Posts Tagged ‘Michigan State’

Hang Time Road Trip: Beach Boys

HANGTIME_PASSENGER


VIDEO: Hang Time Road Trip Day 5

By Sekou Smith

Los Angeles — You don’t  need but a few minutes is this dynamic city to see what all the fuss is about. From the oceans to the mountains to the beaches all along the Pacific coastline to the east for as far as you can see, the Southland has everything you need.

Seeing it from the inside of the bus on The Hang Time Road Trip 2, however, offers up a completely different perspective of Los Angeles. And on Day 5, we tried to soak up as much of it as we could starting early at Venice Beach and weaving our way around town through Beverly Hills and Hollywood and to Los Feliz and a stop at the Griffith Observatory and back again.

What looks like nothing but pure, unadulterated fun on social media was exactly that. Oh, it wasn’t necessarily easy — you try riding a beach cruiser on Venice Beach while filming without crashing into an innocent bystander trying to get a selfie with Rick Fox. But we realize there are much tougher ways to make ends meet, so no complaining from around here.

Kicking things off at the beach was definitely the right move (even if it turned out to be a bit more of a workout than any of us expected)…

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Venice Beach #nbahangtime

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We still have plenty on our schedule, including a planned visit with TNT’s own Kenny Smith and Monday’s trip up the road to see the Los Angeles Clippers (there are a couple of other surprises we have planned but we’ll save those for later).

As mentioned previously, we did visit with Los Angeles Lakers coach Byron Scott. He’s in fighting shape and sounds like a man with a chip on his shoulder after the struggles the Lakers endured during his first season at the helm. Take a look:


VIDEO: Lakers coach Byron Scott joins us on the bus to talk about the upcoming season

Saturday wasn’t all sunshine and beach fun. Some of us has a tougher time making it through the drama than others, given the ending of a certain college football some 2,240 miles away.

With friends like these …

… who needs enemies?

I’m putting all of the negativity behind me for the final days of our trip. It’s the professional thing to do and nothing should interfere with what we’ve got going on here. We’re trying to dig down and examine the DNA of these SoCal NBA representatives and see if it matches up with what we saw earlier on our trip in Oakland with the Golden State Warriors.


VIDEO: Draymond Green and Harrison Barnes on the bus with Hang Time Road Trip crew

Our time here is winding down. Cali’s been so good to us, thus far. We’ve survived the mudslides and even our fair share of bumper to bumper traffic along the way. The beach is always an excellent elixir for whatever is ailing you, so we’ll keep that in mind as we keep doing what we do. #NBAHangTime

Draymond Green makes $3.1 million donation to Michigan State


VIDEO: Draymond Green highlights from The Finals

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Draymond Green is known for being one of the best trash talkers (and talkers in general) in the NBA. But the Golden State Warriors’ star is putting his money where his mouth is where his alma mater is concerned.

Green is making a $3.1 million donation to Michigan State University, the largest student-athlete donation in MSU athletics history, according to the school. It’s also the largest gift ever made by an active professional athlete to his former school, according to Forbes.com. Green’s donation will help fund facilities and endowments for the athletic department, including the building of a new strength and conditioning center that will be named in Green’s honor and overall facility renovation.

“Michigan State means everything to me,” Green said in a statement. “I grew up in Saginaw and was lucky enough to attend Michigan State University where Coach Izzo believed in me and gave me the chance to succeed. I wouldn’t be the person I am today without my Spartan experience and this donation reflects my deep appreciation to the University. This donation isn’t just about me. I want more kids to have the opportunities I had thanks to Michigan State and want to use this to stimulate all Spartans to give back to the best university in the world.”

Green helped the Warriors to their first NBA title in 40 years in June, as they defeated the Cleveland Cavaliers in The Finals before heading into free agency. Green’s signed a five-year, $82 million deal with the Warriors in July.

Green’s philanthropy was no doubt inspired by a history of former MSU athletes giving back to their school. In 1997, former MSU and NBA star and current NBA TV analyst Steve Smith gave $2.5 million to MSU for construction of the Clara Bell Smith academic center, named after his late mother. It was, at that time, the largest donation ever given by a professional athlete to a college or university.

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 208) featuring Steve Smith

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — No disrespect to Stephen Curry (the reigning KIA MVP) or LeBron James (a four-time winner of the award), but Kevin Durant (the 2014 winner) believes he’s “still the best player in the world.” And what self-respecting NBA superstar worth his signature kicks wouldn’t say the same? There’s only one answer that question, according to NBA TV’s Steve Smith, who was never short on confidence during a stellar basketball career that saw him star at Detroit’s famed Pershing High School, Michigan State University and in various stops during his 14 seasons in the NBA.

“What’s he supposed to say, ‘I’m No. 2B or No. 3?” Smitty said on Episode 208 of the Hang Time Podcast, where we also go in-depth with one of our favorite members NBA TV/NBA.com family about the changes in “offseason training” when he played and now. Guys workout together now, but Smitty honed his craft in the offseason by going to hoops grad school battling the likes of Hall of Famers Isiah Thomas, Joe Dumars, Magic Johnson and other seasoned pros.

He also shared his delight in seeing his former teammate, great friend and current neighbor Dikembe Mutombo honored, his joy in seeing fellow Detroit Pershing Doughboy Spencer Haywood finally take his place in the Naismith Memorial Hall of Fame and other hot topics going on in the basketball world with the start of training camps on the horizon.

He certainly got in a few digs about the trials and tribulations my Michigan Wolverines football program has endured prior to the return of Jim Harbaugh, pointing out (and rightfully so) the rise of his Michigan State Spartans on both the football field and the basketball court. Smitty will be on site this weekend in East Lansing when Michigan State hosts Oregon in college football’s marquee game. He’ll do so while celebrating with his fellow Spartans basketball alums and MSU coach Tom Izzo. He’s even convinced me to show a little Michigan pride this weekend and root for the Spartans against the Ducks.

Crazy … I know!

But that’s how we do it around here when we roll with a NBA champion and Olympic gold medalist, a man who has literally seen and done it all, one the oldest and best friends we have in the basketball business, and just happens to be Green!

As always, we dive in on Episode 208 of the Hang Time Podcast featuring NBA TV’s Steve Smith …

LISTEN HERE:

As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of NBA.com,  Lang Whitaker of NBA.com’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.


VIDEO: NBA TV’s Steve Smith looks ahead to his Top Five games of the 2015-16 NBA season

Payne works to adjust to the NBA game


VIDEO: Adreian Payne gets high for the flush on the break

LAS VEGAS — When Adreian Payne was 15 years old, he realized he needed a summer job. He was, after all, a teenager, and Payne heard the same siren song of commerce that appeals to adolescents everywhere.

“I wanted to be able to buy myself something,” Payne recalls. “I wanted to go to the mall with my friends and stuff like that.”

And so Payne, who grew up in Dayton, Ohio, went out and got a job. As a janitor at his own middle school.

To Payne, it was a great gig.

“I swept, took gum off of the desks, mopped. It wasn’t bad, because I knew everybody there at my school, and it was the summer so there wasn’t anybody there. But I knew the janitor, I knew the lunch lady, all the staff. It was kind of fun. Being young I played around sometimes, but it was fun.”

Once he saved up enough money, Payne went to the mall and bought a pair of shoes. These days, as the recent first round pick of the Atlanta Hawks, with the requisite rookie scale contract, Payne’s shopping horizons have broadened a bit: “I’m looking for an apartment right now, actually. That will probably be the next thing I get.”

Payne spent the past week in Las Vegas with the Atlanta Hawks at the Samsung NBA Summer League exhibiting the drive and skill that made the Hawks interested in him to begin with. As a four-year player for coach Tom Izzo at Michigan State, the 6-foot-10 Payne developed into a deft outside shooter, knocking down 3-pointers at a 42 percent rate as a senior. That combination of size and shooting ability should fit perfectly into the spread-and-shoot system the Hawks implemented last season under first-year head coach Mike Budenholzer.

“Being able to shoot the ball can translate to anything, any level,” Adreian said. “But [the NBA game is] a lot different, the speed of the game, and the players are more athletic. So it’s just a matter of you just getting more comfortable out there, trying to find the pace of the game so your shots still come and you’re in rhythm, still. So I’m just trying to get my shot off quicker but not in a rush. But just quicker, more efficient, less movement.”

Payne helped lead the Hawks’ summer squad to a 2-3 record in the round-robin format, and played 28 minutes today in the Hawks’ 78-71 elimination round loss to the Houston Rockets. Payne finished with 11 points but struggled from the field, finishing 4-for-15, including 1-8 on three pointers.

“They were telling me to get my shots, try to slow myself down, run the offense and let them come. They was coming, they just wasn’t falling,” Payne said with a laugh.

Hawks assistant coach Darvin Ham coached the Hawks summer league squad, and saw plenty to like from Payne.

“It’s one of those situations where you always love the fact you have to tell a guy to slow down as opposed to pick it up. He just needs to know how to be quick but not in a hurry,” said Ham. And then, to emphasize the point, he repeated it quickly and in a hurry: “Quick but not in a hurry.

“He gets going and he’s going full speed and that’s normal for guys coming out of college,” Ham said. “They want to do everything a thousand percent, at a hundred miles an hour, and you can’t fault him for that. He’s from a heckuva program and Coach Iz[zo] did a great job with him. We’re just going to try to refine him a little bit and teach him how to play with a change of pace, so to speak.”

Coming into today’s loss, Payne averaged 12.8 ppg on 40 percent shooting from the field in Atlanta’s five previous games. Ham said the Hawks know he can get his shot going.

“His shooting element is there,” said Ham, “the defensive element is there, making athletic plays, we just gotta get him to stop fouling so much.”

Is that easier said than done with rookies?

“Oh, absolutely,” Ham continued. “Because in college, they actually play a lot more physical than we do in the NBA. At the NBA level, the big key is not to impede progress, so referees are a little more ticky-tacky with how they call fouls as opposed to in the college game, where you can get into guys and put your forearm into ’em when they face up and all of that. So it’ll take some time, but he’s a smart kid, a smart player, he’ll make the proper adjustments.”

One adjustment Payne has made thus far has been trying to add shotblocking to his defensive repertoire, something he says he wasn’t able to display at Michigan State.

“[Coach Izzo] wanted me to stay on the floor — I was getting in foul trouble. So the rules here are a lot different than they are in college — you have verticality here, in college you don’t. So it’s a lot different.”

Accordingly, another part of Payne’s adjustment has been studying tape of the NBA game to increase his familiarity with the league. While at Michigan State, he said, NBA games weren’t often on his TV — “I watched a lot of college games.” Video games were no help either — “I suck at 2K.”

“I’ve been watching a lot more NBA now, and I love watching it,” Payne said. “Now that I’m here in the league I’ve been watching a lot more film, been watching film with Coach Ham, and just trying to get better.”


VIDEO: Adreian Payne gets the stiff rejection against the Rockets