Posts Tagged ‘NBA Commissioner Adam Silver’

NBA voices concerns over controversial North Carolina law

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The NBA has formally expressed concerns over controversial legislation North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory signed into law Wednesday.

The Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act, implements a statewide policy that bans individuals from using public bathrooms that do not correspond to their biological sex. House Bill 2 also gives the state, and not individual cities, the right to pass nondiscrimination legislation.

The 2017 NBA All-Star Game is scheduled for Charlotte, putting the league and its partners in the crosshairs of legislation that flies in the face of the diversity and inclusion efforts that they have championed for years.

McCrory sent out a tweet explaining why he signed the bill:

The NBA released a statement today condemning the legislation:

“The NBA is dedicated to creating an inclusive environment for all who attend our games and events.  We are deeply concerned that this discriminatory law runs counter to our guiding principles of equality and mutual respect and do not yet know what impact it will have on our ability to successfully host the 2017 All-Star Game in Charlotte.”

Time Warner Inc., issued a statement of its own today urging Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal to veto legislation that would encourage discrimination by not protecting same-sex marriage opponents:

At Time Warner, diversity in all its forms is core to our value system and to the success of our business. We strongly oppose the discriminatory language and intent of Georgia’s pending religious liberty bill, which clearly violates the values and principles of inclusion and the ability of all people to live and work free from discrimination.

All of our divisions – HBO, Warner Bros. and Turner – have business interests in Georgia, but none more than Turner, an active participant in the Georgia Prospers campaign, a coalition of business leaders committed to a Georgia that welcomes all people. Georgia bill HB 757 is in contradiction to this campaign, to the values we hold dear, and to the type of workplace we guarantee to our employees. We urge Governor Deal to exercise his veto.

Hollywood actors and producers have threatened to take their projects elsewhere if Deal does not veto the bill. The Human Rights Campaign sent a letter to Deal today. He has until May 3 to act. Deal opposed earlier versions but has not commented on the final bill.

 

 

Report: Silver says changes coming to hack-a-Shaq rule

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Changes are in store for the dreaded Hack-A-Shaq (Dwight or DeAndre or Andre) rule this summer.

Or at leas that is the sentiment from NBA Commissioner Adam Silver, who addressed the topic on USA Today Sports‘ NBA A-to-Z Podcast.

Like many fans, coaches, players, executives and observers, the Commissioner has grown weary of the often-used strategy, which basically consists of fouling the poorest free throw shooter on an opposing team in an effort to limit said team’s scoring opportunities.

More from USA Today Sports:

“Even for those who had not wanted to make the change, we’re being forced to that position just based on these sophisticated coaches understandably using every tactic available to them,” Silver said. “It’s just not the way we want to see the game played.”

Hack-A-Player is up this year. The number of those intentional fouls through mid-December surpassed the number of times it happened last season (164), and the league is closing in on 300 Hack-A-Player instances before the All-Star break.

Through Tuesday’s games, fouls against Los Angeles Clippers center DeAndre Jordan, Detroit Pistons center Andre Drummond and Houston Rockets Dwight Howard have accounted for 69% of Hack-A-Player fouls. Jordan accounts for 34%.

Silver knows the data. But the interaction with fans as he watches a game has made an impact, too.

“Again, as I travel around the league, there’s that one school of thought ‘Guys have got to make their free throws,’ ” Silver said. “But then at the end of the day, we are an entertainment property, and it’s clear that when you’re in the arena, that fans are looking at me, shrugging their shoulders with that look saying, ‘Aren’t you going to do something about this?’ ”

 

Silver clarifies his role in Colangelo hire in Philadelphia


VIDEO: The Starters discuss Jerry Colangelo joining the Philadelphia 76ers as chairman of basketball operations

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — NBA Commissioner Adam Silver made the introduction, but contrary to rumblings making the rounds, did not influence the Philadelphia 76ers’ hiring of Jerry Colangelo this week as their chairman of basketball operations. 

Silver clarified his role in the situation today with Justin Termine and Eddie Johnson on Sirius/XM NBA Radio.

“The only role I played was making an introduction to Jerry for Josh Harris,” Silver said. “But I would say that this was something that was initiated entirely by Josh Harris and he’s the principal owner and governor of the Philadelphia 76ers. Contrary to what I’ve read in some of the reports, this was not arm-twisting from the league office telling the 76ers they had to change course or other owners calling me and saying you have to force the 76ers to do something.”

You can listen to the full interview here:

 

Kobe has successful shoulder surgery, faces long recovery

VIDEO: Kobe Bryant was voted a starter for the Western Conference All-Star team by fans last week

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The good news for Lakers fans is Kobe Bryant had successful shoulder surgery Wednesday, the Lakers announced. The tougher part to swallow, however, is the potential length of his recovery. Bryant’s recovery could last as long as nine months, which means he might not be cleared for action until after training camp starts for the 2015-16 season, the final year of his current deal with the Lakers.

Any discussion about Bryant not returning from his third major injury in three seasons seems to have dissipated. His road to recovery, though, will be rigorous for a player who will be 37 when he returns. Named an All-Star starter for the 17th time last week, Kobe will have to be replaced on that team, a decision that will be made by NBA Commissioner Adam Silver. The Lakers will have to find other ways to compensate for his absence.

They are not in the playoff picture this season, but with cap space and other assets to work with are expected to be a major player on the free-agent market this season.

BOG vote down Draft lottery reforms


VIDEO: Commissioner Silver discusses the owners’ vote

NEW YORK – Dealing with ultra-competitive people who’ve chased down success in both sports and business, vying in an industry with millions and these days even billions of dollars at stake in revenue and franchise valuations, it’s no wonder that every NBA rule on and off the court gets bent nearly to the point of breaking.

So dialing in the right mix of incentives, disincentives and weighted percentages in crafting or reforming a draft lottery is like dribbling through the Chicago Bulls defense – in a minefield of unintended consequences. Veer this way and … kaboom!

That, ultimately, was why a proposal from the league’s Competition Committee to modify the lottery failed to pass at the Board of Governors meeting that concluded Wednesday in midtown Manhattan. A 17-13 vote in favor of some significant changes still fell short of the 23 votes needed, based on the league’s by-laws. The issue goes back to the committee for further study.

“We’ve tinkered with the draft lottery several times,” NBA commissioner Adam Silver said. “I don’t necessarily disagree with the way it works now. I’m concerned with the perception.”

Silver, in fact, considers it a “corrosive perception” held by some fans, media types and people within his own league that teams can win big by losing big.

The essence of a draft is to deliver the best young talent to the neediest team. Yet “neediest team” is a moving target: Sometimes it’s a good team whose star player has gone done for a season – or left for good as a free agent. Sometimes it’s a chronically mismanaged roster full of players who never quite panned out. And still other times it’s a crew in need of serious rebuild whose front office has determined that “tanking” in search of a high draft pick is the surest way out of Stinkville.

The Philadelphia 76ers are the current poster guys for that strategy, using lottery picks on injured Joel Embiid and Euro-stashed Dario Saric one year after adding hurt-and-redshirted Nerlens Noel and finishing 19-63. Other teams such as Milwaukee and Orlando lined up with them – the 15-67 Bucks actually undercut the field in 2013-14 – in pursuit of the same prize.

The sense that one or several of the league’s 30 teams would take the court intending to do anything but win is one that rankles Silver. But for every tweak in the lottery system allegedly keeping teams honest in one direction, there was potential for a different club to game the system in another.

“Whether it’s the case, I’m frankly not sure. Sometimes perception becomes reality,” Silver said. “I think there’s an unfair pressure on some of our teams to actually underperform. There’s a view in those markets that they’re better off performing poorly in order to win in the long-term.”

Teams voted for or against the lottery reforms for other, more specific reasons. Some franchises in small-revenue markets feel they’re at a disadvantage in free agency (luring players) or trades (keeping acquired players long-term. They see the draft – and the rules of rookie contracts that can stretch as long as five seasons, at salaries lower than market value – as an equalizer. Teams in larger markets, with greater pressure from their fan bases to win, may view the draft as rewarding the league’s laggards or, worse, the intentionally bad.

According to Yahoo! Sports, the votes broke somewhat, but not entirely, along market-size lines. The 13 “no” votes reportedly were: Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Detroit, Miami, Milwaukee, New Orleans, Oklahoma City, Philadelphia, Phoenix, San Antonio, Washington and Utah.

The proposals floated this week called for broadening the lottery’s sweet spot and giving more teams a better shot at landing the top picks. In flattening the odds among the teams with the four worst records, the “neediest” team’s chance at the No. 1 pick would have been cut from 25 percent to 12. Also, it would be guaranteed no worse than the seventh pick, rather than fourth in the current system, if its lottery numbers proved unlucky.

“People want a change,” one Eastern Conference GM told NBA.com, “but they weren’t happy with the proposal.”

Other topics addressed at the Board of Governors meeting included:

  • Reports on revenue sharing and the new TV and digital rights extensions with Turner Broadcasting and ABC/ESPN that will pay the NBA $24 billion over nine years beginning in 2016-17, approximately triple what the current deals generate.
  • Discussion about the league’s latest marketing campaign and the status of the Atlanta Hawks’ unsettled ownership situation.
  • Presentations on domestic violence, diversity and other workplace concerns.
  • The extension of Minnesota owner Glen Taylor’s term as Board of Governors chairman for one more year.
  • The establishment of the David J. Stern Sports Scholarship, a $30,000 package based on merit and need for a student in sports management. Included: an internship at the NBA office in New York as a junior and direct mentoring from Stern, who retired as NBA commissioner after 30 years in February. “He was honored, flattered,” Silver said. He’s looking forward to engaging directly with these young students.”

The TV money issue looms large over the next two years because, while the infusion of cash won’t occur until 2016-17, all parties know that it is coming. NBA players already have talked about getting back some of what they felt was sacrificed in the last round of collective-bargaining talks in 2011, when their share of league revenues fell from 57 to approximately 50 percent. Owners reportedly are questioning revenue-sharing arrangements agreed to at about that same time and fine-tuned since.

Silver said Wednesday that one-third of the league’s 30 teams still are not profitable, though he added after the news conference that the onus still is on the individual teams to manage well their business. Some in attendance raised the specter of labor strife again in 2017 when the current CBA can (and likely will) be re-opened, and the possibility of a lockout similar to or worse than 2011 in a squabble over the flood of dollars.

The commissioner wasn’t ready to go there.

“So many great things are happening in this league right now,” Silver said. “Putting money aside, I think the system elements are working in the new collective bargaining agreement. I can’t remember a time when we had so many competitive teams in the league, so much hope in markets throughout the league.

“As I’ve said to the players, from day one when I became commissioner, my focus is on growing the pie. And if we do our job growing the pie, the incremental differences in percentages will be rounding error compared to us both sharing in the success of the league.”


VIDEO: Silver breaks down the new media deals

Silver beyond angry Sterling drama is overshadowing playoffs

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com


VIDEO: NBA Commissioner Adam Silver addresses the media before the NBA Draft lottery

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — You don’t have to guess what sort of impact the ongoing Donald Sterling affair is having on NBA Commissioner Adam Silver.

It’s written all over his face.

And when asked about it during a media gathering before Tuesday night’s NBA Draft lottery, the commissioner didn’t hide his disdain for the current phase of the process, the league-initiated charges to terminate Sterling’s ownership of the Los Angeles Clippers and the impact the issue has had on the perception and operation of the league at such an important time of the season.

Moments after Silver’s opening statement, when he praised the game at all levels as part of what he called a national and global “basketball renaissance,” the topic turned immediately to Sterling.

When asked what it meant to have the Sterling dominate the conversation each and every time he’s asked a question, the commissioner did not hold back.

“It’s a great question, and hard for me to put in words sometimes,” he said, “especially coming off some of the best playoffs, certainly in my memory. It makes me think of Kevin Durant‘s MVP speech … at one point Kevin Durant says, really addressing his mother, and I’m paraphrasing, he said, ‘Mom, we weren’t supposed to be here. The deck was stacked against us.’ I get choked up a little bit thinking about it. But I think Kevin Durant as our most valuable player embodies what our league is all about. And Mr. Sterling doesn’t.

“What made this moment bigger than basketball for everyone in the league is that it did come from within. Under David Stern and the commissioners that came before him, barriers were broken. And to the people that say it’s a slippery slope or what happens to the next owner or player that does something wrong? People always say that about race issues. It’s no secret we have a league where a majority of our players are African-American and the majority of our owners are not. This is as an egalitarian an institution as there is anywhere, at least that I know of , hiring players, coaches, front office personnel and within the owners ranks.”

Silver summed up his feelings by referencing his feeling the moment he heard the taped audio of Sterling making racist and bigoted comments that created a firestorm.

“It’s beyond anger,” Sterling said. “A certain sadness, a malaise. It’s something deeper than anger. I felt it when I first met with the Clippers. … We”re not a post-racial society. But at least within the boundaries of my authority, I feel a responsibility to protect the people in this league.”

The time frame for the process to strip Sterling of his ownership of the Clippers will move forward according to the dates outlined in the charges initiated by the league Monday:

The NBA initiated a charge Monday seeking to terminate the ownership of Donald Sterling in the Los Angeles Clippers. If the NBA Board of Governors sustains the charge by a 3/4 vote, all ownership interests in the Clippers will be terminated and the team will be sold to new owners.

The NBA Constitution provides Mr. Sterling with the opportunity to respond to the charge by May 27, as well as the right to appear and make a presentation at a special meeting of the Board of Governors. This hearing, which is planned for June 3, will be presided over by NBA Board of Governors Chairman Glen Taylor, the controlling Governor of the Minnesota Timberwolves.

The charge asserts that Mr. Sterling engaged in conduct that has damaged and continues to damage the NBA and its teams. Among other things, Mr. Sterling disparaged African-Americans and “minorities”; directed a female acquaintance not to associate publicly with African-Americans or to bring African-Americans to Clippers games; and criticized African-Americans for not supporting their communities.

Mr. Sterling’s actions and positions significantly undermine the NBA’s efforts to promote diversity and inclusion; damage the NBA’s relationship with its fans; harm NBA owners, players and Clippers team personnel; and impair the NBA’s relationship with marketing and merchandising partners, as well as with government and community leaders. Mr. Sterling engaged in other misconduct as well, including issuing a false and misleading press statement about this matter.

All of these acts provide grounds for termination under several provisions of the NBA Constitution and related agreements.

All that said, Silver did indicate that “Mr. Sterling still owns the Clippers” and that the commissioner would be open to a “man-to-man” discussion about how to handle the process going forward in way that would allow Sterling to sell.

But he was resolute in his stance that the league is doing what needs to be done by removing Sterling.

“My confidence level is high,” he said. “We’re doing the right thing and I know the owners are behind me. The timing is laid out in the NBA Constitution. We’re following it to the letter, in terms of numbers of days Mr. Sterling has to respond and the date the hearing [will be] held. It’s an unprecedented proceeding. Will there be bumps in the road? Yes. But I know we’re pursuing the right course.”