Posts Tagged ‘Michael Jordan’

Kobe Bryant passes Michael Jordan


VIDEO: Kobe Bryant passes Michael Jordan

With a pair of free throws with 5:24 to go in the second quarter in Minnesota on Sunday night, Kobe Bryant tied and passed Michael Jordan on the all-time scoring list. Bryant currently sits at No. 3, trailing only Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Karl Malone.

Bryant was a willing passer early on Sunday, and shot just 1-for-5 in the first quarter. Upon re-entering the game in the second, he quickly went for Jordan, hitting a fast-break three on his first offensive possession of the period, missing a turnaround jumper in the post, and then drawing a foul on Zach LaVine on an early baseline drive. After a timeout, he nailed both free throws and the game was stopped so that both teams could acknowledge the achievement and Wolves owner Glen Taylor could award him the ball.

Bryant finished with 26 points on 7-for-20 shooting, capping his night with the go-ahead 3-pointer with 1:02 to go.

Indications are that Bryant will retire when his contract expires at the end of the next season, his 20th in the league. So it’s doubtful that he’ll move further up the list. He would need to avoid injuries and a scoring dip just to catch Malone by the end of the 2016-17 season, when he’ll be approaching his 39th birthday.

But no matter what happens down the line, Bryant now reigns as the most prolific scoring guard in NBA history, having passed the guy he’ll forever be compared to. It’s a tribute to his talent, his drive, his work ethic and his longevity.

No. 24 has passed No. 23 to become No. 3.

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VIDEO: Kobe talks about passing MJ

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Blogtable: MJ vs. Kobe

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: MJ vs. Kobe | Golden in Golden State | Nets’ Trade Options



VIDEO: Fan Night crew on Kobe passing Jordan

> The Kobe Bryant-Michael Jordan comparisons have bubbled up again this week, and those two certainly share a lot of similarities. But what is the biggest difference in their games? In their careers?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: Kobe Bryant is to Michael Jordan as Vic Damone was to Frank Sinatra. I know that reference is dated, like something left over from Larry King’s dot-dot-dot column for USA Today. But the comparison is apt. Jordan, like Sinatra, was the original, while Bryant, like Damone, was the copy. Skilled, technically proficient, maybe even superior in a talent or two. But not original. Heck, Bryant even mimicked Jordan’s mannerisms, way of speaking, etc., before developing a little more of his own voice and style in recent years. He was just too literal in the “next Michael” thing, meaning we’d been there, seen that with most of his exploits.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: After his high-flying younger days, Jordan developed a mid-range and post-up game that was dependable, deadly and virtually peerless and thrived on it down to that very last Bulls shot over Bryon Russell. Bryant has those same skills, but still tends to take more “hero ball” 3-point shots.  At the other end, Jordan was just a better shut-down defender, case closed.  You can probably sum up the difference in their careers with two words: Scottie Pippen.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: There are very few differences, one of the reasons it is such a debate. But there are two exceptions in the timeline department: Bryant went to the NBA from high school while Jordan arrived not only with three seasons of college ball, but three seasons at North Carolina with Dean Smith. MJ had the important head start of being more mature and the lessons from a structured program. (Although Bryant was mature far behind his 17 years at the time of the draft. He was focused and a worker.) And, Kobe has played straight through. He didn’t have retirements along the way. He kept stacking big minutes on top of big minutes until he was far ahead of Jordan in that category.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: Jordan was an above-average defender almost until the end, before his knees were shot. He took pride in making stops and even guarding the other team’s best shooter (Reggie Miller, etc.). His strip of Karl Malone moments before sinking the game-winner for his sixth title remains the most underrated play in league history. Kobe, on the other hand, stopped giving effort on defense years ago. As for their careers, Jordan was much more of a cultural force than Kobe ever was, impacting fashion, endorsements, etc. And he has one more ring.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: The biggest difference in their games was on defense, where Jordan was more consistent, especially in regard to off-the-ball focus. Jordan was also a better shooter and more efficient scorer. The biggest difference in their careers was that Jordan was the best player on six championship teams, while Bryant was the best player on two. With MJ, we’ll always wonder what would have happened if he didn’t retire the first time. With Kobe, we’ll wonder how good he could have been if he trusted his teammates a little more.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: The biggest difference in their games to me has always come in the commitment on the defensive side of the ball. Jordan played defense the same way he played offense and every other part of the game, like his life depended on him being better at it than anyone else on the floor every night. Kobe has always struck me as a convenient defender, a guy who could go into lock down mode whenever he wanted and has done exactly that for the better part of the past two decades. As for their careers, Jordan was always the alpha dog in the locker room and on the court. Six championships. Six Finals MVPs. And no debate about it. Kobe, by virtue of when he entered the league, was stuck in little brother mode with Shaq and didn’t get his Finals MVP stripes until later.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: Jordan was the more efficient scorer, which had something to do with the difference in eras. Bryant attempted threes twice as often as his idol, in part because the quality of defense had grown more sophisticated throughout the NBA. During Bryant’s more recent run of contention, the best teams were more talented than the opposition that Jordan faced in the 1990s. Each was a product of the time in which he played.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: To me the most obvious difference is Kobe’s longevity and his ability to play at a very high level even now, in his 19th season. I saw Jordan in 2003 when he was with the Wizards, and sure, he averaged 20 ppg, but he wasn’t as athletic as Kobe is today. Other than that, it’s hard for me to pinpoint differences. They are so similar that it can be uncanny, which isn’t a terrible thing. As my friend Russ Bengtson once wrote, Jordan may have created the blueprint, but Kobe, more than anyone else who was compared to MJ in some way or another, was able to ride the blueprint to the greatest degree of success.

Aldo Avinante, NBA.com/PhilippinesIn terms of their games, MJ was more of a slasher especially in his younger days and he goes for the most simplest moves to score although they have the same skill set and moves, Kobe opts for the more difficult shot most of the times but he is also the best at making the most impossible contested fade-away jumpers. Their careers follow almost the same arc in the sense of interchanging their timelines. Kobe was successful early on his career and got the rings and now he is a tireless scorer trying to lead his team into contention with his competitive drive, compared to MJ who was trying so hard to will his team to champion contention before getting all the accolades late in his career. You can mirror it upside down and it’s almost the same.

Guillermo Garcia, NBA.com/MexicoThe difference between the two, is that Jordan was better defensively, who took a team that hadn’t yet had much of a reputation — in Chicago — and made it a global name.

Simon Legg, NBA.com/AustraliaOne difference that stands out, and Phil Jackson has mentioned it before, is the way they both led their teams. Jordan was more charismatic and seemed to enjoy his one-on-one time with teammates. Kobe is a little different and has taken time to be more open with the guys around him. From a playing perspective, it’s hard to separate their styles but one thing that always stands out is their efficiency. Bryant simply hasn’t been able to match Jordan’s efficiency and the 10 scoring titles to two kind of proves that.

Akshay Manwani, NBA.com/IndiaIn terms of games, Jordan was definitely the more well-rounded player. His scoring, rebounding, assists and steals averages are all better than Bryant. That is why Jordan is considered the most fundamentally-sound basketball player ever. The one difference that works in Bryant’s favour is that he launched nearly three times as many 3-point attempts (5005) as Jordan’s (1778), with slightly better consistency (33.4 percent to 32.7 percent). In terms of their careers, the obvious difference is that Bryant came straight out of high school into the league, which probably explains the longer time he took to mature as a player. But the more important difference to me is the two-year hiatus that Jordan took, right when he was at the peak of his game, with the Bulls having won three in a row. Had Jordan played those years, would it be impossible to imagine Chicago winning eight straight titles? Also, unlike Bryant, who was Shaquille O’Neal’s lieutenant in the Lakers’ title winning years of 2000-2002, MJ was the undisputed numero uno star on the Bulls’ teams.

Stefan Petri, NBA.com/DeutschlandCan I opt for the different colors of their jerseys? No? I that case I would single out MJ’s superior defense: While Jordan was a lockdown defender for many years and still very good during his last run with the Bulls, Kobe has always relied more on his athleticism and gambled for steals – and nowadays it’s matador defense with him. Another aspect is Jordan’s jaw-dropping efficiency: Although the last two seasons in Washington weighed on his numbers, he nonetheless finished his career shooting almost 50 percent from the field. Bryant on the other hand never eclipsed 47 percent over the course of one season. For what it’s worth: In my eyes Kobe is the better shooter from downtown, though his shot selection leaves much to be desired.

Stefanos Triantafyllos, NBA.com/GreeceRegarding their playing style their biggest difference was bulk. Michael Jordan as he grew older he started using his upper body strength more and more, dominating with his shoulders. He weighted 10 lbs more than Kobe and was a player that thrived after contact. As for their game approach the biggest difference comes around to their different aspect of leadership and they way the affect their team and their opponents. It’s not a matter of number-crunching, but more of a contrast of wins and rings.

For more debates, go to #AmexNBA or www.nba.com/homecourtadvantage.

Morning shootaround — Dec. 8


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Dec. 7

NEWS OF THE MORNING

LeBron fired up to play before the royals | Changes don’t fix Lakers’ problems | Reality bites the Heat

No. 1: LeBron relishes opportunity to dazzle the royals — LeBron James, a self-anointed “King”playing before Britain’s Prince William and his wife, Duchess  Kate Middleton tonight in Brooklyn has a certain royal ring to it, no? It does for Cleveland’s King. LeBron is looking forward to showing off for the high-profile visitors, yet another opportunity for the world’s best player to brandish his global brand. Dave McMenamin of ESPN.com has more:

“It’s an honor,” James said before the Cavs practiced in New York City on Sunday. “It’s a huge honor. The stuff that you read about, people like them are only in books growing up. And to hear that they’re coming to town to see me play and they want to see me do what I do best, it’s a huge honor.”

The royal couple will also meet with President Barack Obama on their U.S. tour. Count the president as another dignitary who has come to witness James play in person.

“Well I’ve had people from all across the board as far as stature, but the President of the United States, that was pretty huge,” James said. “To have those two, to say they were traveling here and one of the things that they wanted to do was see me play, it’s a pretty big deal in my household.”

James told reporters he has only seen Will and Kate “on television and the Internet and things, just like the rest of you,” and hopes to get a personal audience with the pair at Barclays Center.

“I would like to,” James said. “They are going to be at the game so hopefully I get the opportunity to interact with them a little bit. We’ll see what happens.”

Cavaliers guard Kyrie Irving joked that he owns a DVD of the prince and duchess’ royal wedding from back in April, 2011.

“It will be great to see them in person,” Irving said. “I mean, for me, seeing celebrities in person is awesome. I don’t really know too much about them, but they’re celebrities in our world so I guess it’s great to see them.”


VIDEO: Russell Westbrook throws down the thunder dunk

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No. 2: Changes don’t fix what’s wrong with the Lakers — Change Lakers fans can believe in still hasn’t come. Byron Scott shook up his lineup, benching Carlos Boozer and Jeremy Lin for Sunday’s game against the New Orleans Pelicans, and got the same result as usual this season. Another loss for Kobe Bryant and the Lakers means that Scott is still searching for the right mix as time is quickly running out on any faint hope for this season in Los Angeles. Mike Bresnahan of The Los Angeles Times sheds some light on the dark times in LA:

Fans booed as the Lakers fell behind by 20 points going into the fourth quarter at Staples Center.

Kobe Bryant took nearly an hour before talking to reporters after the game. Boozer tried to one-up Bryant by not talking to reporters, period. Lin called the demotion “one of the toughest situations I’ve been in.”

Ladies and gentlemen, your 2014-15 Lakers.

“If you look at our record, you have to make changes,” Scott said. “I’m not going to stand back and just watch it continue to be played this way. To me it was a no-brainer.”

Ed Davis had 12 points in place of Boozer and Ronnie Price had three points and three assists in Lin’s spot.

Bryant spoke matter-of-factly, not angrily, when he finally emerged to talk to reporters.

“Not everything is going to be great, champagne, celebrations and winning championships,” he said after scoring 14 points. “You’ve got to go through some hard stuff too. If this was the Titanic, I’d go down with that. … I’m not jumping off.”

This is all too familiar for Lin, demoted last season in Houston after being outplayed by Patrick Beverley. Boozer also had his time shortened in Chicago, benched in the second and fourth quarters toward the end of last season in favor of Taj Gibson.

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No. 3: Reality bites the Heat after fourth straight loss — All of those conversations about the Miami Heat and their place in history that were had over the past four seasons seems like a lifetime ago these days. The Heat, losers of four straight games after falling to the Memphis Grizzlies Sunday, are feeling reality’s bite right now. They are no longer the juggernaut they were with Dwyane Wade, LeBron James and Chris Bosh headlining the show. It’s a different world for the Heat, as Joseph Goodman of the Miami Herald explains:

Chris Bosh slammed the ball against his head in a display of exasperation.

Dwyane Wade just walked off the court laughing and shaking his head.

Even when the Heat did everything right defensively, the Memphis Grizzlies still scored and scored and scored on Sunday at FedEx Forum in their 103-87 victory, but Courtney Lee’s desperation three-pointer from 30 feet seemed especially cruel.

Both Mario Chalmers and Josh McRoberts had their hands on the ball, but neither player could come away with the steal. Instead, the loose ball found Lee, who heaved a prayer toward the rim. It swished the net, of course, because everything goes down against this Heat defense these days.

The Grizzlies shot better than 60 percent until the final two minutes of the game, settling for 58.9 percent from the field. It was the highest shooting percentage of the season for Memphis (16-4), and the high-water mark came on a night star center Marc Gasol was 1 of 6 from the field for two points.

“They didn’t even hurt us in our normal game,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. “That’s what’s disappointing. It was all the miscellaneous actions.”

The Heat (9-11) has lost five of its past six games, including four in a row, and in each of those losses opponents shot at least 54 percent from the field.

“It’s open season,” said Bosh, who had 12 points and two rebounds. “Until we take more pride in that as a unit, it’s just not going to happen. We’ve got to individually guard the ball with passion, and everything else with follow.”

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SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Rockets coach Kevin McHale says Dwight Howard isn’t coming back anytime soon …  Warriors co-owner Joe Lacob apologizes for his comments about former coach Mark Jackson …  Thunder stretch reeling Pistons’ slide to 12 straight … Mum is the word from Phil Jackson on the Knicks …

ICYMI of the Night: The entire cast of Top Five, Chris Rock’s latest comedy, sat down for an interview with our very own Lang Whitaker of the All Ball Blog … 


VIDEO: Lang Whitaker sits down with the cast of Top Five

 

 

Morning shootaround — Dec. 4


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Dec. 3

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Deng suffers hand injury | ‘Melo was truly torn over Bulls and Knicks | MJ wasn’t sole influence on Kobe’s game | Dirk starts All-Star campaigning for Ellis

No. 1: Heat’s Deng suffers hand injury – The Miami Heat face their first prolonged road trip of the season as a five-game stretch looms, and they may very well tipoff that trip without their starting small forward. Luol Deng suffered a hand injury in last night’s 112-102 home loss to the Atlanta Hawks and his status for the road trip is unknown, writes Michael Wallace of ESPN.com:

Heat starting forward Luol Deng is considered questionable heading into the team’s five-game road trip after he sustained a right hand injury during Wednesday’s loss to the Atlanta Hawks.

Deng was hurt when he landed on his right hand as he fell to the court while attempting to draw a charge in the second quarter. Deng did not play in the second half of the 112-102 loss, and an X-ray taken after the game was negative.

The injury was diagnosed as a bone bruise to the area near Deng’s right thumb and index finger, and the 11-year veteran will be re-evaluated again Thursday to determine if further tests are necessary.

“We’re going to just wait and see,” said Deng, who finished with five points and three rebounds in just under 17 minutes. “We’re going to monitor it the next couple of days. I tried to (keep playing). I came back in and I just had trouble passing and shooting the ball, so we made the decision to sit out.”

Deng’s status is uncertain for at least the initial games of a trip that starts Friday against Milwaukee and continues with games against Memphis, Phoenix, Denver and Utah.

The setback is the latest in a number of recent struggles for the Heat (9-9), who were already coping with the absences of starting point guard Norris Cole (illness) and reserve center Chris Andersen (ankle).


VIDEO: Luol Deng talks about the Heat’s loss and his wrist injury

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Report: Garnett would like to buy Timberwolves one day

Can’t you see it now?

A dapper Kevin Garnett, wearing a designer suit and tie, leaping out of his courtside seat at the Target Center, slapping two hands on the floor and snarling expletive-laden invective at visiting teams.

Call it executive level trash talk, giving a whole new level to the idea of “owning” an opponent.

First though, Garnett wants to actually own his own team, namely the Timberwolves, for whom he toiled his first 12 NBA seasons. That’s what he told Marc Spears of Yahoo Sports!:

“I want to buy the Timberwolves. Put a group together and perhaps some day try to buy the team. That’s what I want,” Garnett said after a 107-99 loss to the Golden State Warriors on Thursday night.

The Timberwolves drafted Garnett with the fifth overall pick in the 1995 NBA draft. The 15-time All-Star played for the Timberwolves for 12 seasons before being traded to Boston, where he led the Celtics to a championship in 2008. Garnett pushed Minnesota to eight consecutive playoff appearances, and the franchise has not been to the postseason since his departure.

The Timberwolves were valued at $430 million in January, according to Forbes Magazine. The next NBA television contract will be extremely lucrative and is expected to raise the price of the franchise. Garnett, the 2004 MVP who averaged 20.5 points and 11.4 rebounds during his tenure with Minnesota, has made $315 million in his NBA career and will make an additional $12 million this season. He also has made millions in endorsements.

Nets general manager Billy King said he wouldn’t be surprised if Garnett were to buy the Timberwolves.

“He would be one of the best owners in the NBA because he understands what the players need and he understands what it takes to be successful in the NBA,” King told Yahoo Sports.

On May 12, Timberwolves owner Glen Taylor told the Associated Press he was looking to add a minority partner who would hold an option to buy him out. Taylor also made it clear he is committed to keeping the team in Minnesota.

Timberwolves president and coach Flip Saunders is Garnett’s former coach with the franchise, which is rebuilding and expected to miss the playoffs once again. But the team does have several young talented players: 2014 No. 1 draft pick Andrew Wiggins, Ricky Rubio, Gorgui Dieng, Nikola Peckovic, Anthony Bennett, Shabazz Muhammad and rookie Zach LaVine.
For Garnett, it’s all about his history with the franchise.

“That is the one that has my interest. I have ties there. Flip’s there,” said Garnett, 38.

The NBA has had its share of colorful owners. The late Larry Miller used to stand on the court with his Jazz players shagging basketballs during pre-game warmups. The late Dr. Jerry Buss exuded all that was cool and Hollywood about the Lakers with his casual fashion and his lifestyle. Just last year Grizzlies owner Robert Pera publicly challenged Michael Jordan to a high-profile game of 1-on-1 to benefit charity.

But you’ve got to admit that the volatile, emotional K.G. could take the role of team owner to a new and most colorful direction.

Would it be in-your-executive-suite, in-your-face? The first owner ever voted to the All-Defense first team?

If Garnett’s dream comes true, we’ll admit to having our fingers crossed for a Western Conference finals matchup one day soon against the Clippers and their loud, screamingly excitable boss man Steve Ballmer.


VIDEO: Relive Kevin Garnett’s top 10 plays from his Timberwolves days

NBA TV Fan Night #BestDuos Tournament

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NBA.com staff reports

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — It sounds like a slam dunk — or better yet, a sky hook — in theory.

A superstar pairing of Hall of Famers Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Magic Johnson against … well, just about any other duo in NBA history. When you stack up their accomplishments (titles, MVPs, All-Star bids, etc.) it’s hard to imagine another pair of NBA superstars past or present, piling up more hardware than the Showtime Lakers dynamic duo.

Hall of Famer Charles Barkley and Kevin Johnson didn’t do it as long and didn’t do it nearly as big (no titles), but they had flashes that absolutely dazzled the basketball world. Barkley, who starred with Magic on the original Dream Team, ranks as one of the greatest talents the league has ever seen. And Johnson, the Mayor of Sacramento these days, spent 12 years shredding opposing teams as one of the league’s elite point guards.

NBA TV’s Fan Night #BestDuos Tournament is the only place where you get to vote on on this all-important issue.

You can cast your vote on Twitter using #BESTDUO1 for Magic and Kareem or #BESTDUO2 for Chuck and KJ.

Keep in mind that this is not a vote on who would win an actual 2-on-2 tournament but a vote on the historical impact of the best duo based on what they accomplished during their respective careers.

Tune into Fan Night on NBA TV every Tuesday for the results of the vote and updates on the current week’s matchup. LeBron James and Dwyane Wade won the Week 1 matchup over Julius “Dr. J” Erving and Moses Malone.

Here is the bracket …

bestduosbracket

‘Big Smooth’ didn’t gripe about 82

Sam Perkins ranks 19th all time in games played (1,286) and 55th in minutes (36,598). The sleepy-eyed, sweet-shooting forward/center known as “Big Smooth” played at least 80 games in nine different seasons and played all 82 three times.

He’s been retired for more than 13 years, finishing with Indiana in 2000-01 after divvying up his 17 seasons between Dallas, the L.A. Lakers, Seattle and the Pacers. At 53, he’s not especially prone to “back in my day” crankiness, but he does wonder why a workload of 82 games seems too much for NBA players and their coaches in recent seasons.

Cleveland’s LeBron James talked last month about the benefits of playing fewer games, if the NBA would ever curtail its schedule. San Antonio coach Gregg Popovich has made it part of his calling card – along with taciturn quarter-break interviews – to rest his veteran stars numerous times during the regular season. But Perkins hasn’t been persuaded.

“Huh. I didn’t really have a problem with 82 games,” Perkins said during a Google+ Hangout with SportsBlog.com. “I thought once you got the format and they rolled it out for you, that’s what you had to do. And on top of that, we had to practice three hours a day, two times for two weeks [in training camp]. So I don’t know how much [more] grueling it is now.”

One gripe with which Perkins does agree: The heavy slate of back-to-back games, which grind on the players and may lead to shabbier basketball on those second nights. Or in the Spurs’ case, multiple absences from the lineup.


VIDEO: Perkins talks to SportsBlog.com

“Back-to-backs take a lot out of you, whether you’re a veteran or a young cat. That will tend to mess with you a little bit with injuries,” Perkins said.

Perkins, a teammate of Michael Jordan‘s at North Carolina who was drafted immediately after him in the 1984 Draft, spends time traveling as an NBA ambassador these days. He went to China with the Brooklyn Nets and spent part of the summer “hanging out” with Team USA at the FIBA World Cup in Spain. Perkins serves on the board of Special Olympics and has been preparing for the Games in L.A. next summer.

Last week he and former NBA player Cedric Ceballos traveled to Johannesburg, South Africa, for the Beyond Sport global summit and awards. One of that organization’s initiatives, Perkins said, was a program in Cambodia to eradicate land mines, making fields safe for kids to play.

But he seemed happy to spend time Friday answering questions via his iPad about his NBA career on a variety of topics:

On his notoriety as an ahead-of-the-curve, perimeter-shooting big man: “I know coaches did acknowledge the reason why they hate me so much is because all their players now try to shoot the three instead of staying inside. … Back then, Coach [George] Karl, Coach [Mike] Dunleavy and all these guys, they wanted to open up the game. So they said, you might need to work on your shot after practice. I didn’t even think about it, but shooting 3s with Byron Scott and all the guards, it just got better. … Guys, when I see them from different teams now, that’s all they know, that I shot 3s.”

On the 1984 U.S. Olympic experience: “It was grueling. Bobby Knight had us down in Indiana … and we went three times a day. I had never seen anything like it. Guys you had heard about finally meeting, and everybody was wondering ‘Who are you? What are you going to do?’ It was our first time meeting if you didn’t play then in college. Charles Barkley, Chuck Person, Antoine Carr, Xavier McDaniel. We just had an all-star crew there. … Bobby Knight was a different coach from Coach [Dean] Smith and what I was accustomed to. You had to pay attention because, as you know, Bobby Knight wasn’t one to play with.”

A player he modeled his game after, growing up in New York: “I saw the Knicks a lot. Willis Reed. Dean Meminger. Walt Frazier. Earl Monroe. These are the guys that I always wanted to be like. Because they played hard, they played together.” Perkins also mentioned ABA legends Artis Gilmore, George Gervin and Connie Hawkins – whom he actually saw play on the playgrounds in Brooklyn – as influences.

The NBA players with the best hair and best nickname: “I would have to say [Anderson] Varejao. No, no, I take that back. Joakim Noah. And favorite nickname? It’s got to be Kobe [Bryant]. ‘Black Mamba.’ ”

Favorite teammate: “Chris Mullin, Detlef Schrempf and James Worthy. They were solid.”

His advice to current players about life after basketball: Line up internships in fields that interest them in the offseason. And network. “You definitely have to prepare while you’re playing. They tell you when you come into the league to try to meet as many people as you can – open doors to different avenues. It helped a great deal. And trying to have a positive persona for people to [be attracted to].”

The prospect of NBA franchises in international markets: “The new spot everybody’s thinking about is New Delhi, India. India has the potential of having the NBA there. They have the money, they have the infrastructure. And even though we may not think of India as an NBA country, it is probably one that can sponsor the NBA. It’s fascinating to see the hype for NBA basketball. … The place I would have liked to play would definitely be Spain. It’s a place where I hear a lot of guys go over there, they practice a lot but they don’t play as many games.”

Perkins also participated in a lightning round of word association:

Kobe? “Shooter.”

Knight? “Angry.”

SuperSonics? “Best team I ever played on.”

Michael? “Good teammate.”

Big Smooth? “I think of Byron Scott. He gave me that name.”

MJ’s Hornets going back to the future

CHARLOTTE — Give him the ball and get out of the way.

For years, that was the first ingredient to the recipe for success that helped make Michael Jordan the first true global icon the NBA ever produced. It was like nothing anyone had ever seen.

Fast forward 30 years and it’s the same ingredients for the owner of the Charlotte Hornets. Jordan and the entire management team have rebranded the former Charlotte Bobcats, bringing the buzz back to this city in an unprecedented fashion for the start of the 2014-15 season.

After taking over Twitter on Tuesday (above), MJ held court in a different way, hosting eight reporters from around the country for lunch at Time Warner Cable Arena just hours before the Hornets home opener against the Milwaukee Bucks.

He didn’t need any fancy introduction. He simply walked in, grabbed his seat in the middle of the room and said bring it on.

Like I said, give him the ball and get out of the way …

Q: Are you a better owner today than you were when you first took over, and if so, how did that come about?

MJ: Uh, you have to define what better is really. Am I a more experienced owner? Yes. Am I an owner that made mistakes? Yes. Am I an owner that made good decisions? I like to assume so, yes. But it’s amazing what winning does. I always considered myself an owner that was dedicated to doing the best job to bring the best team here to the city of Charlotte. And with that comes a lot of criticism based on wins and losses. And based on the wins and losses over the years I’ve been in ownership, people have questioned that. Now that we’re winning, people are giving their opinions about that from a different perspective. I’ve always considered myself a very successful owner that tries to make sound decisions. And when you make bad decisions, you learn from that and move forward. I think I’m better in that sense. I’ve experienced all of the different valleys and lows that ownership and successful of business. If that constitutes me being a better owner, than I guess I am.

Q: How tough is it to know when to insert yourself as an owner and when you let your “team” do their business on a daily basis and not interfere with that process?

MJ: In some ways it is very similar to a game. When you feel like you can make an impact and give some insight, some leadership, you do that. You kind of read the scenarios. For me to make good sound decisions I have to understand every facet of what’s happening within the building and within the team. These guys keep me up to date and inform me of all the decisions that need to be made. I dissect that and when the decision is made we collaborate and I ask for their opinion, they ask for my opinion and then at the end of the day we have to formulate a plan and then ride with it. That’s kind of the formula that happens underneath this roof. But it all starts with me. The criticism starts with me. And if things go well, everybody always look a bunch of different ways. But if things go bad, they always look to the top. And I understand that, which makes me get more involved. I understand all the decision-making that has to be done and get a grip on all the things that have to be done.

Q: What do you understand about the role of an owner now that you didn’t understand as a player?

MJ: It’s a big team and you want the team to understand exactly what the focus is. You want to be able to relate from top to bottom. And it’s a bigger responsibility. When you’re the leader of an organization, they look for you in a lot of different ways. And you have to exert that kind of confidence, determination and effort. And the decision-making process, so that has been the process for me over the last four years of ownership … learning the process and applying my personality, thoughts, wishes and leadership whenever necessary so that when the time comes we can make sound decisions. It’s about implementing systems and things that work for this organization. And what may work for this organization may be totally different for other organizations … understanding the dynamics of that. And it’s believe me, it’s been fun. It’s been hard, but I’ve had fun doing it.

Q: You’ve tried different things as an owner, different people in different positions. Why does the combination right now — owner, general manager and coach — in terms of what you want to do?

MJ: Things have fallen into place. The business and the basketball are working hand in hand. And they both have different dynamics. The business has certain things they to do to make sure we maximize all the energy and effort that we have on our team. Same thing on the basketball side. They have to understand how to get the returns on free agency, the Draft and all of the guys we have on our team and somehow, collectively, form the overall product and keep the business thriving and growing. And that’s where I think the last couple of years things have started to happen. The business has really been strong. Our guys beating the bushes to get the community back involved, to get the corporate sponsors back involved. And all of those things back working in a positive way the basketball back to where we are restructuring with coaches and players and things of that nature and now you have both of them on the same page and both of them working in hand in hand to where everything started to turn into a prosperous situation. And it makes me look like a genius. Sometimes it happens that way.


VIDEO: One-on-one conversation with Jordan, Part 1

Q: How different are you this time around compared to when you were with the Wizards, how have you changed?

MJ: It’s been a gradual change. With the Wizards, it was the first time I’ve ever been into the operations standpoint. I had different leadership, different perspectives, different initiatives, different roles, expectations from an organization standpoint, which I had no control. My initial responsibility – Fred [Brown] was there, he can tell you – it was trying to get from where we were to a much more positive sense. That had a lot to do with the financial aspect. And I felt like we did that. A lot of things happened – me going back to play, and in doing so we didn’t understand some of the dynamics of being a general manager in terms of selecting personnel, finding the right mix, finding the camaraderie, the continuity from a basketball sense. So that was a learning curve for me. Coming here in a similar role, I utilized some of those experiences to try to enhance, from a basketball sense, and once again I wasn’t in control of the overall goal of the organization. I was following that leadership. Not that I’m making an excuse, but it changed. Now I’m in control of everything. I can put my own DNA, I can put my own twists, I can put my own demands and start from a different leadership position. And those previous situations helped me set those type of standards for that type of leadership and obviously my participation in all of that. And I think that I’m better because of that. It was a well-traveled road, probably one of the roads I wouldn’t have suggested for myself, but yet I’m much better today because of that experience.

(more…)

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 174) Featuring Bob Ryan

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS – We’ve been having these arguments for years. In barber shops and sports bars, basement man caves and back porches. No one ever wins or loses either, because the debate never ends. Would Wilt Chamberlain or Bill Russell be as dominant today as they were in their day? What about Oscar Robertson today or Shaq, Kobe Bryant or LeBron James back then? Whose game transcends time? Everyone will pick Michael Jordan, Magic Johnson, Larry Bird and other members of the NBA’s all-time elite. But for the rest of the mere mortals … who’s to say a great athlete in today’s game would automatically dominate a bygone era when athleticism was not at the premium it is now? No one can answer with certainty. Educated guesses are still the best anyone can do in this regard.  Unless, of course, you are Bob Ryan, the retired Boston Globe columnist and living and breathing basketball encyclopedia, a man who has literally seen it all, from one era to another and another and another. His new memoir, “SCRIBE: My Life in Sports” is a must read, by the way. He joins us on Episode 174 of the Hang Time Podcast to stoke the age-old debate we revisit often around here. Whose game could shuffle through time and remain as potent in one dimension as it would in another?   Dive into Episode 174 to find out where we all stand … LISTEN HERE: As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of NBA.com,  Lang Whitaker of NBA.com’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand and the best sound designer/engineer in the business,  Jarell “I Heart Peyton Manning” Wall. – To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.

Hakeem: Howard is ‘ready’ for an MVP-type season

Dwight Howard and Hakeem Olajuwon

Hakeem Olajuwon (left) has seen Dwight Howard’s game mature and grow of late. (Bill Baptist/NBAE via Getty Images)

At least one former MVP doesn’t think it should have taken a broken bone in Kevin Durant’s foot to throw the 2015 MVP race wide open.

According to Hakeem Olajuwon, Dwight Howard was already prepared to kick the door down.

“He’s healthy. He’s strong. He’s ready,” said Olajuwon, who won the award in 1994 when he led the Rockets to the first of their back-to-back championships. “Now it’s about having the attitude to go out every night and dominate.”

The Hall of Famer officially rejoined his former team as a player development specialist after Howard signed a free agent contract with the Rockets in July 2013 and recently concluded his second training camp stint working with the All-Star center before returning to his home in Amman, Jordan. Prior to the start of camp, Olajuwon had not worked with Howard since the end of last season.

“He’s older, more mature and you can tell that he is feeling better physically,” Olajuwon said. “I like what I saw. He is a very hard worker. He takes the job seriously and you can see that he has used some of the things we talked about last season and is making them part of his game.”

Howard averaged 18.3 points, 12.2 rebounds and 1.8 blocked shots in his first season with the Rockets and Olajuwon thinks the 28-year-old was just scratching the surface as he regained fitness.

“It was a good start, but last year Dwight was still trying to recover from the back surgery and to feel like himself again,” said Olajuwon. “I think a lot of people don’t appreciate what it is like for an athlete to have a back injury. It is serious. It is a challenge.

“I could see last year when I worked with him in camp that there were some things that he could not do. Or they were things that he did not think he could do. The difference now is that he is fit and those doubts are gone. This is the player who can go back to being the best center in the league and the kind of player that can lead his team to a championship. I think he should be dominant at both ends of the floor.”

Olajuwon is the only player in NBA history to be named MVP of the regular season, Defensive Player of the Year and Finals MVP in the same season when he led the Rockets in 1994 and pulled the wagon again as Finals MVP when Houston repeated in 1995. He and Michael Jordan are the only players to win all three awards in their career.

Olajuwon doesn’t believe there is any reason the Rockets, who finished as the No. 4 seed in the West and were eliminated in the first round of the playoffs by Portland last spring, should fall back, even with the departure of rotation players Chandler Parsons, Jeremy Lin and Omer Asik.

“They have Dwight and they have James Harden,” he said. “That is two of the best players at their positions in the league. Those two can lead. Those two can do enough. You don’t need to have All-Stars at every position.

“The Rockets will need good play from some young players and from others who will be getting their chance to be key players for the first time in their careers. But when we won our first championship in 1994, we had Sam Cassell, who was a rookie, playing at the end of games and making a difference. When we won in 1995, we had Clyde (Drexler). But we also had Pete Chilcutt in the starting lineup and Chucky Brown and Charles Jones stepping up off the bench.

“When you have Howard and Harden, you have two players who can do much of the scoring. What you need are others to not try to do too much. Just concentrate on doing your job and coming to play every night.”

It begins and ends with Howard.

“We all know that center is the key position in the game,” Olajuwon said. “Everything should go through you — offense and defense and the right mentality. If the center is thinking about dominating, the team can go far, can go all the way.

“I played at a time when were so many players that could win the MVP each year — Michael Jordan, Larry Bird, Magic Johnson, Charles Barkley, Karl Malone. It meant you weren’t going to win the MVP every year. But you had to play like an MVP and have your name in the conversation. I believe that’s where Dwight is now. He is healthy. He is physically fit. He is strong. He wants to win.

“It is about attitude. He should have a season that makes everyone vote for him as MVP. If that happens, they should be contenders for the championship. I believe that. Now they have to believe it.”


VIDEO: Hakeem Olajuwon schools Dwight Howard on post moves back in 2010