Posts Tagged ‘Micky Arison’

Heat owner classy in disappointment

Miami Heat owner Micky Arison handled the disappointment of losing LeBron James much better than Cleveland Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert did four years ago.

Arison expressed his shock after learning James will leave the Heat after four seasons and two championships to return to the Cavs with a message on Twitter.

James does leave Arison with those two titles, but losing the game’s greatest player will cost the Heat and Arison untold millions in revenue in the years to come.

Gilbert has felt that impact over the last four seasons after James took his talents to South Beach. Incensed by James’ stunning decision to leave, a decision James made on national television without first apprising the Cavs owner, Gilbert wrote an open letter to fans that disparaged James.

Thankfully, Arison, informed of James’ decision not long before Sports Illustrated broke the news through a first-person essay by James earlier Friday, issued his more measured response.

Gilbert offered his own response to James’ homecoming on Twitter.

And this in response to a logical question from his young son:

Blogtable: LeBron’s Next Move


VIDEO: LeBron James discusses his future in an exclusive NBA TV interview with Steve Smith

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the three most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


Movers and shakers | Texas throwdown | LeBron’s future


LeBron says he can’t envision leaving Miami. Can you? What do you see, this summer and beyond?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: He’s staying put. This ain’t 2010 anymore. James has checked off the big thing from his bucket list (multiple NBA titles) and doesn’t need to be the chaser anymore. Miami is a destination market for most NBA players anyway, and more so with LeBron as its sun, exerting real gravitational pull on those in search of rings. At this point, LeBron is like Moe Greene (“No, I buy you out, you don’t buy me out!”) but with the clout and game of the Corleones.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: As long as puppet master Pat Riley is there pulling all the right strings, I believe LeBron stays in Miami and eventually recruits new partners to replace Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: Where’s he going to go, Cleveland? Really? Chicago? The Lakers? I don’t see it. It makes no sense to hopscotch around the league when he’s already got Pat Riley, sunshine and palm trees. Yes, Dwyane Wade is on the decline, but instead of going elsewhere, LeBron can recruit any talent he wants to South Beach. That’s what I envision.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: You’re asking the guy who for the longest time didn’t think he would leave Cleveland, so definitely bet everything on this prediction. But since you did ask: He does not become a free agent this summer specifically to put off the decision about whether to stay or go and give the Heat every chance to show they can build a bridge to the future. He stays on in a situation he apparently likes a lot but retains the option to change his mind before too much longer.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: No. Dwyane Wade’s health is obviously a concern and the importance of Shane Battier retiring (if Shane Battier does indeed retire) shouldn’t be understated, because he’s a key cog in their positionless rotation. But success in the NBA starts at the top, and LeBron should have confidence that Micky Arison, Pat Riley and Erik Spoelstra will put him in a position to compete for more championships.

Sekou Smith, NBA.comFor the life of me I cannot figure out why LeBron would leave what he has helped build in Miami. There is no reason to flee the scene in search of championship glory elsewhere when the Heat have the chance to reload and rebuild another contender around James starting with the moves they make this summer. So no, I can’t see it. I can’t see him departing Miami for greener pastures in … I don’t know where it is he’s supposed to go that could provide a better platform than the one he’s created for himself in Miami. People keep talking about LeBron’s potential move but I’m much more interested in seeing what Pat Riley has up his sleeve and who he will try and lure to Miami to work with LeBron in the next phase of his career.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com All Ball blog: As I’ve said all along, I don’t think there’s any way he leaves Miami this summer. And to be honest, I don’t think it’s really close. I understand that Cleveland is basically home for him, but he left before, so the need to play nearby apparently isn’t all that important. Why stay? The Heat have shown an ability to continually put together a championship-level team since LeBron’s arrival, and that doesn’t look to be changing any time soon. Besides, have you seen those Samsung commercials? He’s got an infinity pool right by the water! You really think he’s giving that up?

Philipp Dornhegge, NBA Deutschland: Let’s start with what I don’t really see at this point — and that’s another successful title defense. What I do see, however, is Dwyane Wade on a downward trajectory (even though he has his occasional Wade games or moments) and an aging supporting cast which won’t be able to sustain that defensive intensity for much longer. Miami will have to change some of its pieces in the near future, and you never know how that plays out. Ultimately though, there are no guarantees for LeBron anywhere else, either. Unless he really wants to follow in the footsteps of some of those Laker legends, I think he stays — possibly for the rest of his career.

Davide Chinellato, NBA Italia: Honestly, I don’t see right now a team that could attract LeBron the way Miami attracted him in 2010. The Heat went to LeBron with a plan to win and win now. Do you see a team that can offer him the same next summer? I don’t. So I think LeBron will most likely keep his talents in South Beach next season. But Dwyane Wade’s health will play a key role in his decision: the longer D-Wade is the great player we know, the longer LeBron will stay.

Adriano Albuquerque, NBA Brasil: From day one, the idea of LeBron leaving his destination of choice seemed far-fetched to me, but then again, so did Miami putting together a superteam with three All-Stars in their primes when it happened. It will come down to what happens in the postseason; if Dwyane Wade does look washed up and they fall to Indiana, LeBron might see that it’s gonna be hard to rebuild the team to championship level and could test his options on the market. If Miami gets to the Finals again, winning or losing, I feel either way LeBron will think they still got it, will just need to replace some pieces, and stays.

‘Not 2, Not 3′ Goes From Boast To Worry

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MIAMI – Nothing seems to have much staying power anymore. A season of your favorite TV show might run 13 episodes. Tech gadgets need to re-generate every few months or somebody’s stock price plummets. What was the next big thing tomorrow and a huge deal today morphs into old news even before yesterday arrives.

If that’s the backdrop against which we’re to judge the Miami Heat’s immediate predicament — a dynasty curtailed, should they lose to the Indiana Pacers in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference finals Monday night at AmericanAirlines Arena (8:30 ET, TNT) — then maybe the brevity of this whole thing makes sense.

But seen against the expectations the Heat raised when this group came together 35 months ago, measured by the tremors sent through the league when LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh all signed as free agents with Miami, a shelf life this potentially short seems startling. Way premature, too, given the smoke and mirrors, the pomp and circumstance that heralded the Big 3’s arrival and James then famously promising multiple championships with his ‘not one, not two, not three …’ line.

After Game 5, on the same night that James talked about his decision to relocate to south Florida — “That’s what I came here for, to be able to compete for a championship each and every year” — he also was candid about the limited help he was getting vs. the Pacers and the need to reach “back to my Cleveland days” in meeting the must-win challenge.

After the Heat’s 91-77 loss in Game 6, the issues were obvious, the criticism fully revved. On TNT, Reggie Miller called them the “Miami Cavaliers.” Steve Kerr said James was getting “zero help.” And Kenny Smith observed that Bosh and Wade were physically and athletically “outmatched.”

These were the supreme talents who were going to bully the rest of the NBA for years to come? The legends-in-making who would chase down Michael Jordan, Kobe Bryant and other giants for claims on all-time greatness?

At the moment, Wade looks old, Bosh looks overpriced and James, well, he looks lonely. In his most recent public exposure, he sat alone on the postgame podium in Indianapolis after the Game 6 loss, a long way from the lasers-and-anthems of his Miami introduction in July 2010.

“I mean, we can state the obvious: they’re both struggling,” James said, moments after reminding everyone that he believes in his teammates.

Belief comes harder when Wade, his bruised right knee showing no discernible improvement over two months, lingers on the perimeter and shows no explosiveness and lift. And when Bosh, having turned an ankle in the series, looks awkward or absent as a defender and rebounder.

Three seasons ago, in the first season of their grand experiment, the challenge was sorting out their egos and oversized games into a collaboration of trust. Last season, they all figured it out on their way to the championship. This season, the Heat seemed more formidable, its 27-game winning streak as a bit of history and prelude to what, still, they hope is a repeat title. (more…)

Report: Allen decides to leave Celtics, joins Heat

The Big Four are no more. At least not in Boston.

Free agent guard Ray Allen agreed to sign Friday evening with the Miami Heat, ending his five-year run in Boston that was highlighted by two Finals trips for the Celtics, including the 2008 championship. Allen chose Miami over Boston, Memphis and Minnesota, giving the Heat a potentially lethal perimeter option to go along with LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh next season.

The 37-year-old Allen visited Miami Thursday and left town Friday morning after being courted by the Heat organization. He was supposed to visit the Clippers on Friday, but that visit was cancelled after Los Angeles agreed to terms with free agent guard Jamal Crawford on Wednesday. Allen never met with the Grizzlies or Timberwolves.

The Celtics had been optimistic that they’d be able to re-sign Allen after agreeing to terms last week with Kevin Garnett on a three-year deal and reaching terms on Thursday with forward Brandon Bass.

Allen took less money to go to Miami. All the Heat had to offer was the taxpayer’s exception that starts at $3.09 million next season and can go out a maximum of three years and $9.5 million. Boston had offered a two-year, $12 million deal, and the Grizzlies were willing to give Allen their full non-taxpayer mid-level exception that starts at $5 million next season and can go out as long as four years.

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Heat Star LeBron James Gets Engaged

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS – The well wishes on Twitter from Clippers guard Chris Paul and Heat owner Micky Arison confirmed the rumblings. Heat star LeBron James and his longtime girlfriend Savannah Brinson are engaged to be married.

James picked a heck of a way to celebrate the start of a new year, reportedly proposing to his high school sweetheart and the mother of his two sons at a party celebrating New Year’s Eve and his 27th birthday, which was Friday. More from People.com:

At a New Year’s Eve dinner and party at the Shelborne hotel in South Beach, the Miami Heat star, 27, proposed to his longtime girlfriend Savannah Brinson. And he got their kids in on the action as well.

Right after popping the question, James picked up the couple’s sons LeBron Jr., 7, and Bryce, 4, and swung them around on the floor. “It was so sweet to watch,” a rep for Remy Martin V, who hosted the dinner, tells PEOPLE. “Everyone is extremely happy.”

The party, hosted by Heat teammate Dwayne Wade and his girlfriend Gabrielle Union, was also a belated birthday celebration for James, who turned 27 the day before.

Heat star Chris Bosh and Queen Latifah were also on the guest list of 60 friends and family members.

No date has been announced, but we’re guessing James gets more than a few questions about this news before and after the Heat’s game against the Charlotte Bobcats today in Miami.

And congrats to LeBron and his bride to be. There will be a ring ceremony for him one way or another in the future.

Labor Talks: Time To Make A Move

– For labor updates, follow: @daldridgetnt | @AschNBA

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS – Don’t beat yourself up if you’re having a hard time keeping up. Most of us are in the same spot, trying to figure out who is for what as the clock ticks down to the league’s 5 p.m. ET Wednesday deadline for the players to either take or dismiss the league’s 50-50 proposal.

Some players are all for making a deal, as Kobe Bryant told Yahoo! Sports:

“We need for the two sides to get together again before Wednesday, because we’re too close to getting a deal done,” Bryant told Yahoo! Sports. “We need to iron out the last system items and save this from spiraling into a nuclear winter.”

Some others are not. Some of the owners are for it and apparently, per ESPN.com‘s sources, some others are not. It’s high time someone made a move, the right move to get the 2011-12 season up and running.

But when the sides can’t come to a consensus within their own caucuses, it’s tough to see some sort of breakthrough if and when the sides come together again to try and hash out the final details of a new collective bargaining agreement.

With the union representatives from all 30 teams set to meet today in New York, in advance of Wednesday’s end-of-business deadline, plenty of observers are a little nervous about what type of movement could emerge from the gathering. The players have limited options at this point. They can take a vote on the proposal and decide to take the deal, bowing to the league’s “ultimatum,” as union president Derek Fisher called it over the weekend, and breathe life into a season and the NBA fan base. Or they can refuse to even consider it, as Fisher insisted in the immediate aftermath of Saturday’s bargaining session, and push this affair into an even darker corner.

Fair or not, the players will own the next 36 hours of this mess.

(more…)

Labor Talks: New Deadline To Deal With

– For labor updates, follow: @daldridgetnt | @AschNBA

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS – You don’t need X-ray vision to figure out where the NBA’s labor impasse is heading this week (“straight past the ‘Dead End’ sign and over the cliff” is the way an agent put it to us early this morning).

The league has given the players and their union 72 hours to respond to their latest “proposal,” delivered during a marathon Saturday night bargaining session in New York. Union president Derek Fisher made it clear shortly thereafter that said “ultimatum” would not even be delivered to the players for a vote.

The end of business Wednesday deadline issued by NBA Commissioner David Stern is a car wreck we’re all being allowed to watch from a distance far too close for comfort. The threats — of a considerably worse offer if this one is not accepted by the owners and of the dissolution of the union by the players if they ignore Wednesday’s deadline — only make for a yet another wicked twist to an already disturbing tale.

Anyone assuming that at least some of the players are not ready to fight need only scan Twitter timelines, where guys like Deron Williams make it clear that they were ready to fight months ago: “I’ve been ready to sign a decertification petition since July? Can’t believe we are just now going this route! SMH”

That doesn’t sound like a union ready to capitulate or compromise, as union attorney Jeffrey Kessler made clear in the aftermath of Saturday’s nearly nine-hour session. It sounds more like players, at least a faction of them, willing to stare the league down on deadline day and come out swinging the morning after. What that means for us, the true casualties of this lockout, is the loss of more games and potentially the demise of the entire 2011-12 season.

Ugh!

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Ken Berger of CBSSports.com:  In the end, the truest words spoken early Sunday morning came from Kessler, who said the owners’ tactics were “not happening on Derek Fisher’s watch. It’s not happening on Billy Hunter‘s watch. It’s not happening on the watch of this executive committee.” If the players successfully decertified, none of the aforementioned would be in power. A decertification petition requiring the signatures of 30 percent of union membership would put the union on approximately a 60-day clock before an election is held to disband it — and that’s only if the National Labor Relations Board authorizes the election. Typically, the agency does not when a union has an unfair labor practices charge pending. The mere signing of the petition by 30 percent of the union would not by itself cease negotiations since the union would remain in power until the election, which wouldn’t happen before January — if at all. That leaves two months for cooler heads to prevail. But really, the stopwatch has been set for four days — 96 hours to spare chaos. Of all the inflammatory words spoken after this latest fiasco, the words “best and final offer” were never among them. That’s legal mumbo-jumbo for this: There’s still time to end the ass-hattery, if everyone’s heads return to a place oxygen is available. The clock is ticking.

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Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports: After reports that Charlotte Bobcats owner Michael Jordan had become one of the most vocal of hardline owners, union officials were anxious for him to speak up in Saturday night’s meeting. Union officials, just as they wanted to do back at the last labor meeting that Jordan attended on All-Star weekend, were determined to throw back at Jordan many of his old anti-ownership screeds from the 1990s. As one official said, “He never opened his mouth, not once.” The two sides didn’t spend a great deal of the 8½ hours engaging each other, but rather had the federal mediator shuttling back and forth between rooms, a source said. Stern’s ultimatum comes with the backdrop of player agents actively canvassing their clients to determine if there were enough votes to move forward with a decertification vote on the union, agent and player sources told Yahoo! Sports. Before proceeding, agents and players were waiting on the outcome of the weekend’s labor talks. Several agents and players believed support would grow for a vote on dissolving the union without significant progress on a deal. Agents and players took part in two conference calls this week on the subject of decertification. Boston Celtics star Paul Pierce has taken a lead in spearheading those discussions, sources said.

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Chris Sheridan of Sheridanhoops.com: The owners, Kessler said, had been the ones who brought an abrupt halt to the proceedings. After 3 weeks of preconditions that were levied and then removed and then levied and removed again, the owners circled back to basically the same place they have been all along while giving the players a take-it-or-leave-it offer that for all intents and purposes would max out at 50.2 percent of revenues going to the players, 49.8 percent going to the owners. The players had dropped to 51 percent, or as Kessler termed it: “Fifty plus one,” with the extra one percent ($40 million) being earmarked for improved pension benefits for both current and retired players. “These are professional basketball players,’’ Kessler said. “They are the finest athletes in the world. How do you think they feel about threats? How do you think they feel about efforts at intimidation? Who negotiates in good faith when they say it’s this proposal or (back to) 47 percent? Take it or leave it. This is not good faith to the fans. ‘’ Big, bad Michael Jordan had become Paul Allen 2.0 during the meeting, Kessler said, barely uttering a word. Arbitrator George Cohen’ suggestions, Kessler said, had been hijacked by Stern and turned into the owners’ official offer. The money quote from my news story, after the 8 1/2 hours of meetings and 60 minutes of dueling news conferences had ended: “The story here is they want it all,” Kessler bellowed. “They want a win, win, win, win. We wanted a compromise. Our 51 percent offer was based on a fair system. They would have to come to us on the system, but they did not.”

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Howard Beck of the New York Times: This latest negotiating session, the 21st of the lockout, lasted for eight and a half hours, ending around 1:30 a.m. Sunday. Under the guidance of George Cohen, a federal mediator, the parties actually narrowed the gap on some crucial items before the talks collapsed. The players — who had vowed not to accept less than 52.5 percent of league revenues — proposed a 51 percent share, with 1 percent devoted to aid retired players. That moved them within 1 percent of the league’s longstanding proposal. On Saturday, the owners proposed a “band” that would pay the players 49 to 51 percent, depending on revenue growth. But the union said it amounted to a 50 percent offer, because the threshold for growth was so high that the share would never get to 51. Jeff Kessler, the union’s outside counsel and chief negotiator, called the 49 to 51 band “a fraud.” Yet it was ultimately the mechanics of a new system, not the revenue split, that killed the talks. The league’s standing proposal would eliminate spending options for teams that pay the luxury tax, by banning them from sign-and-trade deals and the use of the midlevel exception. At Cohen’s suggestion, the league proposed a “mini-midlevel” that would start at $2.5 million — half the value of the full midlevel — and would be limited to two-year deals. The N.B.A.’s proposal also called for an additional penalty — a so-called “repeater tax” — on teams that exceed the tax threshold three times in a five-year span. The union is open to the concept, but not at the steep rates proposed by the league. The net effect of the N.B.A.’s proposal, the union said, would be to eliminate the highest-spending teams from acquiring top talent — thus devastating the free-agent market.

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Mitch Lawrence of the New York Daily News: The owners have not threatened to impose a flex-cap since last summer. But it’s a sign that they’re running out of patience with the players, who continue to hold out for more of the same soft-cap features that were part of the last collective bargaining agreement. “We want our players to play and we’d like to have a season and these are the terms upon which we’re prepared to gear up and get in as many games as possible,’’ Stern said. The league has already cancelled all of its November schedule. With the players already rejecting the owner’s latest offer, it seems fairly certain that December games will soon start to go up in smoke, too. In addition to the split of revenue, owners in this latest proposal want players to accept a decrease in the mid-level exception, from five years to two years for teams over the luxury tax. There would also be reductions in the terms of the exception for non-tax paying teams. The deal would also penalize taxpayers by not allowing them to work sign-and-trade transactions. Jordan is one of nearly 12 owners who don’t want players to get above 47%. But Stern said that he would have enough votes to get the deal for the players allowing for them to get upwards of 51%. That’s because Jordan, Charlotte majority owner, and other small- and mid-market owners who lost $300 million last season do not have enough votes to kill a deal. To ratify a deal, Stern needs a simple majority of 16 votes. “This is not good faith to the players or to the fans,’’ said union counsel Jeffrey Kessler. “The players will not be intimidated. That’s what the league is doing in presenting an ultimatum to us.’’

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Marc Stein of ESPN.com: Bear in mind that there’s a big difference between rounding up the 130 players needed to sign a petition to vote on decertification and finding a 50 percent-plus-one majority in a union of roughly 450 members amenable to actually voting for decertification. Because decertification is “risky and messy,” as established above, there is undeniable skepticism around the league about how many players would be willing to go all the way through with it. And maybe that’s why some ownership sources insist that the decertification process won’t have nearly as much impact as its supporters contend. But if it merely gets as far as a vote — no matter what would happen when decertification ballots are passed out — that’s when you’ll know that there’s really no hope for a 2011-12 season. If the union ultimately does decertify fully, there won’t even be time at that point to do what NBA commissioner David Stern does not want to do and stage another 50-game season. The reality, though, is that we’re still some distance removed from that crossroads. Wednesday is the deadline announced by Stern for the union to take the deal as currently constructed, but this sad saga can rumble on for at least another good month — and probably longer — unless Stern can convince the union that they better take Saturday’s offer because he’s serious about canceling the rest of the ’11-12 season before Thanksgiving.XX

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Ben Bolch of the Los Angeles Times: Player reaction to Stern’s take-it-or-leave-it offer was swift on Twitter. “U gotta love an ultimatum,” tweeted San Antonio Spurs guard Steve Novak. “How does basketball ever even get to this point?” … All 29 owners gathered early in the day Saturday for a meeting among themselves, and Cohen met separately with players and owners before collective negotiations resumed. Small-market owners in attendance included Charlotte’s Michael Jordan and Portland’s Paul Allen, believed to be among those wanting to hold the players’ share of revenue to 47%. Among large-market owners were the Lakers’ Jerry Buss and Miami’s Micky Arison, the latter of the recent $500,000 tweet claiming he wasn’t the reason the lockout was lingering. The discussions lacked star power on the players’ side. Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade, who had attended earlier negotiating sessions, announced via Twitter that he had landed in Sydney for the start of an exhibition tour. “Got off the plane in my jordan sweat suit,” Wade wrote, “but as soon as I walked out the airport it felt like Miami.” Clippers teammates Blake Griffin and DeAndre Jordan exchanged trash tweets regarding their alma maters’ Big 12 Conference football game in Norman, Okla. Tweeted Jordan: “Sorry but Texas A&M is going to smack OU today!!!” Final score: Oklahoma 41, Texas A&M 25. Jordan wouldn’t find a happy ending with the proceedings in New York either.

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Alan Hahn of Newsday: Stern said that the league would spend Sunday writing up two formal proposals, one as outlined above and another based on a less appealing offer that would come if Wednesday’s deadline passes without an agreement. That deal, Stern said, would have two ominous parts: a 47-53 split of league revenue in favor of the owners and a “flex” cap system that would replicate the NHL’s hard cap. “We hope that this juxtaposition will cause the union to assess its situation and accept the deal,” Stern said. If they don’t take the deal, the union is faced with one option: to decertify the union and fight the league in court. That, of course, would take up the kind of time that would essentially kill any chance of having a season. Neither Fisher nor Kessler would address decertification, which has been promoted by several agents. Union executive director Billy Hunter did not speak to reporters after the talks because, according to a union spokesman, he was under the weather. It was yet another long day for everyone involved, as the owners met early Saturday afternoon to discuss their strategy going into the meeting with the players. Michael Jordan, the Charlotte Bobcats owner who is the marquee name among a faction of hardlining small market owners, was in attendance, along with Trail Blazers owner Paul Allen and Heat owner Micky Arison, who last week was fined $500,000 for a few candid tweets about the lockout. On the players’ side, Knicks guard Chauncey Billups, one of the most respected veteran players in the league, made his first appearance at the talks at the request of the union’s executive committee, mainly vice president Mo Evans. But it was Kessler who had the strongest voice after the meetings, as he continually charged the owners with having no interest in making a deal. “Who negotiates in good faith and makes an ultimatum?” he said. Later he added, “The big story here is they want it all.”

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Labor Talks: Finger-Pointing Season

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS – If you thought October was filled with empty rhetoric from both sides and nastiness that prevents progress in the NBA’s lockout saga, wait until you get a load of the new narrative.

The only thing worse than yet another breakdown in lockout negotiations is the incessant finger-pointing that kicked off in earnest on what should have been the opening night of the season.

And it’s open season on any and everyone connected.

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Labor Talks: Tuesday Mourning Blues

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS – The calendar can be a cruel reminder sometimes.

This was supposed to be Opening Night around the NBA. The games were going to tip off and we’d dive back into the NBA season like we always do this time of year, enjoying the last few hours of the “offseason” before getting into the ritual that is the eight-month odyssey of the NBA season.

We’ve held off on the pity party around here the past few weeks, knowing full well that there was chance we’d wake up this morning to a lockout that apparently knows no end. Worst of all is the memories we have from a fantastic 2010-11 season and a splendid playoff run, one spent chronicling the every move of the eventual champion Dallas Mavericks. As my man Eddie Sefko of the Dallas Morning News points out, ring night for the reigning champion will have to wait:

Seven diamonds. One for each road victory that the Mavericks had in their championship run — shaped in a heart to signify their singular resolve.

Four blue sapphires, representing the four close-out games that they won without ever losing a potential playoff series ender.

Something snappy written in gold. Like maybe, ‘Perseverance.’ Or, ‘Grit.’

Or maybe just: We Are The Champions.

These are the things that should be inscribed and mounted on the Mavericks’ championship rings, which they should be receiving tonight at American Airlines Center.

They won’t, of course. The NBA lockout has erased the first month of the season, which includes opening night. The Chicago Bulls were supposed to be in town and the first leg on the Mavericks’ championship victory lap would have been great for the team and even better for the fans.

Reliving that magical run will have to wait until December or January or later.

It is painful to realize this day, and the 29 that will follow, will not include a single dribble of an NBA basketball in a game that matters. Yeah, I know there are exhibitions planned and the faces that are so familiar to so many will pop up here and there. But it’s not the same. You know it and I know it.

Instead of games, we’re left with more of the lockout soap opera to chew on while we wait for the sides to go back to the negotiating table. Union president Derek Fisher is busy fighting those questioning his loyalty to his constituency. Heat owner Micky Arison is busy digging into his wallet to pay fines for a Twitter habit gone wrong.

Surely, both men would rather be doing something else, namely celebrating the start of yet another championship chase by two teams (Fisher’s Lakers and Arison’s Heat) that would have been considered top contenders heading into the 2011-12 season, along with the aforementioned defending champs — and a few other teams, too.

Instead, all we are left with is these lasting images of the past few weeks (see video below). Hollow promises, edicts and deadlines have been thrown in every direction.

Bottom line: We’ll sit down for Thanksgiving dinner and have to go cold turkey on the basketball trimmings we’re used to, since the entire month was sacked by the labor impasse.

But if we get to Christmas without a season … let’s not even go there!

Labor Talks: As The Lockout Turns

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS – We knew better than to believe there was any substance behind those Thursday night smiles that had us all believing that this thing was anywhere close to over.

From the moment the NBA lockout began July 1, one of our most trusted sources has been reminding us that we would not have NBA basketball to be thankful for at Thanksgiving. And we foolishly ignored that warning. The jovial back and forth between NBA Commissioner David Stern and union executive director Billy Hunter after Thursday night’s session threw us off just long enough for us to dream a little.

Well, we’re done dreaming here at the hideout.

The game face is back and there will be no more sugar-coating the smoldering hot mess that this labor impasse has become. No one has to worry about our hopes getting too high that a deal will be done in due time because we’re done with hope. The time has passed. The first month of the season went up in smoke officially Friday night, along with any chance the two sides had of preserving whatever ounce of goodwill remained amongst the basketball loving masses.

We know now that being “close” on system issues means nothing if the BRI gulf remains the same, that a smile for the cameras one night could easily be a frown for the same cameras the next.

No doubt, someone will reach out over this weekend or early next week and rekindle the talks and eventually everyone will come back to the table ready to play this game again. Just leave us out of this time. Save us the posturing, public sparring and those hollow smiles that make the best cliffhangers in the latest episode of As The Lockout Turns …

Ken Berger of CBSSports.com: Just when this was starting to get fun, just when it was starting to get done, we all got snookered. That was the word Billy Hunter used Friday after negotiations to end the 120-day lockout went kablooey for the second time in a week and third time this month. That was what Hunter said David Stern did to him when the commissioner said Thursday night he was going into Friday’s seemingly promising bargaining session “ready to negotiate everything.” Only he wasn’t. Neither was Hunter. The two men who were supposed to be in position to finally close this deal did not have the authority to do so. That’s the only logical explanation when failing to get a deal this weekend results in approximately $800 million of economic carnage — the total cost to both sides of a month of lost games — when the distance between the two sides is $80 million. “Absurdity,” one person on the management side of the NBA business said Friday night. Oh, no. It’s worse than that. Altogether now: It’s ass-hattery. But you knew that already. I’d brought two bananas to Friday’s bargaining session — mostly for sustenance during these mentally debilitating hours spent waiting for grown men to finish staring at each other, but also as props. You may recall the banana-in-the-tailpipe column in which I detailed the blowout victory the owners were seeking in these negotiations. On Friday, we all fell for the banana in the tailpipe again. And we didn’t even have a late supper — shrimp salad sandwiches, say — to show for it. On top of that, I left my grocery bag with the bananas in the lobby, and by the time the predictable, double-talk-laden news conferences were over, two perfectly good bananas were gone. The latest casualties of the dumbest lockout ever.

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