Posts Tagged ‘Mark Jackson’

Warriors or Knicks for Kerr? Go west!

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com


VIDEO: The Inside Crew discussed Mark Jackson’s future with the Warriors before he was fired Tuesday

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Steve Kerr doesn’t need professional advice from me or anyone else.

But as a concerned colleague, I’m going to give it anyway.

STAY OUT OF NEW YORK!

Seriously.

Listen to everything they have to say. Soak it all up. But no matter how much they sweeten the offer, no matter how intoxicating the idea of joining force with Phil Jackson sounds, you need to resist that urge. Don’t make this an emotional thing. Keep it about business. Strictly business.

If you’re going to dive into these nasty coaching waters, where guys get fired with winning records, after 51-win seasons that include playing in Game 7s of playoff series, do it somewhere other than New York.

The Knicks are not yet ready for the sort of success that can be attained with the core group the Golden State Warriors have assembled. And if you are indeed atop their wish list as well, that’s an opportunity you cannot let pass.

The Warriors fired Mark Jackson this afternoon, surprising no one with the decision to part ways with their coach of three seasons after three straight years of improvement.

The Warriors made the playoffs in two of the past three seasons after making it just once in the 17 seasons before Jackson arrived.  They made it in back-to-back years for the first time since 1991 under Jackson, whose 51-win season this year wasn’t enough to save him from Tuesday’s chopping block.

That first round exit against the Los Angeles Clippers, a Game 7 for the No. 6 seed Warriors against the No. 3 seed Clippers, was again, not enough to save Jackson. Neither was candid and extremely public endorsements from the Warriors’ most high-profile players, including the face of the franchise, All-Star point guard Steph Curry.

But sometimes a fresh perspective is warranted.

Kerr brings that, the same way Jackson did when he was hired.

The window for most coaches to keep a team locked in on their vision is roughly three to four seasons anyway. Walking into that Warriors situation now is the ideal time for someone who has been crafting their own vision of the game and how he’d want his team to play in this era, could be a dream scenario for the right coach.

With a ton of experienced coaches, guys like George Karl, Stan Van Gundy, Byron Scott, Jeff Van Gundy, Lionel Hollins, Mike Woodson and others all available, the Warriors should have no shortage of candidates interested in coaching a team capable of  doing what we’ve seen out of the Warriors under Jackson?

In short, the Warriors have plenty of options. And since they didn’t worry about Curry’s feelings regarding Mark Jackson’s future with the franchise, they probably won’t bother consulting with their franchise player in the selection of Jackson’s replacement.

In years past I’d have worried about a franchise making a move like that. But not now. Not in this day and age of players and coaches making moves of their own in free agency and trades (Doc Rivers from the Celtics to the Clippers seems to have worked out well in LA).

If the Warriors’ front office feels as strongly about Kerr as most insiders believe they do, hence their quick decision on Jackson while the Knicks were trying to negotiate a deal with Kerr, the only thing left to do is make it official.

I’m going to miss Kerr’s sharp analysis on TNT and during March Madness, like plenty of others.

But if he’s hell-bent on coaching, on doing it to win and win big, then it’s pretty obvious to me where that needs to happen. And as much as I love the mystique and intrigue of what could be in New York, the better spot right now has to be in Oakland.

Morning Shootaround — May 5



VIDEO: Daily Zap for games played May 4

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Heat and Nets dismiss regular season series | Westbrook-Paul on center stage | Beal, Wizards prefer underdog role | Jackson’s future with Warriors no easy call | Portland’s Matthews keeps chip on shoulder … always

No. 1: Both sides dismiss regular season sweep by Nets in playoff matchup with Heat —  A 4-0 regular season sweep of the Miami Heat sounds good, until you realize that no one — not the Heat nor the Brooklyn Nets team that owned them (technically and at least on paper) during the regular season — believes it matters. Now that their Eastern Conference semifinal matchup is upon us, leaning on what happened between these two in the immediate past doesn’t seem like such a smart decision. Barry Jackson of the Miami Herald sets the table:

Nobody on either side reads too much into the Nets’ season sweep, which included three wins by one point and another in double overtime.

Remember that the Heat went 1-3 in the regular season against Boston and 0-3 against Chicago in 2010-11, then eliminated both in five-game playoff series. In 2011-12, Miami again went 1-3 against Boston during the regular season, then ousted the Celtics in a seven-game Eastern Conference finals.

“Regular season doesn’t indicate anything,” LeBron James said, speaking in general after Sunday morning’s practice. “You have more time to prepare” in the postseason.

Said Nets swingman Joe Johnson: “We know we can beat them, but it’s going to be a lot different than the regular season.”

The Nets create potential matchup problems with a starting frontcourt featuring Kevin Garnett at center, Paul Pierce moving from small forward to power forward and Johnson from shooting guard to small forward.

One option for Erik Spoelstra would be starting Rashard Lewis or Shane Battier, instead of Udonis Haslem, to match up defensively with Pierce or Johnson, though it’s unclear whether Spoelstra will do that.

Chris Bosh will have to match up with Garnett,” Dwyane Wade said. “The challenge is our rotations, of who [Spoelstra] will feel [comfortable] in playing. LeBron can obviously play [power forward]. So we can match down or we can continue to play our style, whatever [Spoelstra] wants to do.”

Johnson said last month that “I think we have a good chance” to beat the Heat in the playoffs because “small-ball works in our favor with them when they have LeBron James or Shane Battier at [power forward]. It’s a great fit.”

Pierce said last month: “We match up pretty good with them. Size-wise, they’re not an overly big team. If you can match them in quickness and intensity, especially on their home court, you give yourself a chance. The way we shoot the ball, we can pretty much play with anybody when we’re on.”

He said Sunday that Heat-Nets “is not a rivalry yet. We’re still trying to earn respect as a franchise.”

(more…)

#BestNBAPlayoffSaturdayEver!

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com


VIDEO: Damian Lillard finishes off the Houston Rockets with the buzzer-beating dagger in Game 6

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — This was already the best first round of NBA playoff basketball these eyes have seen.

From the opening tip of the very first game to last night’s Dame of Thrones dagger from Portland Trail Blazers All-Star Damian Lillard that eliminated the would-be-champion Houston Rockets in six games, this first-round whirlwind has been above and beyond anyone’s wildest imagination of what the first step of these 2014 NBA playoffs could be.

We’ve had 21 games decided by five points or less, eight overtime (or multiple overtime) games and a final weekend of the first round like nothing we’ve ever seen. The previous record for Game 7s in the same first round is just two, done several times and most recently in 2012 (the first round didn’t go to Game 7s until 2003).

By the opening tip Sunday this will be the most games we’ve ever seen in the first round of the NBA playoffs.

So this historic two-day finish, a staggering five Game 7s, kicking off today with three winner-take-all contests — making this the #BestNBAPlayoffSaturdayEver! — is the happy ending to every hoops lover’s dream scenario.

This is also the first time in NBA history we’ve had the pleasure of watching three Game 7s on the same day. All you have to do is tune in to TNT at 5 p.m. ET and you’ll get roughly eight straight hours of the game’s very best fighting it out for their playoff lives.

If we get five more games anything like what we’ve already seen, you’ll need extra supplies to get through what should be an absolutely wild weekend.

Your Saturday menu …

Game 1 — Atlanta Hawks at Indiana Pacers, 5:30 p.m. ET


VIDEO: TNT’s Game 7 preview of Hawks-Pacers

Will we get a Roy Hibbert sighting in what should easily be the most important game of his career, to date? He’ll be in uniform. And he’ll probably be in the starting lineup, as he has in all six games of this series so far. But will he actually show up? That’s the question that lingers for the Pacers’ flummoxed All-Star center.

The Hawks are not going to change their stripes now. They’re going to stretch the floor and try to make the Pacers defend that 3-point line as best they can, a strategy Mike Budenholzer‘s crew has worked to perfection when they are knocking down their shots. They’ll need another 15-for-27-type effort that helped them win Game 5 in Indy and not the 9-for-35 misery that cost them Game 6 at home. By the way, No. 8 seeds are 0-2 all-time against No. 1 seeds in Game 7s.

Let’s be real. The Pacers should have the edge. Paul George avoided suspension after he and several other players from both teams stepped onto the court during an altercation between Pacers point guard George Hill and Hawks forward Mike Scott in Game 6.

Except, of course, for that little fact that the Hawks have basically owned the Pacers at Bankers Life Fieldhouse the past month. “My thing is that three of the last four times we’ve played these guys (in Indy), they built 20-point leads and beat us pretty good,” Pacers coach Frank Vogel said. “So I don’t think anyone from this team can think we’re going to be OK just because we’re back home.”

***

Game 2 — Memphis Grizzlies at Oklahoma City Thunder, 8 p.m. ET


VIDEO: TNT’s Game 7 preview of Grizzlies-Thunder

Grizzlies big man Zach Randolph could not avoid the NBA’s disciplinary council, losing his chance to play in Game 7 after jaw-jacking Thunder rookie center Steven Adamswho adds the rugged Randolph to his long list of opposing players that have lost their cool trying to deal with the big fella. Raise your hand if you thought Adams would be the most important player in this series … didn’t think so!

As usual, Thunder coach Scott Brooks is in the crosshairs with his team’s season on the line. His lineup decisions — Caron Butler for Thabo Sefolosha? — with Randolph out will be scrutinized to no end if things go awry. It’ll be his fault regardless of what happens. Brooks has become a convenient scapegoat whenever folks discuss the Thunder.

Grizzlies point guard Mike Conley is ailing, too, giving coach Dave Joerger even more to worry about than just playing without Z-Bo. He’ll have Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook in full attack mode, not to mention that home crowd that won’t sit down until the game is in hand one way or another. If the Grizzlies really are planning on doing something special tonight, they’ll have to do it with some big-game contributions from someone with experience in these pressure-packed situations (Mike Miller anyone?).

If the Thunder can’t find its way out of this series, they’ll need to take a long and hard look at their personnel … and that’s from Brooks and his staff all the way down to the end of the bench. They don’t have an endless title-chasing window with this group, even with Durant and Westbrook headed into the primes of their careers. Game 7 is huge for all involved but it’s even more critical for the future of this particular Thunder group.

***

Game 3 — Golden State Warriors at Los Angeles Clippers, 10:30 p.m. ET


VIDEO: TNT’s Game 7 preview of Warriors-Clippers

You have to give Warriors coach Mark Jackson credit, he’s played the mind game in this series every bit as well as his team has played the actual games on the court. “The pressure’s on them,” Jackson told to the Mercury News Friday. “They earned the right to have home court, and they’ve got some stars — some in uniform, and one in a suit and tie. The pressure’s on them.” There’s plenty of pressure on Jackson, too. His players know it and so does everyone else. They’re fighting for him as much as anyone, per J.A. Adande of ESPN.

Speaking of pressure, that buzz about this being a defining moment for Clippers superstar point Chris Paul is not going anywhere. He’s working on a bad hamstring, but all eyes will be on CP3 tonight. As good as Blake Griffin , Jamal Crawford, DeAndre Jordan and others have been this season, this is still his team to lead to championship glory. His matchup with Steph Curry has been every bit as entertaining as expected, but he needs to finish with a flurry or face the wrath of a growing number of critics who insist he hasn’t come up big in the biggest situations for his team in the postseason.

The Warriors enjoy one of the best home crowds in all of sports. But they’ll have to dial-up a signature performance without the aid of that bunch that keep Oracle Arena rocking every night. That means cold-blooded marksmanship from Curry and Klay Thompson and something extra from Draymond Green, who has become the wild card in this series. If he can work his way under Griffin’s skin and get the Clippers’ All-Star into early foul trouble, the entire complexion of this game changes.

That “star in a suit and tie” that Jackson referenced, Clippers coach Doc Rivers, is doing double and perhaps even triple time on the job these days. The vice president of basketball operations is serving as the resident healer in chief not only for his players but also other employees within the organization in the wake of the Donald Sterling drama. For 48 minutes, and hopefully five or even 10 more tonight, he’ll be locked in strictly on what’s going on between those lines on the Staples Center floor.

***

As they say, you better get your popcorn ready for the #BestNBAPlayoffSaturdayEver!

Oh, and save some for Sunday …

 

Heading into Game 7, Mark Jackson makes his case

By Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com



VIDEO: Chuck, Ernie, Kenny and Shaq discuss the pending Game 7 of the Warriors-Clippers series

OAKLAND, Calif. – They were suddenly in a race of attrition, already without center and defensive presence Andrew Bogut the entire series, then Jermaine O’Neal, Bogut’s initial replacement as the starter, went out with a sprained knee, then Draymond Green got his fifth personal with 10:15 remaining, then David Lee, Bogut’s second replacement, fouled out with 9:44 left Thursday night. At least the Warriors had the benefit of knowing the longer Game 6 dragged out, the more time for their nails to grow to make the difference on the finger-tip hold on the season.

The series deficit and the fouls and the injuries and the 39.3 percent from the field and 62.2 percent from the line… and Golden State very comfortably works in the grinder. After an inconsistent season of too often failing to scrape together energy to play to the end, even at Oracle Arena as the passionate home fans push them, this would be the counter. Warriors 100, Clippers 99, Mark Jackson a couple million.

Jackson may still get fired no matter what happens Saturday night in Game 7 in Los Angeles amid a disconnect with upper-management, as plugged-in Tim Kawakami of the Bay Area News Group outlined, but it just got a lot harder for owner Joe Lacob to make the case to change coaches. If the Warriors win those kind of games, with players standing up to the challenge, against a better opponent if both teams were full strength and certainly in this case, Thursday goes at the top of the list of arguments for the pro-Jackson faction.

“(The Clippers) made tough shots and you’re thinking, ‘Oh, my goodness, can we get out of here and make sure there is a Game 7?’ ” Jackson said. “But that is the way we want to leave ball games, where we’re on fumes. It’s a shame that we leave ball games with something left in the tank. I thought (Thursday) everybody that stepped on the floor was engaged. They were involved. We made mistakes, but they battled. They battled.

“I can think of folks saying, ‘Why are we playing small? Why is Draymond Green in the game?’ It’s because of moments like this. We didn’t play for last year or the year before. We played for the future and he’s ready because of those moments. Those guys just competed. I’m excited to see this young basketball team experience a Game 7 on the road. They haven’t experienced it as players. It’s new to Klay Thompson. It’s new to Stephen Curry. It’s new to Draymond Green. It’s new to all my guys other than the veterans that have been around and have been on other teams. It’s new to me. It’s going to be a lot of fun because a lot of folks didn’t think we’d be here.”

He got that right. The teams split four regular-season meetings that were often contentious, but the Clippers finished six games ahead in the standings as the top teams in the Pacific Division. Even the Warriors’ best player, Curry, wouldn’t win a head-to-head matchup at his position, not with Chris Paul his opposite at point guard. And then with Bogut sidelined by a fractured rib, forget it.

It turned into the strangest series from there. Blake Griffin was immediately a force, but fouled out after 19 minutes in Game 1 and Golden State won. The Clippers responded with center DeAndre Jordan appearing unstoppable in the absence of Bogut. Donald Sterling made an appearance. The teams talked about boycotting at least a game as protest if commissioner Adam Silver did not make a strong ruling against Sterling. The Warriors are winning without Curry dominating, the Clippers without Paul consistently starring.

Jackson said before Game 6 the pressure was on L.A. because shorthanded Golden State wasn’t supposed to make it this interesting, so imagine now that it’s at a Game 7 and the Clippers are at home and in an elimination situation. Imagine now that the Warriors are on the brink of the second round and what that would mean for Jackson’s future.

Morning Shootaround — April 30



VIDEO: Daily Zap for games played April 29

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Parker iffy for Game 5 | Removing Sterling may not be easy | Strange times with Warriors’ coaching staff | Noah reveals he has knee injury

No. 1: Banged-up Parker iffy for Game 5 — Around February during the season, San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg Popovich gave All-Star point guard Tony Parker significant time off to rest his myriad of injuries. That was done so that Parker would be healthy and ready to hold up for what San Antonio hoped would be a repeat run to The Finals. Parker, though, is suffering through a troublesome ankle injury and his status for tonight’s Game 5 against the Mavericks in San Antonio is unknown, writes Dan McCarney of the San Antonio Express-News

Tony Parker is listed as day-to-day in advance of Game 5 after being diagnosed with a Grade 1 sprain of his left ankle, suffered in the first half of the Spurs’ 93-89 victory at Dallas on Monday.

“We’ll see how he is (Wednesday),” Popovich said.

The injury is not believed to have required an MRI or x-ray. Grade I sprains are the least severe among three classifications.

Parker finished with 10 points on 5-for-14 shooting in Game 4. He still played 14 minutes in the second half, returning late to hit an important jumper that gave the Spurs an 87-84 lead with 1:37 remaining. The Spurs’ victory knotted the series at 2-2 entering Wednesday’s game at the AT&T Center.

Parker had been uneven even before the injury, averaging just 3.3 in the second half of the first three games. He is averaging 15.5 points and 4.5 assists in the series.

(more…)

Morning Shootaround — April 29



VIDEO: Daily Zap for games played April 28

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Pacers, Vogel ponder lineup changes | Heat soak in another sweep | Report: Ex-Warriors assistant taped conversations | Rockets’ Alexander offers solution for Sterling issue

No. 1: Pacers, Vogel ponder changes after Game 5 shocker —  As our own Steve Aschburner pointed out last night, the Pacers find themselves and their Finals-hopeful season on the brink after a Game 5 loss at home to the Hawks. A telling second quarter — in which Atlanta outscored Indiana 41-19, mostly on the heroics of reserve Mike Scott — has the Pacers thinking some lineup changes will be necessary for Game 6, although even that notion is a bit mixed. Mike Moneith at Pacers.com has more on the team’s state after the loss:

This qualifies as a desperate time, and therefore calls for a desperate measure.

Then again, is it really desperate to change the starting lineup when you’re down 3-2 and in danger of becoming the sixth No. 1 seed in NBA history to lose to a No. 8 seed? The bold thing would be to go with the status quo.

“I consider everything at this point,” Frank Vogel said in the wake of his team’s 107-97 loss to the Hawks at Bankers Life Fieldhouse on Monday.

Changes to the starting lineup, or even playing rotation, aren’t as simple they’re often made out to be, given the lack of time for preparation between games in a playoff series, but a team trailing 3-2 doesn’t have the luxury of getting virtually nothing from its starting center. None of the voices heard in the Pacers’ somber postgame locker room could be heard calling for a drastic change. David West even went so far as to say “we can’t change our starting group.”

When they were down 30 midway through the third quarter, the Pacers’ lineup consisted of Chris Copeland, C.J. Watson, Paul George, David West and George Hill. That group got Atlanta’s lead down to 20 by the end of the period. Lance Stephenson and Ian Mahinmi started the fourth quarter but Mahinmi was subbed out less than three minutes later and Stephenson was back on the bench with 5:23 left. The group that started the comeback from 30 down finished the game from there, and got within nine points twice before it was too late. Their last reasonable hope came after Paul Millsap missed twice and the Pacers got the ball back, but George missed a three-pointer with 1:10 left that could have made it a six-point game.

Still, the lineup worked.

(more…)

Heat in full support of Clippers, anxious for league response to Sterling

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com


VIDEO: The Heat staged a silent protest before Game 4 in Charlotte

CHARLOTTE — LeBron James and his Miami Heat teammates are in full support of their friends, colleagues and competitors in Los Angeles as the NBA players, fans and owners league-wide — along with the entire sports world — await word from NBA Commissioner Adam Silver on the fate of Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling.

As much as James and the Heat were focused on their chance to close out the Charlotte Bobcats in Game 4 of their first round playoff series Monday night at Time Warner Cable Arena, they were just as tuned into the ongoing drama surrounding Sterling, whose alleged racist comments to his girlfriend that were caught on tape by TMZ have created a global firestorm.

They staged their own silent protest before the start of Monday’s game. Silver is scheduled to address the media Tuesday afternoon in regards to the league’s investigation into the Sterling matter.

James didn’t mice his words on the topic in the locker room before tip-off. He’s as anxious as anyone to see how the league will respond.

“We’re all in suspense and in waiting,” he said. “It’s a waiting game right now. We believe in the NBA. We believe in Adam Silver. Justice should be served.”

If the growing reaction from around the league, and the rest of the free world is any indication, that’s exactly what could happen.

Warriors coach Mark Jackson called for the fans to boycott Game 5. “If it was me, I wouldn’t come to the game,” he said. “I believe as fans, the loudest statement they could make as far as fans is to not show up to the game.

“As an African-American man that’s a fan of the game of basketball and knows its history and knows what’s right and what’s wrong, I would not come to the game tomorrow, whether I was a Clipper fan or a Warrior fan.” (more…)

Warriors search for lineup options

By Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com

VIDEO: Clippers vs. Warriors: Game 4 preview

OAKLAND – The coach had something of a threat.

Mark Jackson, his team down 2-1 and unable to stand up to the Clippers in play or intensity, said Friday he was considering a change to the Warriors lineup for Game 4 on Sunday afternoon, hoping to find big men who will at least match the aggressiveness of Blake Griffin and DeAndre Jordan.

“I could make a change,” Jackson said. “I won’t say whether I will or with who. But it’s possible. We’ve got to figure out a way to present some resistance. I think things are going a little too smoothly right now for Blake.”

The starting power forward had a guarantee.

David Lee, given a quick hook by Jackson in the third quarter of Game 3 for defensive failings as Griffin asserted his will without a Golden State stand, took ownership of the showing and pledged a response in the matinee at Oracle Arena.

” … I know other guys guarded him, but to start the game, I need to set that tone,” Lee said. “I’ll be better on Sunday, I can promise you that. I can promise you he’s played two games in a row, but this series is not over. I’m a guy that’s going to keep battling, that’s for sure.”

The Warriors spent Thursday on adjustments, both strategic and mental, to at least slow Griffin (83 points in 93 minutes) and Jordan (averaging 15 rebounds a game). It’s not quite desperate times calling for desperate measures, but did Hilton Armstrong just come up as a possible solution?

Among the problems: Golden State doesn’t have many options. Injured center Andrew Bogut has yet to return to practice, let alone get close to game action. Lee is saying all the right things, but approach and attitude have never been the problem and he was saying all the right things a week ago before the Griffin avalanche started.

The splashiest adjustment would be a change to the lineup. Maybe Lee out and Draymond Green in. Green, after all, helped spark the comeback that fell short in Game 3. Maybe Jermaine O’Neal to the bench, Lee to center and Green elevated to starter that way. But something.

Something all the way to possibilities that could include Armstrong and/or Marreese Speights and maybe even Ognjen Kuzmic. They have six fouls each to spend, and Jackson needs someone who can so much as break Griffin’s rhythm. So there will be some thought given to reaching deep into the bench at a time when all options must be on the table.

“Some serious thought,” Jackson said. “Especially the fact that some of those guys are better defenders. So there’s some thought to it and we’ll figure it out and look forward to Sunday. There’s some serious thought to it.”

They wouldn’t be expected to stop Griffin, just lean on him a few times, maybe fall down and become a human speed bump. Something. Anything.

“It’s been strange because we’re winning the points in the paint battle and winning the rebounding battle, but it seems like I’m seeing the same you are, that we’re having trouble attacking DeAndre at the rim,” Lee said. “And obviously defensively [from by the Warriors], Blake and DeAndre both had a good Game 3. It’s something that we need to continue just to attack and get to the body.

“Whether we’re getting calls at the rim or not, we need to continue to attack and do a better job, whether it be a guard driving or one of the bigs being aggressive. We just need to continue to attack, attack, attack. I feel like we’re letting DeAndre, especially the last game, be too much of a presence in there and deter too much of what we’re doing. It wouldn’t be as much of an issue if we were making a bunch of jump shots. But I think at this point we need to attack first and go from there.”

Adjust first. Then attack.

Warriors’ troubles a chance for Jackson

By Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com


VIDEO: Warriors look to bounce back in Game 3

Mark Jackson has been calling out his Warriors since the end of Game 2. Not as much as the Clippers did during Game 2, a 138-98 light workout for L.A. on Monday that marked the NBA’s first 40-point margin in the playoffs in nearly four years, but it’s a moment worth tracking anyway as Game 3 looms Thursday night.

It’s a perfect moment actually. Boxing fan Jackson had analogies ready about Golden State becoming the aggressor instead of being put in counter-punch mode, but more than anything basketball, coach Jackson had an opportunity to remind that he is an emotional leader in the locker room.

That has always been the case, the first step in credibility building after taking over in 2011 without bench experience. Now, though, the Warriors need a response louder than the Oracle Arena crowd as the 1-1 series moves north. They are still without injured center Andrew Bogut in a blow to the defense in particular, and Jackson’s future in the Bay Area will become bleaker than ever if his team doesn’t even put up a fight. Game 3, then, plays right to Jackson’s strength in being able to instill confidence.

“One thing I will not do, I will not act like I never saw playoff basketball before,” he said of the road kill of a Monday night in Los Angeles. “This happens. We played bad. We were awful. We own it. We’ve got to be better. We’ll get in the lab, we’ll make the adjustments and we look forward to Thursday. We turned the ball over, we didn’t defend at a high level, we were tentative. They (the Clippers) disrupted us with their intensity, with their aggressiveness defensively.

“Give them credit. There’s no sense in pointing the finger anywhere else other than the fact that we didn’t get the job done. But I will say this, just like I told my team: For 82 games we earned the sixth seed, we came here and earned home-court advantage. So we will not overreact.”

Someone asked him how the Warriors bounce back from a loss like that.

“We’re the Warriors,” Jackson replied. “You own it and you make the proper adjustments. We’ll watch film, we’ll go over stuff. The same way that the Clippers bounced back. It’s 1-1. We’re not going to overreact. We’re going to own the fact that we didn’t play well. We had some bad performances out there and we were out of character. But that being said, we’re not going to lose sight of the fact that we now have home-court advantage and if we stick to our game plan and do the things that we talked about doing to put us in position to win this series, I believe we’re going to be fine.”

The problem with the “We’re The Warriors” pitch is that they’re also the Warriors who didn’t take care of the ball during the regular season and then piled up 23 and 26 turnovers the first two games, and the same team that had bad moments against lesser opponents in trying to protect home court before getting to this stage. The flip side is that Golden State was obviously doomed in the first round a year ago, when they got crushed in a different way on the road with the Andre Miller layup that gave the Nuggets the victory, and when All-Star David Lee was lost to injury, and that turned out just fine.

The opponent this time is much better this time, an obvious difference. The bigger issue, though, is there was never a game when the Warriors of the 2013 playoffs lacked effort.

“Disappointed,” Jackson called his players’ competitive level. “(The Clippers were) a desperate basketball team that we played against (Monday). We didn’t match them. … They came into the game and they made plays. The disappointing part is overall we had an opportunity to take a commanding hold of this series and we did not. That doesn’t mean we’re going to win this game. But we didn’t lose it in the fashion that’s acceptable to us.”

The Warriors have a chance to respond Thursday at home. Jackson has a chance to make the moment his own.

Warriors make it seem like old times

By Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com


VIDEO: Warriors vs. Clippers: Game 1

LOS ANGELES – This is what it felt like a year ago, opening on the road against an opponent that rarely loses at home, unnerved by anxious moments, in the underdog role, Mark Jackson appearing firmly in control of the mood, major health concerns a rallying point.

The start of these Warriors playoffs seemed a lot like the last one, and good luck finding a bigger compliment. Yes, they cut to the chase in 2014 and lost Andrew Bogut to injury before the first round, as opposed to David Lee going down during Game 1 in 2013. And, sure, they won the opener at Staples Center this time, unlike Andre Miller cutting their heart out with a slow-speed driving layup in Denver to give the Nuggets the victory before eventually earning a split at Pepsi Center, but same difference.

Adversity? Bring it on.

A hole blown through the big-man rotation? Take your best shot.

Playing as No. 6 in the West against No. 3? Might as well.

For all the drama the Warriors would have preferred to avoid with a more-consistent regular season, for all the doubt that has built over Jackson’s future as coach, they bask in the underdog role. They don’t want it, but they respond to it.

A choppy end to the regular season — nothing more than a two-game win streak in nearly a month, home losses to the Nuggets, Knicks and Spurs minus Tim Duncan and Manu Ginobili since March 22 — led right into the playoffs Saturday and the waiting Clippers.

And then a 109-105 Golden State victory.

As if it was that straightforward. The Warriors were DOA, falling behind 12-1, needing 4:22 for their first field goal and generally looking like they could not stand up to the challenge, then won in a building where the Clippers tied for the second-best home record in the league. Lee was enduring an individual meltdown, getting shots blocked, being sloppy with the ball, then in the second half was one of the keys to the comeback. Jermaine O’Neal, Bogut’s replacement as the starting center, made six of eight shots in the final two quarters.

The Warriors committed six turnovers in the fourth period, and 23 in all, while shooting 34.8 percent the final 12 minutes, and still won a playoff game on the road, with an obvious assist from Chris Paul being out of sync all day and Blake Griffin fouling out after 19 minutes. Golden State, the regular season of high expectations widely viewed as a disappointment and quickly arranging an exit from the playoffs, was transported back to needing to prove it belonged. It was like the old days.

“A lot, a lot,” forward Draymond Green said when asked if the 2014 start in L.A. reminded him of the 2013 start in Denver. “Coming in, we were the underdog. It was a 3-6 matchup. The only thing different is we let that game go in Denver and (the Nuggets) got Game 1. But at the end of the day, we come here to take care of business. We’re not coming in with the underdog mindset or with that mindset that we have nothing to lose. We feel like we’re just as good or better a basketball team as them and we’re going to continue to play like that and let the cards fall how they may.”

When the 1-0 lead in the best-of-seven series was secured, ahead of Game 2 here Monday night, Klay Thompson spiked the ball into the court with a hard swing of his right arm. But mostly the Warriors exchanged high fives and walked calmly into the tunnel at one of the corners and down the hallway to the visitor’s locker room, showing no great emotion.

They acted like a team that still had everything to prove, not one that had done any proving. Perfect.

“I won’t say (we embraced the underdog role),” Jackson countered. “I will say that the lights are brightest. We won on the road last year in both rounds against two very good basketball teams (Denver and San Antonio). We know what we’re capable of doing. When you look at the makeup of this basketball team, individually and collectively they’re fighters. Top to bottom, we’ve got a bunch of guys that, the survey says, were not supposed to be here. I’m not supposed to be coaching. Got no experience. Stephen Curry’s supposed to be retired because of his ankle. David Lee was a loser. Jermaine O’Neal’s supposed to be finished. Harrison Barnes dropped in the draft. Klay Thompson, how can he be sitting with that talent at No. 11 in the draft? And then you look at Draymond Green. A gamer. A gamer. An absolute gamer. I thought Andre Iguodala again gave us great minutes and unfortunately fouled out. But it’s the makeup of this basketball team and I can continue to go on and on throughout my roster. It’s just a bunch of guys that just compete and fight.”

Jackson only oversold it by a multiple of 1,000. There was never talk Curry would retire, Lee was an All-Star before coming to Oakland and Barnes didn’t have a draft freefall. But point taken. The Warriors can reach a special emotional place and deliver in long-shot situations. They can still make it feel like last April in that way.