Posts Tagged ‘LaMarcus Aldridge’

Blogtable: Is Spurs’ 50-win run or Curry’s shooting more remarkable?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Time to move back 3-point line? | More remarkable: Spurs’ run or Curry’s shooting? | Who needs win more in Warriors vs. Thunder?



VIDEOSpurs adapting, thriving with LaMarcus Aldridge

> More remarkable: The Spurs’ streak of 17 consecutive seasons with 50 or more wins? Or Stephen Curry on pace to make about 400 3-pointers this season?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: Steph Curry is a product of his environment as much as he’s a revolutionary player – if he had come along 30 years ago, the 3-point shot still would have been more of a gimmick and a catch-up tactic. The Spurs, meanwhile, defy both the odds and contemporary NBA thinking. This is the age of tanking, after all (which the Spurs essentially did to snag Tim Duncan in 1997, when it was more of a gentlemen’s wink-wink). The accepted way to get better is to embrace the roller-coaster of good seasons and bad seasons, with no one wanting to get stuck in the middle. To borrow from another sport, most franchises are like NASCAR teams willing to lose the race in the pits but unwilling to finish in the middle of the pack. The Spurs have eschewed pit stops altogether, refueling and changing tires while they’re out there running hot. That’s remarkable.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comLook, I’m as big a fan of Steph Curry’s talent as anybody. But this isn’t even a question worthy of debate. The Spurs winning 50 games for 17 consecutive seasons is off-the-charts mind-boggling. Don’t forget: one of those 50-win seasons was the “lockout season” with a 66-game schedule. The maintain this level of excellence without a single slip-up for nearly two decades is unprecedented not just in the NBA, but all of pro sports. Check back in the Year 2116 and there might never have been another such run. Then again, check back in 2116 and Tim Duncan might still be playing and the streak will be at 117.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comSpurs. That’s hard to say because Curry has been in another stratosphere and deserves every positive place in history he has claimed, but c’mon. Fifty wins for 17 seasons. Seventeen! That good for that long is an astounding stat even for those of us who have been watching and appreciating as it happens. It must be impossible to imagine for all the people who started to count out San Antonio a decade or so ago.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: This one’s a coin flip, but I’ll go with the Spurs. Their ability to avoid major injury and have a top-10 all-time player on his game for more than a decade might not get repeated for a long time if ever. Steph Curry might break his own record next year.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comOn average, less than nine teams (29 percent of the league) per season win 50 games. Just on randomness, there are 1 in 1.4 billion odds of doing something with a 29 percent probability 17 times in a row. NBA success certainly isn’t random, but 17 straight seasons of 50 wins is five more than any other streak in NBA history. Stephen Curry is doing things we’ve never seen before, but when you take offense, defense, leadership and longevity into account, Tim Duncan has been the best player since Michael Jordan left Chicago, and the Spurs have built a world class organization around him. The Spurs’ sustained success should be lauded as much as what Curry is doing.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: As wicked a season as Steph is having, it’s hard to go against a team, in any sport, putting together the kind of run the Spurs have the past two decades. Think about that for a second — they’ve been elite for the better part of the past two decades … it’s unheard of. As an organization, the Spurs have no peer in the NBA or in professional sports in this hemisphere. Their ability to continuously produce 50-win results is a standard that will be tough for anyone to match anytime soon. If Steph knocks down 400 3-pointers this season and maybe again the next two or three seasons, then we can revisit this conversation.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comCurry is amazing. But the achievement of the Spurs transcends the achievement of any single season, no matter how brilliant Curry has been.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog The most remarkable thing about Steph Curry’s season, to me, is that it isn’t really all that remarkable. Every night he does the unthinkable, to the point where we expect him to make 10 threes in a game or drill 35-footers with the game on the line. It’s a step up from his MVP performance last season, but it isn’t really surprising. The Spurs continued excellence is, to me, just remarkable. Particularly in this era where almost every team has terrific scouting and uses advanced metrics, the Spurs continue to do things differently and better than the rest of the NBA.

Analytics Art: Rivers, Thompson among best shooters of week


VIDEO: All-Star Thompson’s 3-Point Highlights

By Will Laws, Special to NBA.com

Lesser-known names can occasionally heat up and claim all three spots in this weekly column. But with All-Star Game participants being announced recently, many stars have stepped up their game as of late.

As a result, two of the players highlighted this week are 2016 All Stars. One will even partake in the Foot Locker Three-Point Contest, an honor that hardly needed justifying but has nevertheless been confirmed with some stupendous shooting lately.

The other? Well, let’s just say he has a long way to go before he’s considered one of the elite players on his team, let alone the Western Conference.

Note: All weekly statistics cover games between Jan. 29-Feb. 4. Players must have averaged 20 minutes per game to qualify.

Best Guard: Austin Rivers, Los Angeles Clippers

Austin Rivers famously copped James Harden’s (Lil B’s?) “stirring the pot” celebration in the playoffs against Houston last season, and he conjured up some more home cookin’ at the Staples Center in Los Angeles’ three home games this week. Well, call it two-and-a-quarter.

The much-maligned guard made 8-for-14 shots against the Lakers last Friday, the most made field goals by Rivers against a non-76ers opponent this season.

Rivers followed that up with 16 points against the Bulls behind five 3-pointers on six attempts, tied for a career high. That’s pretty darn good for a guy shooting 28.4 percent from downtown!

Note: You can hover over a shooting zone to see Rivers’ stats compared to the league average.

He just couldn’t get through the week unscathed, however. After finishing an impressive layup in the second quarter of the Clippers’ clash against Minnesota, Rivers was ejected after receiving a double-tech for complaining about a supposed missed foul. He only played seven minutes in the surprising 108-102 defeat.

At least the mercurial coach’s son shot 60 percent when he was on the floor over the past seven days.

Best Wing: Klay Thompson, Golden State Warriors

Klay Thompson is used to being second banana to Stephen Curry in Golden State’s backcourt. Thompson has played in the shadow of the reigning MVP for his entire career, after all.

Though Curry stole more headlines this week with a 51-point explosion, Thompson had the more efficient shooting effort overall — even if you discount his 45-point output against Dallas last Wednesday. With a scorching 51.7 percent clip from deep in three games this week, Thompson is now on pace to finish fifth all-time for 3-pointers made in a season.

Of course, Curry is on pace to smash the record he set in that category just last season, so Thompson’s accomplishment will probably be undervalued.

Thompson can beat his fellow Splash Brother in one regard, however — the leader of the free world proclaimed Thursday Thompson’s jumpshot is prettier than Chef Curry’s. So, there’s that.

Best Forward/Center: LaMarcus Aldridge, San Antonio Spurs

It was tempting to give this spot to Draymond Green, who became just the third player in NBA history to register a triple-double without missing a shot against the Knicks on Sunday.

But while Green took 21 shots on the week, LaMarcus Aldridge nearly eclipsed that total in the Spurs’ victory over New Orleans on Wednesday, continuing a torrid run since from a disastrous outing (2-for-9, five points, three rebounds) against the Warriors.

The former No. 2 overall pick sunk 12-for-20 shots and cashed all 12 chances at the charity stripe against the Pelicans for a season-high of 36 points. That was just two nights after he set his previous high-water mark in 2015-16 with 28 points (9-for-13 overall, 10-for-12 on free throws) against the Magic.

And while nearly all of Green’s buckets this week came right at the rim, Aldridge showed off the mid-range game that’s uncommon among seven-footers.

San Antonio’s marquee summer signing has clearly taken it upon himself to assume a bigger role on offense during the absence of Tim Duncan (knee). If this week was any indication, the Spurs’ well-oiled offensive machine should keep chugging along just fine when The Big Fundamental calls it quits.

Will Laws is a writer for PointAfter, a sports data aggregation and visualization website that’s part of the Graphiq network. Visit PointAfter to get all the information about NBA players, NBA historical teams and dozens of other topics.

All-Star 2016 Reserves Announced


VIDEO: Top 10 Plays from 2016 All-Star Draymond Green

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Millions of fan votes decided who the starters would be for the 65th NBA All-Star Game next month in Toronto.

Only 12 to 14 were required, from coaches around the league, to decide the 14 other players who would fill out the rosters for the Eastern and Western Conference All-Stars.

And there will be a new school flavor to the festivities with a trio of rookie All-Star reserves joining the party.

First time All-Stars highlight the list of reserves, that was announced tonight on TNT. That group includes Golden State’s Draymond Green in the Western Conference and Detroit’s Andre Drummond and Boston’s Isaiah Thomas in the Eastern Conference.

Joining Green on the Western Conference reserves list are LaMarcus Aldridge (San Antonio), DeMarcus Cousins (Sacramento), Anthony Davis (New Orleans), James Harden (Houston), Chris Paul (Los Angeles Clippers) and Klay Thompson (Golden State).

NBA All-Star 2016Joining Drummond and Thomas on the Eastern Conference reserves list are Chris Bosh (Miami), Jimmy Butler (Chicago), DeMar DeRozan (Toronto), Paul Millsap (Atlanta) and John Wall (Washington).

Noticeably absent from the list are Portland’s Damian Lillard, Clippers’ star Blake Griffin (whose injury issues wouldn’t have allowed him to participate anyway), the Cleveland duo of Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love, Atlanta’s Al Horford and perennial All-Stars Dirk Nowitzki (Dallas) and Tim Duncan (San Antonio).

The Cavaliers have just one All-Star, LeBron James, despite owning the best record in the Eastern Conference and having their staff, headed by Tyronn Lue, in charge of coaching the Eastern Conference team.

James, Indiana’s Paul George, New York’s Carmelo Anthony, Miami’s Dwyane Wade and Toronto’s Kyle Lowry are the Eastern Conference starters.

Los Angeles Lakers star Kobe Bryant, playing in his 18th and final All-Star Game headlines a Western Conference starting unit that also includes Oklahoma City’s Kevin Durant, first-time All-Star and San Antonio defensive ace Kawhi Leonard, reigning KIA MVP Stephen Curry of Golden State and Oklahoma City’s Russell Westbrook.

Western Conference reserves


VIDEO: Discussing the West All-Stars

LaMarcus Aldridge, San Antonio: Aldridge’s numbers are down but that was expected when he made the move from Portland to San Antonio and the ensemble cast he’s playing with now. This is his fifth straight All-Star Game appearance.

DeMarcus Cousins, Sacramento: Cousins has staked his claim to the title as the best big man in basketball and is the only true center on the Western Conference roster. This is his second straight All-Star Game appearance.

Anthony Davis, New Orleans: The Pelicans’ rough start to this season did not keep the coaches from making sure Davis made it to the All-Star Game for the third straight year.

Draymond Green, Golden State: The NBA’s leader in triple-doubles this season, Green missed out on a starting nod but takes his rightful place alongside Warriors teammates Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson in his first All-Star appearance.

James Harden, Houston: The runner up for KIA MVP honors last season is still playing at an elite level, individually, even if his Rockets are nowhere near their conference finals pace of a year ago. This is his Harden’s fourth straight All-Star Game appearance.

Chris Paul, LA Clippers: Paul has been the Clippers’ rock with Blake Griffin out with a torn quad tendon the past 15 games (and now a fractured hand for the next 4-6 weeks). This is CP3’s ninth All-Star appearance.

Klay Thompson: The Warriors’ sweet-shooting swingman reminded everyone just how dangerous he can be with a season-high 45 points in Wednesday’s win over the Mavericks. He’s making his second straight All-Star Game appearance.

Data curated by PointAfter

Eastern Conference reserves


VIDEO: Discussing the East All-Star reserves

Chris Bosh, Miami: The 11-time All-Star has come all the way back from the pulmonary embolism that ended cut his season short a year ago. Bosh and Dwyane Wade have led the Heat back into the top four mix in the East after last season’s lottery twirl.

Jimmy Butler, Chicago: The new face of the Bulls has been the motor for a team that has battled inconsistency during the transition from the Tom Thibodeau era to the Fred Hoiberg experience. This is his second straight All-Star Game appearance.

DeMar DeRozan, Toronto: DeRozan and Kyle Lowry, the driving forces on a Raptors team that is entrenched in the top three of the Eastern Conference standings this season, will play co-hosts for the All-Star festivities. This is DeRozan’s second All-Star Game appearance.

Andre Drummond, Detroit: The league’s runaway leader in double-doubles and rebounds this season, Drummond, like Cousins in the West, is the only true center on the East roster.

Paul Millsap, Atlanta: The Hawks’ summer re-investment in Millsap has paid off handsomely. He’s been the best and most consistent player for a team that had four All-Stars hit the floor in New York last year. This is the third straight All-Star appearance for Millsap.

Isaiah Thomas, Boston: The unquestioned leader of a Celtics team that wasn’t supposed to have any true stars, Thomas has shattered that myth since joining Boston last season and become the catalyst for Brad Stevens’ upstart crew.

John Wall, Washington: Wall has done yeoman’s work this season for a Wizards’ team that has dealt with a parade of injuries to other key players, most notably Wall’s backcourt mate Bradley Beal. This is Wall’s third straight All-Star Game appearance.

Data curated by PointAfter

The 65th NBA All-Star Game will be exclusively televised on TNT from the Air Canada Centre in Toronto on Sunday, Feb. 14.


VIDEO: Who should’ve been an All-Star?

Morning shootaround — Jan. 22


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Jan. 21

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Remembering Kobe’s epic game | Van Gundy blasts Pistons’ commitment | Aldridge: Picking Spurs over Suns was ‘very close’

No. 1: Remembering Kobe’s 81-point night — It may seem hard to believe, but it has been 10 years since Kobe Bryant dropped 81 points on the Toronto Raptors. ESPN.com’s Arash Markazi has a great oral history on the game, we have an entire section of this website dedicated to Kobe’s career and the Los Angeles TimesMike Bresnahan, who covered the game that night, provides some great stories from the event, too:

Lawrence Tanter had already witnessed plenty from his courtside view as the Lakers’ public-address announcer.

He was there when the Lakers beat the hated Boston Celtics at the Forum for the 1987 championship. He saw Bryant throw a lob to Shaquille O’Neal in a back-from-the-dead rally in the 2000 playoffs. And he watched the Lakers somehow outlast Boston in Game 7 of the 2010 NBA Finals.

For Bryant’s 81-point outburst, though, Tanter remembered the pen-on-paper challenge for official scorer and longtime friend John Radcliffe.

“He was having a very difficult time finding room in the boxes on the scorebook to put all these points down that Kobe was scoring,” Tanter said. “It was a tedious effort on his behalf to do that because he’d never faced anything like that either. He just kept going, ‘Man, I’ve got to write smaller.'”

Suddenly, Luke Walton wasn’t the cool, collected guy with the quick wit and stentorian voice.

Long before he became the successful interim head coach of the Golden State Warriors, he was a reserve Lakers forward. A pass-first player his entire career, he asked for an assist from Bryant after the Toronto game.

“It was one of the few times I felt like a fan instead of his teammate. I had him sign a ticket for me after the game,” Walton said. “It was incredible. You look up at the scoreboard and see it at, like, 72 and then 78 and then all of a sudden it says 80, and it looks like the scoreboard is broken. I really didn’t even fully grasp it until I went home and watched it on tape that night.”

Bill Macdonald was the ebullient host of Lakers’ pregame shows for Fox Sports West.

He was asked to step up a bit that night and took the place of Lakers play-by-play announcer Joel Meyers, who was contractually allowed by the team to call three NFLplayoff games, including the NFC championship on radio that day in Seattle.

Macdonald had experience broadcasting other sports, but nothing like the Lakers. Certainly nothing like that night.

“I figured this was going to be the only Laker game I ever broadcast. It didn’t matter to me that it was a nondescript Sunday in January, a bad Laker team against a not-very-good Toronto team,” Macdonald said. “The first half was just awful. The Lakers were horrible. They needed every single one of Kobe’s points in the second half to come back.”

Phil Jackson, a share-the-ball proponent who won 11 championships in 20 seasons as an NBA coach, including five with the Lakers, was complimentary of Bryant’s effort at the time but noted, “it’s not exactly the way you want to have a team win a game.”

He chuckled this week when that quote was read back to him. He did it again when told Bryant’s score by quarter — 14, 12, 27 and 28. And again when reminded of Bryant’s shot total — almost one per minute.

“That’s exhausting,” Jackson said. “That’s pretty amazing. The kid is unbelievable.”

Toronto swingman Jalen Rose was the one who guarded Bryant the most. Maybe it’s a form of psychological self-defense, but rather than dwell on Bryant’s point total, he remembers Bryant’s demeanor.

“Kobe never bumped his chest. He never pointed in the crowd. He never trash-talked,” said Rose, now an ESPN analyst. “If Kobe had behaved like that, he wouldn’t have got to 51, let alone 81, because we would have wanted to physically harm him on the court.”

“The greatest thing about Kobe’s 81-point game was that actually wasn’t his best game to me. His best game was actually against a good team, the Dallas Mavs, when I think he had like 60 in three quarters.”


VIDEO: Relive Kobe Bryant’s 81-point game

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Blogtable: What’s ailing the Suns?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: What’s wrong with Phoenix? | Thoughts on a game at Fenway? | Tougher to officiate in MLB or NBA?



VIDEOGameTime’s experts dig in on why Phoenix is struggling

> Things are getting ugly in Phoenix, where the Suns have lost nine in a row and have fallen out of the playoff picture. Who’s to blame here? The owner? The GM? The millennials?

David Aldridge, TNT analyst: Yes. It’s a franchise-wide collapse at all levels. Clearly, everyone in Phoenix went all-in after the surprise 48-win season two years ago, but the moves GM Ryan McDonough made — maxing out Eric Bledsoe, extending the Morris twins, trading Goran Dragic for Brandon Knight, signing Tyson Chandler  haven’t worked, and coach Jeff Hornacek hasn’t reached the players that he does have. (Though I get the Chandler move; the Suns were trying to lure LaMarcus Aldridge by having a center in tow, and it almost worked. Almost.) There are still some good players on the roster in Knight, T.J. Warren and Devin Booker, and I still haven’t given up on Alex Len. But until the Suns move Markieff Morris, they can’t move forward.

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: Owners are responsible in a buck-stops-here way, whether they embrace it or not. But owners gonna own – the stuff we’re talking about with the Suns mostly is on GM Ryan McDonough. It’s his job to both navigate whatever his owner’s peccadilloes might be while overseeing the basketball operation in a much smarter and disciplined way than Phoenix has shown. If you trade a twin and the one left behind squeals as if they’re conjoined, you move the other one — fast. You don’t fire assistant coaches during a season as any sort of solution. You don’t build your team around a cluster of point guards, none of whom brings much coach-on-the-floor authority to the court. Most of all, you don’t squander the built-in advantages the franchise long has enjoyed and the reputation it built as a “destination” market for NBA players.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: That fact that Robert Sarver blamed millennials was, I think, his latest way of saying, “Look at me! I’m your answer.” The owner is rash, impulsive and wants a champagne team on a beer budget. The move to sign Tyson Chandler as a free agent lure for LaMarcus Aldridge was just plain foolish. Now three seasons in, general manager Ryan McDonough’s analytics-driven building plan has done nothing but player checkers with the roster and now leaving coach Jeff Hornacek dangling. Together they’ve turned Phoenix into a, well, desert.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comI thought the millennials are to blame for everything. And the media. In this specific situation, though, it’s the millennials, the media, the front office and the players. Jeff Horncek is on the hook as well because any coach should get credit when things go right and blame when things go wrong, but the problems in Phoenix are more about the roster that was put together and some of the players. That means you, Markieff Morris. It’s amazing to think how the world could have been different if the Suns turned out to be more than unexpected contenders for LaMarcus Aldridge.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comThere was nobody to blame a few seasons ago when the Suns won 48 games, but nothing good has happened since, especially the moves made by GM Ryan McDonough. He and the Suns loaded up on point guards, took a project center in the lottery, beefed with the Morris Twins, fell out of favor with Goran Dragic, overpaid for an old Tyson Chandler and can’t stop the bleeding now. There’s plenty of season left to get right, but this team seems headed in reverse.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Hindsight doesn’t look too kindly on the moves the Suns have made in the last year. They got only a late first-round pick in exchange for Isaiah Thomas, a terrific offensive player who’s on a very sensible, long-term contract. On the same day, they downgraded from Goran Dragic to Brandon Knight, to whom they had to give a new contract (which pays him about twice as much as Thomas) this past summer. In that same trade, they sent Philadelphia a fantastic asset (the Lakers pick). Then this summer, they gave Tyson Chandler (who’s been a disappointment) a contract that’s going to pay him $13.6 million when he’s 36 years old. All that points at GM Ryan McDonough, but success and failure in this league start at the top and from all accounts, Robert Sarver has had his hands in most or all of the decisions that have been made.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Let’s do the right thing and spread the blame around to all involved. Robert Sarver dumping the Suns’ problems on millennials, and Markieff Morris in particular, is no way to bridge the generational culture gap that exists in Phoenix right now. The fact is the Suns have swung and missed a few times in the Draft and in free agency. No crime there, it happens to the best franchises. It’s how you handle adversity, from the top down, that tells the real story. And the Suns, starting with Sarver, are handling things horribly. There’s no need to vent, publicly, about your team (full of millennials in a league full of millennials, mind you) being spoiled and whiny and unwilling to roll with a program that hasn’t even produced so much as a single trip to the playoffs. And no, cutting a practice short so the team can go bowling, or any other forced team-bonding tricks will fix what ails this team.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: The coach, GM and owner are always responsible. At the same time, the Suns are going through the inevitable decline that awaits every good team after the great players (Steve Nash et al) are gone. It is – unless you can convince the likes of LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh to sign on as free agents – the unalterable fact of NBA life that franchises must hit bottom for an extended time before rising up again. It happens everywhere, like a law of gravity, and it makes everyone look bad.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogSuns owner Robert Sarver’s statements about social media made him an easy Twitter target, but that doesn’t mean that he was wrong about the dangers of social media. At the same time, that doesn’t have anything to do with a basketball team. After all, there are a lot of millennials on the Golden State Warriors’ roster (heck, even their interim coach is one) and they seem to be doing just fine. The real problem in Phoenix is that their team just isn’t very good. They doubled-down on a strategy that was more of a novelty than anything, and once they accumulated four point guards they basically were wed to the idea. I like the idea of zagging while everyone else is zigging, but at some point you stray so far from the rest of the group that there’s nowhere else to go.

Blogtable: Who is the best frontcourt?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Who is the best frontcourt? | Butler’s desire to lead is __? | Christmas Day Gift



VIDEO: Kawhi Leonard is a nominee for Kia Western Conference Player of the Month for Decemeber

> Klay Thompson says he and Steph Curry are the best backcourt in the NBA today. My question for you, then, is who’s the best frontcourt in the NBA today?

David Aldridge, NBA.com: I’ll go with the Spurs (Leonard, Aldridge, Duncan) in a photo over Cleveland (James, Love, Mozgov). The addition of Cousin LaMarcus puts San Antonio’s three over the top; his offensive repertoire is just as effective as Love’s, and while Kevin is a better rebounder, LaMarcus is, to me, a little better defender (not that either is a lockdown guy). Duncan’s a Hall of Famer, to be sure, but at this stage, it’s Leonard whose game is otherworldly. We’ve seen Kawhi, in consecutive Finals, be able to slow LeBron’s normal dominance while also producing himself at the offensive end. (Of course it’s a team effort guarding James; no one player does it alone. But like Joe Dumars was the head of the Pistons’ defensive snake against Michael Jordan, Leonard is the effective first line against James.) The Warriors’ threesome of Barnes, Green and Bogut is in the conversation, too.

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comCleveland. And since I didn’t see the adjective “starting” anywhere in the question, I’m going to fine-tune my answer as LeBron James, Kevin Love and Tristan Thompson rather than Timofey Mozgov, because that’s the Cavaliers’ best finishing frontcourt. Thompson is a mobile beast on the offensive boards. Love is much more his old self this season and, uh, no other frontcourt in the league can throw LeBron at the opposition.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: San Antonio. A legend, an MVP candidate and just a guy named LaMarcus.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comThe Bulls. This isn’t the best time to say so, with Joakim Noah just sidelined, but what depth. And that’s with Jimmy Butler starting at shooting guard. When Butler moves to small forward, the Chicago frontcourt can beat opponents in so many different ways.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com The Spurs with Aldridge, Leonard and Duncan. I realize Duncan is a part-time player from November through mid-April, but we saw last spring in the playoff series against the Clippers how he can still transform  when money’s on the line. Aldridge is an All-Star and Kawhi might be the best two-way player in basketball and could finish in the top 5 in MVP voting if he keeps this up.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comThe Warriors — Harrison Barnes, Draymond Green and Andrew Bogut, with Andre Iguodala and Festus Ezeli off the bench — have a case for having the best frontcourt, too. It’s hard to argue against LeBron James, Kevin Love and a whatever rebounder/defender you want to put out there with them. But right now, the best frontcourt belongs to the Spurs. Kawhi Leonard and Tim Duncan (still) are impact players on both ends of the floor, while LaMarcus Aldridge is a guy you can run the offense through. And then you have Boris Diaw‘s passing and David West‘s rebounding coming off the bench.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Klay Thompson was right, by the way. The top honors in the frontcourt resides in San Antonio, where the rise of Kawhi Leonard, the addition of LaMarcus Aldridge and the eternal force that is Tim Duncan overshadows the rest of the contenders. No team covers the frontcourt bases the way the Spurs’ trio does, on both ends of the floor. The best power forward of all time paired with arguably the best two-way player in today’s game and a 7-foot double-double machine thrown in for good measure makes this an easy pick.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: Clearly that honor goes to the retro-frontcourt of the Spurs. Which is why their anticipated conference final against the Warriors would be ideal: Would the traditional big lineup of Tim Duncan, LaMarcus Aldridge and Kawhi Leonard prevail against the perimeter-driven champions of Curry and Thompson? My hunch is that the winner would be the team most able to adapt to the opposing style, because neither the Warriors nor Spurs are going to be able to have it their way throughout a seven-game series.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogIt’s easy to try and get cute with this answer. I mean, you can argue that the Sacramento Kings have two gold medalists in their frontcourt, while the Atlanta Hawks have a couple of All-Stars out there. Any frontcourt with Anthony Davis involved has to be rated highly, no? But of course, the easy answer and the answer that might be overlooked, at least initially, is in this case probably the right answer: The frontcourt of the San Antonio Spurs, with Tim Duncan, LaMarcus Aldridge and Kawhi Leonard, is nothing short of tremendous, all the way around.

Morning shootaround — Dec. 15


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Dec. 14

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Spurs hitting their stride | Crowder wants apology from Smith | Barnes out another week

 

No. 1: Spurs blast Jazz, appear to be hitting their stride — A team boasting an 80.8 win percentage a week or so before Christmas is usually pretty impressive stuff. Yet the 21-5 San Antonio Spurs — like every other team in the league — have taken a backseat to the storylines surrounding the defending-champion Golden State Warriors’ 24-1 start to 2015-16. It’s becoming hard to deny how solid this Spurs team is, though, and last night’s 118-81 romp of the visiting Utah Jazz further illustrates that point. Michael C. Wright of ESPN.com has more:

After the San Antonio Spurs’ 118-81 blowout win Monday over the Utah Jazz, coach Gregg Popovich said his team can analyze the “same things we take from a loss.”

In this case, after San Antonio recorded its 13th victory at home, and NBA-best ninth win by 20 points or more, according to ESPN Stats and Information, the Spurs — which expressed concerns earlier in the season about the offense — seem to be finally gelling into what the brass envisioned before the start of the season.

With the 37-point win, San Antonio now owns the highest margin of victory in the NBA this season; yes, even better than the Golden State Warriors, who have played one less game. Interestingly, the Spurs captured 11 victories last season by margins of 20 points or more but are already up to nine such wins this season.

“It’s always tough to have big leads in the NBA,” said Spurs point guard Tony Parker, who finished with 18 points as one of five of the team’s double-figure scorers. “We have been able to keep it at that the last two games. It’s not easy to win two games like that in a row. So it shows that our concentration was good tonight.”

But perhaps one of the more significant developments over San Antonio’s past two games: LaMarcus Aldridge finding a level of comfort in the system.

Over the past two games, Aldridge has connected on a combined 11 of 19 attempts for 31 points while contributing 14 rebounds.

Those numbers aren’t gaudy by any means, but Popovich likes what he has seen. Aldridge, who started the game 5-of-7 from the floor, made all six of his free throw attempts to finish the game with 18 points.

“He did a good job of getting to his spots,” Leonard said. “He got some offensive rebounds, made some layups, got a rhythm going and made some shots.”

Popovich said earlier in the season that Aldridge was “deferring” in an attempt to fit in with the new team, but it appears those days are coming to a close.

Now, “he’s getting his rhythm,” guard Danny Green said, adding that Aldridge “is getting more comfortable playing his game, doing his own thing and just getting settled in. That’s a good sign for us at this point in the season.”

Popovich agreed.

“He had a lot of opportunities, and he took advantage of them,” Popovich said. “He’s a guy who’s getting used to this system more and more every game and feeling more and more comfortable. [He’s] not worrying about fitting in, not worrying about missing shots or anything like that. He’s just worrying about competing, and he’s doing a great job of it.”


VIDEO: San Antonio demolishes Utah to stay perfect at home

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Morning Shootaround — Dec. 12



VIDEO: Friday’s Fast Break

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Curry, Green rescue Warriors in Boston | Shumpert’s return sparks Cavaliers’ defensive effort | Aldridge finding his groove with Spurs | Report: D’Antoni set to join Brown’s staff in Philadelphia

No. 1: Curry, Green rescue Warriors in Boston No Klay Thompson. No Harrison Barnes. No problem for the Golden State Warriors. As long as Stephen Curry and Draymond Green are in the lineup, it’s going to be extremely difficult for anyone to stop the Golden State Warriors and their historic march. They improved to 24-0 Friday night in Boston, outlasting the Celtics in a double-overtime thriller with Curry and Green coming to the rescue. They are one win away, tonight in Milwaukee (8:30 p.m. ET, NBA TV) from completing the first 7-0 road trip in league history. Diamond Leung of the Bay Area News Group explains how the Celtics escaped Boston with the streak intact:

The Warriors won despite missing starters Klay Thompson and Harrison Barnes, who were both nursing sprained ankles. The Warriors won despite shooting a season-low 39.3 percent and Curry committing a season-high eight turnovers. They won despite trailing by five points with less than two minutes left in regulation.

“We never get rattled,” Draymond Green said of what he learned about the team. “We continued to fight. We believe in ourselves. We believe in each other, and we trust each other. So, nothing new. The same old, same old.”

Green thumped his chest and wrecked the Celtics with 24 points, 11 rebounds, eight assists, five blocks and five steals, playing a career-high 50 minutes and with five fouls during the overtime periods.

Andre Iguodala scored nine of his 13 points in the two overtime periods — including the go-ahead putback layup — and added 10 rebounds in 44 minutes.

Curry exhausted himself playing 47 minutes, going 6 for 13 from 3-point range and scoring 23 of his points after halftime despite finding little room to operate without Thompson on the court.

Avery Bradley and Evan Turner made things difficult, but Curry outlasted the Celtics. He was the one on the free throw line, capping off his night by going 14 for 14 from the charity stripe with two of them giving the Warriors a three-point lead with 13.4 seconds left in the second overtime.

“In my opinion, he’s the best player that this game has right now,” Warriors interim coach Luke Walton said. “He can score in so many different ways. They did a phenomenal job on him, and he scored 38. But that’s how superstars are in this league. I played with Kobe (Bryant). I know what that’s like.”

Ian Clark’s first career start came at shooting guard alongside Curry. Leandro Barbosa played through an illness with Thompson, whose ankle was not yet 100 percent, sidelined.

The Warriors still extended their streak to 28 straight regular-season wins dating back to last season, making it the second longest in league history. They did it in the sixth game of their seven-game trip.

“I think the beauty of our team is when we get out there, nobody’s thinking about if we lose, the streak’s over,” Curry said.

“I think that’s why we are where we are. We’re not getting ahead of ourselves, (we’re) staying in the moment. We’re having a blast chasing history.”

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No. 2: Shumpert’s return sparks Cavaliers’ defensive effort LeBron James did his part, as always, to make sure the Cleveland Cavaliers handled their business against the Orlando Magic. But he had plenty of help, including a welcome spark from the season debut of Iman Shumpert, whose attention to detail on defense had been sorely missed. Shumpert kicked off his season in typical style (his hair was a showstopper, per usual and he made an immediate impact on both ends of the floor). Chris Fedor of Cleveland.com has more on Shumpert’s opening night:

Shumpert didn’t start the game. Cavs head coach David Blatt went with Jared Cunningham, hoping to ease Shumpert back and get him some more practice time before he takes back his previous role as starter, one he excelled in during the Cavaliers’ playoff run.

At the 6:05 mark of the first quarter, Shumpert entered, making his presence felt immediately.

I remember having a conversation about Shumpert last year with Cavaliers general manager David Griffin when I was trying to pinpoint Shumpert’s value after the trade.

Griffin explained how Shumpert not only provided the Cavs athleticism on the perimeter — something lacking while the team was giving minutes to worn-down veterans Shawn Marion and Mike Miller — but Shumpert gave Cleveland an edge.

They needed a player like him, one who gained a reputation early in his career as a hard-nosed defender.

That edge, an intangible quality, became clear on Friday night.

He finished with 14 points on 5-of-7 shooting in 25 productive minutes. He also helped hold the Magic to 28-of-72 (38.9 percent) from the field. That’s his true impact, which can’t always be measured by the box score.

Shumpert is a rare defensive playmaker who brings much-needed toughness.

The schedule didn’t help Orlando, playing at home for the first time after an exhausting five-game Western Conference road trip that ended in Phoenix on Wednesday night. But it isn’t a coincidence that the Cavs played their best all-around defensive game on the night Shumpert debuted.

In the previous four games, Cleveland had allowed 102.5 points per night.

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No. 3: Aldridge finding his groove with Spurs Spurs forward LaMarcus Aldridge needed a little time adjust to life in an ensemble cast in San Antonio. But now that he’s comfortable, the rest of the league will have to deal with him. And that’s a daunting challenge, as the Los Angeles Lakers (one of his many suitors during free agency over the summer) found out Friday night and the Atlanta Hawks will find out tonight (8 p.m. ET, League Pass) at Philips Arena when the Spurs battle their Eastern Conference doppelgänger. Our very own Fran Blinebury examines Aldridge’s all-business adjustment:

Aldridge scored 24 points and grabbed 11 rebounds and did not play the fourth quarter in the Spurs 107-89 win over the Lakers on Friday night.

“I’m getting into a rhythm now and feeling more comfortable,” Aldridge said. “I’m starting to feel like myself.”

The Spurs keep cruising along with the second-best record in the NBA, while the Lakers are now 3-20 and left to wonder how things might look if they’d have landed Aldridge to be the key cog in their offensive attack.

“It is a big what-if,” said Lakers coach Byron Scott.

Scott said the Lakers received the same feedback after their first meeting with Aldridge last summer and changed their strategy when given a second chance.

“The second meeting was just myself and (general manager) Mitch (Kupchak)…It was all basketball,” Scott said. “I think the first presentation, I think we probably looked at it more as a business presentation more than basketball and that’s probably where we made our mistake.”

Right from the start, the Spurs’ approach that eventually landed Aldridge to a four-year, $84-million contract couldn’t have been more different than L.A.’s.

“We don’t try to convince people, very honestly,” said Spurs coach Gregg Popovich. “I think it’s overblown, like we’re going to have some kind of salesman deal. We tried to sell Jason Kidd (2003) and it didn’t work. We had mariachis and everything. We had all kinds of stuff and after that I decided never again. If they come, they come. If they don’t, I don’t care.

“It’s as simple as that, especially for a guy that’s been in the league for nine years. You know what he can do. You know what he can’t do. You know what you like. You know what you don’t like. Whatever it might be.

“But more importantly, he knows who you are and he knows what team he would like to go to for whatever reason. So everything is pretty much out there on the table. If a guy had been in the league for a split second and then he had to make some decisions, it’s different. But he’s seen a lot. He’s been around a long time and we just did the polite thing. We met with him. Our guys talked to him. He talked to us and asked a few questions, he and his agents and that was that.”

Aldridge came into Friday’s game averaging 15.4 points, lowest since his rookie season. He’s also struggled with his shot, making a career-low 45.5 percent. But the Spurs aren’t making a peep of complaint.

“He’s been great,” Popovich said. “It’s a totally new system. When you’re playing with a whole group of new players, it takes time to understand where your place is. Sometimes I think he’s deferred too much because he’s trying to fit in and usually that’s the right thing to do when you enter an organization. Any of us who has a new job defers in the beginning and tries to fit.”

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No. 4: Report: D’Antoni set to join Brown’s staff in Philadelphia — The extreme franchise makeover in Philadelphia that began with the hiring of Jerry Colangelo as chairman of basketball operations earlier this week could get another high-profile addition, and soon. The Sixers are reportedly in talks with Mike D’Antoni to join Brett Brown‘s staff as an assistant coach. Brown’s two-year contract extension was announced Friday afternoon and soon after word of the possibility of D’Antoni coming on board began circulating. Keith Pompey of The Philadelphia Inquirer provides some context:

It turns out that Jerry Colangelo doesn’t have to be in Philadelphia to have an influence on the 76ers.

The team’s recently hired chairman of basketball operations is in talks with Mike D’Antoni to become an associate head coach with the Sixers, according to Yahoo Sports. The website said that Colangelo and coach have spoken to D’Antoni about a role on the Sixers bench that could be filled in late December.

The Sixers introduced Colangelo as chairman on Monday. The former four-team executive of the year for the Phoenix Suns flew back to Phoenix on Tuesday.

D’Antoni and Colangelo have a relationship that dates backs to the Suns and USA basketball. The 64-year-old spent five seasons as the Suns head coach.Colangelo owned the Suns when D’Antoni was named their coach in 2003.  he coached four teams in a total of  12 seasons.

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SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: There was a Kevin Durant takeover in the fourth quarter for the Oklahoma City Thunder Friday night … Kyrie Irving is getting close to his return for the Cleveland Cavaliers … The confidence in D’Angelo Russell’s game is growing in Los AngelesNick Stauskas is struggling with his shot and all of the losing in Philly … The Hornets unleashed the Jeremy Lin-led bench mob on the Memphis Grizzlies … Timberwolves forward Kevin Garnett notches another career milestone …

 

Morning shootaround — Dec. 7


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Dec. 6

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Report: No structural damage to Wall’s kneeWarriors just keep on winning | Young says ejection a result of frustrating season | Cousins blames himself for Kings’ slideSpurs’ West just wants to win

No. 1: Report: No structural damage to Wall’s knee; status for game vs. Heat — Washington Wizards fans can breathe a sigh of relief a little bit this morning. Star point guard John Wall left last night’s loss to the visiting Dallas after hurting his right knee in a collison with the Mavs’ Jeremy Evans. The Washington Post‘s Jorge Castillo reports Wall did not suffer any structural damage to the knee but his status for tonight’s game against in Miami against the Heat (7:30 ET, NBA League Pass) is unknown:

Washington Wizards point guard John Wall exited Sunday’s 116-104 loss to the Dallas Mavericks because of a right knee injury, although he does not have any structural damage, according to a person with knowledge of the situation. His status for Washington’s meeting Monday night with the first-place Miami Heat remains uncertain.

Wall collided knees with Mavericks forward Jeremy Evans late in the fourth quarter. He gingerly exited the contest with help from teammates and without putting any weight on his right leg with 1 minutes 14 seconds left.

“I tried to take a step to go contest, and I didn’t have the strength and I just stopped,” said Wall, who said that the right knee was already bruised before the injury.

Wall said the knee was sore, but an X-ray did not reveal any structural damage and he was walking on his own after the game with a slight limp. He is traveling with the team to Miami and will be reevaluated Monday.

“You try and think positive,” Wizards guard Bradley Beal said. “You hate to see a guy go down for one. And two, it being John. But you know I’m positive at all times and we want him to be smart. So if he can’t go, another guy has to step up.”

The Wizards were already dealing with a depleted roster; they played Sunday with just 10 available players for the third time in eight games and will be shorthanded again Monday.

Starting center Marcin Gortat has missed the last two games because of a family matter and isn’t expected to rejoin the team Monday, while backup Nene (calf) won’t be on the trip to Miami and Alan Anderson (ankle) won’t be available. Big men Kris Humphries (ankle) and Drew Gooden III (calf) are questionable.


VIDEO: John Wall leaves the game with a right knee injury

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Morning shootaround — Nov. 24


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Nov. 23

NEWS OF THE MORNING

LeBron: Warriors are ‘most healthy’ NBA team he’s ever seen | Ainge pleased with Celtics’ direction | Spurs keep chugging along

No. 1: LeBron: Warriors are ‘most healthy’ NBA team he’s ever seen — The topic of good fortune often comes up when discussing the defending-champion Golden State Warriors, a point some use to illustrate the squad was lucky to win the title for a variety of reasons. Wherever you stand on that point, one thing that is true in terms of Golden State’s good fortune is the team’s health during its championship era. Few player games have been lost due to injury and really, only coach Steve Kerr (back) has been out for a prolonged time. Cleveland Cavaliers star LeBron James, who was defeated by the Warriors in the 2015 Finals, knows all too well how the Warriors’ health has helped them. ESPN.com’s Dave McMenamin has more:

LeBron James says there is a not-so-secret ingredient — beyond a talented roster that features reigning MVP Stephen Curry — to the Golden State Warriors’ success: avoiding injuries.

“I think it comes with a lot of health,” James said when asked about the Warriors tying the all-time mark for best start to a season at 15-0. “They’ve been healthy. They’ve been the most healthy team I’ve ever seen in NBA history, and they have great talent. Those guys all play for one common goal and that’s to win, and that’s all that matters.”

James said that continuity in the lineup has led to consistency in their play.

“They’ve just been consistent,” James said. “I think the most impressive thing is the way they just they’ve been playing at a high level, man, for so long.”

The Cleveland Cavaliers, meanwhile, are down four of their top eight rotation players at the moment with Kyrie Irving (left knee), Iman Shumpert (right wrist), Timofey Mozgov (right shoulder) and Mo Williams (right ankle) all sidelined.

“I’d much rather be on the other side and having guys in the lineup, having guys healthy,” James said. “I’ve always heard that saying of, ‘Is it a blessing that guys are out and guys can step in?’ I think it’s good for some of the guys that don’t get to play as much — they get an opportunity. But at the same time, I’d much rather be full and know what we’re going to have and play at a high level for most of the year so we know what we can fall back on at the end of the season.

“But that’s one thing you can’t control. You can’t control injuries. The one thing you can control is what you’re doing out on the floor, how well you’re playing, how hard you’re playing and how much you’re sacrificing and giving to your teammates.”


VIDEO: LeBron James talks about how health has aided the Warriors’ success

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