Posts Tagged ‘NBA’

NBA voices concerns over controversial North Carolina law

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The NBA has formally expressed concerns over controversial legislation North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory signed into law Wednesday.

The Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act, implements a statewide policy that bans individuals from using public bathrooms that do not correspond to their biological sex. House Bill 2 also gives the state, and not individual cities, the right to pass nondiscrimination legislation.

The 2017 NBA All-Star Game is scheduled for Charlotte, putting the league and its partners in the crosshairs of legislation that flies in the face of the diversity and inclusion efforts that they have championed for years.

McCrory sent out a tweet explaining why he signed the bill:

The NBA released a statement today condemning the legislation:

“The NBA is dedicated to creating an inclusive environment for all who attend our games and events.  We are deeply concerned that this discriminatory law runs counter to our guiding principles of equality and mutual respect and do not yet know what impact it will have on our ability to successfully host the 2017 All-Star Game in Charlotte.”

Time Warner Inc., issued a statement of its own today urging Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal to veto legislation that would encourage discrimination by not protecting same-sex marriage opponents:

At Time Warner, diversity in all its forms is core to our value system and to the success of our business. We strongly oppose the discriminatory language and intent of Georgia’s pending religious liberty bill, which clearly violates the values and principles of inclusion and the ability of all people to live and work free from discrimination.

All of our divisions – HBO, Warner Bros. and Turner – have business interests in Georgia, but none more than Turner, an active participant in the Georgia Prospers campaign, a coalition of business leaders committed to a Georgia that welcomes all people. Georgia bill HB 757 is in contradiction to this campaign, to the values we hold dear, and to the type of workplace we guarantee to our employees. We urge Governor Deal to exercise his veto.

Hollywood actors and producers have threatened to take their projects elsewhere if Deal does not veto the bill. The Human Rights Campaign sent a letter to Deal today. He has until May 3 to act. Deal opposed earlier versions but has not commented on the final bill.



Nate Robinson going for NFL dreams

From staff reports

It looks like three-time NBA Slam Dunk champion Nate Robinson is trading his basketball high tops for football cleats. Robinson, 31, announced on Thursday that he will be pursuing an NFL job next season.

Robinson was a two-sport star at the University of Washington as a freshman in 2002 as a cornerback and point guard. The 5-foot-9 athlete in a video below outlined his accomplishments in both sports with the help of some friends of both sports.

There is no indication that any NFL teams would be interested in the 10-year NBA veteran, who averaged 11 points per game.


NBA, NBPA and NBRPA join forces for cardiac screenings

VIDEO: Hall of Famer Bernard King was an unstoppable force on the basketball court

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The wake-up call for Bernard King came the morning after the 2015 Naismith Hall of Fame induction ceremony.

The night before he’d spent a good hour talking with fellow Hall of Famer and former teammate Moses Malone about everything but basketball. It was a joyful time, King said, a chance for old friends to catch up on one another’s lives after the game.

But before King could open the door on his car as he headed to the airport that next morning, he received the news that Malone had died suddenly, yet another member of the NBA family gone way too soon.

That’s one reason why King was one of 25 retired NBA players to take part in a cardiovascular screening for local NBA alumni Saturday at Philips Arena, a program sponsored by the Hawks in conjunction with the NBA, the Players Association and the Retired Players Association.

“We’ve lost a lot of guys over the last couple of years,” King said, “Moses, Darryl Dawkins, Jerome Kersey and before that Pat Cummings, just to name a few. And a lot of these guys have died of heart attacks. So I think it’s great that the league, the players association and the retired players association are joining forces to try and figure out why that is and what we can do to adequately provide for everyone.”

Malone died in September of a cardiovascular disease, a month after Dawkins died of a heart attack. It’s the loss of those close to you, King said, makes the reality of the situation even more real for he and his fellow retired players.

“It certainly hits home,” he said. “These are guys you’ve competed against and played with or against for so many years. I sat with Moses for 90 minutes at the Hall of Fame just laughing and joking about everything you can think of going back to our days playing together in Washington. We didn’t even talk about basketball. Before I could even get in the car the next morning Meadowlark Lemon, who we just recently lost, and Artis Gilmore stopped me and asked if I’d heard about Moses. I said, ‘what are you taking about? I was just with him last night.’ And they told me he’d died last night. So yes, it’s disheartening that anyone would lose their life like that, whether they were a professional athlete or otherwise. The bottom line is, too many guys are dying at too young an age.”

That’s one of the main reasons the cardiovascular screening program was initiated, said Joe Rogowski, the NBPA’s Director of Sports Medicine and Research. The first one was held in Houston in December. Saturday’s event included Hall of Famer Dominique Wilkins, Hawks Vice Chairman Grant Hill, who was instrumental in the event being held at Philips Arena, as well as more recently retired players like Tony Delk.

“This is fantastic,” Delk said. “I’m 42 and very conscious of my health now that I’ve stopped playing. So when I heard they were offering this program free to retired players, I made sure to get my name on the list. When you’re playing, you take so much of this for granted, you’re talking about some of the best-conditioned athletes in the world. But none of us is immune to the issues that come with getting older.”

Rogowski worked in the league for a decade and said that the NBPA’s executive committee was discussing player health and retired player’s health during a meeting and idea for the screening program came out that exchange. It was placed on a high-priority list by the executive committee and fast-tracked for this season.

The NBA and the NBRPA jumped on board immediately when informed about the program, Rogowski said, and now that they have the Houston and Atlanta screenings in the books, there is much more to come.

“It’s been a truly collaborative effort,” he said. “From the NBPA, the NBRPA and the league to all of the specialists we fly in from all over the country to the teams, both Houston and here in Atlanta, for allowing us to set up shop and use the space in the arenas. It’s the same group that goes from city to city. And were thankful we’re doing it, because we’ve found some things that need to be addressed. And this is just the first step in a long-term process that will help us address the needs of the players, past, present and in the future.”

Rogowski cited the program’s mobility as one of the crucial elements to the success of the first two screening events. It can travel and reach the retired players in a place that is familiar and comfortable for them.

“I consider this a golden opportunity,” said King, 59, who has lived in the Atlanta area for over 15 years. “You have the finest experts here, health-wise, to check you out and ensure that your body is okay and functioning the way it should be. Those opportunities don’t always present themselves to you after you are done playing, so I made sure to get my name on the list before it filled up, because it was first come first serve.”

Blogtable: Tougher to officiate pro baseball or pro basketball?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: What’s wrong with Phoenix? | Thoughts on a game at Fenway? |
Tougher to officiate in MLB or NBA?

VIDEOTake a closer look at Joey Crawford’s NBA career

> Joey Crawford will retire at the end of the season after 39 years as an NBA referee. Joey’s father, Shag Crawford, was a longtime Major League Baseball umpire. My question for you: What’s the harder sport to call, pro baseball or pro basketball?

David Aldridge, TNT analyst: I think baseball. There’s a decision to make on every single pitch. Although, I think the single hardest call in sports is block/charge.

Steve Aschburner, Working home plate is harder than refereeing an NBA game, which is harder than working three out of four games as a base umpire. That’s my hierarchy. Making those 300 or so ball/strike calls is a test of concentration and stamina, the elements can be brutal under all that gear — standing in the sun in August in St. Louis? — and baseball gives its players and managers a lot more latitude for griping before you can thumb someone out. An NBA referee has to discern and process what to call or not call at every moment of every possession, but he at least has the cover of two peers doing the exact same tasks, in a climate-controlled environment, with a whistle and technical fouls at the ready. And that still is way harder than making a few safe/out or fair/foul hand signals when an ump is rotating through his crew’s non-home plate duties. On those days, that’s like being the middle guys on a bobsled team.

Fran Blinebury, Bigger, faster, stronger players who are constantly in motion. It’s basketball in a slam dunk.

Scott Howard-Cooper, The NBA must be the easiest sport in the world to officiate. Just look at Tommy Heinsohn. He’s never wrong on any of his objective calls about the nightly string of felonies committed against the Celtics.

Shaun Powell, The hardest is basketball, easily. Making a call on charging vs. blocking stands alone on an island. Basketball players are big and fast and agile and the game comes quick, and even the best refs make mistakes. Other than balls and strikes, what’s so hard about being a baseball ump? Especially with instant replay bailing them out on the bases?

John Schuhmann, I was a referee and an umpire for kids leagues and basketball was definitely tougher. Baseball is pretty straightforward, especially once you’ve got a handle on the strike zone and, in most cases, you can wait a beat, think about what you saw, and then make your call. Basketball is a much faster and much more fluid sport, with a lot more ambiguity in the calls that need to be made (or not made). And I’m fairly sure that the issues I dealt with (reffing 5th and 6th graders) are exacerbated when dealing with athletes as big, strong and quick as those in the NBA.

Sekou Smith, No disrespect to Shag Crawford or any of the great Major League Baseball umpires that served before or after his time, but it’s not even close. Running top speed every night in the land of the world’s most athletic giants tops umpiring in every category. Refereeing NBA games is easily the most physically demanding job in any of the major sports and it requires a mental dexterity (you have to be able to see things in a crowd both above and below the rim and react within a split second often enough) that simply is not required in baseball. Again, I don’t think this is a fair fight for the guys in baseball.

Ian Thomsen, For Joey Crawford to be an elite referee for so many decades is a marvel. Because his is the hardest job in pro sports. The NBA game is fast and unpredictable with contentious rules that are difficult to interpret via replay, never mind real time. And yet Crawford — while running full speed with the world’s greatest athletes — has maintained command of his craft. Baseball and football aren’t easy to officiate, that’s for sure, but there is nothing in sports more difficult than refereeing NBA basketball.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blog: Are you kidding? Basketball is a fast-paced sport that requires constant action up and down the court. There are three officials on the floor with the power to make calls, and even then they can’t keep up with everything that’s happening. Meanwhile, you can umpire a baseball game while sitting in a chair. Also, in baseball it seems to be encouraged that each umpire has their own set of rules that they selectively enforce, as the strike zone morphs from game to game. Heck, for a playoff game in 1997, Eric Gregg randomly decided the strike zone should be about 10 feet wide for the Atlanta Braves hitters, knocking the Braves from the postseason, and this was just allowed to happen with no consequences. And no, I’m not still angry about this.

Morning shootaround — Sept. 18

VIDEO: Recapping the 2015 FIBA EuroBasket semifinals


Report: NBA looking into wearable GPS devices | Green knew he wanted to be with Warriors | McCollum ready for big opportunity

No. 1: Report: NBA looking into wearable technology for players in games — In recent years, the NBA has been looking for ways to use technology to both measure on-court performance and provide data to teams, fans and players about the game that was once unattainable. From SportVU cameras in every NBA arena to the rise of advanced stats, looking at the game from a deeper angle is more and more a regular occurrence in the league.’s Zach Lowe reports the next step in this trend may be GPS technology players would wear in games to further track their movement and health:

The NBA is putting its own money into the study of wearable GPS devices, with the likely end goal of outfitting players during games, according to several league sources. The league is funding a study, at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, of products from two leading device-makers: Catapult and STATSports.

The league declined comment on the study. Most teams already use the gadgets during practices, and Catapult alone expects to have about 20 NBA team clients by the start of the 2015-16 season. The Fort Wayne Mad Ants wore Catapult monitors during D-League games last season in an obvious trial run for potential use at the parent league.

Weighing less than an ounce, these devices are worn underneath a player’s jersey. They track basic movement data, including distance traveled and running speed, but the real value comes from the health- and fatigue-related information they spit out. The monitors track the power behind a player’s accelerations and decelerations (i.e., cuts), the force-based impact of jumping and landing, and other data points. Team sports science experts scour the data for any indication a player might be on the verge of injury — or already suffering from one that hasn’t manifested itself in any obvious way.

The devices can show, for instance, that a player gets more oomph pushing off his left leg than his right — evidence of a possible leg injury. They will show when players can’t produce the same level of power, acceleration, and height on cuts and jumps. Those are typical signs of fatigue, but there is near-total consensus among medical experts that fatigued players are more vulnerable to all sorts of injuries — including muscle tears, catastrophic ligament ruptures, and pesky soft-tissue injuries that can nag all season.

At a basic level, the NBA wants to be absolutely sure the products work before going to the players’ union and arguing players should wear them during games as part of a push to keep players safe — remember, this was why the league reduced the number of times a team plays four games in five days. Having data from practices and shootarounds is nice, but there just aren’t enough of those during the dog days of the 82-game slog for teams to compile a reliable database. The league can plop this study on the table and say, “We paid for this, and now we know for sure these things do what they are supposed to do.”

Several GMs and other team higher-ups have privately pushed for in-game use, but they understand the league has to collectively bargain that kind of step with the players’ union. Team executives want to know as much as they can about player health, and also whether guys are going as hard as they can during games.

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Blogtable: Thoughts on NBA, referee’s new agreement

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Next Team USA coach? | Point guards for 2016? | Thoughts on NBA-refs deal?

VIDEOJoe Borgia explains the changes for next season

> While not yet official, it appears the NBA has reached agreement with its referees through the 2022 season. Is this a big thing, a little thing, or much ado about nothing?

Steve Aschburner, It’s a big thing, because we hear the whining and grumbling that goes on when even the best in the business make calls that some player, coach, executive or owner doesn’t like. Imagine the decibels and frequency of such fussing and fuming if suddenly the league were policed by replacements or newbies. Besides, the completely electronic, eye-in-the-sky, make-every-foul-call-from-Secaucus-replay-center system isn’t quite up and running yet. That’ll kick in around the 2029-30 season.

Fran Blinebury, It’s only a big thing if it didn’t get done and the game was tarnished and diminished by replacement referees. It’s a very big thing if the league and the Players Association can now learn from this experience and get to work on a new collective bargaining agreement to avoid a work stoppage.

Scott Howard-Cooper, A pretty big thing because it eliminates the possibility of a very big thing. Important labor deals should never be shrugged off, just because it came without hard-line comments or a work stoppage. In addition to being a pretty big thing, it’s a good thing.

Shaun Powell, I say it’s a little thing. You can’t dismiss the significance of it because anytime the league can tie up the refs for a reasonable length of time is great. Why risk having the game soiled by inexperienced refs? But it’s not a big thing because, with all the money coming into the league, it was only a matter of time before the refs got their cut. They were in no danger of holding out. Everyone wins in this deal.

John Schuhmann, Big thing. It’s good that the best refs in the world are her for another seven years. It’s comforting that there was never a hint of an issue that would affect the season. And it’s important that the league continues to give these guys what they need behind the scenes as they put them under more scrutiny, via the Last Two Minute reports, in public.

Sekou Smith, I think it’s big enough. Any time you can broker labor peace ahead of a deadline, it’s a victory. And in an effort to make sure that men charged with one of the most difficult jobs in sports (you try keeping up with the tallest and most graceful group of professional athletes on the planet) understand the investment the league has made in them is for the long haul, this goes a long way. I’m not here to disparage replacement referees, but I want to see them under the bright lights about as much as I do replacement players … and that’s never!

Ian Thomsen, It is big. The NBA is seeking to deepen its partnership with referees by pursuing greater transparency and self-reflection. The league wants referees to continue to view themselves as servants to the game to an ever-increasing degree. An extended and bitter contract negotiation would have undermined the big-picture goal; by agreeing to new terms without public drama, the league and its referees can move forward with less acrimony than in previous years.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blogI guess it’s something, but I don’t think it’s a big thing. Even if the NBA had to use replacement refs, there are so many replay and review mechanisms currently in place that I’m not sure how much damage they could have done. I guess it does put an end to my feature idea — “NBA Behind the Scenes: I was a replacement ref.”

Report: NBA, refs union reach tentative agreement on new deal

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The NBA and the union representing the game’s officials have reached a tentative agreement on a new, seven-year deal that will run through the 2021-22 season, according to a report from Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports.

A vote on final ratification of the deal is expected to come Thursday in Chicago, where the union’s members are scheduled to gather. More from Yahoo! Sports:

The NBA and the NBRA opened talks with a year left on the existing collective bargaining agreement, and will replace the final season of the current five-year agreement with terms on a new deal, sources told Yahoo Sports. The referees’ new deal will include substantial raises for referees and the staffing of the league’s replay center in Secaucus, N.J., with refs, sources said.

The NBA will be generating significantly more revenue with a new $24 billion television contract beginning in 2016.


Hang Time Podcast (Episode 193) Featuring Kyle Lowry

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — It’s been a revealing season for Kyle Lowry and the Toronto Raptors. They’ve been one of the best teams in the NBA and yet an afterthought for some, as teams in Atlanta, Cleveland and Chicago — and that’s just in the Eastern Conference — have garnered more and more of the spotlight.

Lowry, of course, is used to being overlooked and underrated. He’s dealt with it his entire career.

And that won’t change just because he earned his first All-Star nod this season and is the catalyst and leader, on and off the floor, for one of the top teams in basketball. In fact, we’re certain that Lowry and the Raptors will have to continue to scrap for anything they get … which exactly the way Lowry likes it.

We dig deep on his journey — past, present and future — on Episode 193 of the Hang Time Podcast … Featuring Kyle Lowry.

We also discuss the hottest topics of the day, including Dwight Howard‘s looming return in Houston, the University of North Carolina math being applied in Braggin’ Rights, our dime store March Madness predictions, the NBA’s version of March Madness, Wednesday’s monster mash between the top of the heap Warriors and Hawks, what happened to Rick Fox‘s beard and LeBron James‘ headband (did they go off to the same remote island?) and so much more.

You get it all on Episode 193 of The Hang Time Podcast … Featuring Kyle Lowry …



As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of,  Lang Whitaker of’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand and the best sound designer/engineer in the business,  Andrew Merriam.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.

VIDEO: The Game Time crew talks to Kyle Lowry after his triple double

Blogtable: Extend the season?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Extend the season? | Rethinking age limit? | Upset-minded East playoff team?

VIDEOThe Starters give their view on extending the season into July

> The NBA says it is considering spacing out the 82-game regular season, and San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg Popovich is already on record saying he won’t be working in July. Are hot dogs, apple pie and basketball a good mix on Independence Day?

Steve Aschburner, NBA in July? No thank you. The season goes deep enough into the calendar as it is, players already are squeezed for offseason recovery and down time, there is lots of business already requiring the summer months (draft, Las Vegas, free agency, FIBA). The obvious fix is to shorten the preseason by a week to 10 days, play three or four tuneup games instead of seven or eight and start the NBA schedule a week before Halloween.

Fran Blinebury, The idea is a bigger dud than a wet firecracker on the Fourth of July. The season is already long … too long. With many players choosing to play for their national teams — Tony Parker and Nicolas Batum have already said they’re in for France at EuroBasket next summer — the offseason time to rest and heal would be shortened further.  On one hand, the commissioner talks of trimming off a few preseason games to provide more down time.  On the other, he has already lengthened the All-Star break to a week to make less.  The only truly serious solution to the problem of debilitating fatigue is simple — a shorter schedule, say 66 or 70 games. That would require owners netting less money from fewer home games and require players taking a corresponding cut in contracts. Both sides, of course, are due a windfall when the new TV contracts kick in. But neither side is willing to forgo a dollar. So it is all talk, some of it just silly, with a few cosmetic changes.

Scott Howard-Cooper, Sure. It will look weird at first and feel strange on the body clock because other big events will have to be pushed back –the Draft, NBA Summer League –but that’s nothing compared to the benefit: better play. Fewer back-to-backs or three games in four nights is a good thing for rosters and, therefore, a good thing for fans. There has to be some give as most people agree the extended All-Star break is a valuable rest stop and the idea of a little more breathing room in the schedule is a positive. Turning another page on the calendar, and it might not since that would mean the season going some two weeks longer now, would be a small price to pay.

Shaun Powell, No, no, no! Basketball isn’t meant to go beyond Father’s Day, let alone July 4th. Stretching the season is a sure way to turn off some hardcore fans (casual fans would flee like Russell Westbrook on the fast break). If the owners and players and networks really cared about the quality of the game, they would agree to play a 70-game schedule, eliminate exhibition games, start the season by mid-October, eliminate four-games-in-five-nights, reduce back-to-backs, and return to best-of-five for first-round playoff series. Which means, it’ll never happen because money always gets in the way.

John Schuhmann, I don’t like the idea of pushing into July. I’m all for limiting the preseason to just one or two games and starting the regular season in mid-October, though. That should eliminate four-games-in-five-nights scenarios and reduce the number of back-to-backs. And I think a 72-game schedule (three games against each team in your conference, two against the opposite conference) would help alleviate wear and tear and put extra value on every game.

Sekou Smith, I’m with Pop on this one. There is no need to drag the NBA season into July. That’s Summer League time anyway. I understand the need, for some, to always be about the business of advancing things and tinkering with things for the sake of tinkering. Growing the game (the number of teams, the size and scope of the pool of players, viewership around the globe, etc.) has always the been the rule. And we’ve all benefited from that growth. But bigger isn’t always better, at least not in this case. If we’re going to mess with the NBA schedule, the move needs to be pushing back the start of the regular season until Thanksgiving or Christmas and shortening the 82-game season by roughly 12 games. I don’t think there is any doubt that fans would appreciate the quality of that sort of NBA season over the quantity that Pop (and so many others of us opposed to a 4th of July NBA Finals) is balking at with the spaced out 82-game regular season.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comEverything changes. Of all the changes that have transformed the NBA since the 1979 arrival of Magic Johnson and Larry Bird — overhauls of salary structure, media coverage (including social media), refereeing, global drafting and on and on — the idea of tacking on a few more days is almost not worthy of argument. As the money and the demands grow ever larger, it’s inevitable that the season will keep growing longer.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blog: To be honest, nothing other than Will Smith and Jeff Goldblum are a good mix on Independence Day. The NBA season need to be done by then, and preferably a few weeks before then. The obvious way to fix this — to space out the schedule while ending the season before July — is to shorten the season. It doesn’t have to be radical — maybe you could shave off 6 or 8 games. Or just cancel the preseason and back up the start of the regular season by a couple of weeks. Either way, whatever you do, I think we all agree that our Independence Day should be properly celebrated by sitting back and watching Randy Quaid invoke the words of his generation while flying a fighter plane nose-first into an alien spaceship. Not by watching the NBA.

NBA postpones tonight’s games in New York area due to weather conditions

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The NBA has postponed the New York Knicks-Sacramento Kings game and the Brooklyn Nets-Portland Trail Blazers game tonight due to blizzard conditions expected in the New York area.

The Kings-Knicks game has been rescheduled for Tuesday, March 3 at 7 p.m. ET at Madison Square Garden. The Blazers-Nets game has been rescheduled for Monday, April 6 at 7 p.m. ET at Barclays Center.

The Trail Blazers-Nets game was originally scheduled to air tonight on NBA TV but has now been replaced by the Minnesota-Oklahoma City game at 8 p.m. ET.