Posts Tagged ‘L.A. Clippers’

Blogtable: Overcoming playoff injuries

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Playoff injuries | Lottery team(s) in 2015-16 playoffs? | Coaching carousel

Kevin Love, John Wall, Mike Conley and Chris Paul are just some of the big names who have missed playoff games because of injury. Which team has done the best job overcoming the absence of a key player?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comMaybe Cleveland would be having a much easier time of things if Kevin Love were around, but the Cavaliers have circled the wagons pretty well. Which is due, of course, to having the best player in the league in LeBron James. James has managed to give the Cavs enough more often than not to fend off a more talented Chicago roster and push the Bulls to the brink of elimination. His team has rallied with contributions from Iman Shumpert, Tristan Thompson, Timofey Mozgov, J.R. Smith and Matthew Dellavedova, with Kyrie Irving some sliding degree of healthy as the series plays out. If Love is only marginally missed right now, he should be factoring that into his long-term planning this summer.

Fran Blinebury, I don’t think there’s any question that it’s the Clippers.  Chris Paul didn’t play in Games 1 and 2 against the Rockets, was used for limited minutes in Games 3 and 4 and yet L.A. took control of the series and is starting to look like the team to beat in the West.

Scott Howard-Cooper, The Clippers. They won a Game 1 on the road, in Houston, without Chris Paul and then won Game 3 at home with Paul not moving well. Austin Rivers has stepped up. The four other starters have stepped up, with Blake Griffin playing at a very high level. A team that didn’t need another boost of confidence just got one.

Shaun Powell, I’m almost forced to say Cleveland only because Love has missed the most games of the four. In terms of importance, he doesn’t rate with Paul or Wall, but was finally becoming comfortable with his role and valuable in the Cavs grand scheme when he damaged his shoulder. The Cavs are still alive and favored to reach the NBA Finals, mainly because LeBron covers most if not all flaws and absences.

John Schuhmann, I’m most impressed that the Wizards have won a game (against the East’s No. 1 seed) and almost won another without John Wall. Their offense was built around Wall (he led the league in time of possession), but they’ve had two strong offensive games without him. They got big games from their bigs in Game 3 and a huge performance from Bradley Beal in Game 4. I still think that the Hawks win the series if Wall can’t play (or play effectively), but my predictions relating to the Wizards don’t mean much at this point.

Sekou Smith, NBA.comThey’ve all done excellent work compensating, so it’s hard to pick one out of the bunch. But the Clippers are on the cusp of history, for the franchise, so it has to be Doc Rivers and crew. They survived the San Antonio Spurs in Round 1 and have handled the Houston Rockets in the conference semifinals with CP3 playing at CP1.5 due to his hamstring issues. Austin Rivers has come alive. J.J. Redick is shooting lights out and playing both ends at a high level. Even Big Baby Davis is in a groove and playing well. This is some of Doc’s best work, if you ask me. No one, and I mean no one, would have predicted the Clippers would grind their way through to this point under these circumstances, not after the roller coaster regular season ride they were on.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comThe No. 5 Wizards have taken it to the top-seeded Hawks without Wall, who would have been the best player in that series. But no team has shown more resolve than the Clippers, who made their Game 7 stand against the defending champs as Paul struggled to recover from his hamstring injury. Then, instead of settling for an opening loss in the next round, they grabbed the initiative against the Rockets.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blog: I think I’ll go with Cleveland, only because they’ve lost so many key players. Right now, for instance, they’re without Kevin Love for the duration, they have Kyrie Irving playing basically without being able to run, J.R. Smith has missed a couple of games with a suspension, and LeBron hasn’t missed any games but clearly suffered a bad ankle sprain, and yet as of right now the Cavs are still just two wins from advancing to the Conference Finals. To me that speaks to not only their depth, but also their resourcefulness in the face(s) of injury.

Clippers’ Griffin to have elbow surgery, out indefinitely

Not great news for the Clippers. In addition to the team struggling here on their Grammy road trip, now comes the announcement from the team that it will be without Blake Griffin indefinitely once the All-Star forward undergoes scheduled surgery Monday for a staph infection in his elbow.

Griffin will definitely miss the next three games against Oklahoma City today, the Mavericks and Rockets, and coincidentally all three teams are either chasing playoff spots or trying to establish playoff positioning, like the Clippers.

The Clippers are currently the sixth seed in the West, and it’s hard to imagine them falling out of the picture even without Griffin. Still, for a team that has lost four of its last five games and was blown out in Toronto, an injury of this magnitude never comes at a right time.

The other issue lies with the All-Star Game and who might replace Griffin, and that will be determined by commissioner Adam Silver. Griffin is averaging 22.7 points, 7.5 rebounds and a career-best 5.1 assists.

Morning shootaround — Jan. 16

VIDEO: Highlights from games played Jan. 15


Reports: Nets’ Lopez, Hornets’ Stephenson at heart of three-team deal | Rivers: No favoritism for son Austin | Blatt calls timeout issue ‘nonsense’ | Report: Kings willing to deal Stauskas

No. 1:

UPDATE, 10:44 a.m. ET: Per Yahoo Sports’ Adrian Wojnarowski, the Nets didn’t want to take on Lance Stephenson and so, Brooklyn and OKC may be working on a straight-up swap for Brook Lopez

UPDATE, 10:27 a.m. ET: Chris Broussard of, who first broke news of the proposed three-team swap involving Brook Lopez, Lance Stephenson and others, is dead

And here’s more from Broussard on why the deal broke down and what’s next:

The Brooklyn Nets and Oklahoma City Thunder are involved in discussions about a trade involving Brook Lopez and Kendrick Perkins, according to sources.

The two sides had been engaged in talks about a three-way trade that would’ve also involved the Charlotte Hornets shipping out Lance Stephenson, however sources said the Hornets are no longer involved in the deal.

Sources Thursday night confirmed a USA Today report that Oklahoma City would send Perkins could go to the Nets in a potential deal. In earlier trade discussions, the Nets and Thunder had talked about a potential deal involving Lopez and Perkins, among other players, according to sources.

UPDATE, 9:40 a.m. ET: Rick Bonnell of the Charlotte Observer reports that the proposed three-team deal may be dormant … for now

A trade that would have sent Charlotte Hornets shooting guard Lance Stephenson to the Brooklyn Nets has been put on hold, an informed NBA source told the Observer early Friday.

The Hornets, Nets and Oklahoma City Thunder were discussing a deal that would have sent Stephenson to the Nets, Brook Lopez to the Thunder and various parts to the Hornets. It appeared close Thursday night, but the Nets pulled back Friday, putting any discussions on hold.

The Nets have multiple options involving Lopez. It’s still likely they will move him.

The Hornets signed Stephenson in July to a three-year, $27.4 million contract with an out after the second season. It has been an awkward situation, where Stephenson has struggled to collaborate with new teammates. Both he and point guard Kemba Walker need the ball extensively to excel and that has made for an awkward situation.

Reports: Nets’ Lopez to Thunder in three-team deal; Perkins may move to Brooklyn, too — Oklahoma City is struggling to gain traction in the Western Conference playoff chase, but they can’t be faulted for standing pat. After acquiring Dion Waiters from the Cleveland Cavaliers roughly two weeks ago, the Thunder are in talks to try and land former All-Star center Brook Lopez of the Brooklyn Nets. The deal would also include the Charlotte Hornets, who would send Lance Stephenson to Brooklyn and would receive veteran guard Jarrett Jack from Brooklyn. OKC’s Jeremy Lamb and Grant Jarrett would head to Charlotte and, Thunder center Kendrick Perkins could be shipped out to Brooklyn, too.

Multiple outlets reported on the deal last night, but we’ll start with Yahoo! Sports’ Adrian Wojnarowski, who details the Nets’ intense desire to move Lopez:

The Brooklyn Nets have intensified trade discussions for center Brook Lopez and want to move him soon, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

The Nets, Oklahoma City Thunder and Charlotte Hornets began to gather traction on a three-way trade late Thursday afternoon, and planned to continue to discussions on Friday morning, league sources told Yahoo Sports. For the Nets, the biggest hurdle remained their willingness to take on combustible Charlotte guard Lance Stephenson, sources said.

Oklahoma City has been the most aggressive in its pursuit of Lopez, league sources told Yahoo Sports. Brooklyn has tried to find teams willing to move the expiring contract of Kendrick Perkins for an established player, sources said.

The Nets have delivered indications to teams they would like to settle on a trade by the weekend, league sources said.

The Hornets have a strong interest in making a deal for Lopez, but league sources believe the Nets are focused on dealing Lopez to the Western Conference, league sources told Yahoo.

Brooklyn officials have been re-canvassing the league for intel on Hornets guard Lance Stephenson, trying to measure the risk-reward of bringing him back to his hometown, league sources said. Charlotte and Brooklyn talked several weeks ago, but discussions cooled when the Nets were reluctant to acquire Stephenson as part of a broader package, league sources said.

The Nets have three max-contract salaries on the roster – Lopez, Deron Williams and Joe Johnson – and are motivated to shed two of the three before the Feb. 19 trade deadline, league sources said. Brooklyn has lost seven straight games to drop to 16-23, and owner Mikhail Prokhorov is pursuing a sale of the team.

Brooklyn has been unable lately to find any traction in talks to move Williams, league sources said.

The Nets have had discussions with Oklahoma City on Lopez, but the best chance for bringing back value on the former All-Star center could be gambling on the talent of Stephenson. There’s support for a Stephenson homecoming to Brooklyn on the ownership level but rival teams believe the front office is more cautious about taking on the volatile player.

USA Today‘s Sam Amick provides more on the Perkins angle, as well as what the trade means for Brooklyn and Charlotte:

If the deal remains in its current form, the person told USA TODAY Sports that Thunder center Kendrick Perkins likely would go to the Nets as well. The person spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the private nature of trade talks.

The Nets clearly would be taking the biggest gamble in this deal, as Stephenson comes with a high-risk, high-reward quality that hasn’t panned out in Charlotte. After signing a three-year, $27 million deal (with a team option for the third) with the Hornets, he has been extremely inefficient (38.6% shooting overall and 15.1% from three-point range while averaging 10.1 points, 4.7 assists and 6.6 rebounds per game) and is widely known to have been a challenging presence in the locker room.

Still, the Nets badly wants to part ways with Lopez and his contract ($15.7 million this season, $16.7 million next season), and taking on Perkins and his expiring contract as part of the deal ($9.4 million) would certainly help their battered bottom-line.

The Hornets, meanwhile, are eager to part ways with Stephenson and would shore up their backcourt depth by making this move. Lamb, the third-year player out of Connecticut who was taken 12th overall by the Houston Rockets in 2012, has shown some promise but is the odd man out in the Thunder rotation right now. Jack, 31, would give them a productive veteran presence (10.8 points, 4.3 assists and 28.5 minutes per game this season) who — unlike Stephenson — would be a leader in the locker room.’s Chris Broussard, who first reported the trade, says the Miami Heat have also shown interest in landing Lopez:

Sources confirmed a USA Today report that Oklahoma City center Kendrick Perkins could go to the Nets in a potential deal. In earlier trade discussions, the Nets and Thunder had talked about a potential deal involving Lopez and Perkins, among other players, according to sources.

The Hornets, who have been trying to move Stephenson for more than a month, want to make the deal, and Oklahoma City has agreed as well, leaving the Nets as the only holdout, according to sources.

Brooklyn also has had trade talks with the Miami Heat about Lopez, sources said.

The Nets made it known to other teams in early December that Lopez, point guard Deron Williams and swingman Joe Johnson were available via trade, and they recently had talks with the Sacramento Kings about Williams, according to sources.

The Nets (16-23) have lost seven straight games, and general manager Billy King has been active in looking to shake things up.

VIDEO:How might this proposed mega-trade help the Thunder?


Morning shootaround — Nov. 21

VIDEO: Highlights from games played Nov. 20


Pierce: Rivalry with LeBron ‘misunderstood’ | Cavs’ Love still searching for his role | Van Gundy fires back at Markieef Morris | Rivers standing by Redick

No. 1: Pierce: Rivalry with LeBron ‘misunderstood’ — The Cleveland Cavaliers from LeBron James‘ first tour of duty there took on Paul Pierce‘s Boston Celtics crew in two separate East semifinals series (2008 and ’10), losing both times. Those matchups — plus others between James’ Miami Heat teams and Pierce’s Celtics, and later, Brooklyn Nets — spurred a notion that Pierce and James don’t like each other personally. In an interview with J. Michael of, though, Pierce says that’s hardly the truth:

For Friday’s showdown between the Wizards and Cleveland Cavaliers, there are so many subplots in play: The preseason war of words between the backcourts; the rivalry between the teams during LeBron James’ first stint with his hometown team; and Eastern Conference playoff position. But the main plot will focus on Paul Pierce and James.

“I think a lot of it is misunderstood. If I see LeBron walking down the street, it’s not going to be no fistfight. I got a lot of respect for him,” said Pierce, who had triumphs and failures against him as a member of the Boston Celtics and last season with the Brooklyn Nets. “The competitive nature of both of us, being at the same position, being on top teams, gunning for the same trophy year in and year out, that’s where that comes in to play. It’s like fighting for the same girl. Why do I want to be cool with that guy?

“I’ve got total respect for him as a person. It’s just the things that we go through are all on the court and that’s where we leave it.”

“It’s something about great players when they play in certain arenas, when they play against other great players they elevate their play,” Pierce said about the stakes being raised Friday. “LeBron is one of those guys. He feels the moment. He understands the moment. This could be a moment tomorrow. We’ve got to be prepared for it.’

More wisdom from Pierce:

  • On the Cavs now: “Their record doesn’t show how good they’re going to be. … We’re going to have a lot of games like this throughout the course of the year. We got to be ready for this. We got to start expecting playoff-type atmospheres, playoff-type level of play. It’s time for us to start raising our level of play when these type of teams come in, Dallas, Cleveland, whoever.”
  • On James’ return home: “I was definitely surprised. With the run that they had in Miami, them going to four straight Finals that that wouldn’t deter him, losing in the Finals. I thought they built something special there. Obviously, Cleveland has a special place in his heart and he felt like he left something behind but it’s good for him. It’s good for the game of basketball. Shifts the balance of power. We know how tough it is to  put together a team and try to win a championship in that first year which makes the Eastern Conference that much wide open.”


Rivers lights up Clippers after loss to Warriors staff reports

The first meeting in a new season of the perpetually budding rivalry between the Warriors and the Clippers wasn’t much of a game at all. Golden State scored early and often in a 121-104 rout that was closer than the score indicated. In the end, it was just surprisingly one-sided.

Clips coach Doc Rivers noticed.


Morning shootaround — Aug. 7


Report: Marion leaning toward Cavs | Pacers to apply for disabled player exception | Griffin says his back is ‘intact’ | Pistons, Monroe hit impasse

No. 1: Report: Marion leaning toward Cavs — Just yesterday in this space, we reported that the Indiana Pacers had expressed interest in signing veteran free-agent forward Shawn Marion. The Cleveland Cavaliers had been on Marion’s trail, too, and apparently are the favorite to sign him, writes Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports:

Free-agent forward Shawn Marion is leaning toward signing a deal to join LeBron James with the Cleveland Cavaliers, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

Marion, 36, has yet to formally agree with the Cavaliers on a deal, but that could come soon, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

The Indiana Pacers wanted to pursue Marion as a short-term replacement for injured forward Paul George, and will likely soon be armed with a $5.3 million disabled player exception that would allow them to trump the Cavaliers’ offer of the veteran minimum of $1.4 million per season.

The Pacers are applying for the exception in the wake of George’s broken leg, sources said. Nevertheless, Indiana has started to move on from Marion, believing he’s headed to the Cavaliers, and search elsewhere for a free agent, league sources told Yahoo Sports.


Morning Shootaround — April 30

VIDEO: Daily Zap for games played April 29


Parker iffy for Game 5 | Removing Sterling may not be easy | Strange times with Warriors’ coaching staff | Noah reveals he has knee injury

No. 1: Banged-up Parker iffy for Game 5 — Around February during the season, San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg Popovich gave All-Star point guard Tony Parker significant time off to rest his myriad of injuries. That was done so that Parker would be healthy and ready to hold up for what San Antonio hoped would be a repeat run to The Finals. Parker, though, is suffering through a troublesome ankle injury and his status for tonight’s Game 5 against the Mavericks in San Antonio is unknown, writes Dan McCarney of the San Antonio Express-News

Tony Parker is listed as day-to-day in advance of Game 5 after being diagnosed with a Grade 1 sprain of his left ankle, suffered in the first half of the Spurs’ 93-89 victory at Dallas on Monday.

“We’ll see how he is (Wednesday),” Popovich said.

The injury is not believed to have required an MRI or x-ray. Grade I sprains are the least severe among three classifications.

Parker finished with 10 points on 5-for-14 shooting in Game 4. He still played 14 minutes in the second half, returning late to hit an important jumper that gave the Spurs an 87-84 lead with 1:37 remaining. The Spurs’ victory knotted the series at 2-2 entering Wednesday’s game at the AT&T Center.

Parker had been uneven even before the injury, averaging just 3.3 in the second half of the first three games. He is averaging 15.5 points and 4.5 assists in the series.


Morning Shootaround — Jan. 30

VIDEO: The Daily Zap for games played Jan. 29


OKC’s adjustment pays off vs. Heat | Rivers lobbying for Jordan to be an All-Star | Myers dishes on Warriors’ rebuild

No. 1: OKC’s halftime adjustment proves crucial vs. Miami — In Wednesday night’s much-anticipated Thunder-Heat game from south Florida, OKC found itself down 30-21 after the first quarter. At one point, Miami’s first-half lead swelled to 18 points, but the Thunder rallied and by halftime had a 55-50 lead. How OKC maintained that lead in the second half en route to a 112-95 rout of Miami had a lot to do with coach Scott Brooks‘ decision to sit starting center Kendrick Perkins in the second half and insert Perry Jones, thus giving OKC a quicker (if smaller) lineup that caused Miami fits, writes our own Steve Aschburner:

So, set aside the MVP debate for a while, at least until these teams meet again Feb. 20 in Oklahoma City. Focus a little on the COY — Coach of the Year — because the Thunder’s Scott Brooks accounted for the biggest highlight move of the night.

Understand that Brooks hasn’t had his preferred starting lineup for a while, not with All-Star guard Russell Westbrook (right knee meniscus surgery) sidelined since Christmas. But the one he started Wednesday has been his next-best option, with a record now (15-5) that’s nearly as good as OKC’s ‘A’ team (17-2).

So, coming out of halftime, Brooks pulled a lineup from column C. He sat down center Kendrick Perkins and inserted backup forward Perry Jones. Jones is listed at 6-foot-11 but he’s a quarter-horse compared to Perkins’ Clydesdale and the switch effectively rendered the Thunder small. Serge Ibaka was the default center, Durant the ersatz power forward.

It worked wonders. OKC outscored the two-time defending champions 36-25 in the third quarter. A 91-75 lead ballooned to its max with 8:45 left when the Thunder opened the fourth on a 10-1 run. Miami fans might have learned their lesson in The Finals about leaving early when things look bleak but this time, there really was little reason to stay.

So Perkins/bad, small ball/good was plain to see on this night. But Brooks dared to tinker with a mostly pat hand (Perkins has started all but two games), in a properly ballyhooed game, in front of an ESPN audience. He went with Jones and left him in for all 24 minutes of the second half. He made sure the Thunder used their mobility especially to get back on defense, choking off any Miami notions of transition buckets (OKC won that battle, getting 20 fast-break points to the Heat’s eight).

And he sold it on in real time, with nary a pout – who can tell with Stoneface Perk anyway? – nor a ripple.

“I thought to win this game, we had to make a decision,” Brooks said. “It’s just this game. It’s not something we have to do all the time. Perk brings so much to us. We’re not going to make it a small lineup/big lineup [issue]. ‘We’ won the game. It’s always been about ‘us.’ We have a bunch of guys who are always about ‘team’ and tonight was a prime example of that.”

OKC fans watch, celebrate the Thunder’s win in Miami


No. 3: Rivers pushing hard for Jordan to make All-Star team — This time of year, many coaches will lobby other coaches within their  conference to vote for a player as an All-Star reserve. The general thought, though, is that this happens during pregame conversations or informal talks amongst NBA coaches. That’s one level of lobbying. Then there’s what Clippers coach Doc Rivers is apparently doing to get center DeAndre Jordan to the All-Star Game.’s Arash Markazi has more on Rivers’ lobbying efforts:

Before the season began, Los Angeles Clippers coach Doc Rivers said his team had a “big three”: Chris Paul, Blake Griffin and DeAndre Jordan.Rivers now would like to see his big three in New Orleans for the NBA All-Star Game and has gone as far as lobbying his fellow Western Conference coaches to include Jordan in their vote to make the team as a reserve.

“I got a great response,” Rivers said. “But that’s why you go under a curtain when you’re stumping and they vote real because [they say], ‘Yeah, I’m going to vote for him,’ and then they shift that other lever.”

Rivers said many of the coaches he called said they would vote for Jordan while others said they liked him without saying whether they would include him.

“Yeah,” Rivers said when asked whether he was hopeful Jordan would be named an All-Star. “But it’s a lot of guys at that position.”

Jordan currently is leading the NBA in field goal percentage at .645 and rebounding with a 13.9 per-game average, and is fourth in blocked shots with 2.38 per game. He also is averaging a career-high 9.5 points per game.

“I’m looking forward to [the announcement]; whatever the coaches vote, I’m going to respect it,” said Jordan, who had 14 points and 17 rebounds against the Washington Wizards in a 110-103 win Wednesday night. “If I make it, I make it and I’ll be really excited, but if not, it’s another chip I can add on my shoulder and just continue to keep playing like I’m playing this season.”

VIDEO: Doc Rivers talks about L.A.’s win on Wednesday over the Wizards


No. 3: Warriors GM dishes on building a contenderJust two seasons ago, Golden State was a 23-win team in the midst of what would become its fifth straight season without the playoffs. Much has changed since then, what with last season’s run to the Western Conference semifinals and this season contender for the Pacific Division crown.’s Nate Duncan caught up with Warriors GM Bob Myers, who talked in detail about crafting a long-term plan to make Golden State relevant again:

You talked about the timeline. When you came on in roughly early 2011 and then going into that summer and after the lockout, what did you perceive this team’s timeline for contention to be at that point?

Myers: Well what’s left from when I started is our two players, David Lee and Steph Curry. So of the 13 or 14 guys three years ago, we’ve kept two. So it’s a total overhaul of the entire roster, whether it’s through draft, trade or free agency. We have I would say, right now 13 new players in two years, which is a big turnover. Ideally you’d like to have more continuity, but we weren’t having success with the roster that year, obviously. We did believe last year, we hoped we put together a team that could make the playoffs. So our goal this year, last year it was to make the playoffs, this year was to make a good showing in the playoffs, and maybe next year it’s more than that. But we try to be realistic about where we are, we want to go beyond the goal of last year, which was just making the playoffs, and this year maybe advance in the playoffs. Maybe advance further than we did last year. So you’re always trying to build. A lot of things factor into your success in the postseason. We do our best in the front office and as an organization to put together the most talented team, and trust in our coaching staff to develop the players we give them. And then we go from there, and see what happens.

In 2011 you’re 36-46 and there’s this sort of truth, we can debate how truthful that actually is, that you kind of don’t want to be in the middle, that that’s the worst place to be. Was there any thought that you might have to bottom out a little bit to improve in that 2011 timeframe?

Myers: Well, the goal was to upgrade our talent from that team, that was the goal all along. We didn’t have a ton of assets to deal via trade. One of our assets, who happened to be our best player at the time, was Monta Ellis. One of the philosophies of the organization was to get bigger. We really wanted to try and be big. This organization has been small for so long and has had some success in that way, but from ownership on down, we feel like size is imperative to compete consistently in the NBA. So we had an opportunity to trade a guard for a center, and I think those opportunities are rare, and we took advantage of it. And Bogut happened to be hurt at the time. I’m not sure we could have got him if he was healthy. If he was healthy that would have been fine, maybe that would have allowed us to make a push towards the playoffs. But the fact that he was hurt allowed us to see what the team was with a lot of our young assets. Every day we come to work, we’re trying to find ways to improve our roster. Whether that’s through current assets or future assets or developing organically through the players we have here. Every day we want to leave work a little bit better than when we came in.


SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: For the second time this season, Evan Turner hit a game-winning buzzer-beater … Historically, the Jazz don’t do so hot on the nights they retire jerseys … Ex-Mavs coach  Spurs coach Gregg Popovich says, like it or not, the “Hack-a-Shaq” strategy is part of the NBA now

ICYMI(s) of The Night: There were two standout breakaway dunks last night, so it was hard for us to pick just one. Which one was better: Giannis Antetokounmpo‘s or Blake Griffin‘s? …:

VIDEO: Giannis Antetokounmpo finishes strong vs. Phoenix

VIDEO: Blake Griffin takes flight on a breakaway jam

Morning Shootaround — Dec. 30

VIDEO: The Daily Zap for games played Dec. 29


Parker might listen to free-agent offers | Durant gets fired up vs. Rockets | More minutes on horizon for Bennett? | Redick nearing return?

No. 1: Parker not opposed to leaving Spurs one day — Much like teammates Tim Duncan and Manu Ginobili, point guard Tony Parker seems destined to join that duo as a life-long Spur. But Parker, responding to an report that says the Knicks have interest in pursuing him once he becomes a free agent in 2015, isn’t so sure he’d stick with San Antonio no matter the cost. While Parker says staying with the Spurs is his top choice, he told the San Antonio Express-NewsJabari Young that he’s also open to testing the free-agent waters should things not work out as he hopes in San Antonio:

Tony Parker to the New York Knicks?

Unlikely, but Parker wouldn’t rule it out. In fact, he wouldn’t rule out going anywhere if certain circumstances aren’t in place.

A report last week by said the Knicks hope to target the All-Star point guard in 2015, when Parker is set to become a free agent. Told of the report, Parker smiled and said he hadn’t seen it, but is keeping all his options open.

Parker made it clear though, his first choice it to remain in San Antonio as long as he could.

“If I can yeah”, Parker told the San Antonio Express-News. “The history here, they always take care of the guys. They did it with [Tim Duncan] and Manu [Ginobili], so hopefully they take care of me. At the end of this year they have to guarantee my year after, so, technically, maybe, I’ll be a free agent this summer.”

The 31-year-old Parker, who is averaging 17.8 points and 6.0 assists this season, signed a four-year, $50 million extension in 2010. He is owed $25 million in the last two years of his contract, but the final year is partially guaranteed for $3.5 million if he is waived by June 30, 2014 and fully guaranteed for $12.5 million after that.

Said Parker: “I just don’t want a guarantee, I want an extension, too.”

Even if Parker remains in San Antonio for the final year, his decision to stay beyond 2014-15 will depend on his coach and teammates.

Who knows when Spurs coach Gregg Popovich will hang it up, though it may not be too far away, and Duncan has a $10 million player option next season, which is the final year of his deal. Will he be around beyond that?

“I want to stay positive,” Parker said, “but if it doesn’t work out, then it doesn’t work out. My wish is to stay here and play my whole career here, but if there is no more Pop or Timmy or Manu, I’m not against going somewhere. I’m not against that.”

Parker being targeted is nothing new, though, and he always expresses his desire to remain in San Antonio for the remainder of his career. But what if the Spurs and Parker don’t reach an extension, would Parker seek a trade?

“I don’t even think like that because I think Pop and [Spurs General Manger R.C. Buford] they always take care of their guys,” Parker responded. “They did it with Timmy and Manu, so I don’t see no reason why they’re not gonna do it with me.”


No. 2: Durant shows fire in win over Rockets — In late October, Kevin Durant told The Oklahoman he wasn’t going to be as ‘obsessed’ about winning a championship as he was a season ago. The Houston Rockets would like to argue otherwise. Durant, in the Thunder’s first game against a contender since losing Russell Westbrook (again), simply dominated on Sunday night against Houston. OKC’s star was going full-tilt, as usual, on offense, but as longtime Thunder observer Darnell Mayberry notes, there was an added passion to Durant’s game:

Perry Jones III hadn’t been in the game 90 seconds.

But Kevin Durant didn’t like what he was seeing.

And so the Thunder star called over his second-year teammate, pulling him off the lane during a free-throw attempt despite OKC owning a 15-point lead.

“Wake your (blankety blank) up,” Durant barked at Jones near the scorer’s table.

No one needed to give Durant a wake-up call.

But it wasn’t just the numbers that defined Durant’s night.

It was the pep in his step, the look in his eyes and the fire and intensity with which he played. He took his game to a higher level Sunday in a showdown he knows could turn into a playoff rematch this spring.

From chewing out an up-and-coming teammate to a second-quarter stare down of old nemesis Francisco Garcia when things got too physical on the low block, Durant was dialed in the whole way.

He harassed an official when he drew a foul call and it was called on Terrence Jones instead of Dwight Howard.

He squawked at the Rockets bench after hitting a jumper over former teammate James Harden, a play he orchestrated the entire way when he called for a screen that would force Harden to switch and be left isolated on the right wing.

“He feel like he got to come and set the tone, and he doing that,” said Kendrick Perkins. “I’m liking the mean KD; giving stare downs when he’s dunking on people. I’m rolling with that.”

Durant, meanwhile, is too politically correct to speak on it publicly, and so he downplayed the source of his efforts after the game. But all throughout the summer, when Houston commanded the league’s attention with its blockbuster acquisition of Howard and caused many to wonder whether the Rockets had surpassed the Thunder, Durant grew testy each time the topic was brought up. The focus, Durant always said, should be on the Thunder. That’s the way he wanted to keep it.

With Sunday’s performance, Durant did his part to make sure it stayed that way.

VIDEO: Highlights from Kevin Durant’s monster game vs. the Rockets


No. 3: Bynum’s suspension opens up minutes for Bennett — ICYMI somehow over the weekend, things aren’t going so great for the Cavaliers in their attempts to restart Andrew Bynum‘s career. On Saturday, the team suspended him for conduct detrimental to the team and by Sunday, rumors were swirling that the Clippers and Heat were interested in landing the one-time All-Star center. As Cleveland navigates its future with Bynum, one player who could benefit from the fallout is rookie Anthony Bennett, writes Jason Lloyd of the Akron Beacon-Journal. Lloyd has info on that, plus some news on what is next for the Cavs and Bynum, too:

Andrew Bynum’s removal from the Cavaliers clears two spots in Mike Brown’s rotation. One will go to Tyler Zeller, the other to Anthony Bennett.

The top pick in the draft has played sparingly to this point, but no longer. The Cavs are committing significant minutes to Bennett moving forward, which is why Mike Brown acknowledged Sunday that he needs to give Bennett time to play through inevitable mistakes.

“I have to continue trying to have patience with him,” Brown said. “This is an opportunity for him to go out and play some minutes and show what he’s capable of doing.”

After saying that, he only played Bennett 11 minutes in the 108-104 overtime loss Sunday to the Golden State Warriors after playing him 19 minutes in the loss to the Boston Celtics on Saturday.

“I’m still clueless about this whole thing,” Bennett said. “I’m still trying to learn a lot. I can still learn from my teammates, from the coaching staff, watching film. I just feel like this whole league is all about learning, just going out and playing.”

He has played a fraction of the minutes other top picks in last summer’s draft are receiving. The Cavs hope more consistent minutes will mean more production.

Brown has juggled Bennett’s role from power forward to small forward and now back to power forward, which seems to have further confused the rookie. When he switched Bennett back to power forward, Brown said there is still the possibility he could see minutes on the wing. For right now, Brown likes some of the things Bennett is doing away from the ball. He just wants the rookie to slow down and show some composure when he has the ball.

In terms of Bynum, it looks like the Cavs will have to move quickly on a trade if they want to spare themselves having to pay the majority of Bynum’s salary this season:

Bynum’s suspension was lifted Sunday, but he is still excused from all team activities. He was docked one game’s pay (roughly $110,000). The Cavs have until Jan. 7 to trade or release him or they will be responsible for the balance of his $12 million deal.

If they can’t find a deal by Jan. 7, a league source confirmed the team is considering holding onto him anyway. They would have until June 30 to trade or release him before his $12 million deal for next season becomes guaranteed.

Bynum’s locker hadn’t been cleaned out yet at Quicken Loans Arena. Among the items left behind was a pair of headphones. He is also still part of the pregame introduction video. The team did not hand out his Fathead on Sunday, as was previously scheduled. They also did not hand out game-day programs, called “Tipoff Tonight,” because he was featured on the cover.

To make up for the Fathead issue, kids 14 and under received a certificate to redeem for future Fathead packs.

Coach Mike Brown talks after the Cavs’ OT loss to the Warriors on Sunday


No. 4: Redick nearing return for Clips? — As one of the marquee additions to the team in the offseason, the Clippers’ J.J. Redick got off to a solid start for Los Angeles before a torn ligament in his wrist sidelined him for 6-8 weeks in early December. He’s been rehabbing the injury ever since and Clippers coach Doc Rivers tells Broderick Turner of the Los Angeles Times that Redick could be on his way back to the lineup soon:

Clippers rookie swingman Reggie Bullock, who is out with a sprained right ankle, has been working out and is making progress.

Coach Doc Rivers said Bullock shot some during the team’s shoot-around before Saturday night’s game against Utah.

“Yeah, he’s getting closer,” Rivers said.

J.J. Redick, who is out with a broken right hand and torn ligaments on the right side of his wrist, now has a soft cast on his hand and not the hard cast anymore.

Redick, a right-handed shooter, has not been shooting the ball yet.

“He’s close too, would be my guess,” Rivers said. “I think it’s a couple of weeks, maybe.”


SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Blazers rookie C.J. McCollum is getting closer and closer to his NBA debut … The Knicks might be closing in on a deal with big man Jeremy Tyler, a move that could result in the cutting of Chris Smith … The Wizards’ Bradley Beal is a much better shooter when Marcin Gortat is on the courtBlake Griffin has been playing some MVP-type basketball the last few games

ICYMI Of The Night: Maybe there are times now, what with Russell Westbrook being injured, that Kevin Durant misses his old teammate James Harden. But he made a point to see him up close again when he dunked on him last night

VIDEO: Kevin Durant drives in and dunks over ex-teammate James Harden

Morning Shootaround — Oct. 24


Rivers sets goals for Clippers | Rondo’s return getting closer? | Pistons’ Jennings healing up fast | Report: Suns, Bledsoe talking extension

No. 1: Rivers wants Clippers to pull togetherThe addition of Doc Rivers to the Clippers’ bench as their new coach was widely seen as one of the biggest moves of the NBA’s offseason. No doubt, the Clippers are counting on Rivers’ history of deep playoff runs with the Boston Celtics to translate to L.A. and take a crew known mostly for regular-season highlights further in the postseason. USA Today‘s David Leon Moore caught up with Rivers and the rest of the Clippers and found the the new coach is embracing the high expectations and hopes for a playoff run that are present in Clipperland:

The hype is loud for a team with two perennial All-Stars — point guard Chris Paul and power forward Blake Griffin — along with a title-winning coach and a deep and talented roster.

Rivers and the Clippers aren’t backing away from it.

“I always thought I’d rather be with a group with high expectations,” the 52-year-old coach says. “Are we ready for that? I don’t know yet. That’s what this journey will be about. I think we are. I think we have a chance to do something. That excites me. If we can look at what’s on paper and get that on the floor and keep it healthy, I think we can be a special team. That excites me.”

What needs to be changed from Del Negro’s regime?

Rivers wants to shore up the transition defense, guard the three-point line better and turn underachieving 6-11 center DeAndre Jordan into a candidate for defensive player of the year.

But there is a bigger goal, Rivers says. “Become a team,” he says. “I was a player. I was in locker rooms, and I understand that part of it. I know how important the locker room is. That’s something we need to improve here — our locker room.

“We just need to grow as a group. We have to embrace ‘heart’ all the time. That’s an area we need to be strongest in. Instead of splintering when things go wrong, we need to pull together.”


No. 2: Rondo may be in contact drills soon — Celtics All-Star point guard Rajon Rondo last played in an NBA game on Jan. 25, 2013 against the Hawks. It was in that game that Rondo injured his knee and shortly thereafter, had a torn ACL and was done for the season. Rondo has been rehabbing steadily since his surgery and might be ready for the next step in process to return to the court, writes Mark Murphy of the Boston Herald:

Rajon Rondo watched last night’s 107-97 Celtics exhibition win over a Brooklyn scrub team with the same calm the rehabbing point guard has brought to every other game this fall.

That’s because while Rondo won’t get specific about a timetable, he acknowledged last night that the next step in his recovery from ACL surgery — contact — may not be far off.

“I’m getting fitted for my first brace, and I don’t think contact will be too far from there,” the Celtics point guard said. “I just have to get cleared by my doctors. I know it’s getting stronger each week. When I’m able to jump off my right leg and dunk, that’s probably when I’ll be ready to play.

“Feeling great, working out every day. I’m doing more as far as compound workouts. I’m doing one workout a day, so I’m doing more as far as working on my leg. It’s getting better each day.”


No. 3: Jennings healing up, expects to return to Pistons soon — Detroit’s new starting point guard, Brandon Jennings, had surgery to repair an issue with his wisdom teeth a few weeks ago. He’s understandably been mostly quiet since the procedure, but the Pistons are thinking he’ll be ready to go by early next month, writes Vince Ellis of the Detroit Free-Press:

Brandon Jennings hasn’t had much to say — it’s tough to talk when your mouth is immobilized.

That’s what the Pistons’ public relations staff has reminded media members who have requested to interview Jennings, who returned to the practice facility this week after a brief absence because of an impacted wisdom tooth and hairline fracture of the jaw.

He hasn’t returned to full practices yet, but his light work and good spirits appear to be good signs that he will be able to return quickly when he is re-evaluated in two weeks. Jennings might play by Nov. 5 against Indiana.

“He’s been a part of everything with the exception of running,” coach Maurice Cheeks said Wednesday. “He’s able to watch film, being on the practice floor, he has been a part of it. Whenever he gets his situation taken care of, we will put him in there and see what he’s got.”

Jennings wore a protective mask Wednesday while taking shots, but it’s still to be determined if he will wear it when he returns.


No. 4: Report: Suns, Bledsoe talking extension — The Suns wrapped up their preseason schedule last night with a victory against the Nuggets that was paced by point guard Eric Bledsoe‘s 21-point effort. Bledsoe finished the preseason as Phoenix’s leading scorer (just 13.0 ppg, but that’ll likely be higher during the season) and has had a pretty smooth transition from Chris Paul‘s backup with the Clippers to his new role as a go-to guy with the Suns. As such, writes Andrew Gilstrap of, the Suns and Bledsoe are trying to hammer out a contract extension before the Oct. 31 deadline:

The Phoenix Suns are currently in talks with newly acquired guard Eric Bledsoe on a long-term contract extension. If the two sides can’t reach a deal by the end of the month, the 23-year-old combo guard would become a restricted free agent at the end of the season.

The Suns are in an interesting spot because they’ve only seen the Kentucky product in training camp and a few preseason games, and it’s still uncertain that he will become the star many project him to be.

Nonetheless, general manager Ryan McDonough, while on Arizona Sports 620’s Burns & Gambo show Wednesday, agreed that Bledsoe does figure into the team’s long-term plans. McDonough said contract talks with the fourth-year player have gone “pretty well” to this point.

“If we’re not able to work out a deal (by Oct. 31), we would start next summer with Eric as a restricted free agent, but obviously we’re hoping to get something done before that,” the general manager said.

“With Eric, there’s more projection. Some would say there’s more risk, but I’d also counter that there’s more upside,” McDonough, 33, said. “He does some unique things athletically. I think he’s the best shot-blocking guard in the league. If he plays extended minutes, which he will for us, I think he might lead the league in steals. He has a unique potential.”


SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: In his farewell Board of Governors dinner, David Stern was immortalized in bobblehead form. Where can we get one of those? … The Jazz are reportedly bringing veteran point guard Jamaal Tinsley back into the fold … The Nets, understandably, are expecting big things from Deron Williams this season …

ICYMI Of The Night: Jazz rookies can’t seem to get a break. Yesterday, we had rookie Justin Holiday getting his welcome-to-the-NBA moment (from Xavier Henry of the Lakers). Today, we’ve got Rudy Gobert getting his welcome thanks to Blake Griffin of the Clippers …