Posts Tagged ‘NBA Free Agency’

Report: DeAndre Jordan parts ways with agents

VIDEO: DeAndre Jordan has reportedly parted ways with his representatives at Relativity Sports

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — DeAndre Jordan‘s summer of change is not over. After causing a stir with his free agent decision to leave for Dallas only to change his mind days later and stay with the Los Angeles Clippers last month, now comes word, per Broderick Turner of The Los Angeles Times, that Jordan is parting ways with Dan Fegan and Jarin Akana, his representatives at Relativity Sports.

It’s the next logical step for Jordan during a summer in which he and his representatives were in the spotlight for all of the wrong reasons during the opening days of free agency.

No one wants to relive the emoji battle waged by Mavericks swingman and chief recruiter Chandler Parsons and a Clippers contingent led by All-Stars Chris Paul and Blake Griffin and shooting guard J.J. Redick. But Jordan was torn between his loyalty to the Clippers and the new opportunities the Mavericks presented.

Doc Rivers and the Clippers won out in the end, keeping Jordan in the fold and remaining among the Western Conference elite with a strong summer haul that also included adding Paul Pierce, Josh Smith and Lance Stephenson to their ranks.

Jordan has had three different agents in seven years and will be free to pick his next one in 15 days.

Report: Gasol agrees to deal with Grizzlies

VIDEO: Marc Gasol and the Grizzlies will continue their grit and grind ride together

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Marc Gasol was never going anywhere and the Memphis Grizzlies’ All-Star free agent center confirmed as much today by agreeing to terms on a five-year, $100 million deal to stay with the Grizzlies, according to a report from Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports.

Gasol didn’t even entertain overtures from other teams in free agency, opting instead to deal only with the Grizzlies. The centerpiece of a tea that has been one of the best in the Western Conference the past three seasons.

More details on the reported deal from Yahoo!:

The deal includes an early-termination option after the fourth year in 2018-19, league sources said.

Gasol met with Grizzlies owner Robert Pera in Spain last Wednesday, and progressed toward a final agreement over the next several days, sources said.

Gasol, 30, never seriously considered leaving the Grizzlies. He attended high school in Memphis while his older brother, Pau, played for the Grizzlies, and has spent all seven seasons of his NBA career with the Grizzlies.

Gasol developed into one of the league’s best centers during his previous four-year, $58 million contract. He averaged a career-high 17.4 points with 7.8 rebounds and 3.8 assists in 81 games this past season.


Morning shootaround — June 29

VIDEO: The Lakers’ selected D’Angelo Russell over Jahlil Okafor in the NBA Draft


Lakers boxed into a big man box? | Dollars and sense for LeBron | Garnett, Saunders definitely back in Minnesota | Ginobili will take his time making up his mind

No. 1: Lakers boxed into a big man box?  The selection of D’Angelo Russell on Draft night was celebrated by Los Angeles Lakers’ fans, luminaries and pundits alike. But did that risky move, passing up Duke’s low-post load Jahlil Okafor in favor of Russell, come at a larger price than expected? Marc Gasol has already made it clear that he is not interested in following in the footsteps of big brother Pau in a Lakers uniform. So that leaves slimmer pickings than expected for the Lakers (and Kobe Bryant) in free agency. Mike Bresnahan of The Los Angeles Times explains:

The Lakers have enough money for only one big-name free agent, gathering about $23 million in spending power after declining the $9-million option on free-agent center-forward Jordan Hill in a couple of days. Aldridge would make almost $19 million next season after pulling down $16.3 million last season.

The Lakers’ only big men going into free agency are Tarik Black and Robert Sacre after they presumably make the latter’s sub-$1-million contract guaranteed by Tuesday’s deadline.

They boxed themselves into a big-man corner by passing on Duke center Jahlil Okafor to draft Russell, putting the Ohio State point guard next to promising Jordan Clarkson while setting up the Lakers’ backcourt “for the next 10 years,” according to a near-giddy team source.

Perhaps a quick shot of reality is needed.

The Lakers have had problems getting free agents to take their money in recent years. Dwight Howard spurned them for less money in Houston, Carmelo Anthony said thanks but no thanks, and Pau Gasol took less to go to Chicago.

The only big name they signed lately was Kobe Bryant, who accepted a two-year, $48.5-million extension in 2013 before returning from a torn Achilles’.

The Lakers need a Plan B if Aldridge says no. Two teams from his home state, San Antonio and Dallas, will reportedly court him too.

It would take some persuasion to get Clippers center DeAndre Jordan to take less money and leave L.A.’s more talented team. The Lakers love his rebounding and shot-blocking, like many teams, and Dallas will also recruit him heavily.

It’s harder to figure what to make of Love, who had an off year in Cleveland and said in February there was not a scenario where he’d play for the Lakers. He might meet with them next week even if it’s only a ploy to ensure a maximum offer from the Cavaliers, reportedly the favorites to retain him.

Marc Gasol has no interest in the Lakers because of the uneasy last few years his brother spent with them, according to numerous people familiar with the situation. Versatile big man Greg Monroe, oft-injured Brook Lopez and his workman-like brother, Robin, are other alternatives at center.

If the Lakers strike out, they could try re-signing Hill for less and chase swingman Jimmy Butler, who could ease into the hole vacated soon by Bryant. The problem is Chicago’s expected action of matching any offer sheet the restricted free agent signs.

Whatever happens, it’s simple table-setting for a year from now. The Lakers will have double the fun when Bryant’s contract is off the books ($25 million next season) and the salary cap jumps from $67 million to about $90 million with the NBA’s gigantic new TV deal.


No. 2:Dollars and sense for LeBron — Cleveland Cavaliers fans need to get used to hearing the words LeBron James and free agency in the same sentence. They’ll be married this time of year, every year, at least for the foreseeable future. Our very own John Schuhmann of explains how the free agent dollars will make sense for the best player on the planet:

News broke Sunday afternoon that LeBron James has reportedly informed the Cleveland Cavaliers that he will opt out of the second year of the contract he signed last season.

This news was expected and doesn’t mean that James is leaving Cleveland again. All indications are that the best player in the world intends to re-sign with the Cavs. But even if he wants to stay with the wine and gold for the rest of his career, he’s probably going to become a free agent next summer and the summer after that, too. And it’s mostly about the money.

Free agency does give James some leverage. It keeps the pressure on Cavs management to do everything it can to give him the best supporting cast possible.

It also makes James a richer man.

James’ option for the 2015-16 season was for a little less than $21.6 million. A new contract this summer (for a player with at least 10 years in the league) could start at at maximum of about $22.0 million. (We’ll know the exact number when the 2015-16 salary cap is officially announced on or around July 8.) That’s not a huge raise (especially when you take income taxes into account), but it’s worth the paperwork.

James will have much more incentive to become a free agent in 2016 and 2017, when the salary cap is expected to make two big jumps, thanks to the new TV contract.

Assuming James signs another two-year, max deal with an option in the second year (a one-plus-one contract) again this summer, the ’16-17 option would be for about $23.0 million. But a new, max contract next summer could have a ’16-17 salary of more than $29 million.

That deal could have a second-year option (for ’17-18) of about $30.5 million. But a new, max contract in 2017 could have a starting salary of more than $35 million.


No. 3: Garnett, Saunders definitely back in Minnesota — Kevin Garnett and Flip Saunders aren’t going anywhere. They’ll be back in Minnesota to oversee the rebuilding job that is underway with young talent like Andrew Wiggins, Zach LaVine, new No. 1 Draft pick Karl-Anthony Towns and hometown kid Tyus Jones as the building blocks. Charley Walters of provides some context:

Although it hasn’t been announced, pending free agent Kevin Garnett definitely will re-sign with the Wolves, and Saunders definitely will return as coach.

Terry Kunze, who was a Timberwolves season-ticket holder for 25 years, knows basketball. He figures the Wolves, who won just 16 games last season, were smart to draft Jones.

“I knew they would get Jones,” Kunze said. “The Wolves aren’t stupid — he’s a local kid and he’ll sell tickets. The best thing about losing 66 games is that 18,000 people watch.

“I think (the Wolves) are going to sell a lot of tickets. Tyus Jones has a big name, and I think he’s a good player. He’s under control.”

Kunze was a star guard for 1961 undefeated state champion Duluth Central, went on to start for the Gophers, was drafted by the then-St. Louis Hawks but opted for Europe for three times the salary, then played for the ABA’s Minnesota Muskies, then was a Gophers assistant who recruited Kevin McHale before coaching at East Carolina, then became head coach of the Minnesota Fillies women’s team.

“I like the pick of Towns,” said Kunze, 71, who resides in Fridley. “It was a good (Wolves) draft not only for players, but for public relations.

“What’s the most important thing for a pro franchise? Sales No. 1, winning No. 2. That’s true.”

Jim Dutcher, who coached the Gophers to the 1982 Big Ten championship before becoming a peerless Big Ten TV analyst, said of the Wolves’ drafting of Towns and Jones, “They couldn’t have scripted it better.

“They got the player they wanted in Towns,” Dutcher said.

Saunders had Dutcher, 82, watch some private workouts of draft prospects.

“And being able to tie in Tyus Jones, he’s a perfect fit for them with (Ricky) Rubio‘s health and his end-of-game turnovers in critical situations,” Dutcher said. “In critical situations, they’re directly opposite — Tyus is strongest in key situations at end of games, and to have a young point guard with his potential, particularly a kid from Minnesota, it couldn’t have been better for the Timberwolves.”


No. 4: Ginobili will take his time making up his mind (and will do it in Spanish) — Manu Ginobili will inform the world of his intentions — to either come back for another season in San Antonio or to retire — on his own clock. And he’ll do so in his native tongue, via the Argentinian newspaper “La Nacion” in self-written letter. Take that LeBron James. Mike Monroe of the Express News has the details:

Spurs fans anxious to know if Manu Ginobili will be back for another season may want to brush up on their Spanish and bookmark the website for the Argentine newspaper, ‘La Nacion.’

The 37-year-old guard on Sunday told the Express-News he will announce his decision in a self-written sports column in ‘La Nacion’ “when the time comes.”

Presumably, that time will be before he hits the free agent market at the stroke of midnight, EDT, on Tuesday.

Ginobili acknowledged after the Game 7 loss to the Clippers that ended the Spurs season on May 1 that retirement “could happen easily.” He pointed out that the effects of a pro career that began in Argentina in 1995 has taken a physical toll that sometimes makes him question his ability to compete.

“Some days you feel proud and think you did great and other games I say, ‘What the hell am I doing here when I should stay home and enjoy my kids?’ ”


SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Mason Plumlee could be the perfect fit for the Trail Blazers … The challenge issued in Orlando, Magic need to dare free agents to be different this summer … Houston rookie Sam Dekker‘s not too big to mow his Mom’s lawn … Time for ‘Melo to put up or shut up? …

Veterans Duncan, Pierce still loom large as free-agent dominoes

If this were, say, 10 years ago and both Tim Duncan and Paul Pierce were hitting free agency July 1, the NBA landscape already would be quivering in anticipation. At 39 and 37 years old, however, and with 2,980 regular season and playoff games behind them, Duncan and Pierce aren’t the A-listers they once were.

But their situations still will have ripple effects on several teams, and potentially players such as LaMarcus Aldridge, Marc Gasol, Otto Porter Jr., Mike Dunleavy Jr., and rookies from the Class of ’15.

First, consider Duncan and the difference now from a year ago. Back then, lots of people thought that a successful title defense in 2014-15 by San Antonio might prompt the greatest of all Spurs to walk away this summer. The repeat didn’t happen but Duncan had a strong season – eerily so, if you look at the consistency of his per-36 stat – and now looms large in San Antonio’s plans. Here is Mike Monroe of the San Antonio Express News on Duncan’s pivotal role in seeking and signing other talent:

It is how, and when, the Spurs and Duncan agree on a new deal that will determine how the club approaches the most important summer since 2000, when a 24-year-old Duncan became a free agent for the first time and received an offer from the Orlando Magic that was too good not to consider seriously.

With 10 players hitting free agency on July 1 the Spurs have only six players under contract for next season. Those six — Kyle Anderson, Boris Diaw, Patty Mills, Tony Parker, Tiago Splitter and Reggie Williams (non-guaranteed) — have salaries totaling about $34.2 million.

But NBA rules require all teams to “hold” at least 12 players at all times, and the Spurs can only retain their free agency rights to Duncan, [Manu] Ginobili, Jeff Ayres, Aron Baynes, Marco Belinelli, Matt Bonner, Danny Green, Cory Joseph and Kawhi Leonard by putting them on their player list with salary cap hold figures that presume salary increases.

The cap holds put the Spurs way over the projected $67 million salary cap.

There are several NBA player personnel executives who believe the Spurs will offer Duncan a two-year contract that begins between $6 million and $7 million, with a partial guarantee and a player option in the second season.

If Duncan doesn’t exercise the option, he gets, say, 50 percent of that season’s salary. In effect, his salary for next season would remain over $10 million, the partially guaranteed portion of the second season’s salary remaining on the Spurs team salary after the cap explodes with the NBA’s new TV money kicking in for 2016-17.

“You can call it a ‘wink-wink’ deal if you want to,” said an Eastern Conference team executive.” It’s what they did with [Antonio] McDyess, so why not for Duncan.”

Then there is Pierce, who sounded on the verge of retirement after his last-second shot against Atlanta in Game 6 of their East semifinals series barely missed beating the buzzer. According to Wizards beat writer Jorge Castillo of the Washington Post, Pierce is definitely planning to play again next season, with the big question being where: Washington or Los Angeles, for his old pal Doc Rivers and the Clippers?

Here is a taste of Castillo’s report, which delves into the impact of Pierce’s choice on Porter, on the Wizards and on assorted free agents or player Washington could select in Thursday’s talent roundup:

Pierce emphasized he loved his year with the Wizards, guiding the Wizards’ young core and getting another crack at the postseason in a more diminished role. And just because he opts out his contract doesn’t mean he won’t stay in the District; Pierce, who turns 38 in October, could sign a one-year deal for more than $5.5 million to stick around, which would also help the Wizards keep the flexibility they desire for the much anticipated summer of 2016.

The Clippers will likely only be able to offer Pierce the mini-mid-level exception of $3.37 million, but they are arguably closer to hoisting the Larry O’Brien trophy than the Wizards — even in the tough Western Conference — and provide Pierce two amenities the Wizards cannot: A return home and a reunion with Rivers. Pierce grew up in Los Angeles and Rivers, now the Clippers’ maestro as the organization’s coach and general manager, coached him for nine seasons with the Boston Celtics. They won the title together there in 2008.

Rivers had a chance to nab the future Hall of Famer last summer, but opted to give the Clippers’ full mid-level exception to Spencer Hawes. The decision proved to be catastrophic as Hawes was buried on the Clippers bench for most of the campaign and was traded along with Matt Barnes to the Charlotte Hornets for swingman Lance Stephenson earlier this week.

Like his arrival, Hawes’s departure could have a direct impact on Pierce: In a radio interview Wednesday, Rivers said he prefers Stephenson coming off the bench and will look for a starting small forward elsewhere this summer. ESPN then reported the Clippers are considering Pierce.

So what would the Wizards do if Pierce decides to take a pay cut and return to the City of Angels for one final hurrah?

One thing is almost certain: Porter Jr., who enjoyed a breakout in the playoffs, would start at small forward. But Washington’s depth and scoring would take a hit regardless. Rasual Butler is a 35-year-old free agent. Martell Webster is entering the final guaranteed year of his contract but the 28-year-old was ineffective after his third back surgery in four years. Garrett Temple is a wing option but is better suited as a two-guard and emergency point guard.

2014 Free Agency — The Other Dominoes

From staff reports

Now that LeBron James is headed back to Cleveland, the belief is many of the other players in the free-agency pool are going to start making deals now, too. Here’s the latest from around the Twitter-sphere and the Internet as we get closer and closer to a real flood of free-agent news …

Update, 1:51 a.m. — Pau to Bulls means ‘Melo stays a Knick?

There’s no such thing as too late for free agent news, and one late-night agreement nearing completion between big man Pau Gasol and the Bulls might mean the end to the will-he-stay-or-will-he-go Carmelo Anthony saga in New York. Is ‘Melo a lock to stay the apple of NYC’s eye?

Update, 12:05 a.m. — Memphis nabs Vince Carter

For three seasons in Dallas, Vince Carter transformed himself into a knock-down 3-point shooter. He wanted to return to the Mavericks, but not at the bargain rate he felt he had been signed on for three summers ago even as his career seemed to be coming to a close. In a surprise, Carter has signed with the Memphis Grizzlies, a team desperate for 3-point shooting.

The Grizzlies shot the fewest 3s in the NBA last season, even with Mike Miller back on the team. And with Miller looking elsewhere, perhaps joining LeBron James in Cleveland, the Grizzlies simply had to get a shooter off the bench.

Update, 9:05 p.m. — Hawks make late entry into Gasol sweepstakes

A few hours ago Pau Gasol tweeted that he was nearing a decision. His suitors had been narrowed to two, reportedly the Spurs and Bulls. Now the Atlanta Hawks have made a late bid for the 7-foot center, envisioning Gasol playing next to center Al Horford.

Update, 8:15 p.m. — Knicks waive Lamar Odom

Lamar Odom‘s comeback is apparently over before it really began.

The versatile forward who won titles with the Los Angeles Lakers very well could be at the end of his NBA career. At 34, it’s tough to see another team take a chance on him. Knicks president Phil Jackson obviously has the L.A. connection with Odom and looked to give an opportunity.

Odom didn’t play at all last season after a rough summer that allegedly included heavy drug use.

Update, 7:05 p.m. — Pat Riley releases statement on LeBron

Heat president Pat Riley, who challenged the Big Three to return to the Heat and fight another day if they’ve got the guts, released the following statement on LeBron James‘ decision to leave Miami and return to the Cleveland Cavaliers:

“While I am disappointed by LeBron’s decision to leave Miami, no one can fault another person for wanting to return home. The last four years have been an incredible run for South Florida, HEAT fans, our organization and for all of the players who were a part of it. LeBron is a fantastic leader, athlete, teammate and person, and we are all sorry to see him go.

Over the last 19yrs, since Micky and I teamed together, The Miami HEAT has always been a championship organization; we’ve won multiple championships and competed for many others. Micky, Erik and I remain committed to doing whatever it takes to win and compete for championships for many years to come. We’ve proven that we can do it and we’ll do it again.”

Update, 6:45 p.m. — Lakers bring back Jordan Hill; Gasol a goner?

The Lakers are slowly but surely starting to fill out their roster now that it appears they will not be getting the services of Carmelo Anthony. Of course, Anthony still has yet to make his decision official.

After trading for guard Jeremy Lin earlier in the day, the Lakers are now set to bring back power forward Jordan Hill.

It’s becoming more apparent that Pau Gasol will have played his final game with the Lakers. He reportedly turned down an offer from the Lakers and is being heavily pursued by contenders such as the Spurs and Thunder, plus the Bulls and the Knicks could be an option if they keep Carmelo Anthony.

Gasol tweeted earlier Friday that he was nearing a decision.

Update, 6:30 p.m. — Suns, Kings agree to Isaiah Thomas trade

Phoenix is loaded at point guard, but they’ve made an aggressive play by engaging in a sign-and-trade for diminutive Kings point guard Isaiah Thomas. Thomas will head to Phoenix on a four-year, $27-million deal.

The surprising Suns rolled with two point guards in the starting lineup last season with Goran Dragic and Eric Bledsoe, a restricted free agent who the Suns have vowed to keep by matching any offer.

Dragic, named the league’s Most Improved Player last year and who could easily have been an All-Star, will essentially be entering the final year on his contract. He is set to make $7.5 million this season and then has a player option on $7.5 million in 2015-16, an option he will likely opt of to seek a bigger payday.

Update, 5:40 p.m. — Bosh stuns Houston, stays in Miami

In the wake of losing LeBron James, The Miami Heat aggressively pursued Chris Bosh , who appeared to be on the verge of accepting a deal with the Houston Rockets. In a stunner, Bosh accepted Miami’s five, year, $118 million deal.

The Heat are now making a strong push to bring Dwyane Wade  and forward Udonis Haslem.

It’s big news for the Heat, who looked to be reduced to rubble following James’ announcement. And it’s a crusher for the Rockets. They miss out on an All-Star power forward that seemed a perfect fit beside Howard.

Now the Rockets have a difficult decision whether to match the Mavs’ three-year, $45 million offer sheet to Chandler Parsons. If Houston matches, it will eat up the remainder of their cap space.

Only a few hours ago, the Rockets looked to be a vastly improved team. Now they might wind up watching a key player walk to the rival Mavs.

Update, 5:34 p.m. — Swaggy stays in Hollywood

Nick Young is headed back to the Lakers.

Update, 4:25 p.m. — D-Wade going home?

Woj is, as Woj often does, tearing it up. Here, he offers a blurb on Dwyane Wade who, remember, turned down nearly $42 million to get out of his contract with the Heat in hopes of giving Pat Riley more room to get LeBron back.

With that now not happening, would Wade be up for a return to his home town?

Update, 4:03 p.m. — Chicago, Charlotte after Hinrich

Captain Kirk average 9.1 points and 3.9 assists in 29 minutes a game last year for the Bulls.

Update, 3:16 p.m. — More on Lin’s move, Rockets’ Bosh chase

Yahoo! Sports’ Adrian Wojnarowski provides an update on L.A.’s move to pick up Jeremy Lin from Houston and the Rockets’ pursuit of Chris Bosh:

In an effort to clear salary cap space for Chris Bosh, the Houston Rockets have reached a deal to send guard Jeremy Lin to the Los Angeles Lakers, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

The Rockets will send a 2015 first-round pick, and other draft considerations to the Lakers to unload the final year of Lin’s $14 million expiring contract that includes a salary cap hit of $8.3 million based on the deal’s structure.

The Lakers will send cash and the rights to an overseas player, sources said.

Moving Lin to Los Angeles will clear most of the salary cap space necessary to sign Bosh to a four-year, $80 million-plus contract. The Rockets are still working to formalize a commitment out of Bosh, who will leave Miami because of the departure of LeBron James to Cleveland. The Rockets also plan to match Chandler Parsons‘ three-year, $46 million offer sheet with the Dallas Mavericks once Bosh has committed, sources told Yahoo Sports.

Bosh was planning to speak to Houston coach Kevin McHale on Friday afternoon, a source said.

Update, 3:05 p.m. — Another move in store for Cavs?

In order to get LeBron James the max contract offer he’s seeking in Cleveland, Alonzo Gee may end up being dealt …

Update, 2:54 p.m. — Report: Lin dealt to Lakers

And, just like that, Jeremy Lin is on his way to Los Angeles …

Update, 2:52 p.m. — Report: Bosh, Rockets inching closer to commitment

Keep reading below, but it looks like the Rockets and Chris Bosh are nearly a done deal …

Update, 2:46 p.m. — Reports: Lakers, Rockets finalizing Lin deal

It looks like Jeremy Lin is headed back to home state of California …

Update, 2:36 p.m. — You know you’re a big deal when …

… the White House chimes in on your latest career move …

Update, 2:24 p.m. — What about ‘Melo? Bulls staying in touch

Carmelo Anthony, much like Chris Bosh, is one of the big free-agent pieces who has yet to reveal/decide where he’s going next. K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune says the Bulls aren’t out of the race yet. And, as ESPN reports, the incumbent Knicks are in the race, too … (more…)

Report: Livingston, Warriors agree on deal

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Veteran point guard Shaun Livingston has reached an agreement to join the Golden State Warriors, according to Yahoo! Sports.

Livingston’s deal, for three years and a reported $16 million (with the third year partially guaranteed, per USA Today Sports), gives the Warriors a new dimension and some security in the backcourt

Livingston’s addition will allow All-Star point guard Steph Curry to play off the ball and alleviate some of the ball-handling and facilitating duties he shouldered last season. The Warriors will be adjusting to new coach Steve Kerr‘s system anyway, but the addition of a season veteran like Livingston gives them all sorts of possibilities in the backcourt.

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 127) Featuring Rockets Play-By-Play Announcer Craig Ackerman

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Leave it up to Rick Fox to skip out on his own birthday party on Episode 127 of the Hang Time Podcast.

Perhaps it was for the best, since we spent quite a bit of time discussing his least favorite subject of this free agent summer: Dwight Howard and his moving from the Los Angeles Lakers to the Houston Rockets. (Lakers coach Mike D’Antoni still can’t wrap his head around Howard leaving for Texas.)

While Rick is already on record as being a bit put off by the way Dwight handled himself with the Lakers and with his departure, Rockets play-by-play man Craig Ackerman couldn’t be happier with how things played out.

His phone has been ringing like crazy since Howard joined the Rockets. And things will only get more hectic the closer we get to training camp and the start of the 2013-14 season. He gives us some quality insight on what the Howard era of Rockets basketball will look like from an insider’s perspective and waxes on all things Rockets [sorry Rick].

We also break down the latest news, notes and happenings around the league, including a recap of what we saw during the Las Vegas Summer League, USA Basketball’s mini-camp in Vegas, Brandon Jennings and his fresh start in Detroit and the teams on the rise and fall after a wild July of action in free agency and trades.

You get all of that and so much more on Episode 127 of the Hang Time Podcast: Featuring Rockets Play-By-Play Announcer Craig Ackerman …


As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of,  Lang Whitaker of’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand and the best engineer in the business,  Jarell “I Heart Peyton Manning” Wall.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.

Wizards Sign Wall To Extension



HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The Washington Wizards building their franchise around John Wall went from theory to reality the moment Wall’s signature went on that five-year, $80 million extension the two sides began working on recently.

That time is now, according to Michael Lee of The Washington Post, who reports that the deal is done and will be announced Thursday at a news conference.

Wall hasn’t made an All-Star team yet and the Wizards haven’t reached the playoff since he was taken with the No. 1 overall pick in the 2010 Draft. But the Wizards believe he is the key to their future and are paying him accordingly. Wall’s new deal will not start until the 2014-15 season. But Wizards’ general manager Ernie Grunfeld is making sure that the linchpin to the Wizards’ future doesn’t have to worry about free agency any time soon.

The Wizards found out last season what life is like without Wall when they sputtered to a 5-28 without last season while he was recovering from a left knee injury. They finished the season 24-25 with Wall in the lineup. He posted the best numbers of his career in those final 29 games, averaging a career-high 18.5 points and 7.6 assists while shooting a career-best 44 percent from the floor.

With Wall as the ringleader of a young core that also includes fellow lottery picks Bradley Beal and Otto Porter Jr., the Wizards are poised to make a move up the Eastern Conference standings next season.

Signing Wall through the 2018-19 season with a maximum extension might seem like a risky move to some without more evidence that he is going to be the type of player that can lead the Wizards into the mix at the top of the Eastern Conference standings. But the Wizards are avoiding a load of extra drama by avoiding restricted and unrestricted free agency with a player they have much invested in already.

They’ve seen what a healthy and motivated Wall can do, what sort of impact he can have on a team that ranks among the best in the league defensively. As his growth and maturation process continues, the Wizards are clearly focusing on Wall’s immense potential with this extension.

Wall is the first member of his Draft class to receive an extension but probably not the last. The Sacramento Kings have reportedly engaged the representatives of DeMarcus Cousins, Wall’s college teammate at Kentucky, in conversations about a deal for the talented big man. There is an Oct. 31 deadline for players from their Draft class to receive extensions.

Childress Eager For Another Shot In NBA


HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Josh Childress has no regrets.

And he’s not looking for a payday or anyone’s pity. Let’s clear all of that up now, before we get into the meat of his story, a comeback one of sorts, in need of an appropriate ending.

His only desire is to finish what he started nearly a decade ago, when he was the sixth pick in the 2004 NBA Draft and began what was supposed to be a long and promising NBA career with the Atlanta Hawks.

No, contrary to the rumors circulating in the basketball universe, he is not ready to retire. Far from it. He has not lost an ounce of the desire that he had the day he first set foot in the league. He is simply a veteran player whose career has taken enough twists and turns the last five years you’d need motion sickness medicine to survive it.

“It’s been a ride, a wild ride,” said Childress, who is three weeks away from finishing up his degree at Stanford while training vigorously in Palo Alto, Calif., and contemplating his next basketball move. “It’s not about the money for me. It’s about having an opportunity to get back out there and play the game at the highest level. That’s what is important to me.”

Childress is a free agent this summer, just another seasoned veteran looking for the right training-camp fit, the right place to show that he can still play a vital role for the right team in a mutually beneficial situation.

He’s just a month past his 30th birthday and is as healthy as ever, as athletic as ever, his basketball IQ remains off the charts and his body is fresh. After all, he’s played just 1,485 minutes in 102 games over the past three seasons with the Phoenix Suns and Brooklyn Nets. But he’s operating in a realm where the prevailing wisdom of the day changes like the wind. What’s hot today is ancient history tomorrow. Fall off the NBA radar long enough and you’ll fade into obscurity.

“I feel like I’m the best I’ve ever been right now,” Childress said. “When I was with the Hawks it was a little different. I’d been there four years and really grown in that system. We all knew each other and knew each other’s tendencies. And I don’t think I’ve changed as a player since then. For a guy like me, it’s always been a matter of the right fit. My time in Phoenix … it just wasn’t the fit i thought it would be and they thought it would be. That’s not a good or a bad thing, it’s the way it is. You look around the league every year and guys are in situations that work and some that don’t, and a change of scenery changes everything.”

One choice alters career path

Childress made a drastic change in scenery five years ago, a move that altered the course of his career and carved out his place in NBA free-agent lore. He is far removed from that spotlight now, but five years ago he was in a much different space. He was dealing with the constraints of restricted free agency and a Hawks franchise that was in tumult as members of its ownership group were embroiled in a legal fight that overshadowed everything.

Childress’ unprecedented move to bolt for Greece and a groundbreaking contract with Euroleague power, Olympiacos, landed him a deal that would pay him the equivalent of $32.5 millions over three years. That deal dwarfed the five-year, $33 million the Hawks offered only after learning that the deal from Olympiacos was on the table and legitimate option for Childress.

He accepted Olympiacos’ offer — one that he could not refuse — and made a business decision no matter how controversial it might have seemed at the time. That decision, along with the five-year, $34 million deal he signed when the Hawks traded him to the Suns after he returned from his two-year stint in Greece, is one of the reasons his comeback story now isn’t about getting another lucrative pay-day.

That’s also what makes his current predicament so perplexing. In a league where money and championships serve as the ultimate motivators, in different order for different players at different times in their careers, Childress is someone decision-makers have had a hard time figuring out.

“We honestly haven’t seen enough of him the last couple of years to know what he’s got [left] and what’s driving him now,” an Eastern Conference executive said. “There’s no doubt he was a solid payer before he went to Europe. He was one of the best sixth-men in the league and on a team that was on the rise. I watched him a little bit when he was in Europe and he played well. He didn’t dominate necessarily, but he was solid. But since he came back [to the NBA] it’s been a mixed bag. The Suns were a mess when he was there and they ended up amnestying him. And he only played like 14 or 15 games with the Nets before they waived him. This is a what-have-you-done-for-me-lately business, man. Everyone knows that.”

Childress was the victim of an ill fit, some poor timing and plain bad luck in his last two NBA stops.

Stats revolution affects Childress’ future

A broken ring finger on his shooting hand slowed him down in his first season with the Suns. He came back sooner than he probably should have, given his desire to prove himself after playing in Europe, and was in a system where wings were spot-up shooters and not the jacks-of-all-trades player Childress thrives at being.

He was on a non-guaranteed deal in Brooklyn was playing lights out in the preseason before a severely sprained ankle knocked him out of the rotation and opened the door for veteran Jerry Stackhouse, who promptly went on a shooting tear. Childress was slated to serve as Gerald Wallace‘s backup, but never got the chance. When it became clear that he wasn’t going to be in the Nets’ plans, he requested and was granted his release.

In the larger scope, Childress has also become a casualty of the analytics revolution that has swept through the league the past five years. High-percentage jump shooters who stretch the floor have become the new utility players who cash in most during free agency (see Kyle Korver and J.J. Redick this summer).

There’s always room for a pro’s pro on someone’s roster, a guy who does all of the dirty work and accepts that role. But now that guy needs to be a dead-eye shooter, too. And while Childress is a career 33 percent 3-point shooter (52 percent from the floor overall), he’ll never be confused for one of these shooting specialists.

But he knows there is always a place for the skills he has honed over the course of his career. He just needs the right setting to show it … again.

“You know it’s really training camp, just being able to show what I can do on the court,” he said. “You get on the court in that situation and do the little things I’ve always tried to do; hustling and rebounding, and all the stuff that helps my team win. More than anything, what I’d love is to get into a situation where I’m with somebody who actually believes in me and what I can bring to a team. I can’t say that I’ve had that lately.”

Fighting for one last chance

Between dispelling foolish rumors and having to remind executives that he was drafted ahead of guys like Andre Iguodala, Luol Deng and even his friend and former Hawks teammate, Josh Smith, for reason, this summer has been a trying process for Childress’ camp.

“Without question it’s frustrating,” said his agent, Chris Emens. “It’s frustrating that so many of the experts … it’s funny how quickly things change. Josh hasn’t changed as a person or a player since he got back from Greece. It’s almost mind-boggling to see him go from a guy worth $6 million a year to fighting for a contract. The thing I love is that Josh wants to fight for it. It’s really not about the money for him. It’s about pride and proving people wrong. I’ve never seen him with chip on his shoulder like this.”

That chip will rest squarely on that shoulder until training camp, wherever that might be. But it’ll be a slow-burn for the always measured Childress. He’s had offers to play elsewhere, overseas. Ironically enough, Olympiacos pursued him again, though it wasn’t an offer he couldn’t refuse this time.

He’s focused strictly on the NBA this time around in free agency.

“I’m patient,” Childress said. “I realize the situation that I’m in. I’ve had offers to go elsewhere. But I feel like I am a NBA player and I can still play at a high level. It’s a mater of getting in a situation where I can do that.”

Howard Made His Decision With A Smile!


HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The smile looked genuine.

For the first time in nearly two years, Dwight Howard‘s smile looked like the real thing and not the forced teeth sucking he’s had to do with people and cameras in his face from Orlando to Los Angeles and all parts in between.

If it’s the new environment, as Howard was officially introduced as a member of the Houston Rockets earlier today, so be it. But something tells me he’d have worn that same smile anywhere, so long as it wasn’t Los Angeles.

Much has been made of his unhappiness while wearing a Lakers uniform, while playing alongside Kobe Bryant and for Mike D’Antoni. There is no need to rehash it now, not on the day that Howard finally looked relieved enough to crack that mile-wide smile of his for real.

For all of the people who have felt the need to smash Howard for the way he’s handled things, everything from the way he waffled his way out of Orlando to his unease during his season with the Lakers to his stint as the most coveted free agent since LeBron James leading up to The Decision, he deserves this moment. And I say that after having taken plenty of shots at Howard and his process myself.

But if Houston is where is the heart is and playing alongside James Harden, Chandler Parsons and Jeremy Lin, and for Kevin McHale, is what gets his juices flowing, then more power to him. NBA careers don’t last long enough for elite players to play under any extra stress.

Howard knows his championship clock is ticking after nine seasons in the league and just his one appearance in The Finals. He’s fully aware that his third stop has to produce some hardware or he’s in danger of wearing the label as a underachiever, something most of the great big men before him shed at one time or another during their playing days.

He’ll have all the resources you could ask for in Houston. General Manager Daryl Morey is an innovator and fearless. He’ll do whatever it takes to make sure Howard’s current surroundings are conducive to winning at the highest level. McHale has championship experience that should prove to be invaluable for a post player trying to refine his game and continue to hone his craft at this stage of his career. Harden is a budding star who will take on the late-game, big-shot pressure that Howard has struggled with throughout his career. And Parsons and Lin lead a supporting cast willing to do whatever is needed to make sure the Rockets’ biggest stars have a drama-free work environment.

It’s up to Howard now. He can’t blame his franchise, the front office, coach, teammates or anyone else for his shortcomings on the floor. The Rockets made a commitment to him that he must now reciprocate in the form of turning back the clock and playing the dominant force he was as recently as three years ago.

I know it seems like an eternity to some of you, but the man averaged 23 points, 14 rebounds and 2.4 blocks as recently as three years ago. We’re not talking about some fading star who’s seen his best days. Howard is just 27 and he’s only begun what should be the prime of his career.

He’s smiling because he knows that, because he realizes that this “fresh start” he’s getting in Houston could serve as the spark he needs to shake off the past two years and return to his rightful place as the best and most dominant big man in the league, not only in the eyes of a few, but in the eyes of everyone.

No words will convince the masses, though. Only actions will suffice.

That smile, the genuine one, is a start.

But it’s only the beginning.

The heavy lifting is on the way.