Posts Tagged ‘Kevin Love’

Love has no plans to leave Cleveland early


VIDEO: Love at shootaround

HANG TIME BIG CITY — When the Cleveland Cavaliers traded for Kevin Love before the start of the season, they knew they would get at least one season from him before the summer of 2015, when Love has the option of opting out of his contract and testing free agency. But on Tuesday, Kevin Love said he’s counting on at least one more season with the Cavs before hitting free agency.

At shootaround Tuesday in Phoenix, Love told the Northeast Ohio Media Group that he plans on returning to the Cavs for the 2015-16 season. As Chris Haynes writes

“I think that we will figure it out here, so I don’t plan on opting out or any of that,” Love told NEOMG. “I plan on being here. As far as leaving my options open, I mean sure, it’s always there. At the end of the day, it’s always good to have something but no, I plan on being here.”

By picking up his $16.7 million player option for 2015-16, Love, 26, would stay with the Cavs until at least the summer of 2016. That would allow him to sign a new contract just in time to tap into the expected spike in television revenue before the 2016-17 season.

Love says he’s committed to the Cavaliers organization and stressed that while he’s still trying to find his niche with the team, it will have no bearing on his future arrangements.

“I’ve said all along that I plan on being a Cavalier long-term,” Love said without hesitation. “As we continue to evolve, my role will continue to evolve. It’s still a process where I’m figuring it out.”

Earlier this week, Cavs coach David Blatt said Love was “not a max player yet,” though Blatt later clarified that he meant Love was ineligible to sign a new contract with the Cavs until he had opted out of his current deal.

The Cavs are currently 19-19, and have been without LeBron James the last two weeks as he recovers from injuries. Heading into this season, in his first six seasons in Minnesota, Love averaged 19.2 points and 12.2 rebounds. With the Cavs, Love’s production has decreased slightly playing alongside James and Kyrie Irving, as Love has averaged 17.9 and 10.5 over 37 games.

While the Cavs have lost nine of their last 11 games, including 1-7 since James began his rehab, James said this morning that he is close to returning to the court and will be a game-time decision tonight against the Suns. As ESPN.com reports …

“We got to get better,” James said. “We got to approach every game with a sense of urgency. And I hated the fact that we were playing some pretty decent ball when I went out and we just dropped a lot of games when I was out. Hopefully I can get back tonight or very soon and we can start getting back on our winning ways.”

Morning shootaround — Jan. 13


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Jan. 12

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Thibodeau lays into Bulls after loss | Story behind KG-Howard scuffle | Blatt clarifies his ‘max’ player comments | Anthony knows surgery is inevitable

No. 1:  Thibodeau rips into Bulls after loss to Magic – Had Pau Gasol not dropped a career-best 46 points on the Milwaukee Bucks on Saturday, the Chicago Bulls could be looking at a four-game losing streak. The Bulls have lost three of their last four games, including a surprise loss at home last night to the Orlando Magic. Afterward, Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau wasn’t exactly happy with the effort his squad displayed. Joe Cowley of the Chicago Sun-Times has more:

It’s been more than a year since Tom Thibodeau brought out “the circle.’’

It’s a mythical place in the mind of the Bulls coach that measures his players, measures the man.

After Monday’s embarrassing 121-114 loss to the Orlando Magic at the United Center, the talk of “the circle’’ was front and center from Thibodeau.

Specifically, which of the Bulls players were going to be in, and which wanted out.

“You can make an excuse every night in this league if that’s what you choose to do, whether it’s new players, the schedule, the start, who’s out, who’s in,’’ an angry Thibodeau said after the game. “There’s an excuse every night. You can’t do that. We have to make good. Either you’re in the circle or you’re out of the circle. You want to be in? Let’s go. You don’t want to be in? That’s fine too. Let’s go.’’

The circle seemed pretty empty against the Magic.

For a Bulls team that’s made its reputation under Thibodeau as one of the stingiest defenses the Association has? Blasphemy as far as the coach was concerned.

“Every aspect,’’ Thibodeau said, when asked what part of his defense needed to improve. “We gotta decide what we’re going to be. If we’re going to come in and just try to outscore people, we’re not going anywhere. I know that doesn’t work. We’re going to have to bring a lot more intensity and the only you bring a lot more intensity is gotta work a lot harder. It’s really that simple.’’

There wasn’t a lot of argument from his players, either.

Pau Gasol, fresh off a career-high 46 points in the win over Milwaukee on Saturday, however, took it a step further, not hiding his anger.

“I am upset. I am upset,’’ Gasol said. “We’ve given away too many home games against teams that we shouldn’t. That has to stop.

“Defensively, we struggled. There was no energy, no aggressiveness, no engagement from our team. So we’ve got to improve … dramatically. Just no energy, not really working together, and that’s something that has to change, has to improve. Can’t give up 120 points … 121 … so that’s something we have to reflect on. If we really want to do something here that’s something that can’t happen.’’


VIDEO: Derrick Rose talks after the Bulls’ home loss to the Magic

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Morning shootaround — Jan. 12


VIDEO: Highlights of the games played Jan. 11

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Cavaliers lack effort in latest setback | What makes Kerr tick? | Trail Blazers enjoy “Lillard Time” every time | Clippers’ bench struggling to find its way

No. 1: Cavaliers lack effort in latest setback — LeBron James can’t get back fast enough for the Cleveland Cavaliers, losers of five straight games after a humiliating loss to the Sacramento Kings Sunday night at Sleep Train Arena. If LeBron’s two-week absence from the lineup has shown us nothing, it’s that these Cavs (even with All-Stars Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love) are nowhere near the championship outfit they were billed to be over the summer. Yes, it’s just one game and one without the team’s best player in uniform. But as Chris Haynes of the Northeast Ohio Media Group points out, the shocking lack of effort in this latest setback is something for Cleveland fans to worry about:

What happened at Sleep Train Arena on Sunday night was disturbing.

The Sacramento Kings were not supposed to manhandle the Cleveland Cavaliers that way, resulting in a 103-84 rout.

Cleveland (19-19) had just come off of a game where they fought tooth and nail with the Golden State Warriors until things unraveled late in the fourth quarter.

They showed life, promise and the willingness to never quit. But on Sunday, it was an inexcusable amount of exertion placed forth and that simply will not do.

“It wasn’t a good performance by us, honestly,” head coach David Blatt said. “You can’t sugarcoat that…That was not the performance we hoped for.”

When the Kings built a significant lead, shoulders started to slump, heads were hung down and tempers flared. Players started to behave out of character. Not pleased with the lack of calls, Kyrie Irving chased down referee Leroy Richardson as both teams were headed to the locker room for halftime.

Teammates intervened before the All-Star could pick up a cheap technical and it would have been his first ever technical, a sign of how irate he was at the time.

“The emotions,” Irving said. “Like I said, I’m usually composed, but my emotions just got the best of me going into halftime.”

DeMarcus Cousins talked trash and he backed it up, bruising the Cavaliers’ frontcourt for 26 points and 13 rebounds. Rudy Gay dissected Cleveland’s defense with an array a midrange jumpers to end with 23 points on an efficient 9-for-14 shooting.

Sacramento, a team that was six games under .500 entering the game, made it look easy and that’s because it was easy.

“We didn’t have the best effort,” Kevin Love admitted. “We missed some good shots but all in all, it wasn’t there for us tonight.” He later said, “In anything that you do, that’s unacceptable. We have to compete and compete every single night.”


VIDEO: Kyrie Irving discusses the Cavs’ loss in Sacramento (more…)

Morning shootaround — Jan. 10


VIDEO: Trevor Booker taps in possibly the shot of the year

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Booker practices those ‘circus’ shots | Tarpley, dead at 50, ‘could do it all’ | Cavs find sunshine through dark clouds | Rock bottom in 5 seconds for Nets

No. 1: Booker practices those ‘circus’ shots — Necessity is the mother of invention, but it occasionally can be the father of ridiculous. That’s how it felt Friday night in Oklahoma City, when Utah Jazz forward Trevor Booker took resourcefulness to an outrageous level and made not just the play of the night but the shot of the 2014-15 NBA season, at least based on rarity and degree of difficulty. Booker’s back-to-the-basket, no-time-except-to-tip, underhanded flip of a field goal attempt stunned pretty much everyone in the gym. Here’s Jazz beat writer Jody Genessey on the play:

With 0.2 seconds remaining on the shot clock, the Jazz got the ball out of bounds on the far sideline. The only shot that can even be completed in that amount of time is a tip, and that’s what Jazz coach Quin Snyder called for.

Booker said he didn’t even know the play that his coach barked out, so he headed to the hoop thinking Gordon Hayward would probably throw a lob. When that didn’t materialize, Booker rushed over toward Hayward and stopped with his back toward the basket.

That’s when, as the NBA marketing department might say, amazing happened.

Hayward made a bounce pass to Booker, who creatively and instinctively tipped the ball with both hands and flipped it up and over his head in the nick of time. It’s a move that might come in handy next summer when he plays volleyball again.

Incredibly, the ball plopped into the net, helping the Jazz take a 50-44 lead into the break.

“We try to cover a lot of game situations. That was not one,” Jazz coach Snyder said. “I have to say they manufactured that.”

While Snyder, Hayward and everyone else was startled, Booker grinned and immediately thought to the hours he and his cousin, Lakers forward Jordan Hill, spent practicing – yes, practicing – such goofball shots and situations. As cited by Aaron Falk of the Salt Lake Tribune:

“I know you won’t believe me, but I really do practice those shots,” he said in the locker room afterward. “My cousin [Lakers forward] Jordan Hill, he texted me after the game and said, ‘They’re not going to believe we practiced those shots all the time growing up.’ I guess you could say the hard work finally paid off.”

The Jazz lost the game, 99-94, and dropped to 13-24. But Booker was buoyant afterward about his team as well as that shot.

“That’s a good [team] right there,” he said of the Thunder. “Let’s not forget that they went to the Finals a couple years ago. We’re playing good ball right now, playing hard. I told the group, there’s no group I’d rather go to war with than these guys. We’re still trying to figure everything out, but as long as we keep playing hard the way we are, we’re going to be fine.”

***

No. 2: Tarpley, dead at 50, ‘could do it all’ — He was a child of the ’60s, which meant that Roy Tarpley was a young professional athlete in the ’80s, and while no decade has held exclusive rights to illegal drug use among major sports figures, that one ranks high. Tarpley was the seventh player picked in the 1986 NBA Draft – five spots after Len Bias, the poster guy for squandered dreams and tragic ends even today. Others taken early that day included Chris Washburn and William Bedford, two more whose careers washed out to substance abuse. Other sports had similar tales, and Tarpley’s came to an end with the news Friday that the former Dallas Mavericks forward had died at age 50. Eddie Sefko of the Dallas Morning News chronicled the sad news:

Cause of death was not immediately known Friday night, although when the Mavericks arrived in Los Angeles for their game Saturday against the Clippers, several members of the traveling party had been informed that liver failure was at least partly to blame.

The 6-11 Tarpley was the seventh pick in the 1986 draft by the Mavericks out of Michigan. In his second season, he was the NBA’s sixth man of the year before drugs and controversy shrouded the rest of his six seasons in the league.

According to a medical examiner’s report, Tarpley’s death happened at Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital. It is a sad ending to one of the most gifted players in franchise history. Tarpley had a rare combination of strength and speed that made him one of the best athletes of his era.

“Our condolences go out to the family of Roy Tarpley,” Mavericks’ owner Mark Cuban said via Twitter. “RIP Roy. Mavs fans everywhere will remember you fondly.”

Tarpley’s off-court troubles probably followed him into the NBA from the University of Michigan and largely defined his time in Dallas, with the Mavericks assisting in significant ways. When he was right, he was very right; the 6-foot-11 native of Detroit averaged 12.6 and 10.0 rebounds in 280 regular season games over parts of six seasons. In 24 playoff games, his numbers were even better: 17.0 points, 12.8 rebounds and a 20.8 PER. He led the NBA in total rebound percentage (22.6) while winning the Sixth Man Award in 1987-88 and he led in that category again two years later. That’s the Tarpley fans would prefer to remember.

“If Roy had stayed healthy, he could have been one of the top 50 players ever,” said Brad Davis, the Mavericks’ radio analyst and player-development coach who played with Tarpley. “He could do it all, shoot, score, rebound, pass and defend. We’re all sorry to hear of his passing.”

Tarpley would spend most of his career battling personal problems. He was suspended by the NBA after five games in the 1989-90 season after being arrested for driving while intoxicated and resisting arrest. In 1991, he drew another suspension after a second DWI arrest and, a few months later, had a third violation and was banned from the league for violating the NBA’s drug-use policies.

He returned to the Mavericks briefly in 1994 but then was permanently barred in December 1995 for violating terms of his aftercare program.

***

No. 3: Cavs find sunshine through dark clouds — Some of us at Hang Time HQ have chided some of the Cleveland Cavaliers’ knee-jerk critics for ignoring the one thing everyone said that team would need in 2014-15, namely patience. Then again, a stretch of seven defeats in eight games, a four-game losing streak and two weeks without LeBron James – all while nearing the mid-point of January – might be an appropriate time to … PANIC! And yet, there was a calm of sorts about the Cavs after their 18-point drubbing at Golden State Friday and even some rays of optimism, as Cleveland beat guy Dave McMenamin of ESPN.com saw it:

It’s amazing how much the direction of a team can change once its members change the perception of their situation.

Monday in Philadelphia it seemed as low as you could go, with the Cavs blowing an early lead and losing to the laughingstock of the league with Kyrie Irving not making the trip because of a back injury and LeBron James away from the team, also nursing strains to his back and left knee while making a quick rehab trip down in Miami.

Five days later, with the team having pulled off two trades (in essence Dion Waiters for J.R. Smith and Iman Shumpert, and a couple of first-round picks for Timofey Mozgov and a second-rounder), Irving back in the lineup, and James back with the team for its five-game road trip — and even going through “minor” on-court activities for the first time since sitting out Dec. 30 — there’s some sunshine peaking through the clouds, according to coach David Blatt.

“It’s tough right now and I know it’s tough to see, but when we do get back to full strength, we’re going to be good,” said Kevin Love.

It was particularly noteworthy that Love was waving the encouragement flag because he took only 11 shots — compared to 23 apiece for Smith and Irving — but instead of focusing on his involvement in the offense after the fact, he set his sights on what the Cavs will look like in the near future.

Blatt took the same tone.

“I think you see we’re a better team today than we were yesterday and we were a week ago,” Blatt said. “I’m not even going to talk about the guys that aren’t playing, because we’re a better team today.”

The signs are more encouraging than sappy stuff like playing tough teams close – Houston, the Warriors – without their best player. There are no guarantees, but at least there have been some changes and the LeBron arrow is pointing up:

The new faces are already making their presence felt, whether it was Smith’s 27 points against the Warriors (“I told you coming in; I had nothing but a good feeling about J.R. joining our team,” Blatt said), or it was Mozgov’s nine points and eight rebounds in his debut and his reaction to how he was received (“The guys meet me so good,” the Russian-born Mozgov said in endearing broken English, “make me be the part of the family on the first day. … So, I love it”), or Shumpert’s competitive side relishing the fact he was leaving a sinking ship for a team that’s playoff-bound (“I didn’t want my season to end early,” Shumpert said).

There are no “gimme” games in the Western Conference, but Sacramento should be a winnable game on Sunday; and then, if James comes back just slightly ahead of his two-week rest schedule he could be in the lineup Tuesday in Phoenix, and if that happens you get the lame-duck Lakers next, and possibly have picked up a full head of steam going into the trip finale Friday against the Clippers.

***

No. 4: Rock bottom in 5 seconds for Nets — Realists in this league have a saying they occasionally invoke: “You are what your record is.” Pessimists around the Brooklyn Nets woke up Saturday believing that their team is about 10 games worse than its record, though, because the 16-19 Nets somehow blew a game against the 6-29 Philadelphia 76ers Friday night at the Barclays Center. The blog TheBrooklynGame.com had an intriguing snapshot of the team hitting rock bottom – actually, it was more of a film analysis, second-by-second, of Brooklyn’s best last chance in the game. It began with coach Lionel Hollins‘ admonitions that the Nets really aren’t a good team and then dissected an inbounds play that led to center Brook Lopez launching a prayer from beyond 3-point range on a failed attempt to win or tie:

With may-day approaching after three failed screens and little misdirection, Lopez shot up towards [Alan] Anderson, extending his left arm away from Nerlens Noel to catch the ball, as the only player left who had a chance.

The option was doomed from the start. The seven-footer, who has never made a three-pointer in the regular season, caught a wide pass from Anderson one-handed, spun counterclockwise to the middle of the floor, performed a ball-fake against the long and talented Noel to no avail, and flung a contested, fallaway three-pointer wide right, officially listed at 27 feet away but might as well have been from the Wookiee planet of Kashyyyk.

“We’re honestly playing down to these teams these last few games,” Lopez said. “We’re better than this, and we’re doing it to ourselves. And we have to be better than this for the entirety of the game.”

It should’ve never come down to Lopez taking that final shot, because it never should’ve come down to a final shot at all.

“When we executed and made good decisions, and defended, and rebounded, we were ahead. Soon as we relaxed and made some bad decisions on offense, made some bad decisions on defense, they came back.”

Now, the Nets can only look ahead, and the road is ugly. 13 of the team’s 17 games before the All-Star break (and the trade deadline) come against teams slated to be in the playoffs, and that’s not including tomorrow night’s contest against the Detroit Pistons, who had won seven straight games before barely losing to the Atlanta Hawks, the Eastern Conference’s best team, Friday night.

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: The Phoenix Suns considered Brandan Wright the “best backup center in the league” even before they acquired him from Boston. … Skip the soap-opera stuff, Mark Jackson‘s return to Golden State scarcely could have been more moving. … Don’t assume the Boston Celtics are done, even after they spend the weekend working out the kinks of their Jeff Green-to-Memphis trade. … No Kobe, no problem for the Lakers, who got a big boost off the bench from new guy Tarik Black. …

Blogtable: Thoughts on Cavs’ deal?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Thoughts on Cavs’ deal? | Struggling marquee teams | Where will Dirk finish?



VIDEONBA TV’s crew discusses the three-team trade

> Cleveland’s deal for Iman Shumpert and J.R. Smith was made, seemingly, to shore up some holes on defense. Mission accomplished? Or more to come?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comIf the Cavaliers are done sprucing up their roster defensively, then I think they’re done, period, as a serious contender this season. It’s not like I expect them to lure Dikembe Mutombo out of retirement and coax assistant coach James Posey back into uniform, but they’re going to have trouble coughing up from within the proper defensive intensity, on the fly, in what’s left of the season. Rim defense in particular is needed, and no one on the current roster (with Anderson Varejao out) is capable of filling that void. As for finding one of those much coveted 7-foot shot swatters walking around outside the arena, good luck with that. The Cavs need to make another deal.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comDefinitely not. From the beginning of the season the Cavs have been short on big men and the loss of Anderson Varejao for the season only exacerbated the problem. More than one hole in the hull of the S.S. LeBron. Still need bigs.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comMission accomplished to get away from Dion Waiters. Maybe Shumpert makes the Cavs better on defense, but the primary goal was addition by subtraction, not shoring up holes on defense. Although Waiters has talent, he obviously wasn’t a good fit there, and that’s not just with the new roster, either. More to come? I could see it. Cleveland doesn’t have many trade chips left, but any tinkering is possible after the way the season has started.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comI wouldn’t say mission accomplish or that there is more to come. Not sure if the Cavs, at this point, have any more disposable assets to swap that will fetch the shot-blocking rim protector they need. Shumpert is just a band-aid. The Cavs need more of a team effort defensively that will help hide the shortcomings of Kevin Love and, to an extent, Kyrie Irving, but I’m not so sure that mentality is there. LeBron can only do so much, and even he isn’t the defender he used to be.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comThe mission certainly hasn’t been accomplished, because they still lack rim protection and both Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love still need to show that they can play both ends of the floor. But the trade is definitely a step in the right direction. Trading Waiters is addition by subtraction, Shumpert gives them more perimeter defense than they had, and Smith is a good shooter if he can just play off LeBron James and Irving and limit the isolation, step-back nonsense. I’ll be curious to see how coach David Blatt finds playing time for all these guards, though.

Sekou Smith, NBA.comIt has to be a little of both. The Cavaliers certainly found a potential perimeter defensive stopper (no offense to Shawn Marion, who has performed those duties in the past) in Shumpert. So that part of the mission has been accomplished. But there has to be more to come in terms of shoring up the rim-protector/post-defense deficiency that was created when Anderson Varejao (Achilles) was lost for the season. The Cavaliers have plenty of time to continue exploring their options. And based on what we’ve seen from them so far, they need to turn over every rock in the basketball world in search of the idea fit.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comMuch more to come … and much of it must happen in-house. Shumpert is a good pickup because he join LeBron James in his commitment to defense. Will everyone else come around? The mentality in Cleveland needs to change in addition to the mandatory acquisition of an intimidating big man. If everybody isn’t paying attention at that end of the floor, then nobody in Cleveland is going to be winning the championship.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogThe more I think about this deal, the more I like the way it works out for Cleveland. First of all, Dion Waiters either wouldn’t or couldn’t fit into the sixth man role he’d been asked to occupy, so the Cavs went out and got a former sixth man of the year in Smith. On top of that, they added Shumpert, the Knicks’ most versatile player and a true a-level wing defender. I think this will really help Cleveland down the stretch in games, where they’ve tried auditioned various players, from Matthew Dellevadova to Mike Miller, as Irving’s backcourt mate. Doesn’t matter which one, Shumpert or Smith is an upgrade.

Waiters, J.R. Smith, Shumpert traded in Cavs-Thunder-Knicks deal


VIDEO: Bleacher Report’s Ethan Skolnick describes the surprise in Cleveland over the Waiters’ trade

On a perfectly good night of NBA action, with 22 of the league’s 30 teams open for business, it was a flurry of activity on social media that seized much of the attention Monday evening.

The buzz: The New York Knicks, Cleveland Cavaliers and Oklahoma City Thunder were orchestrating a three-team trade that was leaking out piece by piece, important details backed up by not-quite-right speculation.

It started with some rumblings on Twitter by someone in Dion Waiters‘ camp, suggesting the Cleveland guard was being dealt by the Cavs. Soon enough, Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports was breaking the news, as is his wont:

The prospect of Waiters, Cleveland’s third-year shooting guard considered a poor fit on the newly configured Cavs, being traded in mid-season was juicy enough. Most insiders anticipated some chafing from the No. 4 pick in the 2012 draft after Cleveland coaxed back LeBron James and built the team around the four-time MVP, point guard Kyrie Irving and former Minnesota power forward Kevin Love. Soon enough, Wojnarowski followed with more info on the deal, including this:

But not long after, the NBA scribe from Yahoo! updated, still ahead of the pack:

Various reports also sketched out the three-team transaction, mentioning  J.R. Smith and Iman Shumpert as Knicks who were headed to Cleveland. Also, veteran big man Samuel Dalembert‘s name popped up, his destination initially not known. Later, it was reported that Dalembert would be waived by New York.

With Waiters headed to the Thunder and Smith and Shumpert bound for Cleveland, fans in New York might reasonably have wondered: Who’re we gettin’?! Turns out, Knicks president Phil Jackson was maneuvering for salary-cap relief along with, perhaps, some addition by subtraction.

Quickie analysis? Waiters wasn’t going to adjust to the slippage in Cleveland’s pecking order forced on him by the new and improved Cavs. He still has superior offensive tools, if his game can be harnessed and disciplined, but James & Co. have little time for that. Smith is an established NBA knucklehead, but he can score as well or better than Waiters and he might lock in on a team with real purpose. Shumpert is a valuable role player who should help Cleveland defensively.

Wojnarowski cited league sources in reporting that the Knicks would be getting rookie center Alex Kirk from Cleveland in the deal, along with a protected future first-round pick from OKC.

There were other facets to the deal that were picked up and kicked around – in excitement, in mirth and in all seriousness – by the usual suspects on social media, including these:

Late Monday, the Knicks, Cavaliers and Thunder officially announced the deal. The Thuunder receives Waiters from the Cavaliers in exchange for a 2015 first-round pick and Lance Thomas was sent to the Knicks. The Knicks acquired Lou Amundson and  Kirk from the Cavs in exchange for Schumpert and Smith.

Morning shootaround — Jan. 5




VIDEO: Highlights from games played Jan. 4

NEWS OF THE MORNING
Stoudemire is shocked | A new-look Love? | Rocky Mountain Zzzzzzs | Kareem helps Hibbert | A special anniversary in Dallas

No. 1: Knicks boggle Amare’s mind — The Knicks are bad. Historically bad. You’d have thought that reality might have set in on the bench and in the locker room weeks ago. Maybe it’s the pages on the calendar turning from the old year to the new, but the plunge to the bottom of the standings has hit veteran Amar’e Stoudemire in a way he didn’t expect. Ian Begley of ESPNNewYork.com has the details:

“It’s beyond my imagination at this point,” he said Sunday before a 95-82 loss to the Milwaukee Bucks that extended their losing streak to 11 games. “I never thought I’d see this. … This is definitely kind of mind-boggling.”
The Knicks (5-31) dropped their 21st of 22 and have the most losses in the NBA.

Carmelo Anthony missed his second straight game due to knee soreness. There was no clear timetable for his return.

“It’s a tragic thing,” said center Samuel Dalembert of the mounting losses. Though healthy enough to return, Dalembert did not play after missing three straight games with an ankle injury.

The Knicks are now one loss shy of tying the franchise mark of 12 straight defeats, last done in 1984-85. New York has already set the record for consecutive home losses. It was the team’s 10th straight loss at home.

Of course, this wasn’t how Stoudemire — who missed his fourth straight game due to knee soreness — envisioned what could be his final season in New York playing out.

When Stoudemire signed a five-year, $100 million contract with the Knicks in the summer of 2010, he declared the team would return to relevance. He mostly delivered on that promise, helping New York reach the playoffs for three straight seasons.

But things have fallen apart this season. Now, in the last year of Stoudemire’s contract, it seems as if the only thing the team is competing for is a lottery position.

“When I first signed with New York, that wasn’t the game plan,” Stoudemire said. “… But the past is not here. And neither is the future, so we’ve got to deal with the now, and I think we’ve just got to continue to try to get better as a team and as players, try to keep improving.”


VIDEO: The Bucks handle the Knicks at MSG (more…)

Morning shootaround — Jan. 3


VIDEO: Highlights from games played Jan. 2

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Melo done for the season? | Curry, Dubs on fire | Hawks on top, new No. 1 in East

No. 1: Melo done for the season? — Carmelo Anthony’s season could be over. Finished before he or the New York Knicks could even get started basically. At 5-30 and staring at one of the worst seasons in franchise history, word has surfaced that a lingering knee injury could require surgery and that Melo could be potentially be done for the season. That’s brutal news for a Knicks team that has yet to acclimate  itself to coach Derek Fisher‘s system. But as Filip Bondy of the New York Daily News suggests, perhaps it’s time to do the right thing and shut ‘Melo down:

The Knicks fell again for the 10th straight time, serenaded by jeers, slaughtered this time by the lowly Pistons, 97-81. They demonstrated the sort of hopeless defensive performance that surely made Phil Jackson and Jim Dolan change the channel, wherever they happened to be watching.

But there was a difference Friday, an important one at the Garden. For the first time, really, Derek Fisher faced reality, sounded ready to shut down Carmelo Anthony and throw away this brutal 5-30 season once and for all. It’s not that Fisher was tanking, although that probably would be the best thing right now for the Knicks. It’s just that the coach admitted, finally, that there needs to be some discussions about long-term treatment of Anthony’s lingering injuries — about putting him on ice, along with his knee.

There is a growing feeling among people close to the Knicks that Anthony will require minor surgery on his joint after his season, whenever that ends. Fisher suggested there will likely be some good arguments made to Anthony soon about embarking on a sabbatical of some length. Eventually, Fisher implied, Anthony might see the light and accept a personal blackout.

“There’s a balance between a player and his health and the part that he plays in the decision-making process and then where we are as a team and giving our thoughts and our opinion to it,” Fisher said. “We can’t unilaterally just say, ‘Hey, you know, you can’t play for the rest of the season because of A, B and C.’ I think our medical staff, our training staff, continue to have conversations with him about where he is.”


VIDEO: Rajon Rondo returned to Boston in style and dazzled the old fans in the Dallas win

(more…)

Love, Marion set to return for Cavaliers

Hang Time Big City — The Cleveland Cavaliers’ bad year just got a bit better.

Yesterday the Cleveland Cavaliers announced that LeBron James would miss the next two weeks with left knee and lower back strains. The absence of James, who leads the Cavaliers in points per game (25.2 ppg) and assists per game (7.6 apg), was the latest in a recent run of rough luck suffered by the Cavs. Anderson Varejao was already out for the season after rupturing his Achilles tendon, and Kevin Love (back spasms) and Shawn Marion (sprained left ankle) both missed Cleveland’s loss to Milwaukee on Wednesday night.

But this morning at their shootaround in Charlotte before tonight’s contest against the Hornets (7 ET, League Pass), Love and Marion confirmed they will play tonight. Love, Cleveland’s leading rebounder at 10.1 boards per game to go with 16.7 points per game, should at least help shoulder the offensive load in James’ absence, while Marion will provide much-needed depth.

As the Northeast Ohio Media Group’s Chris Haynes reports, Love believes the remaining Cavs need to look at James’ absence as an opportunity:

Love, who usually gets a bulk of his touches in the opening quarter, is expecting there to be a balanced attack.

“It will be spread out throughout,” Love said. “It will be a lot of continuity out there. If we can play like that, we’ll be a better team, be able to move that ball.”

No one is feeling sorry for the Cavaliers as they go through this injury-plagued period. Teams are still aiming to take them out. To avoid a two-week crumble, players will have to step up to the plate and produce.

“I think you have to look at it as a glass half full,” Love explained. “Our best player is out, our leader is out but it’s a chance and an opportunity for players to step up, myself included.”

At that same shootaround, Cavs coach David Blatt elaborated on James’ injuries. As the Akron Beacon-Journal‘s Jason Lloyd reports, Blatt said James just needed a break:

“You’re going to have aches and pains. This became an issue where he really just couldn’t play comfortably,” Cavs coach David Blatt said of James. “A lot of things were said unfairly. The guy has been playing with a lot of pain or some pain and we just decided enough. Let’s shut him down, let’s take care of the problem, let’s get him back to feeling 100 percent and we’ll start from there when he’s ready to go again.”

LeBron reaching 100 percent can’t come soon enough for Cleveland. The Cavaliers, who are 18-14 and in second place in the Central Division, have lost four of their last five games, with four of their next five games coming against teams who made the playoffs last season. James is two days in the rehab process and says he’s ready to “get healthy and back to myself.”


VIDEO: Ethan Skolnick explains why Kevin Love’s play will be vital now

Cavaliers lose LeBron for 2 weeks

VIDEO: LeBron out for two weeks

LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers are having a lousy year.

The year 2015 wasn’t even 15 hours old, after all, when the Cavaliers announced that James, their franchise guy for the second time, was going to miss “the next two weeks” with left knee and lower back strains. James already had sat out the Cavs’ back-to-back games at Atlanta Tuesday and against Milwaukee Wednesday with left knee soreness, so if he truly is out two more weeks, he will be sidelined until or through the Jan. 15 game against the Lakers in Los Angeles.

That one is the fourth on the Cavs’ five-game upcoming West Coast swing. If that timetable holds, it means James would be sidelined for nine or 10 consecutive games, the longest stretch of his 12-season career. It also would cause him to play his fewest games ever in a full season – he missed seven of 82 games in 2007-08, with a maximum of 71 possible if he’s back in time for the Lakers. Even in 2011-12, James’ 62 appearances in the lockout-shortened 66-game schedule were the equivalent of 77 in a normal season.

Guess it proves the old saying that “getting old isn’t for sissies,” since James just turned 30 on Tuesday.

Social media was buzzing quickly, even on a day with only two scheduled NBA games in the evening (Denver at Chicago and Sacramento at Minnesota). But the Cavaliers were out front of most of it with their official status update:

LeBron James was evaluated yesterday at Cleveland Clinic Sports Health by Richard D. Parker, MD, Cavaliers Head Team Physician. Tests included physical exam, radiographs and a MRI, the results of which revealed left knee and low back strains. These conditions will be treated via a multimodal approach consisting of anti-inflammatories, rehabilitation, training room treatments, and rest. LeBron is currently projected to be Out for the next 2 weeks.

Cleveland’s 18-14 record (0-3 without James), its other injuries (Kevin Love and Shawn Marion both missed Wednesday’s game with back spasms and an ankle sprain, respectively, and big man Anderson Varejao is out for the season after Achilles surgery), head coach David Blatt‘s newness to the NBA and the whole group’s inconsistent progress along the learning curve to presumed contender status has set hands to wringing in northeast Ohio.

Even James has drawn criticism. He remains the only player in the league averaging at least 25 points, five rebounds and seven assists, while shooting 48 percent or better. But his numbers are down in several categories – his 25.0 PER is the lowest since his rookie year and off from the 31.7, 31.1, 30.7 and 31.6 of his four MVP seasons – and his engagement with the Cavs’ newly assembled roster has been questioned.

As a result, everything from James’ rapport with Blatt to his long-term commitment to staying in Cleveland has been the subject of speculation.

Here’s something else for folks to speculate on: How are the Cavaliers going to do without their best player and acknowledged leader? If Love and/or Kyrie Irving pick up so much of the slack, will people immediately wonder if their games are being stunted by James’ presence? If Cleveland struggles, will James be positioned to make a stronger case for a fifth MVP?

If nothing else, NBA fans are about to see something entirely different in seeing the nothing of James’ immediate future in suits and training rooms throughout the league for the next couple weeks.