Posts Tagged ‘Milwaukee Bucks’

Report: Kidd loses power play in Brooklyn, free to talk with Bucks

After being denied a promotion by the Nets, Jason Kidd was granted permission to talk to the Bucks.

After being denied a promotion by the Nets, Jason Kidd was granted permission to talk to the Bucks.

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Jason Kidd‘s run as coach in Brooklyn could soon be over after just one season, courtesy of his own ambition.

Kidd was denied a promotion with the Nets and, in the wake of that failed attempt to increase his power to include personnel decisions, was granted permission to discuss future employment with the Milwaukee Bucks, according to a report from Tim Bontemps of the New York Post.

The Bucks, of course, already have a coach in Larry Drew. So it’s unclear exactly which job Kidd is exploring in Milwaukee. Both Kidd and Drew just finished their first seasons, respectively, in their current positions.

Kidd’s reported power play puts him in a precarious position with the Nets, who have loads of other decisions to make, including what to do with Kevin Garnett and the final year of his contract, and might have to add a coaching search to their to-do-list.

If Kidd tried to undercut Nets GM Billy King and failed, he’s almost certainly out of a job in Brooklyn. For this news to break on the eve of free agency makes for an extremely bizarre process as the Nets try to reload for the 2014-15 season.

There’s an excellent chance they’ll do so without the services of Kidd, whose methods, per the Post, were nothing if not bold:

According to a league source, Kidd recently approached ownership with a series of demands, including the role of overseeing the Nets’ basketball operations department in addition to his head coaching responsibilities. The source said Kidd didn’t want general manager Billy King to be dismissed, but wanted to be given a title and placed above him in the organizational hierarchy.

Ownership declined to grant Kidd that kind of power, which is rare for any coach in the league to have. The source said ownership felt Kidd wasn’t ready for that kind of responsibility after having only one year of coaching experience — the team finished his first season on the bench with a 44-38 record, good for sixth in the Eastern Conference — and allowed Kidd to seek other opportunities.

The franchise then was approached by the Bucks to speak with Kidd about the prospect of hiring him, and have done so with the Nets’ permission.

Kidd has a small ownership stake in the Nets, so perhaps he felt he was well within his rights to ask for more power. But someone else within the organization clearly didn’t agree with his way of doing business.

Whatever role the Bucks have played or will play in this process can only be further complicated by them speaking to a coach of an Eastern Conference rival while they already have a coach under contract.

Whatever happens in Milwaukee, it’s clear Kidd’s days are numbered in Brooklyn.

Morning Shootaround — June 27


VIDEO: Relive some of the best moments from the 2014 NBA Draft

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Report: Rose would welcome ‘Melo | Jackson says chemistry issues sparked trade | Wiggins, Parker forever linked | Bucks happy to have their rookie | Sixers will require more patience

No. 1: Report: Rose would welcome Anthony in Chicago — Former MVP Derrick Rose of the Chicago Bulls is hoping to be back at 100 percent for the start of the 2014-15 season. He’s also hoping to lift Chicago back to its elite status with Joakim Noah, Taj Gibson, Jimmy Butler and the rest of his Bulls teammates by his side. Would he welcome Carmelo Anthony into that core? According to K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune, the answer is a decided “yes”:

In December 2011, shortly after the lockout ended, Derrick Rose uttered a character-defining statement.

“I’m rolling with Keith,” said Rose, the league’s reigning most valuable player.

Keith was Keith Bogans, the oft-maligned, then-starting shooting guard whom management waived later that month.

This is how Rose views teammates, which is instructional at a time when free agent recruiting has been spotlighted. He’ll never publicly recruit players because he won’t disparage current teammates.

But this stance doesn’t mean Rose wouldn’t love adding high-profile talent. In fact, sources close to Rose said Carmelo Anthony’s camp is aware that Rose would welcome the addition of the elite scorer.

The same sources said a recent report that Rose preferred Kevin Love over Anthony is “fiction.” Rose is in support of any improvements.

(more…)

NBA Draft 2014 Live Blog

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK — It’s that night again, when all the players come, from far and wide, rocking their best suits and shoes, ready for a busy night. Which is no understatement: Tonight could be one of the wildest draft nights in recent memory. As I sit here a few feet from the stage, about half an hour before the picks start coming in, there’s still no real consensus on who will be the first overall pick. Jabari Parker out of Duke? Andrew Wiggins from Kansas? Where will Dante Exum and Joel Embiid get selected? And once some of these names are picked, how does it affect everyone else in the draft? And we haven’t even mentioned the (very real) possibility of trades, with teams picking up picks or moving up and down the draft.

Whatever happens, your intrepid correspondent is here, ready to chronicle the entire night. Here’s the view from my seat…

You guys ready? Let’s go!

The Player’s Ball

Fashion choices will be important to keep on eye on. #NBASTYLE, you guys.

Also, the Michigan State crew is going heavy on the plaid, it seems…

A Tradition Unlike Any Other

7:19 PM

We still have a few minutes before e get started, but the crowd here in Barclays is rowdy and ready to go. Already had one rather loud “LET’S GO SIXERS!” chant break out — apparently a lot of Philly fans made the short trip up for the draft. Let’s see how they feel about whomever the Sixers end up taking third overall. Loudest boos so far were for a fan shown on the scoreboard wearing a Miami Heat jersey.

Also, looks like fans in Orlando have turned out in force for their viewing party…

In Milwaukee they’re waiting to make their selection…

Meanwhile, things are a little less compelling in Atlanta…

7:33 PM

And away we go! Comissioner Adam Silver gets a few boos, as is customary, but for the most part gets cheered…until he congratulates the San Antonio Spurs. And the Cavs are officially on the clock…

Meanwhile, Steven Adams and Chris Bosh are remembering their times at the draft…

Minutes before the pick is made, word from Cleveland is the pick will be Andrew Wiggins…

1. Andrew Wiggins — Cleveland Cavaliers

Twitter doesn’t lie. With the first pick, Cleveland takes Wiggins. Not much of a surprise, and leaves Parker for Milwaukee. Wiggins should be able to help immediately with defense and athleticism. (To read about how exactly the Cavs got the first pick, their third in four years, go here.) Shoutout to Canada, producing consecutive number one picks…

And a pretty cool look at the actual draft card…

2. Jabari Parker — Milwaukee Bucks

Seemed like everyone knew if Parker was available, he would be Milwaukee’s guy here. And whaddya know, he was…

He’s already being welcomed by the local community…

And while we wait for the third pick, it seems a trade may be in the works… (more…)

Morning Shootaround — June 26


VIDEO: Jabari Parker is the No. 1 pick in NBA TV’s 2014 Mock Draft

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Report: Wade, James Bosh discuss future | Durant backs James’ opt-out call | Van Gundy ready for all Monroe offseason scenarios | Bucks’ Antetokounmpo grows two inches

No. 1: Report: Heat’s ‘Big Three’ get together to talk future — Let the worrying about the Miami Heat’s future begin … if it hadn’t already. LeBron James opted out of his contract on Tuesday and his fellow Heat All-Star teammates, Chris Bosh and Dwyane Wade, may do so soon, too. So what happens next for the “Big Three” in Miami? The first thing was a meeting over dinner to presumably discuss what the future may look like in Heat-ville. Brian Windhorst of ESPN.com has more:

Much like they did before signing with the Miami Heat in 2010, LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh got together for a meeting to discuss their futures on Wednesday, sources told ESPN.com.

James opted out of the final two years and $42 million of his contract with the Heat on Tuesday. Wade and Bosh have until midnight on Monday to decide if they will follow suit.

The meeting included a meal at a South Beach eatery, the Miami Herald reported.

Additionally, Miami-based Associated Press reporter Tim Reynolds had the following to add on the meeting via Twitter:

(more…)

Morning Shootaround — June 7


VIDEO: Popovich discusses Finals opener, looks toward Game 2

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Spurs look to get sharper for Game 2 | LeBron knows he’s an easy target | AT&T Center air is working | Utah Jazz hire Quin Snyder | Kings to give Rudy Gay full-court press

No. 1: Spurs look to get sharper for Game 2 — Even though the Spurs ended up winning Game 1 of The Finals by a whopping 15 points, 110-95, there were several facets of their game that could be tightened up in Game 2. And don’t you just know that Spurs coach Gregg Popovich is going to be all over the little things?

Right at the top of the list were 23 turnovers, an amount that almost always spells doom against the Heat. Indeed, Thursday’s game marked just the fifth time in 52 games they’ve lost when forcing at least that many since signing LeBron James and Chris Bosh before the start of the 2011-12 season.

“For us, that’s always a bad sign,” said Popovich, even though his team is 12-6 this season when committing 18 or more miscues. “We escaped last night by shooting the ball the way we did, I guess. So if that continues, we’re going to have a big problem.”

Every bit as galling were the wide-open 3-pointers conceded by a defense that allowed the fewest makes from long range in the NBA this season. The Heat still made 12-for-29 beyond the arc, but it could have been far worse had they capitalized on more looks.

In particular, Ray Allen missed three open 3s in the span of two possessions. They were among nearly 30 Miami jumpers classified as open by NBA.com’s player tracking data, the type of breakdowns that gave Popovich the sweats even beyond the sweltering temperature at the AT&T Center.

“I thought they missed some wide, wide open shots that they had, that scare you to death once you watch the film,” Popovich said. “That’s not just blowing smoke or an exaggeration.  There were about seven or eight wide-open threes they had that just didn’t go down.”

The Heat helped mitigate those mistakes by suffering similar breakdowns. In addition to committing 18 turnovers of their own — leading to 27 points for the Spurs, one more than Miami scored on their miscues — they pitched almost no resistance at the 3-point line as the Spurs made 13 of 25 from long range.

***

No. 2: LeBron knows he’s an easy target — LeBron James was carried off the court with cramps toward the end of Game 1, and despite suffering from an injury where he couldn’t really move, LeBron was still on the business end of a lot of jokes. In an interview with ESPN’s Michael Wilbon, LeBron said he understands that the criticism goes with the territory.

“For me, all I can control is what I control,” James told Wilbon. “For me, as one of the leaders of our team, one of the biggest competitors of our team, and knowing what it takes to win, for me, I’ll maintain my focus and get ready for Game 2. (There’s) anger in the sense that I wasn’t able to be out there for my teammates to possibly help them win Game 1 of the Finals. But what I can control is what I do to prepare myself mentally going to the next game.”

Heading into the 2011-12 season, James made it a point to start attempting to enjoy his life more, and to do that he stopped consuming as much media. After seeking the advice of Hall of Famers Isiah Thomas and Jerry West, James said that he started to focus on enjoying the process and the journey instead of focusing solely on the end result.

In the three seasons since, James said he has gotten more comfortable and become more immune to attacks.

“I can’t play the game of basketball and live my life on what other people expect me to do or what they think I should do, that doesn’t make me happy,” James said. “What makes me happy is being able to make plays for my teammates, to be able to represent the name on the back of my jersey. That’s what makes me happy. What everybody else thinks? That doesn’t really matter to me.”

***

No. 3: AT&T Center air is working — Big news for everyone playing in Game 2, not to mention all the fans and media who will be in attendance: The Spurs say the air conditioning inside the AT&T Center has been fixed and is working! Probably a good idea to go ahead and hydrate, though, just in case.

The Spurs issued a statement during Thursday’s humid, cramp-inducing game that pinned the blame on an electrical problem. Friday morning the Spurs announced the problem — whatever it was — had been fixed.

“The electrical failure that caused the AC system outage during Game 1 of the NBA Finals has been repaired,” Spurs spokesman Carlos Manzanillo said in a written statement released Friday morning

“The AC system has been tested, is fully operational and will continue to be monitored,” Manzanillo continued.

“The upcoming events at the AT&T Center, including the Romeo Santos concert tonight, the Stars game on Saturday night and Game 2 of the NBA Finals on Sunday, will go on as scheduled. We apologize for the conditions in the arena during last night’s game.”

***

No. 4: Utah Jazz hire Quin Snyder — As the Jazz continue their rebuilding campaign, they’ve hired a coach working to rebuild his own reputation. Quin Snyder was once the fast track to a career as a college coach, but when that didn’t work out he ended up bouncing around professional basketball and working his way up. Now he will be the eighth head coach in Jazz franchise history.

One ‘n’ in his first name. Two majors and advanced degrees from Duke University. Three Final Four appearances as a point guard with the Blue Devils. Four previous jobs in the NBA, including with the Clippers, Sixers, Lakers and Hawks.

Five on the list of Jazz coaches since the franchise moved to Utah in 1979, following in the footsteps of Tyrone Corbin, Jerry Sloan, Frank Layden and Tom Nissalke.

Six gigs in the past five years, including this new one and stops in Atlanta, Moscow, Los Angeles, Philadelphia and Austin, Texas.

And the list of accolades, accomplishments, trivial tidbits, flowing hair references and, yes, questions about his past go on for this former Missouri coach, who will be formally introduced to Utah in a Saturday morning press conference.

“The opportunity to join the Utah Jazz and to be part of such a highly respected franchise with an incredibly bright future is a great honor,” Snyder said via a statement released by Jazz PR. “I approach this opportunity with gratitude and humility and am committed to doing everything I can to help the Jazz become a championship-caliber team.”

If that last phrase sounds familiar, it might be because Snyder had a working relationship with Jazz general manager Dennis Lindsey from 2007-10 when they both worked for the San Antonio organization. “Championship-caliber team” is a phrase Lindsey has repeated often since he was hired as the Jazz general manager since leaving his assistant GM position with the Spurs two years ago.

After deciding to not renew Corbin’s contract following the 25-57 rebuilding season of 2013-14, Lindsey and Jazz ownership believe Snyder is the guy who can best help get this franchise back to that level. Not only is he well known for being a bright basketball mind, but he’s also been credited for developing talent and being a motivating leader.

***

No. 5: Kings to give Gay full-court press — Sacramento forward Rudy Gay has a few weeks to decide whether he’ll use an opt-out clause that could make him an unrestricted free agent. On the one hand, if he hits free agency he could sign a long-term deal. On the other hand, if he doesn’t opt-out, he will make a reported $19 million next season. Seems like an easy choice, but the Kings intend to make sure Gay stays a King by putting together a high-tech presentation that will include virtual reality glasses.

Hall of Famers Chris Mullin and Mitch Richmond, a former Kings star, are expected to join Kings owner Vivek Ranadive, general manager Pete D’Alessandro and head coach Michael Malone when they meet with Gay.

Gay was originally expected to have the meeting in his offseason home of Memphis, but preferred to have it in Sacramento.

When asked recently about his decision process, Gay told Yahoo Sports: “I’m just taking my time. That’s all.”

If Gay opts into his contract for next season, it could pave the way for future extension talks. During the meetings, the Kings also will have Gay wear a headset with eyewear that will give him a complete virtual digital tour of the inside of the new Kings arena, including the locker room and arena floor. The new Kings arena is expected to open in September 2016.

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Donald Sterling still hasn’t signed the papers to complete the sale of the Clippers … Scott Brooks will be back next season in OKC … Before hiring himself as head coach, Flip Sanders tried to hire Jeff Van Gundy in Minnesota … This guy tracks every tattoo in the NBA … 76ers are looking into building a waterfront practice facility in New Jersey … Jabari Parker might be a nice fit in MilwaukeeAlvin Gentry is still in the mix for the Cavs’ coaching gig … But Derek Fisher is not in the mix in Los Angeles

Morning Shootaround — May 14



VIDEO: Daily Zap for games played May 13

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Late mistakes irk Paul in Game 5 loss | Report: LeBron may sit out next season if Sterlings still with Clips | Report: Stockton among Jazz’s list of coaching candidates | Report: Bucks’ sale to be official Thursday

No. 1: Late miscues irk Paul more than controversial call — If you somehow missed Game 5 of the Clippers-Thunder series, do yourself a favor and go watch the recap (we’ll wait). OKC climbed out of a seemingly insurmountable late hole to stun L.A. 105-104 with a controversial call down the stretch serving as this morning’s main NBA talking point. What that call might overshadow, though, are some uncharacteristic miscues from Chris Paul down the stretch that might have enabled OKC to get the win. Our Jeff Caplan was on hand at last night’s game and has more on that:

Game 5 will be remembered for the call, the officials’ curious explanation following the replay review and Los Angeles Clippers coach Doc Rivers‘ scorching rant of the entire surreal sequence. It will all be replayed and dissected on a continuous loop.For Chris Paul, the call that didn’t go the Clippers’ way with 11.3 seconds left to another unfathomable finish in this heart-stopping Western Conference semifinal series, isn’t what will eat at him for hours on end; isn’t wasn’t what left him in a near-catatonic state in the postgame interview room.

Despite early foul trouble in a game in which the whistles blew early and often, Paul engineered a spectacular game for 47 minutes before he so unexpectedly came unglued in the final 49 seconds. Two turnovers, about what he’s averaged in each game in these playoffs, and inexplicably making contact with Russell Westbrook‘s shooting arm from behind the arc with 6.4 seconds left played a leading role in the Clippers’ collapse, a seven-point lead, and a series lead, dashed in 49.2 seconds.

With 6.4 seconds showing on the clock, Westbrook, dynamite throughout the game with 38 points and six assists, and the only reason OKC had a chance at all, made all three free throws to put OKC ahead 105-104.

After a timeout to move the ball into the frontcourt, Barnes inbounded to Paul, guarded by Thabo Sefolosha. A screen set Paul free around the right side as he darted toward the lane with designs of feeding a rolling Blake Griffin. But the Thunder’s Jackson dropped off Crawford, got a hand close enough to the ball to avoid a foul while disrupting Paul’s dribble. Paul lost it in the lane and time expired.

Stunned and angry, the Clippers were beside themselves as the buzzer punctuated the finality of an incredible Game 5 that moved the Thunder win from a third West finals appearances in four seasons.

“We lost and it’s on me,” Paul said. “We had a chance to win and the last play, we didn’t get a shot off and that’s just dumb. I’m supposed to be the leader of the team.

“It’s just bad, real bad.”

(more…)

Morning Shootaround — April 22



VIDEO: Daily Zap for games played April 21

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Pacers have changes in mind for Game 2 | Nowitzki backs Calderon as Mavs’ starter | Report: New arena remains key for Bucks’ future | Thibodeau unhappy with Bulls’ defense | Jefferson vows to play in Game 2

No. 1: Pacers planning on some changes in Game 2 — Simply put, the Indiana Pacers were shellshocked after the Atlanta Hawks marched into Bankers Life Fieldhouse and beat the home team from start to finish. With that defeat on their minds, the Pacers are examining each and every thing they did in Game 1 and are open to making some pretty big changes on things from who guards the star of Game 1 (Atlanta’s Jeff Teague) to what kind of defense they’ll play as a team and more. Mark Montieth of Pacers.com has more:

Coach Frank Vogel was coy when pressed on the issue following Monday’s practice at Bankers Life Fieldhouse, not wishing to become the first coach in NBA history to reveal strategy to the opponent a day before a playoff game. But, winds of change were wafting through the building. Practice ran longer than was originally advertised to the media, and all doors were closed. Afterward, Lance Stephenson created a breeze when asked if strategic changes were forthcoming.

“Of course we’re going to make changes,” he said. “We’re not allowed to talk about the changes we made, (the Hawks) will figure it out when we play.”

Earlier, Vogel had only hinted at the possibility.

“I prefer not to make major changes,” he said.

Are you willing?

“Of course.”

Do you think you will?

“We’ll see.”

Any changes are most likely to come on defense. Offensively, Vogel simply wants his team to move the ball more quickly and more often, and for Roy Hibbert to establish better post position near the basket and for his teammates to toss the ball to him when he does. But given the way Hawks point guard Jeff Teague punctured the Pacers’ defense on Saturday, some sort of adjustment seems in order.

The players talked Monday about doing a better job of helping one another, filling gaps and all that, but would they go to the extreme of rolling out a zone defense for the first time this season? Vogel said during last season’s playoff series with Miami that he would implement it this season. He hasn’t, largely because the team’s trip to Taiwan and the Philippines for two preseason games sliced too large a chunk out of his practice time.

The bottom line is, something will be to be done to prevent Teague from running a layup line. He had nine of them on Saturday on his way to 28 points. A zone defense would be one way to do it.

“I wish we had used it more, because then I’d be more comfortable using it now,” Vogel said. “That is something we’re talking pretty lengthily about.”

At the very least, it’s likely that Paul George will defend Teague at some point. George isn’t as quick as Teague, but he is seven inches taller and the Pacers’ best perimeter defender.

George has said he wants to do it. But he wasn’t going to say he would do it.

“If the opportunity calls for it, I’ll enjoy the match-up,” he said, smiling.

“For all I know,” he added, “Hibbert’s guarding him.”


VIDEO: Frank Vogel talks about possible changes for the Pacers in Game 2

***

No. 2: Nowitzki backs Calderon as Mavs’ starting point guardMost NBA followers know that Dallas Mavericks point guard Jose Calderon is one of the best playmakers in the league … and also one of its worst defenders at the point as well. In Game 1, though, Calderon struggled a bit, amassing seven points and two assists in 16 minutes. His primary understudy, Devin Harris, had a much better game, going for 19 points and five assists in 32 minutes. So, is there a point guard quandary in Big D. ESPNDallas.com’s Tim McMahon reports that to star Dirk Nowitzki, there’s no question who the starter is for Game 2:

Coach Rick Carlisle refused to discuss whether he’d consider starting Devin Harris instead of Jose Calderon in Game 2, using his stock line about revealing his lineup 16 minutes before tip.

However, Dirk Nowitzki readily declared about 53 hours before Wednesday’s tip in San Antonio that no change in the Mavericks’ starting lineup was forthcoming.

“We’re rolling the way we’re set up,” Nowitzki said. “Jose has been our starter the whole year. We’ve got to start the game off a little better. I think we were a little slow and we were down eight or 10 pretty quick there in the first quarter, so we’ve got to be a little better there, but Jose is our starter. He’s the guy that puts us in our plays and we’re rolling with it.”

The Mavs’ normal starting lineup has been badly overmatched against the Spurs, having been outscored by 40 points in 33 minutes in the Dallas-San Antonio meetings this season, including Game 1. The Mavs have had a 24-point advantage in the 79 minutes that Harris has played against the Spurs, but that’s also evidence of the success the Dallas bench has had against San Antonio’s second unit, a strength that Carlisle might not want to mess with.

“We’re going to approach it the way we approach it, doing it the way we feel is best,” Carlisle said. “If we get to the point where I feel major lineup changes are in order, we’ll do it, but I’m not going to talk about it two days before the game.”


VIDEO: Dirk Nowitzki talks after Dallas has practice Monday in San Antonio

***

No. 3: Report: New arena critical to Bucks dealLast week, Milwaukee Bucks fans got some happy news about the future of their team as longtime owner Herb Kohl announced he was selling the team to the duo of Wesley Edens and Mark Lasry for a reported $550 million. While that ownership group is committed to keeping the team in Milwaukee, they could lose the ownership rights on their team if they cannot get a new arena built for the Bucks by 2017. Marc Stein and Brian Windhorst of ESPN.com have more: :

The NBA has the right to buy back the Milwaukee Bucks from incoming owners Wesley Edens and Mark Lasry if a deal to a bring a new arena to the city is not in place by November 2017, according to sources briefed on the situation.

Sources told ESPN.com that the sale agreement announced last week to transfer the Bucks from longtime owner Herb Kohl to Edens and Lasry for a purchase price of $550 million includes a provision that allows the league to buy back the team for $575 million if construction on a new building in Milwaukee is not underway by the deadline.

Although one source said Monday that the league would likely only take that step if it didn’t see “significant progress” toward a new arena in Milwaukee by then, this provision ensures that the NBA would control the fate of the franchise from that point as opposed to Edens and Lasry.

Edens and Lasry agreed last week to pay a league-record $550 million to Kohl for the Bucks and promised to contribute an additional $100 million toward a new arena. Kohl also pledged to gift $100 million toward construction of a new facility, but more financing will be needed to get the project going, with city officials in Milwaukee estimating that a new arena would cost in excess of $400 million.

The inclusion of this clause in the sale agreement, furthermore, is an unspoken admission that neither the league nor the new owners are convinced that construction on a modern building in Milwaukee will be underway in the space of three-plus years.

Two local task forces have been assembled to study the issue, but there has already been pushback to potential public financing by politicians and community groups. The Bucks’ lease with the antiquated Bradley Center runs through the 2016-17 season, which establishes the fall of 2017 as a natural deadline to find a solution.

***

No. 4: Thibodeau calls out Bulls’ defense In Game 1 of the Bulls-Wizards series, Chicago allowed Washington to roll up 102 points as the Wizards’ big man combo of Marcin Gortat and Nene pounded away and picked apart the Bulls’ vaunted defense. That kind of performance left a bitter taste in coach Tom Thibodeau‘s mouth and he didn’t mince words during Monday’s practice about how displeased he was with Chicago’s defense, particularly the play of point guard D.J. Augustin. Joe Cowley of the Chicago Sun-Times has more on what the Bulls plan to do differently in Game 2:

‘To put it on one guy, that’s not how we do it here,’’ Thibodeau said.

But that didn’t prevent the Wizards from finding that perceived weak link in the chain and attacking it, especially in their fourth-quarter comeback. Unfortunately for guard D.J. Augustin, he was the guy the Wizards went after in crunch time.

“Not only D.J., our defense,’’ Thibodeau said when asked if he thought Augustin had to improve on the defensive end. ‘‘I could go from start to finish. There’s an endless list of things that we didn’t do correctly. We’re capable of doing much better. And we’re going to have to.

“They’re a good team. In the playoffs, you have to play for 48 minutes and be disciplined. You have to stick to it. Some plays, they made tough plays. Give them credit. Others, we made mistakes. And we have to correct those mistakes.’’

According to one source, though, Thibodeau was concerned about Augustin’s defensive shortcomings being exposed, especially in the playoffs, when opposing coaches smell blood and attack. Sure enough, the Wizards’ guards seemed to go right after him down the stretch, whether it was John Wall, Bradley Beal or even 38-year-old Andre Miller, who scored eight of his 10 points in the fourth quarter.

Thibodeau was asked if the defensive breakdowns were more related to bad positioning or poor communication.

“It was a compilation of all those things,’’ he said. ‘‘To me, if one guy is not doing their job, it’s going to make everyone look bad. We have to be tied together. We have to have the proper amount of intensity and concentration. And we have to finish our defense. That’s one thing that we could do a lot better.”

While there will be tinkering, it didn’t sound as though Thibodeau was going to change his rotation. That means Augustin and the other players on the court at the end of games will have to find a way to deal with the Wizards’ backcourt and to slow down forward Nene, who burned the Bulls for 24 points.

***

No. 5: Jefferson: ‘I’m suiting up’ for Game 2 — Bobcats center Al Jefferson can count on one hand the number of times he’s been in the playoffs. As the big man is in the midst of just his third career playoff appearance, there’s little doubt he’s going to let anything prevent him from playing. That statement apparently applies to his bout of plantar fascia in both feet that flared up early in Charlotte’s Game 1 loss to the Miami Heat. But as Rick Bonnell of the Charlotte Observer reports, Jefferson is determined to play in Game 2 … and beyond:

Jefferson was in surprisingly good spirits Monday after missing practice, undergoing a magnetic resonance imaging and several hours of treatment. He said there’s no way the injury he suffered Sunday in Game 1 of this playoff series is a season-ender.

“I’m suiting up,” Jefferson said. “It’ll take more than that to make me sit down.”

The issue for Jefferson is not so much his availability, but rather his effectiveness. He will again miss practice Tuesday and his left foot is encased in a protective walking boot.

The pain he experienced in the first quarter Sunday, after he felt a “pop” in his left foot, was excruciating – he compared it to the sudden attack of appendicitis he suffered several years ago, resulting in emergency surgery.

“Like somebody shot me. A terrible feeling. I knew something was wrong,” Jefferson recalled.

Despite that, Bobcats medical staff told him and coach Steve Clifford that Jefferson is taking no special risk by playing. He was told not to anticipate needing surgery in the off-season; that this is about pain-management now and rest in the off-season.

The plantar fascia is a thick band of fibrous material that runs along the bottom of a foot, connecting the heel bone to the toes.

There doesn’t seem to be a significant risk in Jefferson playing with this injury, so long as he can handle the pain, according to Dallas-based sports orthopedist Dr. Richard Rhodes.

“If you can fight through, and they can manage the pain (with medication), you can go on it and then heal in the off-season,” said Rhodes, describing the plantar fascia as helping the foot hold its natural arch.

The issue going forward is how Jefferson can perform in the short-run. Clifford said the injury seemed to harm Jefferson’s performance more on offense than defense. In particular, Clifford noted, Jefferson struggled to pivot off his left foot, which is key to his low-post scoring moves.

Jefferson agrees with Clifford that he spent much of the second half pulling up for jump shots or floaters, rather than completing a move to the rim. He said that was more out of initial fear after the injury than the physical inability to recreate his moves.

“I stopped short. I was afraid to continue,” Jefferson described. “It was more in my head than anything, that I was afraid to do things I normally do.”

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Could the Hawks be gearing up for a rare No. 8-over-No. 1-seed upset?Tony Allen is doing what he normally does — frustrate Kevin Durant in the playoffs … The Clippers’ Game 2 rout of the Warriors got them back on track in several different ways … With a heavy dose of his trademark intensity, Joakim Noah took home the Kia Defensive Player of the Year award last night … These five names may be on the Utah Jazz’s short list for its new coach …

ICYMI OF THE NIGHT: Yes, the Grizzlies won Game 2 in OKC last night. But there’s no denying that Kevin Durant was doing all he could to get the win last night, as evidenced by this wild and-one 3-pointer he nailed late in regulation …


VIDEO: Kevin Durant hits the ridiculous and-one 3-pointer

Kohl manages to save the Bucks … again


VIDEO: Lasry and Edens visit pro shop

By Jon Hartzell, NBA.com

Herb Kohl’s pending sale of the Milwaukee Bucks to hedge-fund billionaires Marc Lasry and Wes Edens for approximately $550 million, plus a $100 million gift from Kohl and $100 million commitment from Lasry and Edens to build a new arena, firmly cements the Bucks’ future in Milwaukee.

“My priority has always been and will continue to be keeping the Bucks in Milwaukee,” said Kohl during an afternoon press conference on Wednesday. “This announcement reinforces that Milwaukee is and will continue to be the home of the Bucks. Wes and Marc agree, and they share my commitment to the long-term success of this franchise in Milwaukee.”

This isn’t the first time Kohl has stepped up to keep the Bucks in Milwaukee.

During the heyday of the franchise – when they won 50 or more games each season from 1980-87 – Bucks’ principle owner Jim Fitzgerald was forced to put the franchise up for sale in 1985 after a failed business venture (a premium TV service called SportsVue started with then Milwaukee Brewers owner Bud Selig). Fitzgerald quickly received offers from Minneapolis, Toronto, Miami and Santa Ana to buy the Bucks away from Milwaukee. Despite his preference to keep the team in Wisconsin, seemingly no local investors were willing to throw money at a franchise which was reportedly incapable of making a revenue in the incredibly small MECCA Arena which only sat 11,052 people.

“Herb was the only individual who pursued this diligently,” Fitzgerald said in 1985. “Milwaukee is very fortunate to have Herb Kohl.”

Kohl purchased the franchise for approximately $18 million (the highest price for an NBA franchise pre-expansion) on March 1, 1985. Even then, he knew the importance of the Bucks to Milwaukee.

“Had it not been for Herb Kohl, it would be inevitable that it would not be the Milwaukee Bucks today,” former NBA commissioner David Stern said during an interview in 1987. “He stepped in and did it not because it projected out to be such a great investment but because that was the price to keep the team in Milwaukee.”

The arena situation in 1985 was quickly settled when Lloyd and Jane Pettit privately financed the entire construction costs of the Bradley Center. It doesn’t seem likely the Bucks will be so fortunate this time around, but the $200 million commitment from Lasry, Edens and Kohl will surely help initiate the arena discussion.

The Bucks have struggled under Kohl. But his commitment to the franchise, City of Milwaukee and state of Wisconsin has not wavered. Which is why, after yesterday’s announcement, this quote from prominent Milwaukee real estate developer Marvin Fishman in 1985 still holds true:

“This purchase now by Herbie Kohl ensures that this team will never leave Milwaukee.”

Report: Bucks to announce sale of team

From NBA.com staff reports

The Milwaukee Bucks face an uncertain future — as detailed here by our own Jon Hartzell — as current owner Herb Kohl seeks a new owner who will help keep the team in town and secure a new arena to replace the dilapidated BMO Harris Bradley Center.

A new arena for the Bucks remains up in the air, but it looks like a new owner may be on board. ESPN.com’s Marc Stein first reported today that Kohl has reached an agreement to sell the team to a pair of investors:

The Milwaukee Bucks will announce later Wednesday that longtime owner Herb Kohl has reached an agreement to sell the team to Wesley Edens and Mark Lasry for a purchase price of $550 million, according to sources familiar with the transaction.

Sources told ESPN.com that the deal, subject to league approval, will be confirmed in an afternoon news conference.

The Bucks have a news conference scheduled for 3:30 p.m. ET today, presumably to announce this transaction.

Bucks face uphill battle for new arena


VIDEO: Adam Silver on Milwaukee’s arena situation

By Jon Hartzell, NBA.com

MILWAUKEE — The Milwaukee Bucks need a new arena, and they need it soon. New NBA commissioner Adam Silver has said so. The Bucks’ owner has said it. Everyone across the league acknowledges the need to replace what has become maybe the NBA’s most dismal arena.

How the Bucks plan to pay for one is a different story, and one which recently intensified as reports indicated owner Herb Kohl may be close to selling the team, with an announcement possible at the NBA Board of Governors meetings later this week in New York.

The 79-year-old Kohl has stated his willingness to sell, but he also has said he’s dedicated to finding an owner who will keep the team in Milwaukee. A new downtown arena is the quickest way to secure the franchise’s future in Milwaukee.

“In order to keep the Bucks, we have to have a facility,” Kohl said during Bucks media day in October. “And in order to get a facility, we have to keep the Bucks. So it’s like a two-fer: We’re either going to get both in the years ahead or we’re going to have neither.”

Kohl has stated he is willing to contribute a significant personal financial investment to replace the current BMO Harris Bradley Center. The “Fortress on Fourth” was a privately funded gift built in 1988 with funds donated by philanthropists Jane Bradley Pettit and her husband, Lloyd Pettit. In addition to housing the Bucks, it is home to the Marquette University men’s basketball team and the Milwaukee Admirals of the American Hockey League.

But it has gradually fallen into disrepair, with a leaking atrium and a refrigerant system that’s no longer permitted in the United States. The Bradley Center struggles to generate the revenue needed to make fixes due to a lack of suite space and no year-round, on-site restaurant.

Kohl might be willing to fund an arena by himself if he could afford it. But with a reported net worth around $264 million, according to the Center for Responsive Politics, Kohl may not have the desire or the means. Especially after he contributed $25 million to the Wisconsin Badgers’ arena in Madison, now named the Kohl Center, in 1998.


VIDEO: Kohl on Potential Investors

A pricey proposition for Kohl, Milwaukee

This is where a sale of the team could solve the Bucks’ problem. Recent reports from Grantland’s editor-in-chief Bill Simmons suggest the sale price for the franchise will be upward of $550 million, far greater than the $405 million that Forbes valued the team at in January. (Kohl paid an estimated $18 million for the franchise in 1985.)

Some speculate that given an arena price tag like that, Kohl might be willing to make a big investment in a new building after the team is sold. Others suggest that the sale of the franchise will depend largely on a commitment from the new ownership group to make a major contribution to an arena. These two sources could get the Bucks close to the $500 million necessary to construct an arena (the Sacramento Kings’ new arena is projected to cost $448 million), though Kohl has said he believes funding should come from a combination of public and private funds.

It may be difficult to raise enough private funds. But one of the groups reportedly interested in the Bucks, New York-based hedge-fund billionaires Marc Lasry and Wes Edens, have an estimated combined net worth around $3 billion, according to Forbes. They reportedly were close to closing a sale on the Bucks less than a week ago for $550 million, but a “late flurry of offers” drove the price up and re-opened negotiations, according to Simmons. Grantland also reported that Kohl refused to sell to a Seattle ownership group led by Chris Hansen and former Microsoft CEO Steve Balmer (who is worth approximately $20.1 billion, according to Forbes).

The other names to emerge as possible investors are nowhere near as wealthy as Lasry and Edens. But they all have at least some connection to Milwaukee, or the Midwest, which would ease the fear that a new ownership group would attempt to relocate the team. The most likely of these local investors are Chicago-based businessman Richard Chaifetz, who donated $12 million to build an arena at his alma-mater (Saint Louis University), former Bucks player (and one of Wendy’s largest franchisees), Junior Bridgeman, Wisconsin-based consultant Jon Hammes and current Milwaukee Brewers owner Mark Attanasio, who previously stated he would be interested in investing in a new arena. It seems likely Kohl would remain involved with the team in some capacity if he decides to sell to a local ownership group, and he could even remain the majority owner.

While a local ownership group sounds like a smart way to keep the team in Milwaukee, most believe that to go that route with the potential investors whose names have surfaced, significant public funding for a new arena would be needed. And local governments do not seem too keen on that idea.


VIDEO: Kohl on Arena (2012)

Tax-for-arena argument won’t help cause

Southeastern Wisconsin residents continue to have a sour taste in their mouth over the five-county, 0.1 percent sales tax enacted in 1996 to fund the development of the Brewers’ Miller Park, which opened in 2001. The tax initially was to expire in 2012. But it was delayed to 2014 and now 2020 as tax revenues in the region have declined.

The battle over that tax was fierce in 1995. It passed by just one vote, cast by Racine County State Senator George Petak, who was quickly recalled nine months later because of the vote. Racine County already passed a resolution in July stating it would not support a tax for a new arena, and the other three local counties have made similar statements. Some have suggested extending the Miller Park tax to cover the new arena, but that seems unlikely at this point.

Local apathy is a huge hurdle in getting public money for a new arena. The perception around town is that a new arena would be only for the Bucks, rather than for the community. And the Bucks, the third-winningest team in the NBA during the 25 years prior to Kohl, have not gained many fans during the Kohl era. They’ve advanced past the first round of the playoffs just once since 1989 and are in the midst of their worst season ever.

All public funding hope is not lost, however. The private contributions from Kohl, Attanasio and a new ownership group would at least lessen the burden placed on the public to fund the arena. So the tax would not need to be as large as it was for Miller Park, which received $290 million in public funds in 1996 (equivalent to roughly $437 million in 2014). There are also emerging ideas about a “cultural tax” which would not only fund a new arena, but also parks, museums and the Milwaukee County Zoo. The concept was successfully used in Oklahoma City to fund the construction of the Thunders’ Chesapeake Energy Arena.

New public funding ideas will continue to emerge (“Super TIF,” anyone?). Still, it seems clear most Milwaukeeans are not enthusiastic about helping rich owners fund a new arena.

Bucks on-court product has some hope

All of this hullaballoo comes at the end of a season in which the Bucks will finish with the worst record in the NBA, after an offseason which saw them add 11 new players and coach Larry Drew in hopes of making another exasperated run at the playoffs. The Bucks will have a top pick in this year’s NBA Draft, joining a young core of Larry Sanders, John Henson, Brandon Knight, Khris Middleton, Nate Wolters and 19-year-old Giannis Antetokounmpo. The future of the franchise and the arena may be cloudy, but the roster’s future is arguably bright.

Silver is pleased with Kohl’s efforts to keep the team in Milwaukee, where it has been since 1968. But Milwaukee will force the NBA’s hand if there is no plan in place for a new arena when the Bradley Center’s lease expires in 2017. Current signs point toward Kohl selling the team. But many thought current Charlotte Bobcats owner Michael Jordan was going to buy the franchise in 2003 before Kohl pulled out late in the negotiation.

It’s been a horrible season for the Bucks, one that mercifully ends tonight when they host playoff-bound Atlanta at the Bradley Center (8 ET, League Pass). After that, with the franchise on the selling block, an unsettled arena situation and a critical top four pick in the Draft, the Bucks will step uncertainly into what may be their most important offseason yet.