Posts Tagged ‘Kyle Lowry’

Morning Shootaround — July 6


VIDEO: TNT analyst David Aldridge reports the latest free-agent news

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Lakers make move for Melo | Heat meet with Deng | Gortat’s return to D.C. was easy call | Novak traded to Jazz

No. 1: Lakers make move for Melo — In the earliest days of free agency, the Los Angeles Lakers seemed to be the odd team out, as free agents and reps for LeBron James and Carmelo Anthony met with and considered various franchises, from Chicago to Miami to Houston to Dallas, not to mention the incumbents — the Knicks and the Heat. Meanwhile, the Los Angeles Lakers entered the summer with just a handful of players under contract and significant room to maneuver under the luxury tax.

But you can never count the Lake Show out. While many reports had Melo choosing between the Knicks and Bulls, last night Yahoo Sports’ Adrian Wojnarowski reported that the Lakers are definitely in the picture. After his meeting with Lakers execs, reports are that Carmelo is absolutely considering a move to the coast, to join Kobe Bryant in a west side connection…

The Los Angeles Lakers have ascended into serious contention to sign New York free agent Carmelo Anthony, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

The Lakers moved into strong consideration with the front-running New York Knicks and Chicago Bulls over this weekend, sources told Yahoo Sports.

No one with direct knowledge of the process would declare the Lakers had overtaken New York and Chicago in Anthony’s mind, but one source close to Anthony said of the Lakers, “They’re in the game now.”

The Lakers met with Anthony on Friday, offering him a four-year, $97 million contract. Lakers star Kobe Bryant has been in constant contact with Anthony, and the Lakers could re-sign Pau Gasol to pair with Anthony on the frontline.

This story kicked off when ESPN’s Bill Simmons noted via Twitter…

Of course, Melo signing with the Lakers would mean him leaving over $30 million from the Knicks on the table — as his former team, the Knicks can offer Anthony a larger and longer contract than any other team. There’s also the question of whether a pairing of Anthony and Bryant (with Gasol) in the rough-and-ready Western Conference would give Anthony the best and quickest chance to win.

Whatever happens, after weeks of speculation and simmering, free agency is finally reaching the boiling point. Get your popcorn ready.

***

No. 2: Heat meet with Deng — While several NBA teams are loaded with cap space, the Miami Heat are still a work in progress. While James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh all opted out of their contracts and seemed interested in returning, the path forward for the Heat has seemed less clear, both in terms of financials and personnel. With an aging roster and burgeoning payroll, the Heat have to find a way to get their Big Three some help, without breaking the bank.

Yesterday, according to an ESPN report, Heat president Pat Riley took another step forward by meeting with one of the top free agents on the market, Luol Deng

The meeting was described as “preliminary,” according to a source, as Riley attempted to sell Deng on the benefits of joining the four-time defending Eastern Conference champions.

Sources told ESPN The Magazine’s Chris Broussard that Deng will not take a salary significantly below his market value, believed to be above $10 million annually, merely to sign with the Heat.

Deng has several suitors, including Dallas, Atlanta, Chicago and the Los Angeles Lakers, but a source said Riley’s pitch intrigued him.

Adding Deng would give the Heat experience, depth, and help on both ends of the court. It may also be something of a dream — can the Heat actually create enough room to make Deng an offer he can’t refuse?

The task facing Riley and the Heat is anything but easy. But then, the best things very rarely are. Four seasons ago, Riley defied many expectations when he successfully constructed the Big Three. Now he’s got a different kind of difficult task ahead of him.

***

No. 3: Gortat’s return to D.C. was easy call — Not long before last season began, the Wizards gave up a first-round pick along with the rights to injured center Emeka Okafor in exchange for Marcin Gortat. While Gortat has always been a solid interior performer, he was going to be a free agent this summer, and the Wizards were gambling they’d be able to convince him to re-sign in D.C. After showing promise during the regular season and making a run into the second round of the playoffs, Gortat felt confident enough in the future of the Wizards to stick around.

In an interview yesterday from Orlando Summer League on NBA TV, Gortat said re-upping with Washington was a simple decision

“A lot of different reasons,” Gortat said, when asked why he elected to stay with the Wizards. “First of all, I like the city. I like the team. I definitely feel comfortable over there. The team really took me under the wing and they help me since the day one. I definitely love the chemistry between me and John Wall. I think Bradley Beal is going to be a great player one day. Coach Randy [Wittman] believes in me, and I have a great relationship with him. So, the decision was real easy for me. I believe that we will be a special team for the next four or five years.”

Gortat was asked about interest from the Miami Heat and bobbed his head side to side, “We had a few teams, but I don’t think it [makes] any sense to talk about that now.”

If they’re planning to get the entire band back together, the Wizards still have to convince Trevor Ariza to re-sign — and as an in-demand swingman, Ariza may take a little more convincing than Gortat.

***

No. 4: Jazz trade for Novak — Sweet-shooting swingman Steve Novak spent the last few seasons knocking down 3-pointers for the Knicks and the Raptors. While out enjoying the 4th of July holiday with his family in his hometown of Milwaukee, Novak found out he would have a new NBA home next season: The Raptors reportedly agreed to move Novak to the Jazz for Diante Garrett, who the Raptors could waive to create salary cap space.

One of the interesting bits of this story is how Novak discovered he was being traded: According to the Desert News, Novak found out via a series of text messages from his Toronto teammate Kyle Lowry

Novak, who was dealt to the Raptors from the Knicks just a year ago after thinking he’d finally found his long-term NBA home in New York, wasn’t expecting that news. He even wrote back to Lowry, “Are you kidding me?”

Traded again? To Utah? On Independence Day?

What!?!

“It was the Fourth of July. I didn’t have any idea that you could get traded on a national holiday,” Novak said, laughing, Saturday evening in a phone interview with the Deseret News. “I didn’t think GMs worked so hard.”

The gift and the curse for Novak is his combination of shooting and size (he is 6-10) simultaneously makes him a hot commodity and a tradeable asset. For his part, Novak seems to be embracing his new home…

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: The long wait to see Nerlens Noel in a Sixers uniform may have been worth every second … If the Rockets need to move Jeremy Lin to create cap space, Philadelphia might be an option … You know who’s not happy about players being asked to take pay cuts? Their agents and their union. … Looks like Devin Harris will agree to a three-year extension with the Mavericks …

Raps keep Lowry, still have more work


VIDEO: Free Agency: Lowry Remains a Raptor

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – The Toronto Raptors have taken care of the important business, agreeing to terms with Kyle Lowry on a new four-year, $48 million contract. After winning their division for the second time in franchise history and returning to the postseason after a five-year absence, they’re bringing back their best player. Lowry is a bulldog on both ends of the floor, and if he wasn’t the best point guard in the Eastern Conference last season, he was right there with John Wall.

The Raptors had one the conference’s best benches as well. Greivis Vasquez and Patrick Patterson arrived in the Rudy Gay trade in December and made big impacts. Patterson spaced the floor at the power forward position, while Vasquez’s passing was infectious. Toronto recorded assists on just 49 percent of its baskets before the trade and 60 percent after it.

The numbers spell out how important Patterson and Vasquez are. They had the two best on-court NetRtg marks on the team, with the Raptors outscoring their opponents by 9.9 points per 100 possessions with Patterson on the floor and by 8.5 with Vasquez on the floor. In the playoffs, Toronto outscored Brooklyn by 53 points with Vasquez on the floor and was outscored by 64 with him on the bench. Patterson was a plus-30.  As it was in the regular season, they were at their best with those two guys on the floor.

If the Raptors want to build on last season’s success, they need to keep the bench together. If Lou Williams (acquired in a trade for John Salmons) is healthy, it could be even better than it was last season.

On Friday, Toronto reportedly agreed to terms with Patterson, a restricted free agent, on a three-year, $18 million contract. That’s Step 2.

Vasquez is another restricted free agent, meaning the Raptors can match any offer sheet he receives from another team. But with the new contracts for Lowry and Patterson, the addition of Williams, and the possibility of adding rookies Bruno Caboclo and Lucas Nogueira, Toronto is approaching the luxury tax line. And they want to make one more move.

After Joe Johnson beat them up in that playoff series, the Raps acknowledged that they need more size on the wing. Even if Caboclo is less than “two years away from being two years away,” that size would have to come in free agency, perhaps from an Al-Farouq AminuAlan Anderson, Jordan Hamilton or Richard Jefferson. The Raptors have the mid-level exception (or a portion of it) to spend on an outside free agent.

Adding one of those guys, keeping Vasquez, and staying under the tax line will be a challenge. If Darren Collison can get the full mid-level exception (from Vasquez’s former team) in Sacramento, Vasquez should surely be worth that much. Complicating matters is that Toronto is already paying small forwards Landry Fields and Steve Novak almost $10 million to ride the pine.

Back in January, SportsNet’s Michael Grange reported that the Raptors would be willing to go over the line “at the right time.” But if they bring everybody back, they’re still a team that lost in the first round.  Even if they add a piece, they still have a ceiling, especially if LeBron James remains in Miami. And if Jonas Valanciunas gets a lucrative contract extension next summer, it will overlap with the last two seasons of Lowry’s deal (and the last of DeMar DeRozan‘s), which may be the time to think about paying the tax.

So Raptors GM Masai Ujiri has his work cut out for him over the next couple of weeks. He got the most important deal done. But his team’s depth is just as critical to its success as its best player.

Lowry agrees to deal with Raptors

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Kyle Lowry  isn’t going anywhere. Not to Miami or Houston or Los Angeles or anywhere else.

Lowry is returning to the Toronto Raptors on a four-year, $48 million deal, as first reported by Yahoo! Sports.

Targeted by contenders around the league in free agency, including the Miami Heat, Lowry will return to lead a Raptors team that broke through last season, winning the Atlantic Division earning home court advantage in the first round of the playoffs.

Lowry’s deal has an early termination option after the third season, giving him the chance to become a free agent after the third season of his new deal.

The Raptors had to hold on to their starting point guard and catalyst. Raptors general manager Masai Ujiri declared Lowry priority No. 1 in free agency and made good on his words by keeping the leader of his team in the fold, even after Lowry became the hottest point guard on the free agent market.

Lowry averaged 17.9 points and 7.4 assists last season, helping guide the Raptors to the playoffs for the first time since 2008.

Big year and a bigger decision for Lowry


VIDEO: Kyle Lowry is one of the more coveted free agent point guards on the market

HANG TIME SOUTHWEST — Kyle Lowry faces the decision of his career: Cash in with the Raptors and maybe one day walk away a Canadian folk hero (you saw those crazed playoff crowds, right?), have faith in the leaky, but legendary Lakers or settle for a mere pittance to play with the King.

But wait, there’s more …

To start free agency at the stroke of midnight Tuesday, Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey and coach Kevin McHale were in Philadelphia seated in front of Lowry. The two men who shipped Lowry north of the border in the first place were now telling him how perfect he is for the team he actually aided in assembling.

Plotting a path to form a super team in Houston, Morey was hoarding drafts picks and the first-rounder he got from Toronto for Lowry two summers ago was supposed to be another carrot to finally lure Orlando into a deal for Dwight Howard. A month later Howard was traded to the Lakers, and the draft pick wound up in Oklahoma City as part of the package for James Harden. Howard, conveniently, followed as a free-agent acquisition last summer.

As Morey, McHale and Lowry dined, or whatever it is that goes on in these after-midnight meetings, Raptors general manager Masai Ujiri was working his own plan (reportedly a contract starting around $12 million) to keep the spark plug point guard behind Toronto’s resurgence, a spark plug Ujiri was prepared to trade to New York at the deadline if not for the reluctance of the  Knicks’ former regime to throw in a future first-round draft pick.

Meanwhile, back in South Florida, Heat president of basketball operations Pat Riley was maneuvering for his own meeting with free agency’s top point-guard target. The Riley pitch, if he gets to make it, will get straight to the point: Come to Sacrifice City and compete for these shiny rings with LeBron James.

Amazing what a career year will do for a guy’s fortunes. Lowry, not long ago down on his luck, last season averaged career highs in scoring (17.9 ppg), assists (7.4), minutes (36.2) and 3-point percentage (38.0), while tying his career-high in rebounds (4.7).

Many believed Lowry, 28, should have made his first All-Star team of his eight-year career. After the All-Star break he reinforced that notion by averaging 20.4 ppg, 7.1 apg and 5.1 rpg, while maintaining his bulldog approach to defense. The Raptors finished the season 20-10 and won a franchise-best 48 games, finishing above .500 for the first time since 2006-07.

So perhaps a contract starting at $12 million isn’t too high for this big-market franchise desperate to maintain its playmaker and elusive momentum.

Yet becoming just as desperate are the Miami Heat.

James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh are free agents, too. They’re waiting to finalize new contracts while Riley works to re-tool the roster. Big men, wing depth and a point guard are needed. On Tuesday, Heat target Marcin Gortat reached an agreement to return to the Washington Wizards at a price (five years, $60 million) far too rich for the Heat. Another report stated small forward Luol Deng will not sacrifice pay to play for Miami. A later report had Washington nearing a deal to bring back yet another Heat target, small forward Trevor Ariza.

The aggressive, 6-foot Lowry fits the Heat needs to a T. Only they won’t be able to match the Raptors’ reported offer and fill other needs. Earlier Tuesday, Jodie Meeks agreed to a free-agent deal with the Detroit Pistons for three years and $19 million, a hefty pay raise for a middling player, and one that would make it seem highly unlikely that Lowry could feel good about taking a deal that wouldn’t pay him much more.

The wild card here, as it always is with the Heat, is a lower pay grade is the price to play with LeBron. We’ve seen it with players nearing the end of their careers, but not necessarily from one in his prime.

Lowry has seven postseason games to his name since 2009 back with Houston when he reached the second round. All seven came this past season with Toronto. The Raptors, boasting an emerging star in DeMar DeRozan and rising talents in Terrence RossJonas Valanciunas and restricted free agent Patrick Pattersonlost a heartbreaker to Brooklyn in the first round.

For a franchise that has experienced two winning seasons in the last dozen, and has had its troubles keeping and recruiting star-level players, Lowry would be welcomed back as hero.

But then there’s always LeBron … or the Rockets … or the Lakers …

The decision of Lowry’s career will be coming soon.

Morning Shootaround — July 2



VIDEO: GameTime’s crew discusses where Kyle Lowry and other top point guards may land

NEWS OF THE MORNING
Rockets, Mavs ready their pitches for Anthony | Report: Rose works out for Anthony | Plenty of big names linked to Heat | Livingston gets his payday | Report: Lakers, Gasol have long chat

No. 1: Rockets prep for their ‘Melo pitch, Mavs do too — Stop No. 2 (and 3) on the Carmelo Anthony Wooing Tour heads to Texas today as the Rockets and Mavericks will make their respective bids for the seven-time All-Star. Neither will be holding back anything, writes Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle, what with Dwight Howard and James Harden on hand to greet ‘Melo — plus some other bells and whistles, too — in Houston.

UPDATE, 2:22 p.m. ET: The Rockets have begun their wooing of ‘Melo …

As for the stop in Dallas, the Mavs have a five-pronged pitch for Anthony, writes Tim McMahon of ESPNDallas.com:

The Rockets did not wait to make their presentation to Knicks free agent forward Carmelo Anthony to get busy with players and their agents, starting with their late-night reunion with former Rockets point guard Kyle Lowry in Philadelphia.

The focus, however, entirely shifts to Anthony, scheduled to be at Toyota Center on Wednesday for the second stop of his tour of suitors.

Anthony spent his first day of free agency with the Bulls and will go from his session with the Rockets’ welcoming committee to a meeting Wednesday afternoon with the Mavericks in Dallas. He will also meet with the Lakers this week in Los Angeles and the Knicks can come in with an offer that no other team can approach.

The Rockets, however, have confidence in their message and presentation, combining the successful pitch to Dwight Howard last summer with the $7 million worth of new facilities stuffed assorted state-of-the-art bells and whistles that have been geared to put on a show.

The Rockets will have Howard and James Harden in on the presentation and will make Anthony the first free agent to tour the new basketball operation and training facilities, which were completed after free agency recruiting had ended last season.

When Anthony arrives in the lockerroom, in addition to the show on the video boards that circle the locker room, there will be a life-sized poster of Anthony in a Rockets’ uniform holding the championship trophy. The book the Rockets annually provide (and also have prepared for LeBron James and Chris Bosh, if need be) features Anthony on the cover, also with the trophy, and featured throughout along with information about living in Houston geared toward him.

As with last season’s pitch to Howard, the bulk of the presentation will focus on the Rockets contention that with Anthony, they would be ready to contend.

The Rockets began free agency recruiting with general manager Daryl Morey and coach Kevin McHale catching up with their former point guard in Philadelphia as soon as free agency began early Tuesday.

McHale called former Rockets forward/center Jordan Hill shortly after midnight and Morey followed up with his agent Tuesday afternoon. Discussions were considered preliminary, but the Rockets indicating strong interest in bringing Hill back with an offer expected shortly after the Rockets meeting with Anthony.

And here’s McMahon on the Mavs’ approach to recruiting Anthony today:

There will surely be some bells and whistles during Carmelo Anthony’s visit with the Dallas Mavericks, such as entertainment elements and marketing plans.

You can count on money coming up in the conversation, too, with that discussion centering on just how close Mark Cuban can come to a max-contract offer.

1. Play for an elite coach: Carlisle joins Gregg Popovich, Erik Spoelstra and Doc Rivers as the only active NBA championship coaches, and he has outwitted two of those men in recent playoff series.

2. Play with a selfless star: Nowitzki is not only willing to hand the keys to the franchise over to a capable superstar, he’s taking a massive pay cut in an effort to help make it happen. He might even accept a lower salary than anticipated if that’s what it takes to make Melo a Mav.

3. A quality supporting cast: The Mavs believe the trade for defensive anchor Tyson Chandler gave them a legitimate chance of landing Anthony. They can now make the case that adding Anthony would give Dallas the league’s best frontcourt.

4. A proven front office and culture of winning: When it comes to stability and sustained success among front offices in today’s NBA, only the Spurs trump the Mavs.

5. A plan for the future: Would Anthony be left as Dallas’ lone star when Nowitzki stops shooting one-legged fadeaways and starts spending days in a rocking chair? Not if the front office executes its plan.


VIDEO: What will Houston bring to the table when Carmelo Anthony visits?

(more…)

What can the Heat offer free agents?


VIDEO: Wade opts out

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and now Chris Bosh have informed the Miami Heat that they will exercise the early termination options on their contracts, ending what were six-years deals after four seasons.

In addition, Udonis Haslem, has declined his $4.3 million player option.

Nine days ago, Pat Riley made it clear that he’d like his three All-Stars to take less money to help him retool the roster. On Tuesday, James put added pressure on Bosh and Wade by opting out of his deal. Now, it looks like things are falling into place and Riley will have the opportunity to upgrade the other two positions in his starting lineup.

Rumored targets for the Heat include point guard Kyle Lowry, forward Trevor Ariza and center Marcin Gortat. All have tools (ball-handling, defense, size) that would certainly help Miami. The idea of adding Carmelo Anthony seems far-fetched, but it all depends on how much money he’s willing to sacrifice, as well as how much Miami’s Big Three are willing to sacrifice.

Yahoo’s Adrian Wojnarowski reports that James is seeking a max contract, which would be a five-year deal worth about $120 million. So it would apparently be Bosh and Wade who would have to take pay cuts.

ESPN’s Chris Broussard tweeted that Bosh is seeking a new five-year deal worth $15-16 million per year. Those two reports (as well as the assumption that Wade isn’t going to take less than Bosh) gives us the framework of the Heat’s salary math, with an expected salary cap of $63.2 million …

Heat salary math

Player 2014-15 Notes
1 James, LeBron $20,020,875 Cap hold
2 Bosh, Chris $13,043,478 Reduced salary (5 yrs/$75M)
3 Wade, Dwyane $13,043,478 Reduced salary (5 yrs/$75M)
4 Cole, Norris $2,038,206 Under contract
5 Andersen, Chris $915,243 Cap hold
6 Napier, Shabazz $1,032,200 Cap hold
7-11 Cap hold x 5 $2,536,680 Cap hold
TOTAL $52,630,161
Salary cap $63,200,000
Left for free agent $10,569,839 4-year deal for $45.1 million

1. James’ max contract would start at about $20.8 million. Since his cap hold (1.05 x last year’s salary) is a little less than that, the Heat would use that number until the other pieces are signed. Then they can go over the salary cap to re-sign James.

2 and 3. If Bosh and Wade both accept five-year deals worth $75 million ($15 million per year), those contracts would have starting salaries of just over $13 million.

4. ESPN’s Brian Windhorst reports that the Heat are looking to unload Norris Cole. If they do that (and don’t get another player in return), his $2.0 million would be replaced by another rookie minimum cap hold (see 7-11) and they’d have an additional $1.5 million of cap space.

5. The Heat could renounce the rights to Chris Andersen, but he has just a vet’s minimum cap hold. Keeping that would allow them to sign him for much more after they’re back over the salary cap.

6. The Heat can pay Shabazz Napier 120 percent of the rookie scale for the No. 24 pick. As with James, better to keep the cap hold number until the other pieces are signed.

7-11. If you don’t have 12 guys on your roster, there is a rookie minimum cap hold ($507,336) for every slot that takes you up to 12. So, if we’re talking about James, Bosh, Wade, Cole, Andersen, Napier and one free agent, we need five minimum cap holds.

Additional note: In this scenario, the Heat have renounced their rights to Haslem, Ray Allen, Michael Beasley, Mario Chalmers, Toney Douglas, James Jones, Rashard Lewis, and Greg Oden, and have also waived Justin Hamilton (who has a non-guaranteed deal). It’s assumed that Haslem will get rewarded for opting out (with a long-term deal that pays him more than the $4.3 million he could have earned next season), and Allen is a critical piece in the rotation, but their cap holds ($8.2 million and $4.2 million) are too big to keep on the books.

After the Heat have gone over the cap, they can use the room exception (starting at $2.7 million) to bring one or more of those guys back (or add other free agents). It can be split among multiple players. After that, they’d have only minimum deals to offer players.

If all the above holds, the Heat could offer one free agent $45.1 million over four years ($11.3 million per year). If they are able to trade Cole, that would turn into $51.7 million over four years ($12.9 million per year).

That’s still about half of what Anthony could earn elsewhere. If he were to re-sign with the Knicks for the max, he’d get $129.1 million over five years ($25.8 per year). If he were to sign with a new team for the max, he’d get $95.9 million over four years ($24.0 million per year).

So Lowry, Ariza and Gortat are obviously more realistic options. If the Heat were to split their cap space among two free agents (assuming they traded Cole), they could offer them a total of about $13.5 million per year. Ariza and Gortat each made $7.7 million for the Wizards this past season, while Lowry made $6.2 million for the Raptors.

Both Gortat and Lowry will likely be offered raises from their current teams, who are both looking to keep the momentum going after returning to the postseason after long layoffs. With Martell Webster and Otto Porter on the roster, the Wizards might not fight hard for Ariza, but he could still get more than mid-level money elsewhere, as one of the better three-and-D guys in the league and still just 29 years old.

So there’s no clear starting-lineup upgrade for the Heat. But if James accepts less than the max or if Bosh and/or Wade accept less than $15 million per year, there’s more money to spend. And since they’re also offering a chance to play with the best player in the world for a championship on Biscayne Bay, they may not have to spend as much as other teams.

Wade, Haslem opting out, gives Heat a chance to get back in


VIDEO: Wade opts out of final two years with Heat

Is that a sigh of relief out of Miami? Or the winds of change that are blowing?

The decision by Dwyane Wade and Udonis Haslem to join LeBron James in opting out of their contracts to become free agents — Chris Bosh is still deciding — either cracks the door open for a return of the most star-studded team in the NBA or starts a line at the exit.

Nothing is settled yet. But like Pat Riley says, it’s time to get a grip.

According to ESPN, Wade will give up $41.8 million and the last two years of his deal, Bosh $42.6 million for two years and Haslem will not exercise his player option for $4.6 million.

Coming less than three days before the start of the free agency period, the move doesn’t yet mean the party continues in South Beach, but is the necessary first step.

“Today we were notified of Dwyane’s intention to opt-out of his contract and Udonis’ intention to not opt into his contract, making both players free agents,” Heat president Riley said in a statement issued by the club. “Dwyane has been the cornerstone of our organization for over a decade, and we hope he remains a part of the Heat family for life. Udonis has been the heartbeat of this team for 11 years. He has sacrificed countless times to make this organization successful, and he is the epitome of what this organization stands for. We look forward to meeting with Dwyane and Udonis and their agent in the coming days to discuss our future together.”

Following Miami’s dismal 4-1 loss to the Spurs in The Finals, it was clear that the Heat were not just outplayed, but overmatched in terms of strength in the starting lineup and depth on the bench. Veteran forward Shane Battier showed considerable wear on his game and announced his retirement following the series, while 38-year-old guard Ray Allen, who was inconsistent all year long, recently said he’d like to return for a 19th NBA season.

Point guard Mario Chalmers was particularly ineffective against San Antonio and the Heat are known to be interested in Raptors free agent Kyle Lowry.

Bosh has reportedly said he’d be willing to take a reduction in annual salary, playing for $15 million to $16 million per season, if he got a new five-year commitment. If James and Wade are also ready to play for less in annual salary, the Heat would be able to boost their overall talent level and get right back into the hunt as championship contenders in the Eastern Conference.

The knee-jerk reaction to defeat by the Spurs was that the glorious and brief Heat Era had come to an end after two championships and four straight trips to The Finals.

Teams from Cleveland to Houston to Los Angeles have been lining up to take their best shot at convincing James to make another jersey switch and relocation, and he might still listen to the sweet nothings they whisper into his ear before making a final decision.

But Riley threw down the challenge last week for all of his stars to stand their ground.

“I think everybody needs to get a grip,” Riley said. “This stuff is hard. You have to stay together and find the guts. You don’t find the door and run out of it.”

That door is now cracked open and that’s good news in Miami, if only the first step.

Another big bang of free agents on tap

LeBron James has chosen to test the free-agent market this summer. (Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE)

LeBron James has chosen to test the free-agent market this summer. (Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE)

Most scientists believe it was roughly 14 billion years ago when a single point exploded to create the universe. Of course, it was a more thoroughly documented Big Bang four years ago that blew a hole in the NBA space/time continuum, sending the celestial bodies of LeBron James and Chris Bosh south to join Dwyane Wade in Miami.

Two championships and four Finals trips for the Heat later, the potential for another explosion is on us.

Carmelo Anthony’s declaration that he will opt out of the final year of his contract with the New York Knicks was the first stick of dynamite ahead of the July 1 start of the annual free-agent scramble. Then, Tuesday, LeBron told the Miami Heat that he was going to test the waters, too.

You can feel the ground quiver as the movers and the shakers in the league start to do their thing …

Who has the space?

There are a lot of big-name free agents on the market — or there will be July 1. But the number of teams who have enough space under the salary cap that would enable them to sign some of those big-money players … well, that’s a lot smaller. Here’s a list:

Miami Heat: Up to $55 million, assuming virtually everyone opts out of contracts.
Dallas Mavericks: Up to $32.4 million
Utah Jazz: Up to $29.6 million
Philadelphia 76ers: Up to $29.0 million.
Phoenix Suns: Up to $28.4 million.
L.A. Lakers: Up to $28.2 million.
Cleveland Cavaliers: Up to $23.4 million.
Orlando Magic: Up to $22.2 million.
Detroit Pistons: Up to $22.0 million.
Charlotte Hornets: Up to $19.5 million.
Atlanta Hawks: Up to $13.9 million.
Milwaukee Bucks: Up to $13.0 million.
Memphis Grizzlies: Up to $12.0 million, if Zach Randolph opts out of his final year.
Chicago Bulls: Up to $11.3 million if they use their one-time amnesty on Carlos Boozer.
Boston Celtics: Up to $9.3 million. (more…)

Five teams LeBron should, but won’t consider

By Jeff Caplan, NBA.com


VIDEO: Pat Riley discusses the Big 3 staying in Miami

HANG TIME SOUTHWEST – Even before Pat Riley went all Clint Eastwood — Stay, “if you’ve got the guts” – during his entertaining Thursday news conference, my money was on LeBron James understanding that island hopping for titles on the backs of fans’ emotions isn’t a good look. And so he will ultimately keep gunning for not three, not four, not five … in sun-kissed South Florida.

Of course, Dan Gilbert never dreamed LeBron would dump his Cleveland Cavaliers, but he did. So until he says otherwise, there is always a chance The Chosen One will think his work is done here and seek a new hoops metropolis to conquer.

It certainly would be unprecedented, the most dominant player in the game packing his bags yet again, and this time after leading his last franchise to four consecutive Finals and two championships. Who in the history of the game has ever done that?

And yet, there’s something devilishly fascinating about that very prospect.

Could LeBron lift a third team to the NBA Finals? Could he win a third title? A fourth, a fifth?

And for which team would he play?

Forget the Knicks, that move would have to wait until the summer of 2015 when New York has cap space. The Lakers? Always a possibility, but how rewarding would it really be to hang a 17th championship banner in Staples Center all the while being Kobe Bryant‘s personal valet to a sixth ring and even him up with Michael Jordan?

I’ve got five teams — three in the East and two in the West — that LeBron could vault to instant contender. Three of the five franchises have never won an NBA title, and of the other two, neither has won one since 1983. So LeBron would be a sight for sore eyes, and a boon for business in any one of these locales.

I call this list, The Teams LeBron Should, But Won’t Consider.

His desire should be to stay in the Eastern Conference because it’s just a whole lot easier to get through the East than the brutally competitive West. Plus, with the Heat instantly weakened, the path to the East crown would truly be wide open. So here are my five:

1. Washington Wizards: The Wizards’ finances are in as good as shape as the Wizards’ backcourt with John Wall and Bradley Beal emerging as a dynamic duo. Washington needs to re-sign center Marcin Gortat to reproduce a front line with Nene. Add LeBron — who would come in as the elder statesman to the Wizards’ rising stars, so there’s no adjustment period as to who is the alpha dog (assuming Wall can handle it) like there was initially in Miami with Dwyane Wade – to this starting lineup and dare I call them Eastern Conference favorites.

2. Philadelphia 76ers: Don’t laugh. And, hey, if LeBron and Carmelo Anthony really want to team up, here’s their spot. There’s so little money on the books that Philly could sign both stars and still have enough left over to add some pretty good role players. These two could come in as the big brothers and lead one of the great youth movements of our time. Think about it, the Sixers already have Rookie of the Year Michael Carter-Williams at point guard and 6-foot-11 Nerlens Noel is ready to roll after sitting out all of last season. With the third pick in next week’s Draft, they’ll add another high-caliber youngster, maybe Andrew Wiggins or Jabari Parker. Then there’s consummate pro Thaddeus Young. Sounding good isn’t it?

3. Toronto Raptors: General manager Masai Ujiri has already overseen a couple minor miracles in shedding the salaries of Rudy Gay and Andrea Bargnani, so what’s one more? The books still aren’t as clear as in Philly, but it can work. Re-signing Kyle Lowry might be out the window, but how about Greivis Vasquez, budding, young star DeMar DeRozan, LeBron, Patrick Patterson and Jonas Valanciunas? I’m pretty sure coach Dwane Casey would be good with it.

4. Phoenix Suns: Imagine LeBron driving and then trying to decide if he should kick it out to Eric Bledsoe, Goran Dragic, Channing Frye or maybe Gerald Green. Imagine LeBron sprinting for fast-break dunks with a perimeter defense that includes himself and the dogged Bledsoe, and a team that stamped itself as one of the great hustling squads of last season. If we thought the old Steve Nash-Mike D’Antonio Suns teams were fun, whoa, this one could fly off the charts.

5. New Orleans Pelicans: There’s some work, not a ton, to be done on the payroll side, and there’s some tradable commodities despite multi-year deals in place (i.e. Tyreke Evans, Jrue Holiday, Eric Gordon) and nothing should be viewed as impossible when it comes to pairing LeBron with Anthony Davis, right? Greatest inside-out duo since Kobe and Shaquille O’Neal? This pairing has devastation written all over it. New Orleans would never be the same.

However, we all know that no one backs down from a challenge issued by Clint Eastwood.

Blogtable: Holding it together in Miami

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the three most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: What to do in Miami | Spurs faves in 2015? | Who wants to be Lakers’ coach?



VIDEO: The Heat address their loss to the Spurs and an uncertain future

> You’re Pat Riley. How do you convince the Big Three to stick around … and take a pay cut? Who – give me names – do you go after to give them some help? They need help, right?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: Pay cut? Did someone say pay cut? We’re all too hip and cynical to take that notion seriously. You’ve gotta get whatever you can get, as much as you can as fast as you can, because that’s what the other guy is doing, and besides, you’ll look like a chump if you don’t! Except then you notice that Tim Duncan, Manu Ginobili and Tony Parker are playing for about $29 million combined, and you cannot deny the role that plays in the Spurs’ sustained excellence. The help Miami can put around them is directly related to the budget they leave on the table for others. Who should that be? I’d only want to see Carmelo Anthony go there for the gawkability of the Heat going all-in on the “star” system and to actually witness Anthony making such a huge financial sacrifice for the title he claims to covet. My hunch, though, is that Miami would be better off shoring up its weakest positions – point guard and center.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comThe pitch is that they’re all better together than apart. Wade and Bosh certainly benefit sticking very close to LeBron. And it’s hard to see James going to play in Kobe’s shadow with the Lakers or repeating his Cleveland experience. Riley will make his obligatory run at Carmelo Anthony and, after what he pulled off in the summer of 2010, I’m not counting him out. That’s the kind of addition that possibly have a longshot chance of convincing the Big Three to take a salary haircut. I might also be interested in Pau Gasol, who at this point in his career, might be willing to take less for a shot at another title or two in Miami.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: The Big Three know this: If all three opt in, there will be no room under the current rules to to bring in players that can make an impact. Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh have to agree to opt out and re-sign at considerable discounts. The James can opt out and re-sign. As for help, obviously Carmelo Anthony has been mentioned at the top of Miami’s wish list, but that will take some real financial sacrifice from the Big Three and Melo. Until the Big three opt out and re-sign to lesser deals, it’s hard to determine how much money will actually be available to go shopping. A run at Kyle Lowry or Greivis Vasquez, a cheaper option, to run the point would be great, or maybe Ramon Sessions. Kent Bazemore is a young, athletic two-guard with size, defensive chops and a potentially strong offensive game, who could backup Wade. How about Pau Gasol giving this team a real post presence and allowing Bosh to do his preferred thing on the perimeter?

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: I convince them that their real legacy is based on titles and that the chance to respond to setback is what will separate them from other champions, as the Spurs just proved. I’m Pat Riley. I’m good at the head games. “You are already crazy wealthy. Don’t you want the riches no one can buy?” The Carmelo Anthony conversation does make sense for this team in this time. That’s the longshot of getting a lot of people to take a pay cut, including the guy who forced a trade to the Knicks because he wanted to be in New York, but would be at the top of my list. It doesn’t get nearly the attention, but adding Kyle Lowry at point guard would equal a huge offseason as well.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comStaying together in Miami gives them the best opportunity to win more championships. Even though they had some defensive slippage this season, they still got to The Finals without much of a challenge in the Eastern Conference. They do need help, and guys like Shawn Marion (defense at the other forward spot), Carlos Boozer (rebounding, if amnestied by Chicago) and Steve Blake (ball-handling and shooting) might be willing to come for cheap in pursuit of a championship. But losing in The Finals to a team that good playing that well is not cause for major changes. If the Heat stay largely intact, they will give themselves a chance to win for the next few years. And that’s all you can ask for.

Sekou Smith, NBA.comI remind all three of them of the four straight trips to The Finals, the two championships and all of the opportunities they’ll have to remain atop the Eastern Conference by sticking together and continuing to make sacrifices from a financial standpoint. And yes, they need help in the form of a point guard like Kyle Lowry, who can serve as a breath of fresh air and a catalyst for this group for years to come. It’s obvious that the Heat lost faith in Mario Chalmers during The Finals. They recognize the need for a more dynamic floor leader and they also know that they need another energy source for this team with Dwyane Wade clearly on the other side of the mountain of his career. They’ll also need to replenish the reserve ranks with veterans willing to join the championship search party and my first call would be to Shawn Marion.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: If all three of the Big Three stick around under the current contracts, the Heat are effectively handcuffed. So if I’m Pat Riley, I talk to Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh and somehow convince them that they should take less — I guess you talk to them about longer deals if these deals are opted out of. And to me, that’s the most important thing — you have to do something to create some flexibility. Then the other thing I’d do is go find a point guard who can penetrate and create. If the midlevel is your threshold, maybe someone like, uh-oh, Patty Mills, or even instant offense like Nate Robinson. Either way, I think you have to have a point guard who can handle the ball and create for his teammates and take some of that burden off of LeBron’s shoulders.