joerger was tasked by Hollins to oversee the Grizzlies’ defense, which was ranked 25th in efficiency in 2009-10. In the three seasons under Joerger’s direction, the defense has improved from ninth overall in 2010-11, to seventh in 2011-12, then ranked second in the NBA during the Grizzlies’ historic 2012-13 season.

Before arriving in Memphis, Joerger coached in the International Basketball Association, the Continental Basketball Association and the D-League, where he won five titles in seven seasons as a head coach.

The fact that the Grizzlies passed on several more high-profile names, most notably Karl, the reigning NBA Coach of the Year, says something about the confidence the front office has in Joerger’s potential.

He’s taking over a team that improved dramatically in each of the past five seasons. They reached the Western Conference finals this season, where they were swept by the San Antonio Spurs.

Hollins made it clear that he wanted to sign a new contract to continue coaching in Memphis, but a division between his style and philosophy and that of the analytics-focused front office did not mesh and Hollins was not offered a new deal.

Now we’ll see what Joerger, who is plenty familiar with the Grizzlies’ colorful roster, can do with this group that Hollins could not.

Report: Nuggets Hire Brian Shaw



HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS – Cross Brian Shaw‘s name off the list of available coaches on the market this summer. The Denver Nuggets have reportedly tabbed the Indiana Pacers’ assistant as the man to replace NBA Coach of the Year George Karl on the bench in Denver, according to The Denver Post.

Shaw has been rumored as a candidate for basically every opening that has popped up this season. But he finally settled on the opportunity that awaits with the Nuggets:

“I can’t express my appreciation enough,” Shaw told The Denver Post by phone Monday evening. “It’s been a grind to say the least, but I’m just very appreciative of the opportunity to lead this team. … It’s been years, 11-12 interviews I’ve gone through. And I’ve felt I’ve been prepared by the best of the best. You know, everything that’s worth something, a lot of times you have to wait for it. I feel like I’ve waited and paid my dues.

“I feel honored and privileged that (Nuggets executives) Josh (Kroenke) and Tim (Connelly) have put faith in me that I’m the guy they want to grow with going forward.”

Shaw, 47, spent the past two seasons as the associate head coach under Frank Vogel with the Pacers. He spent six season as an assistant to Phil Jackson with the Los Angeles Lakers. Jackson discussed Shaw on Episode 122 of the Hang Time Podcast last week and suggested that it was only a matter of time before Shaw found the right spot.

Shaw takes over a Nuggets team that won 57 games and was 38-3 at home last season and boasted not only Karl as coach of the Year, but Masai Ujiri as the league’s Executive of the Year. Ujiri left for the Toronto Raptors after the Nuggets’ were eliminated in the first round of the playoffs by the Golden State Warriors. Karl was fired earlier this month.

Perhaps most interesting with Shaw’s hiring is what sort of system he will employ with a roster built for an up-tempo attack and his background with the triangle that the Lakers used to win five titles under Jackson. He made it clear to The Post that whatever system he runs will be all his own:

“Although I played in the triangle and coached the triangle, I also played in a lot of systems, so that’s not something I’m looking to bring to the Nuggets and try to implement,” Shaw said.”I’m going to look at a lot of film of things the team did well, running was one of them. And I’ll continue to build on things they did well and get more of a feel for the personnel and what I think will be conducive to everybody’s ability.”

Serge Ibaka Now In Tourist Season

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TREVISO, Italy – He has mostly spent the offseason as a tourist, spending the majority of the last three weeks in Europe while trying to forget whatever that was that passed for the Thunder in the second round of the playoffs. Serge Ibaka has traveled a lot of roads, just not yet the road back.

Escaping reality? Ibaka has made it a point not even to watch the rest of the postseason on TV.

“It’s too difficult for me,” he said.

One year later, after starting for the Thunder in the Finals against Miami, one Russell Westbrook knee injury later, after the health concern that altered an entire conference, Ibaka was in northern Italy on Sunday for an appearance at the adidas Eurocamp, not playing the Heat in Game 2 in a championship-series rematch. Memphis, not Oklahoma City, went to the next round and San Antonio, not Oklahoma City, won the Western Conference crown, and so Ibaka went away. Left the country, the continent and, in the real trip, left the sport.

“I haven’t really stayed connected with basketball,” he said.

Serge Ibaka

Serge Ibaka of the Oklahoma City Thunder takes a jump shot as he coaches players during adidas EUROCAMP.

Ibaka knows his approach cannot last forever and that he eventually has to return to the reality that, yes, the Thunder, a team that rightly considered itself a serious championship threat, a team that felt the experience of getting to the 2012 Finals had steeled it for a return to June, actually did lose in the second round.

Only now, Ibaka explained during a break in the camp, is he finally ready to get back to basketball.

“It changes the guys a lot because it makes us more hungry,” he said. “Everybody will be spending the summer working to come back strong for next season. It’s something we learn from our mistake and then try to get better. I can give you the example of myself. I can’t wait to get back and start working out. I’m going to be ready to help the team next year to another level.

“We learned. Of course. We learned something.”

Learned something?

“We just learned to be ready to play with any circumstance that can come,” Ibaka said. “We need to be ready. I don’t want to get an excuse about we lost some guys on our team. For next year, I think we’ll be ready. It will be really fun to see us play.”

For real head-spinning, though, all Ibaka had to do was look across the room. Kenneth Faried was also in attendance to speak with players, many of whom are hoping to get picked in the June 27 draft, the same Kenneth Faried who since the regular season ended in Denver with such high hopes for the future lost in the playoffs in the first round, lost general manager Masai Ujiri to the Raptors and then lost coach George Karl.

“I really have no comment for that,” Faried said. “It’s basketball. Stuff happens. It’s a business.”

Asked if he has talked to Karl, a coach he credits for helping in his early NBA development, Faried said, “No, I haven’t talked to anybody. I’m just kind of keeping to myself. I’ll just wait until I get back to Denver to hear everything.” He added he is not concerned about the sudden turnover around the Nuggets.