Posts Tagged ‘Moses Malone’

Morning Shootaround — Sept. 20

VIDEO: Anthony Davis’ Top 10 Plays from 2014-15 season


Shaq to son: Follow Anthony Davis | Is Deron done as a star? | Moses Malone remembered

No. 1: Shaq to son: Follow Anthony Davis Pelicans forward Anthony Davis has received plenty of props from within the basketball world, but maybe the highest compliment came the other day from Shaquille O’Neal. Shaq has a son, Shareef, who is a budding basketball star in Los Angeles. Shareef is 15 and lean and brings some skill for someone who’s already 6-foot-8, and Shaq attends his son’s games whenever he can. You’d think Shaq would want son to copy dad, who did a few good things in the NBA. Instead, Shaq wants Shareef to use Davis as an example of how to play the game. Shaq spoke to John Reid of the Times Picayune about his advice …

Instead of pushing him to pattern his game after him, O’Neal said he’s told his son to learn the game by watching power forward Anthony Davis, the New Orleans Pelicans’ transcendent star who finished fifth in the league’s MVP voting last season.

”I told him to watch Anthony because he’s probably going to be the same height and have the same type of build,” said O’Neal, who returned to Baton Rouge to host his annual annual LSU Life Skills Golf Classic at Carter Plantation on Friday in Springfield. ”Not skinny, but long.

”He’s (Davis) probably the best at that position. He can run, rebound, dominate take over games. He’s going to do his thing this year.”

Already at 6-foot-8, Shareef O’Neal also is doing his own thing to turn heads. He emerged in AAU ball this summer playing for the California Supreme as a power forward.

Unlike his father, the younger O’Neal has a mid-range game, capable of scoring from the perimeter and can handle the ball. O’Neal said Shareef O’Neal also is learning from watching LeBron James, Kevin Durant and Kobe Bryant.

Only a sophomore at the Windward School in Los Angeles, Shareef O’Neal has already received scholarship offers from USC and UCLA.

O’Neal expects more to come, but said he is going to allow his son to make his own decisions and not steer him to LSU or any other school.

At LSU, O’Neal was a two-time SEC Player of the Year and the fourth leading scorer (1,941 points) in school history behind only Pete Maravich, Durand Macklin and Howard Carter. He was the No. 1 overall pick in the 1992 NBA Draft by the Orlando Magic.

In the NBA, O’Neal won four NBA championships in 19 seasons, scoring 28,596 career points and grabbing 13,099 rebounds.

”I won’t steer him along,” O’Neal said. ”He’s got to find his way. He’s a big guy that can shoot it.”


No. 2: Is Deron done as a star? Somewhere between Utah and Brooklyn, Deron Williams lost his way. He was a star with the Jazz and perhaps one of the league’s top 10 or 15 players, certainly among the best two or three point guards. But not long after he arrived with the Nets as the marquee face on the franchise’s move to Brooklyn, Williams crashed. He had some injuries and they certainly contributed, but none so serious that caused him to miss an entire season. Besides, Williams was so good that even if he lost a step, he’d still have three steps on most point guards. But now? Well, the Nets bought out his contract and he had little choice but sign with the hometown Mavericks for a fraction of what he made on his last contract, which paid him well over $100 million. Ken Berger of CBS Sports did a fine analysis of Williams and what may or may not lie ahead, and here’s his take …

Williams’ body and impact have been in steady decline since he was shipped out of Utah as a proactive strike against his impending free agency. But the intrigue surrounding one of the league’s most enigmatic talents continues to grow.

Do you remember when it seemed Williams was on the fast track to the Hall of Fame, when he could do things like this? Yeah, nobody else does, either. And the story of what happened, and what sort of arc Williams’ career will track in Dallas, is no less mystifying than his lethal crossover used to be.

The Mavericks, stung by the reversal of free agent DeAndre Jordan, harbor no delusions that Williams will ever reclaim his once rightful and perennial All-Star status. With a low-risk deal for $10 million over two years — on the heels of the $27 million buyout that mercifully ended his ill-fated tenure in Brooklyn — the Mavs are merely hoping for serviceable.

That’s how far the 31-year-old Williams has fallen. For a player once so dominant and electrifying that he stood toe-to-toe with — and, at times, towered over — Chris Paul in the debate over who was the best point guard in the NBA, serviceable is now the goal.

“I don’t think he’ll be an All-Star again because of how good the West guards are,” one longtime executive told CBS Sports. “I don’t think he’s a top-15 point guard right now, but I think he can eventually get there.”

Williams’ stunning decline in New Jersey and Brooklyn over the past four-plus seasons puts him squarely in the discussion of the NBA’s biggest $100 million busts in the modern era — along with the likes of Shawn Kemp, Allan Houston, Gilbert Arenas and Rashard Lewis. But even more so than any of those guys, the case of Williams’ demise, or at least the suddenness of it, remains mystifying. We know about the ankle problems, the fallout in Utah, all of that. But to fall this far so quickly? According to league sources dialed into Williams’ ill-fated time under the bright lights in New York, the point guard’s journey from elite to scrap heap was both physical and mental — a tale of superstar wanderlust gone terribly wrong.

“He played a lot better with less than he did with more, when he was more of a focal point,” former Nets assistant GM Bobby Marks said.

No one put Williams on blast more candidly than his one-time Brooklyn teammate, Paul Pierce, who torched the three-time All-Star in an infamous interview with Jackie MacMullan back in April.

“Before I got there, I looked at Deron as an MVP candidate,” Pierce said. “But I felt once we got there, that’s not what he wanted to be. He just didn’t want that.

“I think a lot of the pressure got to him sometimes,” Pierce said. “This was his first time in the national spotlight. The media in Utah is not the same as the media in New York, so that can wear on some people. I think it really affected him.”


No. 3: Moses Malone remembered The sudden passing of Hall of Famer Moses Malone shook the basketball world and many gathered in Houston on Saturday to pay their respects. Interestingly, the funeral was held at Lakewood Church, which was formerly the Summit, where Malone starred while a member of the Rockets. Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle was on hand to file a report

With NBA legend Moses Malone, there was always laughter, a gift he happily shared and left for those that gathered Saturday to remember him. The pain and shock and loss were still fresh at his memorial less than a week after he had died in Virginia. But there were stories to tell and imitations to share. Malone was mourned, but also fittingly celebrated.

Mourners had flocked from around the country to Houston, Malone’s adopted hometown, with an estimated 1,200 people gathering at Lakewood Church – formerly The Summit, where Malone starred for the Rockets – to honor the life of an icon and to support one another with reminders of why he had become such a beloved part of NBA and Houston sports history.

So as they spoke, they punctuated stories with imitations of Malone’s distinctive, rapid-fire mumble. And as he had so many times before, he left them laughing.

“That’s how Moses was,” said Charles Barkley, who delivered the eulogy for the former Philadelphia 76ers teammate he called “Dad.” “He made you smile. He made you laugh. And he loved everybody.

“He helped everybody. From the rookies on, he treated everybody great. He was a wonderful man. It was an honor for me to do the eulogy.”

Malone, 60, died Sunday in Norfolk, Va. The Virginia medical examiner’s office listed his cause of death as hypertensive and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

Malone was survived by his sons, Moses Malone, Jr., Michael Earl and Micah, a granddaughter, Mia.

One of the giants of basketball history was celebrated by many members of that most exclusive club. Among those in attendance were former Rockets teammates Rudy Tomjanovich, Calvin Murphy, John Lucas and Major Jones as well as Julius Erving and Maurice Cheeks, with whom Malone won the 1983 NBA championship with the Philadelphia 76ers.

Other former players who attended the ceremony included Dominique Wilkins, Ralph Sampson, Clyde Drexler, George Gervin, Artis Gilmore, Alex English and Tracy McGrady.

They came out of love and admiration for one their own who was still even in their company special.

“He did it his own way,” Erving said, comparing basketball’s “Chairman of the Boards” to another. “You have to compare him to Frank Sinatra, a guy who did it his own way and in the process, changed everything. Moses wasn’t the smoothest. He wasn’t the most articulate. There’s a short list of things he wasn’t and a long list of things that he was.

“I feel like he completed his mission. He always had a mission, the message that he carried around in his bible. He did what it said. He was a man who loved his family, loved life to the fullest and got the most out of his time here.”


SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Shaquille O’Neal wants Kobe Bryant to play beyond this season … Heat have some decisions to make very soon … Haven’t had enough of Tristan Thompson’s contract talks? Then read onDerrick Favors is hyped for the Jazz, even without Dante Exum

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 209) Rick’s Return



Rick Fox is back in the fold on The Hang Time Podcast, picking up on Episode 209 where he left off months ago, cracking us up while sharing the details of the wild and crazy roller coaster ride that is his life. From Hollywood to Las Vegas to New York and around the globe, Rick has been busy since he last showed up for his job (one of about 226 different jobs) here.

We should clear up a few things now, before you dig in. No, he is not to blame for Serena Williams missing out on the grand slam (he didn’t even make it to her final match at the U.S. Open), that was Drake‘s fault.

Yes, brilliant comedian and actress Amy Schumer is going to need a restraining order to keep Rick a safe distance away from her now that he’s become her unquestioned No. 1 fan.

And yes, these rumors of a musical twist (he’s searching for a stage name but is leaning towards “DJ Trainwreck” … sorry Amy and LeBron James) in his future are legit.

It’s been a while since we’ve had the pleasure of poking fun at the most hilariously entertaining member of our crew.  But it’s good to have him back to share his insights on the sudden passing of Moses Malone, Kobe Bryant‘s readiness for training camp and what that means for the Los Angeles Lakers, his need to learn Spanish (yesterday) for his latest acting gig, rubbing elbows with Oprah, Gayle King and Roger Goodell, his infatuation with live streaming videos on Facebook, introducing his daughter to Nas and so much more.

That’s just a small sampling of what you’ll get on Episode 209 of the Hang Time Podcast: Rick’s Return …


As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of,  Lang Whitaker of’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.

Blogtable: Best offensive rebounder in NBA today?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Were ’83 Sixers most dominant playoff team ever? | NBA’s best offensive rebounder today? | What you remember most about Malone?

VIDEOMoses Malone’s 30-point, 30-rebound game from 1982 vs. Seattle

> Moses Malone is the NBA’s all-time leader in offensive rebounds, but who is the best offensive rebounder in the NBA right now, today?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comWhen Detroit’s Andre Drummond grabbed 440 offensive rebounds in 2013-14, he was the first player with more than 400 in a season in 16 years (Jayson Williams had 443 in 1997-98). Drummond had 33 percent more than the No. 2 man, DeAndre Jordan. Then last season, Drummond grabbed 437, topping runner-up Jordan by 40. So with all due respect to the Clippers center and to wily Zach Randolph in Memphis, the easy answer here is Drummond.

Scott Howard-Cooper, Andre Drummond. More than five per game last season? That’s how to make a big contribution on offense while not having much of an offensive game, or at least a traditional offensive game.

Shaun Powell, After watching him rip through the playoffs last season I’m tempted to nominate Tristan Thompson. He goes for more second helpings than you at Thanksgiving. But the premier offensive rebounder is Andre Drummond, and he’s still learning how to play the game. Imagine what happens when he develops a post move or a mid-range shot. Until then, the offensive glass is what he does very well, better than most.

John Schuhmann, Andre Drummond was the league leader in offensive rebounding percentage last season, but DeAndre Jordan was second while playing for a coach — Doc Rivers — who doesn’t want to sacrifice transition defense for offensive boards. No team allowed a lower percentage of their opponents’ shots in the first six seconds of the shot clock than the Clippers, who ranked 28th in offensive rebounding percentage as a team. With that context, the case could be made that Jordan is the better offensive rebounder among two similarly long and bouncy bigs.

Sekou Smith, Andre Drummond‘s the only player in the league to average more than five offensive rebounds per game last season, so he has to get the nod. But I love watching DeAndre Jordan (4.8 offensive rpg and a league-leading 15 rpg last season) do his work around the rim for the Los Angeles Clippers. He’s huge, like Drummond, and uses every bit of his size and athleticism to his advantage on the boards. He does it with more flair than Drummond and does it in a dominant fashion on a team where he’s never really been featured on that end of the floor.

Ian Thomsen, Andre Drummond dominated during the regular season, but the big man who made you think of offensive rebounding as a weapon last year was Tristan Thompson. As the Cavaliers’ scorers went down during the playoffs, Thompson tirelessly created second-chances while helping to drive his team within reach of the championship.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blogBy all the stats, Detroit’s Andre Drummond is pretty effective, by a pretty healthy margin, with DeAndre Jordan not far off. But fresh in my mind is the work Tristan Thompson did during the NBA Finals. We always hear from coaches that rebounding is mostly about effort over anything else, and I thought Thompson showed that during The Finals.

Blogtable: What will you remember most about Moses Malone?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Were ’83 Sixers most dominant playoff team ever? | NBA’s best offensive rebounder today? | What you remember most about Malone?

VIDEOMoses Malone career retrospective

> The NBA lost one of its all-time greats when Moses Malone died Sunday at age 60. What will you remember most about the “Chairman of the Boards?”

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comI’ll remember Moses as a man of few words, whose comments took on greater import and pithiness because he wasn’t all that talkative. I’ll remember the pools of sweat he left at both ends of every court on which he played – hardest working and most perspiring man in the game at the time. Unfortunately, though, I think I’ll remember how jarring it was to see Malone play for so many teams in his career. Legendary players aren’t supposed to pack their bags that often – even skipping his ABA stops due to that league’s shoddy finances, Malone changed NBA teams eight times. For a while it almost seemed like a Moses-of-the-month club, with Malone spread around the league so everyone could have him for a stint. Guess that makes him both old-school and very modern, as pro athletes go.

Scott Howard-Cooper, Probably the tenacity. It seemed like if there was a rebound anywhere in the area code, he would grab it. Imagine the number of times an opponent got chewed out by their coach for not sealing Malone off the offensive boards. Coaches must have gone hoarse. Moses had good size, but he wasn’t Shaquille O’Neal or Wilt Chamberlain. But when the ball was coming off the rim, it didn’t matter.

Shaun Powell, Moses wasn’t the most eloquent speaker and was rather reluctant to do interviews, but he came up with a few gems. Of course, there was “fo, fo, and fo” and also the quip about “me and four guys from Petersburg” being able to beat up the Celtics in The Finals. He nicknamed his two young boys “Harvard” and “Yale” because that’s where he said they were going to school (neither did). And finally, Moses remarked how he “learned” Hakeem Olajuwon how to play the game and after getting roasted by a young Hakeem regretted that he “learned him too good.”

John Schuhmann, I don’t know if “underrated” is the right word, but looking back at Malone’s career, he clearly doesn’t get mentioned enough as one of the best big men in NBA history. When you look at his shooting numbers (49 percent for his career, only five seasons at 50 percent or better), he obviously wasn’t as efficient as Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Wilt Chamberlain or Shaquille O’Neal. But by rebounding so many of his own misses (and that he shot free throws better than all of those guys), he kind of made up for that. Really, his numbers are right there with Shaq.

Sekou Smith, In addition to this Air Force 1 poster that hung on the bedroom wall when I was a kid, it’s the fact that Moses was a technician. The polish and proficiency of his game, on both ends of the floor, is what will always stick out to me about him. He dominated with what would classify now as an “old school” style that didn’t rely on his physical prowess as much as it did his pure skill and ability to wear you out by beating you to all the sweet spots on the floor. You don’t score and rebound the way he did, at his size, without being an absolute technician. 

Ian Thomsen, I think about how he was underestimated when the ABA folded in 1976. In the ensuing dispersal draft Malone was chosen second by the Blazers (their first pick was Maurice Lucas) and was then unloaded to the Buffalo Braves for a first-round pick (which turned into Rick Robey). The Blazers already had Bill Walton, who would lead them to the 1976-77 championship — but that doesn’t change the fact that they and the Braves undervalued 21-year-old Malone, who was traded again for a pair of first-rounders (Wesley Cox and Micheal Ray Richardson) to the Rockets. Two years later, Malone would be the NBA’s MVP, and in 1981 he would lead the Rockets to the NBA Finals. The misunderstanding of his potential was stunning.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blog I was in middle school in 1988, when my hometown Atlanta Hawks signed a then 32-year-old Moses Malone to team him with Dominique Wilkins and Reggie Theus and give the Hawks, finally, a potent inside-out attack and make them a presumptive Eastern Conference contender. I may have only been a kid, but I knew enough about the NBA to know that these Hawks had a chance to be special, so I mowed lawns all summer and raised $205 and bought a $5 season ticket for that ’88-89 season. By then Moses wasn’t the dominant glass demon he’d been earlier in his career, but he was still effective and still worthwhile. The main thing I remember was how often he seemed to miss short shots intentionally when nobody was near him, and how through this my friends and I learned what it meant to “pad” one’s stats. Many times after games, we would hang around near the locker rooms and ask for autographs. Moses wasn’t the most enthusiastic autograph giver, but he usually made himself available eventually. One night someone asked him if he had any extra shoes he could give away, and without looking up, Moses said, “Ain’t got no shoe contract.” What made this even better was he was starring in a national Nike commercial at the time.

Blogtable: Were ’83 Sixers most dominant playoff team ever?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Were ’83 Sixers most dominant playoff team ever? | NBA’s best offensive rebounder today? | What you remember most about Malone?

VIDEOThe Sixers sweep away the Lakers in the 1983 Finals

> After winning 65 games in the 1982-83 regular season, Moses Malone’s 76ers went 12-1 in the postseason and swept the Lakers 4-0 in The Finals. Was this the most dominating postseason performance ever?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comThanks to Malone’s “Fo’, fo’, fo'” prediction, the 1983 Sixers’ postseason run might be the easiest to remember in terms of their 12-1 record (only Milwaukee got a game from them, defending home court while down 0-3). But it takes two teams to make for a great series and a succession of them to elevate a playoff run. While Philadelphia’s gauntlet to the title was challenging, it wasn’t as tough as the one the Los Angeles Lakers ran in 2001 while going 15-1 or what the Chicago Bulls faced either in 1996 (15-3) or 1991 (15-2). The ’00-01 Lakers outscored Portland by an average of 14.7 points, Sacramento by 9.2 and San Antonio by 22.2 in starting 11-0. They dropped Game 1 of The Finals against feisty Allen Iverson (48 points) but were far superior to that overmatched Sixers squad as they won the series’ next four.

Scott Howard-Cooper, That team, the 2001 Lakers that went undefeated against three 50-win opponents in the West before beating Philly for the title or the 1996 Bulls that crushed everyone in sight before a brief stumble in The Finals. Maybe the 76ers of 1983 get the edge because they swept a very good Lakers club, the defending champions, for the championship. That was a higher degree of difficulty than the others. L.A. had a lot of talent and couldn’t come close to keeping up.

Shaun Powell, Well, the Shaq-Kobe Lakers of 2000-01 get the nod because they had to play an extra round (under the 16-team playoff format) and their only loss in the postseason was in overtime during The Finals (coincidentally in Game 1 against the Sixers). Also, the Moses-Doc Sixers had a few close calls along the way; winning two against the Knicks by a total of five points and sweating out an OT win against the Bucks. Besides, while that Bucks team was maybe the best in Milwaukee history (they swept the Celtics), the Sixers didn’t have to go through Larry Bird and Kevin McHale, who tormented them the years before.

John Schuhmann, Statistically, the 2000-01 Lakers (15-1) were the most dominant team in the postseason, outscoring their opponents by 13.5 points per 100 possessions. Nine of their 15 wins came by more than 10 points. The ’82-83 Sixers only outscored their opponents by 6.7 points per 100 possessions, winning only two games by more than 10 points. The ’90-91 Bulls (15-2, +12.6 points per 100 possessions) aren’t far behind the Lakers.

Sekou Smith, It was indeed the most dominating postseason performance in my lifetime. The Sixers were loaded and swept the defending champion Lakers in The Finals. How good or great a team was depended on its parts, how dominant it was depended on the quality of the competition. The 1983 Sixers reached The Finals with an 8-1 record and then swept a championship team. That speaks volumes.

Ian Thomsen, I’ve got to go with Michael Jordan’s 1995-96 Bulls. After going 72-10 in the regular season, they won 14 of their first 15 playoff games, including seven straight victories against teams that had won 60 games. Can we forgive them for losing twice in the NBA Finals after seizing a 3-0 lead over the Seattle SuperSonics? We should: That team was unbeatable.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blogJust how old do you think I am? I don’t remember the 1983 Finals, but a 12-1 postseason run, at least on the surface, sure seems dominant. The only other team to me that sticks out as similarly dominant is the 2002 Lakers, who won a title with a 15-4 postseason record.

More Moses memories, pre- and post-NBA

VIDEO: Moses Malone career retrospective

It’s been a couple of days since Moses Malone died unexpectedly at age 60 Sunday in Norfolk, Va. Even in this era of 24/7 news coverage, some of the appreciations and remembrances of the legendary NBA center still are getting posted and published. One, from the Richmond (Va.) Times-Dispatch, provided some details of Malone’s passing and cause of death (hypertensive and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease), along with a glimpse into Malone’s recent post-NBA life. Another, by L.A. sports columnist Mark Whicker, recalled the clamor-bordering-on-uproar generated when Malone, intensely recruited as a high school senior, decided to skip NCAA basketball entirely.

First from the Times-Dispatch:

On Tuesday, Malone visited a doctor in Houston, where he lived. Malone was working out when he felt his heart skip a beat. The doctor found nothing wrong, but gave Malone a heart monitor. When Malone was found Sunday, he was wearing his heart monitor.

Police and EMS responded, and they told [Malone’s best friend Kevin] Vergara that Malone probably died of in his sleep.

The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner for Virginia said Malone died of natural causes. The cause of death was listed as hypertensive and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

“He was always very health-minded,” said Vergara, who noted Malone didn’t drink or do drugs, and skipped sodas and fried foods in favor of grilled chicken, fish and salad. “He’s vigorous about working out.”

Even when Malone traveled, he frequently rose early and visited the hotel fitness center. So when Malone didn’t show up at breakfast at 6 a.m. Sunday morning, no one was worried at first. When he didn’t answer his phone, Vergara went to his room and knocked on the door. Still, there was no response.

Vergara obtained a room key from the front desk. He tried to open the door, but the latch was locked from the inside. That’s when he knew something was wrong.

The story, by Richmond reporter Eric Kolenich, also mentioned Malone’s girlfriend Leah Nash, their 6-year-old son Micah and his two older sons Moses Jr. and Michael. It also spoke of the Malone’s friendships.

“We talked every day, literally,” Vergara said. Even though Malone lived in Houston and traveled frequently, and Vergara remains in Hopewell, they kept in constant contact, often talking about Moses’ love of the Dallas Cowboys and Vergara’s love of the Washington Redskins. As Malone’s mother aged, Vergara cared for her.

And Vergara got to know Malone better than most. Malone had a reputation of not being very smart. But that wasn’t the real Malone, Vergara said.

“He is very smart,” Vergara said. “He was a shy person, but when he got to know you he opened up. And he knows the game. … He would have been a good coach.”

But that wasn’t the route Malone took. Instead, he spent retired life doing speaking engagements and playing in charity golf events. He was still under contract with Nike, which occasionally sent him on trips. He worked out, but he didn’t play basketball much anymore. Golf became his sport of choice.

On Sunday, he was scheduled to play in NBA referee Tony Brothers’ golf event to support single mothers. Malone had participated each of the past six or seven years.

Malone talked about operating his own charity golf event in Petersburg. Vergara says he might start one in Malone’s memory.

Whicker wrote about Malone as a highly sought prep star who ultimately disappointed all of college basketball by signing directly with the ABA Utah Stars. Within two years, he was tearing up the NBA, averaging 25.5 points and 14.1 rebounds through his first nine seasons in the league (1979-87), numbers that no player has matched in a single season since then.

Malone, elected to the Naismith Hall of Fame in 2001, wound up as one of four high school-to-NBA stars who won both NBA championships and Most Valuable Player awards (three in Malone’s case). The others: Kevin Garnett, Kobe Bryant and LeBron James. But in simpler media times, when word-of-mouth mattered, there was an undercurrent of excitement about Malone’s game and potential that stirred a frenzy among college coaches:

Malone somehow became as good as the college recruiters thought he was. New Mexico had a late-season game against Florida State, and assistant coach John Whisenant went from Tallahassee to Petersburg. And stayed. He was at the Howard Johnson motel until Malone signed in June, with Maryland.

Whisenant now works in commercial real estate in Albuquerque. Malone was his friend. After he signed, he drove to the hotel to tell Whisenant.

“I don’t know whose car it was,” Whisenant said Monday. “I know Moses didn’t have one. The whole thing was the most bizarre recruiting story you’ve ever seen.”

Whisenant would accompany Malone to high school all-star games, throughout the country, and then fly home with him. Malone would hang out at the motel before he went home. Together they watched Hank Aaron hit his 715th home run on TV. Sometimes Malone would bring his best friend Nathan, who was a manager on the high school team.

“They would sit there and sing,” Whisenant said. “Nathan was a great singer and Moses would do backup. They sang Motown songs. Sometimes I hear songs on the radio and think of those two.”

Malone and Nathan would take Whisenant to the Mouse Trap, the local nightclub, and Whisenant would sit there as the only white person in the place and think how far he’d come from Gore, Okla.

“I was trying to hold off the entire ACC,” Whisenant said. The Maryland people were everywhere. Lefty Driesell was an all-world recruiter. His obsessive assistant, Dave Pritchett, was known as Pit Stop. They would visit the hotel, too. That’s where Whisenant met an intense Detroit coach named Dick Vitale.

Sometimes Driesell would call Whisenant and imitate Malone, just for fun.

Driesell asked Malone who the toughest playground player in Petersburg was.

“Well,” Malone said, “there was The Milkman.”

Why did they call him The Milkman?

“Because he killed a milkman, man,” Malone replied.

The best part of that story is that it is possibly true.

Morning shootaround: Sept. 14

VIDEO: Remembering the great Moses Malone


Malone helped shape Olajuwon’s game, career | World Peace ready to return, but where? | A pressure shift in Miami from Bosh to Dragic | Moses the NBA’s most underappreciated great player

No. 1: Malone helped shape Olajuwon’s game, career — Moses Malone, who died Sunday at 60, was a pioneer, a teen phenom who would go on to become a three-time MVP, all-time NBA great and a Hall of Famer who ranks among the biggest and best players the game has seen. But who knew he served as a tutor and guide to another one of the NBA’s all-time greats, Hakeem Olajuwon, during the formative stages of The Dream’s Hall of Fame career? Our very own Fran Blinebury tells the story of Moses the mentor and the special bond between these two NBA titans:

It was 1982 and Malone had just won his second MVP award with the Rockets (he’d claim his third the next season). Olajuwon had just finished his first season at the University of Houston.

“Oh Lordy,” NBA veteran Robert Reid remembered years later. “The place got real quiet. It was on that play, at that minute, when a lot of us stood there and wondered, ‘What do we have here?’ ”

What a shrinking world had in this most unlikely union that brought together a made-in-America big man off the streets of Petersburg, Va., with a wide-eyed sponge from Lagos, Nigeria, was perhaps the greatest teacher-student class project in basketball history.

Malone, who died Sunday at 60, combined with Olajuwon to total 54,355 career points, 29,960 rebounds, 5,563 blocked shots, 24 All-Star appearances, four MVP awards, three Finals MVP trophies and two places in the Naismith Hall of Fame.

Theirs was a relationship born in the school of hard knocks and forged by the white-hot fire of mutual and insatiable competitive drive, out of range of the TV cameras, away from the prying eyes, where all that mattered was how much you had to give.

“I would never have accomplished what I did if I did not play against Moses at Fonde,” Olajuwon said before his own Hall of Fame induction in 2008. “I knew the rules. I knew the basics of the game and what you were supposed to do. But he is the one that taught me how to do it.

“With Moses there were no rests, no breaks. He was working every time down the court — scoring, rebounding or just making you feel his body. He would laugh when he slammed into you. If you tried to take a breath, he went by you or over you. There was no stop.”

They were opposite sides of the same coin. Where Malone would bump and grind and wear down an opponent with his sheer physical play and relentless pursuit of the ball, Olajuwon wore opponents out with an array or spins, fakes, double- and triple-pumps that were more varied and colorful than a painter’s palette.

“I usually couldn’t go through Moses, because he was just so strong,” Olajuwon said. “So I had to learn to use speed and agility to go around him. That’s how I built my game.”

*** (more…)

The NBA responds to the death of Moses Malone

HANG TIME BIG CITY — The NBA lost one of its greatest players this weekend, with news breaking that three-time Most Valuable Player and Hall of Famer Moses Malone had passed away at the age of 60. Around the NBA, current and former players as well as teams took to social media to mourn the devastating loss of Malone…

Rest in peace big mo. I'm truly lost for words.

A photo posted by Dwight Howard (@dwighthoward) on


Three-time MVP Moses Malone dead at 60

One of the inevitable sentiments that crop up each year at enshrinement weekend for the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame is, “Thank goodness they’re honoring these guys before it’s too late.” Then, during the event, the Hall features an “In Memoriam” segment dedicated to those HOFers who have passed away in the past year.

Both of those thoughts hit home Sunday, with the news that NBA legend Moses Malone had passed away at age 60. A three-time MVP and one of the NBA’s 50 Greatest players when that list was compiled in 1997, Malone was a slam-dunk Hall inductee in his first year of eligibility. Here’s some more info via on the storied career of a fellow famous for his exploits on the court and his inscrutable personality off it:

Malone, named one of the NBA’s 50 greatest players, was the Finals MVP as he led the Philadelphia 76ers to the 1983 championship.

The 6-foot-10 center, nicknamed the “Chairman of the Boards,” averaged a double-double while playing for eight teams over 20 NBA seasons and led the league in rebounding six times. The 12-time All-Star averaged 20.6 points per game and 12.2 rebounds over his career.

His 16,212 rebounds still rank fifth on the NBA’s all-time list, while his 27,409 career points rank eighth.

Malone was the first player to go pro right out of high school, signing with the Utah Stars of the American Basketball Association (ABA) in 1974. He played the following season for the Spirits of St. Louis before moving to the Buffalo Braves after the ABA-NBA merger in 1976.

He also played for the Houston Rockets, 76ers (twice), Washington Bullets, Atlanta Hawks and the San Antonio Spurs, with whom he finished his career during the 1994-95 season.

His No. 24 was retired by the Rockets, with whom he won the MVP in 1979 and 1982. He won his third MVP with the 76ers in 1983.


NBA Commissioner Adam Silver issued the following statement:

“We are stunned and deeply saddened by the passing of Hall of Famer Moses Malone, an NBA legend gone far too soon.  Known to his legions of fans as the ‘Chairman of the Boards,’ Moses competed with intensity every time he stepped on the court.  With three MVPs and an NBA championship, he was among the most dominant centers ever to play the game and one of the best players in the history of the NBA and the ABA.  Even more than his prodigious talent, we will miss his friendship, his generosity, his exuberant personality, and the extraordinary work ethic he brought to the game throughout his 21-year pro career.  Our thoughts are with Moses’ family and friends during this difficult time.”


The Philadelphia 76ers issued the following statement from Chief Executive Officer Scott O’Neil:

“It is with a deep sense of sadness that the Sixers family mourns the sudden loss of Moses Malone. It is difficult to express what his contributions to this organization — both as a friend and player — have meant to us, the city of Philadelphia and his faithful fans. Moses holds a special place in our hearts and will forever be remembered as a genuine icon and pillar of the most storied era in the history of Philadelphia 76ers basketball. No one person has ever conveyed more with so few words — including three of the most iconic in this city’s history. His generosity, towering personality and incomparable sense of humor will truly be missed. We will keep his family in our thoughts and prayers and as we are once again reminded of the preciousness of life.”


NBA TV Fan Night #BestDuos Tournament

bestduosimage staff reports

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — It sounds like a slam dunk — or better yet, a sky hook — in theory.

A superstar pairing of Hall of Famers Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Magic Johnson against … well, just about any other duo in NBA history. When you stack up their accomplishments (titles, MVPs, All-Star bids, etc.) it’s hard to imagine another pair of NBA superstars past or present, piling up more hardware than the Showtime Lakers dynamic duo.

Hall of Famer Charles Barkley and Kevin Johnson didn’t do it as long and didn’t do it nearly as big (no titles), but they had flashes that absolutely dazzled the basketball world. Barkley, who starred with Magic on the original Dream Team, ranks as one of the greatest talents the league has ever seen. And Johnson, the Mayor of Sacramento these days, spent 12 years shredding opposing teams as one of the league’s elite point guards.

NBA TV’s Fan Night #BestDuos Tournament is the only place where you get to vote on on this all-important issue.

You can cast your vote on Twitter using #BESTDUO1 for Magic and Kareem or #BESTDUO2 for Chuck and KJ.

Keep in mind that this is not a vote on who would win an actual 2-on-2 tournament but a vote on the historical impact of the best duo based on what they accomplished during their respective careers.

Tune into Fan Night on NBA TV every Tuesday for the results of the vote and updates on the current week’s matchup. LeBron James and Dwyane Wade won the Week 1 matchup over Julius “Dr. J” Erving and Moses Malone.

Here is the bracket …