Posts Tagged ‘Kyrie Irving’

Fixing defensive downfalls remains job No. 1 for Cavaliers


VIDEO: GameTime’s crew discusses what the Cavs must do to shore up their defense

CLEVELAND – It sounded like the old Steve Martin joke, advising people how to be a millionaire and never pay taxes (“First, get a million dollars. Then…”). Someone asked Gregg Popovich how he and his San Antonio coaching staff get players not known for their defense to “buy in” to the Spurs’ system so they uphold that team’s stingy reputation.

“I don’t bring anybody in like that,” Popovich said after the Spurs’ shootaround session Wednesday at Quicken Loans Arena. “Except maybe [Marco] Belinelli. He’s trying.”

Even the trigger-happy Belinelli got vetted through Tom Thibodeau‘s five-guys-on-a-string tactics in Chicago for a year before Popovich and general manager R.C. Buford signed him in July 2013.

The Cavaliers imposed no such prohibitions when they came together this offseason, parts being bolted around LeBron James in a flurry of trades and free-agent acquisitions. The incumbent backcourt of Kyrie Irving and Dion Waiters had no particular defensive chops. Power forward Kevin Love racks up formidable rebounding numbers but otherwise hadn’t shown much defensive proclivities. Center Anderson Varejao is energetic and aggressive in the paint, but Love and Tristan Thompson aren’t bonafide rim protectors. Shooters Mike Miller and James Jones are, well, shooters. And even James’ defense seemed to slip a notch in his last season with Miami.

Through nine games, Cleveland’s defensive rating of 108.3 was tied for fifth-worst in the league. That’s not just worse than his Heat team’s performance last season (102.9), it’s worse than the 2013-14 Cavaliers managed (104.8) on their way to a 33-49 record.

The Cavs have given up 100 points or more seven times, and their defensive effective field-goal percentage of .536, which adjusts for the premium on 3-pointers, is third-worst in the NBA, better only than the Lakers (.551) and Minnesota (.559). The breakdowns in Cleveland’s schemes are clear, from zone coverage to pick-and-roll misdirections to some poor or lazy individual habits.

So while everyone has focused on the blending of offensive styles and responsibilities of James, Love, Irving and the rest, Cleveland opponents have found it awfully easy to score – a flaw the Cavaliers can’t afford to ignore.

“I don’t think it’s something you learn on the fly,” James said Wednesday. “I think it’s something you work on every single day. You teach it, you preach it, you demand it. I didn’t come [into the NBA] as being a big defensive guy. I played defense and my high school coaches did preach it, and we knew in order to win, we had to defend. This is a different level.

“When [former Cavs coach] Mike Brown came to this team, that was just his whole mindset, saying, ‘If we don’t defend, we can’t win.’ And he preached it every day. It was just instilled in us as players. You’ve got to teach it, you’ve got to preach it, you’ve got to demand it every single day.”

Sounds like current Cavs coach David Blatt is there now, too.

“You have to raise the level of expectation,” Blatt said the other day, “and the level of accountability, and you have to make the whole greater than the sum of its parts. Sometimes if you’re not blessed with great individual defenders, your principles have to be that much stronger, and your helps and your court recognition have to be that much better. And that’s why it’s taken us longer in that area of the game than on the offensive end.”

San Antonio, by contrast, ranks third in the NBA in defensive rating (96.0) after finishing fourth (100.1) last season and tied for third (99.2) two years ago. A team whose main pieces have been together for multiple seasons might be expected to have an edge, though effort and priorities matter as much or more.

The Cavs’ familiarity will grow, but it’s on them to drag the defense along. Bumping up Shawn Marion‘s minutes has helped some, and there has been chatter about pursuing Timberwolves wing Corey Brewer in trade. Still, a roster overhaul is unlikely and any defensive makeover will require lipstick (and more) on what so far has been a pig.

“Defensively we just need more than anything to just trust each other,” Love said. “We’re all capable, especially as a team. We’ve got to take the individual battle. But at the end of the day, we need to trust each other that we need to help each other out.”


VIDEO: LeBron James is driven to get the Cavs back to winning consistently

 

Morning shootaround — Nov. 19


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Nov. 17

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Anthony dealing with knee ‘soreness’ | James wants less minutes for ‘Big Three’ | KG hoping Kidd gets warm Brooklyn reception | Cuban takes shot at Lakers

No. 1: Anthony dealing with knee ‘soreness’Carmelo Anthony has played fantastic of late, averaging 30.4 ppg over his last five games. Unfortunately, his New York Knicks are 1-4 in that span, a stretch that includes last night’s failed comeback attempt against the Milwaukee Bucks. After dropping 26 points on the Bucks, though, Anthony revealed to the media that his left knee has been giving him some trouble since opening night. Peter Botte of the New York Daily News has more:

Carmelo Anthony laid on a training table in the visiting locker room for several minutes, his left knee being iced down following the Knicks’ failed comeback bid in a 117-113 loss Tuesday to the Bucks.

Anthony left the court briefly in the second quarter to have his left knee retaped before returning to play 20 of 24 minutes in the second half – and finish with a team-high 26 points in 37:45 overall.

But the $124 million All-Star revealed he’s been playing with some “soreness” in his left knee “since the Cleveland game” on Oct. 30, and acknowledged that he recently “had some (medical) tests” on that leg, although he wouldn’t reveal any specifics.

“I don’t think it’s serious. I’m out there playing. I don’t think it’s that serious,” Anthony said after the game. “My knee was bothering me a little bit. The tape job I had on it, it kind of got wet a little bit. I started feeling it a little bit after that. I cut the tape off on the bench and I started to feel a little bit more pain. I had to come back and get it retaped. It felt better once I got it retaped. I banged my knee when I had to dive on the ball with Giannis (Antetokounmpo), I banged my knee on the floor. It was sore from that point on.

“I’ve just been trying to go through it and play through it and not kind of think about it. Some days are better than others. Today once the tape came off of it, I felt it. When I banged it on the floor, it made it worse.”


VIDEO: The Bucks hold off the Knicks in Milwaukee

*** (more…)

Love shoots down Lakers talk

Up in smoke?

That’s where Kevin Love is sending any talk of him bailing out on the Cavaliers after one season and heading West to join the Lakers next summer.

The All-Star forward also told Jason Lloyd of the Akron Beacon Journal that there was no fire to the burning rumor that he and teammate Kyrie Irving were making any illicit hand gestures:

“Whatever we were doing with our hands was about as true as me going to the Lakers,” Love said Friday. “Going to the Lakers, I don’t know where someone got that.

“I don’t know why it was so hard for people to realize we were actually curling our mustache. I guess because I had my fingers in the wrong place. But looking at the tape, film don’t lie. It does look like we’re doing something bad, but that’s not the case.”

Blogtable: Your move, LeBron

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Clippers soft | Forsooth, this fortnight | LeBron’s move



VIDEO: LeBron James had a near-triple double in the Cavaliers’ win over New Orleans

> Say you’re LeBron James. How do you help the Cavs figure this out? Take over at point? Take over the scoring load? Sit back and let them make mistakes?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comLeBron James should huddle up with coach David Blatt and declare a second training camp. Now’s the time – the schedule is slack, with a three-day gap before Friday’s game at Boston and then eight of the next nine at home. The Cavs’ first training camp was all about introductions and excitement; now it’s time to practice hard and develop habits, especially defensively. Nothing has gone on with this team that wasn’t expected and there are a bunch of winnable games in those upcoming nine. But the Cavs cannot slip below .500 without triggering a panic and it’s on James to lead the way on the floor – sometimes playing like Magic Johnson, sometimes like MJ – until they get it right. Might want to take Dion Waiters snipe hunting, too.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Really? We’re going here already? Again? How many times do we have to be reminded that the Heat were 8-9 on Nov. 27 in his first season in Miami. That was with a roster built around three veterans at the core.  This is a green lineup with virtually no playoff experience. To quote LeBron: RELAX.  How long until I flip my lid? A year from now. Vegas made the Cavs the betting favorite to win the title this season because the wise guys know better than most how many suckers there are in the world.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: What matters is whether LeBron is asserting himself in some way, even if it doesn’t come through in the stats. If he’s a large presence behind the scene, pushing teammates in the right direction, setting an example of putting the time in to learn the system of a new coach, that’s a way to help the Cavs figure this out. At some point, though, he will need to deliver the same on the court. LeBron James wasn’t signed to fit in. He should not sit back and let teammates make mistakes. He needs to score, and he will. But his passing, rebounding and defense will win games as well. It’s not just the scoring load.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: The last thing LeBron needs to do is show any signs of panic or concern. If he does that, then the troops will follow his lead and this could spin out of control in a hurry. Given his status as the best player in the game and the only Cav with any championship clout, LeBron should make demands but not ultimatums, motivate, tell his teammates what the Heat went through initially in 2011, and above all, lead by example.

Kyrie Irving (David Kyle/NBAE)

Kyrie Irving (David Kyle/NBAE)

John Schuhmann, NBA.comI wouldn’t force anything, either on the floor or in the locker room. I wouldn’t put up with guys putting themselves ahead of the team, but I would allow Kyrie Irving to experience the joy of sharing the ball, allow David Blatt to find his NBA coaching legs, and put my trust in teammates who haven’t necessarily earned it right now. If there’s one issue early on, it’s that only eight guys are getting playing time every night. Even when Dion Waiters and Matthew Dellavedova return from injury, this team will need guys like Joe Harris and Brendan Haywood to be ready to contribute. But it’s very early and the results don’t matter right now.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: I do what I’ve always done if I’m LeBron, and that’s lead by example. I take over everything, play the point forward spot I revolutionized in Miami and demand that Kyrie Irving, Dion Waiters and anyone else who missed my last four years in Miami recognizes that I am the difference between The Finals and oblivion. Seriously. What in the world does LeBron have to prove at this point in his career? This notion that he should defer to anyone else on that roster so they’ll be comfortable is preposterous. You either follow LeBron’s lead or get gone. That’s the only way things should work in Cleveland this season.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: You go to your strengths. That means setting up the other guys, directing the defense and filling in the gaps. He knows better than anyone that he cannot carry them. The other guys are going to have to figure it out for themselves and the best he can do is to help them find their way. But if he tries to do their jobs for them, that isn’t going to help anybody.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: LeBron made very clear in “the letter” this summer that the Cavs would have growing pains, and none of us believed him. Why not? Because they have LeBron, of course, along with Kyrie and Kevin Love. But now they’re on a large stage, learning a new offense, new defense, how to play with each other, and how to handle the immense pressure on that stage. But if I’m LeBron, the last thing I do is try and take over right now. If this is going to be a team, let coach Blatt do his thing, and let Kyrie and Love figure things out on their own. Basically, give this thing some time to breathe.

Orr Ziv, NBA.com/Israel: LeBron shouldn’t do anything different than what he has done so far. Just let it play out. It seems that he buys into coach Blatt’s system and as time moves on, those Cavs will get lethal on offense. Remember — they only have five guys returning from last year, and it takes time for all the new pieces to jell, even if those pieces are some of the best players in the world.

Karan Madhok, NBA.com/India: LeBron James is one of the greatest all-around basketball players, with the talent to fill in the blanks for any team he plays for. For the Cavaliers, the biggest ‘blank’ is defense; the team has struggled defensively and even if Coach Blatt irons out their offensive hiccups, the problems on D will remain all year. This is where I feel that LeBron should focus. The Cavs have enough scoring talent; James needs to evolve his game to focus on becoming an elite perimeter defender and lead the charge of the team by getting stops and inspiring his teammates to do the same. Everything else should fall into place.

Simon Legg, NBA.com/Australia: LeBron needs to find the right blend of scoring and distributing. He’s easily the best passer on this team and his court vision is exceptional. Whether it’s passing or shooting, he generally makes the right play, something that Kyrie has struggled with in the past. LeBron has played with the likes of Mo Williams and Mario Chalmers, two point guards who have the ability to play off-the-ball and spot up. With Irving and Kevin Love playing alongside James, those open catch-and-shoot opportunities will be welcomed by LeBron’s supporting cast. He also needs to work off the ball and score accordingly which is where James and Irving need to combine and find the right balance. Something they found in the win against the Pelicans. Wins are always important and they need to pick up early ones, but it’s the chemistry that they need to find on both ends of the floor that will be pivotal if this team is to execute in the playoffs.

Stefanos Triantafyllos, NBA.com/Greece: LeBron playing at point? LeBron scoring more? If you are the best player in the planet, the one that can do it all, there is only one thing that you have to do: play your game, like it’s the Finals. LeBron has to give the message to the league, that these are the new Cavs, that they are contenders. He has to be aggressive, he has to be a leader. And you know leading is not only about scoring, or taking the last shot. Is about giving the example to the teamates that want to cut slack in defense or make more dribbles and less passes.

Ole Frerks, NBA.com/Germany: I’d say wins aren’t that important right now, because the Cavs will make the playoffs in the Eastern Conference anyway. It is far more important for the guys to get to know each other and for David Blatt to figure out how to use his new weapons. Personally, I had figured they would struggle on defense, but their offensive problems have really surprised me, given they have so much passing talent. As for LeBron, I’d assert myself, but I wouldn’t try to take over from Kyrie or anything, because it is too important that Irving maintains his confidence. But I guess there’s nobody who knows better how to handle this situation, because he’s experienced a similar one in his first season with the Heat. That didn’t turn out too bad.

Marcelo Nogueira, NBA.com/Argentina: I see Cleveland as a big truck that hasn’t yet settled its load correctly. And of course this is the case – they haven’t been together long enough. Like any team who wants to succeed, defining the roles will be key.  David Blatt should look into Erik Spoelstra’s mirror – Spoelstra knew how to properly manage the egos of his players and make more than one championship team.

For more NBA Debates, go to #AmexNBA

LeBron, new big 3 in the zone


VIDEO: LeBron James collects his 38th regular season triple double in a Cavaliers uniform

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The next time LeBron James tells you to “relax” you’d be wise to listen to him.

Whatever issues and growing pains the new Big 3 of James, Kevin Love and Kyrie Irving are experiencing clearly won’t last forever. In fact, they’ll melt away in the next few days if LeBron can keep this up.

He went off in a 118-111 win over the New Orleans Pelicans, collecting his 38th career triple double (32 points, 12 rebounds and 10 assists) in helping the Cavs to their first home win of the season over Anthony Davis and the Pelicans.

The Cavs piled up a season-high 27 assists and James, Love and Irving combined for 86 points, 61 of the Cavs’ 67 points after halftime, and they each scored 20 or more points in the same game for the first time since joining forces.

It took 17 games and nearly two full months for the Miami Big 3 of James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh to find a groove in the opening stages of the 2010-11 season. The Cleveland crew looks like it might be ahead of that schedule.

Morning shootaround — Nov. 8


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Nov. 7

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Clippers struggling to live up to the hype | Rockets will be short-handed in battle of unbeatens | The “dark side” of the triangle

No. 1: Clippers struggling to live up to the hype — Don’t believe the hype, especially when it’s self-generated. The Los Angeles Clippers are finding that out the hard way this season, struggling early on to play up to expectations (both internally and externally) that had many folks picking them as the favorite to win the Western Conference and perhaps the NBA title. We’re barely two weeks into this NBA season, but it’s clear they are not playing at a level that was expected of them. Ben Bolch of The Los Angeles Times breaks it down in advance of the Clippers’ afternoon tussle with the Portland Trail Blazers:

Everyone, it seems, is playing pop psychologist, diagnosing the problems of a team widely expected to contend for the Western Conference title that has gotten off to an underwhelming start.

With the Lakers winless through the season’s first five games, the Clippers could color Los Angeles red and blue beyond their “BE RELENTLESS” ads adorning buildings and billboards. It hasn’t happened.

“This is a chance for the Clippers to take over the city and they don’t want it,” Hall of Fame shooting guard and TNT analyst Reggie Miller said Friday in a phone interview. “You should have people in the barber shop buzzing about the Clippers. As opposed to talking about their effort, they should be saying, ‘Did you see that play?'”

A more common refrain after the season’s first week: Oy vey.

The Clippers are 3-2 but were blown out by Golden State and lost at home to a Sacramento team that won only 28 games last season. They have been outrebounded in every game and couldn’t hold double-digit leads in four games.

Clippers Coach Doc Rivers called his players “soft” after their 17-point loss to the Warriors and didn’t seem impressed by a team meeting afterward.

“When I read about team meetings in the league, I’m thinking, ‘I hope we play them next,'” Rivers said Friday. “We all know we didn’t play hard. I don’t think I need a team meeting for that.”

One observer who watched the Warriors’ demolition of the Clippers has remained Zen about the team’s prospects.

“I think everybody in Clipperland has to do the Aaron Rodgers thing right now,” ESPN analyst and former New York Knicks and Houston Rockets coach Jeff Van Gundy said, referring to the Green Bay Packers quarterback who told fans to loosen up amid a slow start. “Relax. Let it play out. If at 20 games, you get to a quarter of the year and there’s issues, that’s when I think you start evaluating more so than after five games.”

Van Gundy said what’s more important than the Clippers’ spotty play is what they do next. They play the Portland Trail Blazers on Saturday afternoon at Staples Center.

It’s a chance to start resembling the team the Clippers want to be. Of course, even a blowout victory wouldn’t end their concerns.

“It’s not like we go out against Portland, have a good game and we’re like, ‘Well, thank God that’s over,'” Griffin said. “We’ve just got to stay with it and keep working on the things we have to work on.”


VIDEO: Hornets guard Lance Stephenson sinks the game winner against the Hawks

*** (more…)

Cavs’ issues spill into locker room


VIDEO: LeBron James speaks after the Cavs’ loss to the Jazz

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – The Cleveland Cavaliers are 1-3, experiencing some growing pains, obviously. And LeBron James has made it clear that he thinks some of his teammates need to learn how to share the ball.

Kyrie Irving, who has attempted 36 shots since he last recorded an assist, was apparently the man on the other end of a LeBron lecture after Tuesday’s loss in Portland, as Brian Windhorst of ESPN reports

LeBron James and Kyrie Irving exchanged words in the Cleveland Cavaliers’ locker room following the team’s 20-point loss to the Portland Trail Blazers on Tuesday night, and it led to Irving leaving quickly without speaking to the media, multiple sources told ESPN.com.

The discussion was seen as healthy, sources said, with the veteran James voicing concerns about the direction of the Cavs’ offense. James scored just 11 points against the Blazers and did not score in the second half and was often not a part of the offense. Cleveland is off to a 1-3 start following a last-second loss to the Utah Jazz on Wednesday night.

“There’s a lot of bad habits, a lot of bad habits been built up the past couple years,” James said to the media moments after the exchange. “When you play that style of basketball, it takes a lot to get it up out of you.”

Morning shootaround — Nov. 5


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Nov. 4

NEWS OF THE MORNING

LeBron: ‘Long process’ ahead for Cavs | Kidd responds to Prokhorov’s barb | Wizards’ Rice took hit from Knicks’ Smith | Injuries pile up for OKC

No. 1: LeBron cautions of ‘long process’ ahead for Cavs — A glance at the NBA history books will tell you that when LeBron James got started on his last championship-seeking venture, in Miami, the Heat got off to a 9-8 start despite having a startling lineup laden with three All-Stars. James is in Cleveland now and the Cavs are off to a 1-2 start after losing 101-82 to the Portland Trail Blazers last night. After the loss, James told ESPN.com’s Dave McMenamin and other reporters how the high expectations for the Cavs have to be tempered with the reality that Cleveland must first break a lot of losing habits forged over the last few seasons:

“We have to understand what it takes to win,” James said. “It’s going to be a long process, man. There’s been a lot of losing basketball around here for a few years. So, a lot of guys that are going to help us win ultimately haven’t played a lot of meaningful basketball games in our league.

“When we get to that point when every possession matters , no possessions off — we got to share the ball, we got to move the ball, we got to be a team and be unselfish — we’ll be a better team.”

After starting the game 10-for-10 as a team against the Blazers, Cleveland went 21 for its next 75, finishing with a dismal 36.5-percent clip from the field. James was bad (4-for-12), but the Cavs starting backcourt of Kyrie Irving (3-for-17) and Dion Waiters (3-for-11) was even worse.

Irving and Waiters were on the team the last two seasons, of course, as the Cavs racked up a combined record of 57-107.

James did not call out any teammate by name, but seemed to be referencing Irving’s and Waiters’ play when reflecting on what needs to change in order for Cleveland to start playing the right way.

“There’s a lot of bad habits, a lot of bad habits have been built up over the last couple of years and when you play that style of basketball it takes a lot to get it up out of you,” James said. “But I’m here to help and that’s what it’s about.”

Cavs coach David Blatt deflected the blame from James on a night when the four-time MVP finished with 11 points, seven rebounds and seven assists along with three turnovers.

Even though James went scoreless in the second half en route to the least amount of points he’s scored since Dec. 5, 2008, he managed to extend his double-digit scoring streak to 575 games, tying Karl Malone for the third longest such streak in NBA history.

“I don’t hold him responsible,” Blatt said of James. “We have to help him get looks. It’s not only about him. It’s about helping him get looks. That’s what I feel like.”

Blatt chose to point the finger at the Cavs’ defense, or lack thereof.

“I don’t think we brought any type of mindset to defend,” Blatt said, later adding, “We never took a stand defensively tonight at all.”

The question is, just how long will it take before the Cavs start to play like the team that many predicted would be in the championship chase come June?

“Hopefully not too long but it could go on for a couple months until we’re all on the same page, we know exactly where we need to be both offensively and defensively and we buy in on what it takes to win,” James said. “I think a lot of people get it misconstrued on what it takes to win (by thinking) just scoring or just going out and trying to will it yourself. This is a team game and you have to rely on your teammates as well. So, we will get an understanding of that as the time goes on.”


VIDEO: LeBron James talks after the Cavs’ road loss in Portland (more…)

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 176) Are You Kidding Me?

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS – One week.

That’s all it took for the Hall of Famer Reggie Miller and the Dean of Discipline Stu Jackson to dive back into their feisty roles on Are You Kidding Me? … our debate segment on the Hang Time Podcast.

Don’t worry, the crew (Rick, Lang and yours truly) still did our thing on Episode 176 of the Hang Time Podcast. But we made sure to include Reggie and Stu debating LeBron‘s debut Part II in Cleveland and the dumpster fire in Los Angeles that is the Lakers (right now).

We also dive in on the undefeated Heat and Chris Bosh, the undefeated Houston Rockets and Dwight Howard, the M.A.S.H. unit in Oklahoma City headlined by Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook, Derrick Rose‘s tender ankles and so much more on Episode 176 of the Hang Time Podcast.

Dive into Episode 176 of the Hang Time Podcast featuring Reggie Miller and Stu Jackson for more  …

LISTEN HERE:

As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of NBA.com,  Lang Whitaker of NBA.com’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand and the best sound designer/engineer in the business,  Jarell “I Heart Peyton Manning” Wall.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.

Who cashed in (and who didn’t) from the 2011 draft?

VIDEO: Klay Thompson extends with the Warriors

The best way to judge a draft is to wait a few years and see who gets paid the most and the quickest. Which means we know a lot more about the first round of the 2011 class, now that the deadline for contract extensions has passed.

And the verdict is … what, exactly?

Only six of the 14 players taken int the lottery beat the deadline and got richer. That means the draft was so-so at best and disappointing at worst. But complicating matters is the smell of big money down the road. Thanks to the new TV deal and the looming labor negotiations in a few years, some players are willing to place bets on themselves and hold out for a few extra dollars. It’s also known as the Kawhi Leonard route. The MVP of the 2014 Finals and 15th overall pick had hoped for a max deal, didn’t get one from the Spurs, and will try the market next summer during restricted free agency.

But he was the big exception, and so, we survey the scene for the first-round winners and losers.

Winners:

Klay Thompson (drafted No. 11): Got four years and $70 million from the Warriors to make a big, umm, splash. At roughly $17 million a season, he hasn’t made an All-Star team, yet he’s earning more than Paul George and Russell Westbrook. If you think that’s an overpay, well, the market, which is about to expand, says otherwise. Warriors didn’t want to chance Thompson going on the market and were very comfortable with his growth so far.

Kyrie Irving (1): The Cavs didn’t waste any time giving him the max this summer, and as a bonus, gave him LeBron James. If he gets a ring next June, then it will have been quite the 12-month stretch.

Kenneth Faried (22): There were six power forwards taken ahead of him, including three in the lottery. But Faried worked his way into a four-year, $50 million deal with rolled-up sleeves. The Nuggets are hoping this deadline deal works better than the one for JaVale McGee.

The Morris Twins (13 and 14): Markieff and Marcus Morris didn’t want to test the market, not necessarily because the money wouldn’t have been better, but because they didn’t want to separate. Unless you were born within minutes of your brother or sister, you wouldn’t understand. So the Suns’ forwards agreed to keep the family together. Markieff gets $32 million and Marcus $20 million. Oh, and they keep their money in the same bank account.

Nik Vucevic (16): It didn’t take long for the Magic to find Dwight Howard‘s replacement. Vucevic still needs to refine his skills but big men with double-double ability averaging 13.6 and 11.5 in two Magic seasons) are hard to come by, and that’s why Orlando forked over $53 million over four years. That’s a good, fair price for a young and developing center.

Kemba Walker (9): A day after agreeing to a four-year, $48 million deal with the Hornets, Walker hit the game-tying and game-winning shots in the home opener. He’s a small, shoot-first point guard but is a straight-up baller who craves big moments. A no-brainer for a team desperate for talent and a turnaround.

Ricky Rubio: He was drafted in 2009 but after two years playing in Spain is technically part of the 2011 rookie crop. After the Wolves lost Kevin Love, there was a concern whether Rubio would want to stick around for what could be a lengthy rebuilding process. Yet from the first day of camp, Rubio said he was excited to start a fresh era in Minnesota. His four year, $56 million deal is essentially Eric Bledsoe money, not bad considering Rubio is still looking for consistency and a stretch of good health.

Chandler Parsons (38) and Isaiah Thomas (60): Yes, they were second-rounders, but when one player gets roughly $16 million a season from Dallas and the last pick of the draft gets $6 million a year, as Thomas did this summer from the Suns, they sound like winners to me.

Losers:

Derrick Williams (2): He’s already on his second team and could fetch a few dollars next summer, but this so-called NBA-ready player from the draft struggles to find a comfort zone between the forward spots. He needs a solid season to decrease his flaws and prove that he can be more than a journeyman in this league. If he can’t do that in Sacramento, you wonder if he can do it anywhere. You only get so many chances before teams simply move on.

Enes Kanter (3): After the Jazz forked over big dollars for Gordon Hayward and Alec Burks, they’re done paying for potential, at least for the moment anyway. Not only is Kanter inconsistent, he’s on a team with Derrick Favors, who got paid a year ago, and Rudy Gobert, whom the Jazz are high on. Kanter looks to be the odd big man out and could be bait at the trade deadline.

Jimmy Butler (30): He and the Bulls were a few million apart at the deadline, and even though Butler could get a decent offer next summer, it might not be from Chicago. The Bulls like his defense, but he lacks what they really could use: outside shooting from the two-guard spot. That’s why they didn’t blow him away at the deadline.

Kings: In addition to delaying Williams, they spent their first-round pick on Jimmer Fredette, who was taken one spot ahead of Thompson. In a weird twist, the Kings, whose brain trust comes from the Warriors, were hoping to steal Thompson next summer.

Wizards: Has anyone seen or heard from Jan Vesely, the No. 6 pick in 2011? There haven’t been many players drafted that high who failed to get a third-year qualifying offer. He’s now playing in Turkey after flaming out quickly with the Wizards, then Nuggets.