Posts Tagged ‘Kevin Love’

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 199) Dirty Play or Playoff Basketball?

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Dirty play or just playoff basketball?

It’s a legitimate question to ask now that the postseason fate of LeBron James, Kyrie Irving and the Cleveland Cavaliers has been tweaked by two plays that occurred in the Cavaliers’ Game 4 win over the Boston Celtics Sunday at TD Garden.

Kelly Olynyk‘s arm bar on Kevin Love yanked Love’s shoulder out of socket. The dislocation and subsequent labrum tear will keep him out of the Eastern Conference semifinals and perhaps the remainder of the postseason, according to Cavaliers’ general manager David Griffin. J.R. Smith‘s two-game suspension for knocking out Celtics swingman Jae Crowder will also have a huge impact on the start of that next series for the Cavaliers, who will be down two starters whenever they hit the floor.

What looks like a dirty play to one set of eyes is nothing more than playoff intensity-level basketball, good and physical play that we’ve all come to expect at this time of year from players and teams around the league. Which side of that line you come down on depends on your perspective. Love called Olynyk’s play “bush league” and James said it was “not a basketball play.”

The same could be said of Smith’s, no-look, swinging right-hook that knocked Crowder to the ground. Again, it depends on whose perspective you subscribe to and also what era of the NBA you were raised on.

Whatever your view, the playoffs, certainly in the Eastern Conference, were changed fundamentally with just two plays. And we factor that into our discussion about the postseason and where it goes from here on Episode 199 of The Hang Time Podcast: Dirty Play or Playoff Basketball?

LISTEN HERE:

As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of NBA.com,  Lang Whitaker of NBA.com’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand and the best sound designer/engineer in the business, Andrew Merriman.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.


VIDEO: Kevin Love talks to the media after dislocating his shoulder in Game 4 against the Boston Celtics

Love ‘highly unlikely’ to return during playoffs


VIDEO: Cavs GM David Griffin shares his thoughts on Kevin Love’s injury

HANG TIME BIG CITY — It took Kevin Love seven seasons to make it to the postseason. It appears his first trip will last all of four games.

After the Cleveland Cavaliers forward injured his shoulder after tangling with Boston big man Kelly Olynyk during Cleveland’s Game 4 win over the Boston Celtics on Sunday, the Cavs initially ruled Love out for the near future. Speaking with reporters today, Cavs general manager David Griffin lent some clarity to Love’s absence, writes Jason Lloyd of the Akron Beacon Journal:

Kevin Love is not expected to play again during this postseason, Cavs General Manager David Griffin said Tuesday. Griffin called a return by Love for these playoffs “highly unlikely” and said surgery is being considered.

”The damage to his shoulder is extensive,” Griffin said. “This is not a situation where we are expecting he will be available for any of this.”

Love was diagnosed with “acute anterior inferior glenohumeral dislocation with corresponding ligament/labrum tearing & humeral head bone bruising,” according to the team. He essentially dislocated his left shoulder and suffered torn ligaments and a torn labrum.

“I think it would be a real surprise if he were able to participate in the postseason,” Griffin said. “I still have a sliver of hope for something very late, but highly unlikely.”

The Cavs entered the postseason as the hottest team in the Eastern Conference, finishing the season 53-29 and seeming to assimilate Love into the offense. Love finished the season averaging 16.4 ppg and 9.7 rpg, and the Cavs’ postseason chances seemed bright even as rumors swirled about the long-term future of Love, an impending free agent, with Cleveland.

With Love out and J.R. Smith suspended for the first two games of the next round, the short-handed Cavs will square off against the winner of the Bulls vs. Bucks series.

If the Cavs are looking for a bright side, LeBron James and Kyrie Irving, who have dominated fourth quarter scoring for the Cavs in the postseason, will be healthy and coming off several days of rest.

Morning shootaround — April 28


VIDEO: Highlights from games played April 27

NEWS OF THE MORNING

How long might Love be out?| ‘D-Will’ lives again in Game 4 win | Report: Parsons may need microfracture surgery

No. 1: How long might Cavs be without Love? — The Cleveland Cavaliers are in the Eastern Conference semifinals for the first time since 2010, but they got there by paying a steep price. Star forward Kevin Love suffered a shoulder injury courtesy of Boston Celtics big man Kelly Olynyk in the Cavs’ Game 4 series-clinching win against Boston. The team revealed yesterday that Love will miss the East semis with a dislocated shoulder and, as USA Today‘s Jeff Zillgitt reports, he could miss 4-6 weeks:

The team said Love has “an acute anterior inferior glenohumeral dislocation with the corresponding ligament/labrum tearing and humeral head bone bruising” and is undergoing treatment. The team also said it is exploring additional opinions and treatment options.

The corresponding ligament and labrum tear make the injury much more serious and the recovery time longer. A 4-6 week absence or longer is possible.

The average absence for a dislocated shoulder is 27 days, according to athletic trainer Jeff Stotts, who maintains a comprehensive database of NBA injuries. Some players, such as Channing Frye, return in 14 days. Cleveland guard Iman Shumpert, however, missed six weeks with a dislocated shoulder earlier this season.

If the Cavaliers play the Bulls, who are up 3-1 on the Bucks, in the next round, they face a difficult task against a team with a deep frontcourt: Pau Gasol, Joakim Noah, Taj Gibson and Nikola Mirotic.

The Cavaliers lose scoring and rebounding without Love. It’s likely forward Tristan Thompson will move into the starting lineup, but then that leaves a hole on Cleveland’s already short bench.

It no doubt helps to have James and guard Kyrie Irving on the floor, and those two will need to produce at an even higher level.

Though the Cavs had a 19-20 start and lost Anderson Varejao to a season-ending injury early in the season, this is the Cavaliers’ first playoffs adversity. Having never played in the playoffs before this season, Irving doesn’t know about playoff hardship.


VIDEO: The Cavaliers are trying to figure out their next move 

*** (more…)

Smith, Olynyk suspended; Perkins fined

The other shoe dropped, as expected, and now the Cavaliers will open the Eastern Conference semifinals without two of their starters.

The NBA suspended guard J.R. Smith for two games without pay for swinging his arm and clocking the Celtics Jae Crowder in the head during the third quarter on Sunday.

The Cavs had announced earlier that forward Kevin Love would miss the entire series after suffering a dislocated shoulder in the first quarter of the game.

The league office said that Kelly Olynyk caused Love’s injury when the two became entangled by yanking his arm down and has been suspended without pay for one game. Olynyk will serve his suspension in the first game of the 2015-16 season for which he is eligible and physically able to play.

In addition, Cavs center Kendrick Perkins had a second-quarter Flagrant 1 Foul upgraded to a Flagrant 2 Foul and was fined $15,000.

Smith took to Instagram to address the situation:

Love out for conference semifinals


VIDEO: How will the Cleveland Cavaliers adjust in the wake of Kevin Love’s injury?

It is official.

The Cavaliers will be without forward Kevin Love for the next round of the playoffs, definitely missing what everyone expects could be a contentious showdown against the Bulls.

Love was injured in a run-in with Boston’s Kelly Olynyk.

The team made the announcement in a release:

Cavaliers forward Kevin Love sustained a left shoulder dislocation during the first quarter of yesterday’s game in Boston vs. the Celtics. His shoulder was assessed, reduced in the locker room, immobilized, and he did not return to the game. X-rays and an MRI have been performed, as well as further evaluation at the Cleveland Clinic Sports Heath today by team physician Dr. Richard D. Parker and Dr. Mark Schickendantz. Evaluation and imaging have defended the extent of the injury: an acute anterior inferior glenohumeral dislocation with the corresponding ligament/labrum tearing and humeral head bone bruising. Currently, Love is undergoing training room treatments while addition opinions are being obtained and treatment options are being explored. Love will be unavailable for the Cavaliers upcoming Conference Semifinal playoff series and an update regarding his status beyond that will be determined over the next several days.

After the Cavs closed out their 4-0 sweep of the Celtics on Sunday, Love said he believed Olynyk’s play was “bush league” and intentional, which Olynyk denied. The referees gave him only a common foul.

In a Q & A with the Boston Globe, Olynyk offered his reply:

“I’d probably get killed if I went to Cleveland right now. I don’t think if someone gave me their arm and I was running forward like that and locked up, I don’t think I could dislocate someone’s arm if I tried. I think it’s a real tough thing to do.

“Like I said before, it’s kind of ridiculous to say you intentionally meant to. I’d never intentionally hurt someone, him or anybody else for that matter. I don’t think anybody goes out trying to hurt anyone. I think it’s just real unfortunate. If you get tangled up and he doesn’t dislocate his shoulder, there’s nothing dirty ever said or anything. It’s just a foul. So I just really hope he can get back as soon as possible and help that team keep making a push.”

Assuming that Chicago, currently up 3-1 on Milwaukee going into Monday night’s Game 5, eventually closes out the series, Love’s absence would leave a void in the next round. With the strong presence of big men to pack the lane, Love’s ability to shoot from 3-point range and draw defenders to the perimeter is a valuable part of the game plan. Love’s replacement Tristan Thompson operates close to the basket.

The Cavs could also be missing shooting guard J.R. Smith, who was slapped with a flagrant 2 foul and ejected for hitting Boston’s Jae Crowder in the head in the third quarter. It is expected that Smith will be suspended for at least one game.

Morning Shootaround — April 27



VIDEO: Highlights from games played April 26

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Report: Pelicans plan to sign Davis to the max | Austin Rivers saves Clippers season | Buss says Lakers will celebrate Kobe next season | Trail Blazers vow to show heart, avoid sweep

No. 1: Report: Pelicans plan to sign Davis to the max — The New Orleans Pelicans have a summer to-do-list that starts and ends with taking care of Anthony Davis. The Pelicans’ immediate future rests on making sure Davis is a part of the organization for years to come and that means signing him to a max deal. Marc Stein of ESPN.com has more:

League sources say that the Pels will be as aggressive as possible on July 1 in presenting Davis with a five-year maximum contract that makes him New Orleans’ designated player.

Given that the 22-year-old was voted to start in February’s All-Star Game and will likely earn All-NBA first-team status when voting results are announced in coming days, Davis would be in line to start his max deal at 30 percent of the league’s salary cap as opposed to a mere 25 percent as long as he earns just one of those same honors next season — or if he is named the 2015-16 MVP.

Based on the league’s most recent cap projections, Davis will thus be presented with a five-year pact that will eventually top $30 million annually and could exceed $140 million in total value in a deal that kicks in beginning in 2016-17 and run through his 28th birthday.

Can he really turn down those sort of riches and that level of security in the name of flexibility?

Would he turn that down when he’s clearly comfortable in New Orleans and, by all accounts, highly engaged as the young leader of his team?

Hard to see Davis resisting such lucrative insulation, though he certainly does have the option of signing a shorter extension to keep his free-agent future more open.

***

No. 2: Austin Rivers saves Clippers season — He was supposed to be a bit player in this series, a footnote at best. But make no mistake, with their season on the brink in Game 4 in San Antonio, Austin Rivers stepped up and helped save the Los Angeles Clippers. Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports explains how Austin Rivers brought tears to his father’s eyes:

When Doc Rivers walked into the locker room, the scene stopped him. Chris Paul called on the Clippers to congratulate the young guard responsible for saving the season and present him the game ball. Everyone clapped. Everyone let out a long, loud cheer for Austin Rivers.

“For a moment, for a half second maybe, I became a dad in there,” Doc Rivers told Yahoo Sports later on Sunday at the AT&T Center. The tears welled in his eyes, but he quickly wiped them away and stiffened in the concrete corridor.

To trade for his son, Rivers had to make a case on the move’s merits to a dubious basketball community. He’s had to live with the criticism. They’ve had to live with it together. They had Sunday together, too.

Austin Rivers had his finest moment in the NBA on Sunday, scoring 16 points, delivering defense, deflections and a 114-105 victory over the San Antonio Spurs to bring this best-of-seven series 2-2 back to Staples Center. He made deft drives to the basket, fearless finishes to stun the Spurs.

For nine years, Doc Rivers coached and lived in Boston. For most of that time, his wife and children stayed in Orlando. Austin completed middle school and high school, spent a year at Duke and moved onto the NBA. Father and son were separated a long time, often coming and going in moments Doc had flown down and stolen an off-night for a high school game or an ACC game on Tobacco Road.

“Listen, we haven’t been together a lot,” Rivers told Yahoo Sports. “In a lot of ways, I am his coach.”

More coach than father, he’s trying to say. It’s an honest admission, and it comes tinged with a touch of sadness. Nevertheless, Austin Rivers has had to find his own way with these Clippers, earn his own respect. This was a beginning on Sunday, nothing more, nothing less.

***

No. 3: Buss says Lakers will celebrate Kobe next season — It’s all about Kobe Bryant next season for the Los Angeles Lakers. Even with a monster free agent summer on tap, the Lakers’ focus will be on Kobe. Lakers boss Jeanie Buss insists the 2015-16 season will be a celebration of one of the franchise’s and NBA’s all-time greats and his 20 years with the franchise. Sean Highkin of ProBasketballTalk.com has the details:

It’s been more or less known without anybody outright saying it for a while that next year will be Kobe Bryant‘s final year. His contract is up in 2016, which will put his career at 20 seasons, all with the Lakers, and the last three have ended with injuries.

Lakers president Jeanie Buss seems to know the end of the Kobe era is coming, if you go by her comments on a Sunday morning Bleacher Report radio interview:

Bryant has said that he doesn’t want a Derek Jeter-style farewell tour when he hangs it up, but it seems pretty obvious that it’s coming. And for the impact he’s had on the NBA and the sport worldwide, he deserves to take a victory lap regardless of what the Lakers do next season.

***

No. 4: Trail Blazers vow to show heart, avoid sweep — The Portland Trail Blazers insist they will not go away quietly. They will not be swept out of these playoffs without a fight. Their season is on the line tonight against the Memphis Grizzlies and they vow to fight until the very end. Joe Freeman of The Oregonian explains:

A little more than nine weeks ago, the Trail Blazers‘ practice court was brimming with confidence and gusto.

They had just made a splash at the NBA trade deadline, acquiring Arron Afflalo to strengthen their bench and add depth for what figured to be a long and successful playoff run. Pundits universally lauded the move. San Antonio Spurs Gregg Popovich hailed it as a “great addition.” The Blazers boldly pronounced they were poised to contend for an NBA Championship.

Oh how things have changed.

On Sunday afternoon, that confidence and gusto had been replaced with disappointment and dejection. The Memphis Grizzlies have pummeled the Blazers in their best-of-seven Western Conference playoffs series, using muscle, moxie and better talent to build a 3-0 lead. No team in NBA history has overcome a 3-0 deficit to win a playoff series.

And that history hovered over the Blazers like a thick fog Sunday at the practice facility in Tualatin, where they gathered for what could be their final practice of the season. No one said the season was done. Everyone promised to show heart and fight and claw until the final buzzer sounds at the end of Game 4, which is scheduled for 7:30 Monday night at the Moda Center.

But there was no escaping the daunting challenging in front of them. And there was no masking the inevitable gloom that comes with the reality the season is all but over.

“Right now, we’re at the point where we have to just have some heart and have some pride,” Damian Lillard said.

The Blazers spouted off the usual array of clichés, promising to take the series “one game at a time” and “only think about tomorrow’s game.” But history is impossible to ignore. And when the Cleveland Cavaliers swept the Boston Celtics on Sunday, they became the 112th team in 112 chances to win a series after building a 3-0 lead.

“You can’t think about it,” LaMarcus Aldridge said. “You just have to go game-by-game. If you try to think about, ‘Oh, we’re down 0-3 and let’s try to win the series,’ I think that’s when you think about the history. But if you just go game-by-game, just focus on getting Game 4, then anything’s possible.”

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Boston’s summer pursuit of Kevin Love will no doubt be complicated after the “bush league” play from Kelly Olynyk … Knocked down and out, gutsy Jae Crowder embodied toughness of Celtics this season … The Hawks are still a bit salty after their poor shooting effort in a Game 3 loss to the Brooklyn NetsSteals could help the Bucks steal another playoff win if the Chicago Bulls aren’t more careful with the ball … Kevin Love‘s absence in Cleveland with that shoulder dislocation will depend on his personal injury history

 

Morning shootaround — April 26



VIDEO: Highlights from Saturday’s playoff action

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Conley injury hex continues, Calathes steps up | No nonsense as Warriors sweep | Bucks graduate to winning | Sixers eyeing Russell in draft?

No. 1: Conley injury hex continues, Calathes steps up — Just when it appeared that Memphis point guard Mike Conley was getting healthier, he gets a whole lot more hurt. Conley had to leave Game 3 between the Grizzlies and Trail Blazers in Portland Saturday after being hit in the face (between the cheekbone and the eye) by an elbow from Blazers guard C.J. McCollum. He was taken to a local medical facility, and though he Tweeted out an encouraging prognosis later, his status for Game 4 and beyond remains uncertain (NBA concussion protocols might mandate a layoff).

With backup point Beno Udrih already out with a sprained ankle, it fell to Grizzlies deep reserve Nick Calathes to finish out Game 3 and keep Memphis in position to sweep. Mike Tokito of The Oregonian reported on Calathes’ stepping into the void:

All Calathes did was to contribute 13 points, six rebounds and four assists while committing no turnovers in 27 minutes of the Grizzlies 115-109 win that extended their series lead to 3-0.

“I thought Nick Calathes came off and gave us a big boost tonight,” Memphis coach Dave Joerger said.

It wasn’t just a one-time feel-good story in the manner of, say, Troy Daniels of Houston in last year’s Blazers playoffs. Calathes could become a key to Memphis wrapping up the series.

Conley left the game with 4:03 left in the third quarter, and Memphis leading 74-64. Calathes played the rest of the game and provided a much-needed steadying influence.
A big key was that he did not hesitate to shoot when Portland left him unguarded, and he made two key three-pointers.

“I’m a shooter, I’m very confident in my shot,” he said. “If they’re going to play off me, I’m going to shoot the ball. And tonight I made them, and Monday I’ll do the same. I’ve been working on my shot with the coaches, and I’m ready.”

The 6-foot-6 Calathes is in his second NBA season and playing in the playoffs for the first time, but he’s no stranger to big games. Calathes was a college standout in two seasons at Florida, then played overseas, in Greece (born in the U.S., he holds dual citizenships because both his parents are Greeks) and Russia. In 2011, he helped Panathinaikos win the EuroLeague championship, and has played in all kinds of high-level international tournaments.

“He’s played in a lot of big games, you can tell – international competitions that he’s played in,” Joerger said. “He’s a very, very solid NBA point guard.”

Calathes would have made his NBA playoff debut last season, except for a bizarre circumstance: He incurred a 20-game NBA suspension for testing positive for Tamoxifen, which is on the league’s banned substance list. The drug is not considered to be performance-enhancing, but rather, a masking agent. Calathes said he took it in an over-the-counter supplement, but whatever the case, he was not able to play in the playoffs, making Saturday’s performance even sweeter.

“It was real nice,” he said. “What happened last year will happen, but for me to be here with these guys, to be out there on the grind and go to battle with them, it’s a great feeling.”

***

No. 2: No nonsense as Warriors sweep — When a team wins 67 games, it doesn’t deal with much adversity over the course of the long NBA season. That means the opportunities to reach down in tough times are limited, leaving questions about what might happen if some team tightens the screw on them in the postseason. That’s why Golden State coach Steve Kerr seemed more satisfied by how the Warriors handled their two road games against New Orleans in sweeping through the first round, rather than the games in Oakland that so often wind up as feel-good affairs. Our own Fran Blinebury was at the Smoothie King Center Saturday to chronicle Golden State’s seriousness of purpose:

These were the Warriors at their hammer-on-the-anvil, bludgeoning best.

The threesome of Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson and [Draymond] Green combined for 86 points, 21 rebounds and 18 assists while shooting 30 of 53 (.567) from the field and 13 of 21 (.619) on 3-pointers.

The Warriors defense was back to being its smothering, stifling best. Consider this stat: the Pelicans had zero fast break points.

Green and Curry couldn’t have done much more damage setting the tone in the first quarter if they were swinging clubs, filling up the bucket and not letting the Pelicans fill their heads with any more cute notions of pulling off the upset.

And when New Orleans put together a couple of runs to get what was a 24-point lead down to seven on a couple occasions late, Green took a feed from Curry for a tourniquet of a layup and then Thompson buried one more three.

“I’d say we reacted pretty well at the end of Game 3 being down,” Kerr said. “But that was a little different because it was desperation and we just had to let it rip.

“Tonight was more indicative of the feeling of being the favorite. You play a great game. You’re in control and all of a sudden you’re not…Yeah, it was good composure.”

***

No. 3: Bucks graduate to winning — Everyone knew the Milwaukee Bucks, winners of just 15 games in 2013-14, had much to learn about playoff basketball. Everyone figured the Bucks’ young players, such as forward Giannis Antetokounmpo and guard Michael Carter-Williams, would take lumps from the Chicago Bulls in the teams’ first-round series and come back in October better for it. But a group of salty veterans, knocked around in their NBA travels, wanted more than moral victories and, as our Steve Aschburner noted, they got it in a buzzer-beating Game 4 victory over the rival Bulls:

[Bucks coach Jason] Kidd used a small lineup the entire fourth quarter, with forward Khris Middleton accompanied by four bench guys: Jared Dudley, Jerryd Bayless, O.J. Mayo and John Henson. Kidd liked their ball movement offensively, he liked their aggressiveness and mobility defensively. And frankly, he had to like the way they stiffened and executed and demonstrated for some of their fresher teammates who might have been halfway into their Hefty bags [to clean out their lockers at series end].

“This was a mental game,” Dudley said. “A lot of people, you start shipping your cars, planning your vacations. You’re down 3-0… But we’re still young. People don’t even know what to think. Today I think the veterans stepped up and said, ‘Hey, this is how you have to do it.’ “

Milwaukee’s bench — those four guys — scored 47 points of their team’s 90 points, had 13 of their 34 rebounds, passed for 16 of the Bucks’ 25 assists, accounted for seven of their nine 3-pointers, had five of six blocks and seven of the 20 steals.

The bench, for the second straight game, opened up a fat lead for Milwaukee, only to see it squandered by starters. Dudley was running hot at halftime but recalled thinking: “This is perfect to see where we’re at. If we can adjust and make changes [great] — if not, we’ll be home. It’s up to us.”

Dudley also was the Bucks inbound passer on the final buzzer-beating play. After Middleton dug the ball loose from Derrick Rose as the Bulls guard set up for what seemingly would be the last shot of regulation, Kidd called a timeout. That left 1.3 seconds, with the ball advanced, for Milwaukee to run what their coach drew up.

Dudley — whose mother never let him play tackle football, so forget the quarterback references — spotted Bayless behind Rose near the baseline. “I was kind of shocked that Bay’d be behind him,” said the 29-year-old, whose weekend-warrior look obviously is deceiving. “You know what, I made the good pass but Bayless made the play and he scored.”

Bayless’ reverse layup, with Rose going from startled to dejected in an instant, did the carpe diem thing for the Bucks while earning them a little more per-diem to spend in Chicago’s River North night spots.

“A lot of us have been in, I’m not going to say ‘unfavorable’ but we’ve been around,” Bayless said. “We’ve been around the league. O.J. has been on teams, I’ve been on teams, ‘Duds’ has been on teams and John … he’s had ups and downs. These guys and their will to keep fighting every night throughout the 82-game season and now in the playoffs — and try to win — it’s something I’m really happy to be a part of.”

***

No. 4: Sixers eyeing Russell in draft? — The Philadelphia Inquirer quoted an unnamed league executive in its report that the Sixers might be targeting Ohio State’s D’Angelo Russell with their lottery pick, a wing player to complement the premium big-man prospects they’ve taken in the past two talent roundups. The Sixers are guaranteed no worse than the No. 6 selection and are hoping to do better than that in the May 19 draft lottery to move into position to pick Russell. Here’s more from the Philly news outlet:

“He’s the guy they want,” the executive, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said Saturday. “That’s the word around the league. You know the Sixers. They won’t come out and say it, but he’s the guy they want.”

The executive called former Kentucky center/power forward Karl-Anthony Towns and Russell the top two draft prospects, ahead of point guard Emmanuel Mudiay and Duke center Jahlil Okafor. Mudiay played this season for the Guangdong Southern Tigers of the Chinese Basketball Association.

“Russell has star quality,” he said of the 6-foot-5, 180-pounder.

Russell averaged 19.3 points, 5.7 rebounds, and 5.0 assists while shooting 41.1 percent on three-pointers last season en route to being named a first-team all-American and Big Ten freshman of the year.

Five Sixers executives, including general manager Sam Hinkie, were on hand when the Louisville native collected 23 points, 11 assists, and 11 rebounds in a 79-60 victory at Rutgers in February.

He made 8 of 13 shots and had one steal and two turnovers in 35 minutes while handling the ball most of the game. A source said the Sixers were impressed by his performance.

It’s not surprising that they would want Russell.

A league scout and the executive say he is more NBA-ready than Mudiay, a 6-6, 205-pounder who struggles shooting from the outside. Mudiay would be a gamble, considering that he played only 12 games in China because of an ankle injury. He averaged 18.0 points, 6.3 rebounds, 5.0 assists, and 1.6 steals in what some have called a subpar league.

Unless the Sixers are secretly unhappy with Nerlens Noel or Joel Embiid, they don’t need to acquire a center for a third straight draft. In addition, they desperately need a lead guard who can shoot from outside, and Russell can definitely do that.

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: After his Blazers got pushed to the brink of elimination, Portland owner Paul Allen took a long, lonely walk Saturday night, as witnessed by The Oregonian‘s Jason Quick. … LaMarcus Aldridge didn’t feel like the next big thing in Portland during his first year there, no matter how Zach Randolph tells the story now. …Milwaukee and Brooklyn have avoided sweeps, now it’s Dallas’ turn. If it can do something to slow a Rockets attack that has put up 359 points in three games. … How ’bout some Kevin Love free-agent speculation from the city where the Cavaliers are playing? … First it was Roy Hibbert and the Pacers. Now the Toronto Raptors have a style question to answer, with big man Jonas Valanciunas‘ fit to be determined. …

 

LeBron, Cavaliers calm on eve of close-out opportunity against Celtics


VIDEO: Cavaliers playoff rookie Kevin Love is delivering the goods

BOSTON — For a team poised to close out its first round playoff series and move on to a conference semifinal matchup the basketball world has been buzzing about since the summer, the Cleveland Cavaliers don’t appear to be overwhelmed at all by the moment.

There is no added internal pressure on the eve of Sunday afternoon’s Game 4 win-and-move-on opportunity against the Boston Celtics at TD Garden.

In fact, the Cavaliers couldn’t be more calm or measured in their approach.

“It’s no sprint, it’s a marathon,” a totally relaxed LeBron James said Saturday afternoon. “That’s what this postseason is about. And all I’m concerned about is how well we play in this game [Sunday]. We want to play well, we have an opportunity to close out. But it’s not the end of the world and our team is not approaching it that way. We want to play well and we want to play just as hard as we did in the last game and hopefully that results in a win.”

The Chicago Bulls hold a 3-1 lead over the Milwaukee Bucks on the other side of the bracket. But the Cavaliers are not looking beyond Game 4 and what the Celtics are sure to bring to a pressure-packed environment.

“This is a very important game,” LeBron said. “You know the type of pressure the opposing team is under. It’s win or go-home for them. And they’re going to bring everything they have in the tool box to get this victory. For us, we have to stay calm and play our game, do what we’ve been doing over the course of this series, and treat a Game 4 like a Game 1. We want to play well, we want to defend well, we want to get the ball up the floor more and move the ball and share the ball and things will take care of itself.”

The Celtics have tried their best to turn each of these games into grind-it-out slugfests. They’ve played physically and tried their best to rattle the Cavaliers in any way they can.

However, this notion that the Celtics are playing their guts out while the Cavaliers, the more talented and season bunch, are just getting by on talent does not sit well with Cleveland coach David Blatt.

“That’s not fair,” Blatt said. “We’re playing hard. I don’t like that. I do agree that they are playing hard. But we are playing no less hard. And we’re just as committed to the task as they are. It’s not a matter of us just being more talented. That’s just grossly unfair. Our team is making every effort. Our team is engaged. Our team is playing aggressively and maturely. Anyone saying anything other than that is being unfair to our players, and I don’t like it.”

Lebron’s not worried about the narrative playing out elsewhere. Not with the chance to finish the first round business in four games on the line.

“Perception doesn’t matter,” he said. “Doesn’t matter. We go out and work hard and take care of our business just like any other team. Talent doesn’t win basketball games. You have to play hard, you have to execute. We’re in the NBA. Everybody has talent. Everyone’s here for a reason.

“We’re in a position to win our first ever series as a group. For a young team that’s a pretty big deal. We have an opportunity to do that and we just want to take care of business.”

Morning shootaround — April 24


VIDEO: Highlights from games played April 23

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Curry sparks Warriors’ wild comeback win | Parker questionable for Game 3 | Carlisle stands by Rondo trade | James give Love another vote of confidence

No. 1: ‘Fearless’ Curry fuels epic Warriors comeback — Years and years from now, perhaps we will all look back on Game 3 of the Golden State Warriors-New Orleans Pelicans series as the one that sparked Golden State’s title run. Or, if nothing else, the game has already secured a spot as one of the all-time great NBA playoff comebacks. The Warriors climbed from a 20-point hole in to tie (and, eventually, win) Game 3 thanks to the heroics of Stephen Curry and his never-say-die style of play. Diamond Leung of the Bay Area News Group expertly details an amazing game by the Warriors and Curry:

The Warriors won a franchise-record 67 games in the regular season, including a league-leading 28 on the road. But none compares to the one they notched against the Pelicans in Game 3 of their first-round series that the Warriors now lead 3-0.

After dominating for most of the game, the Pelicans left a crack open when Anthony Davis missed a free throw with 9.6 seconds left, giving the Warriors a chance to tie it with a 3-pointer.

Of course the ball went to Curry, and the NBA’s all-time single-season record-holder in such shots missed his first try. Given a second attempt off a Marreese Speights offensive rebound, Curry threw up some magic from the corner as Davis collided into him. Curry pumped his fists after Tyreke Evans‘ 3-point attempt at the buzzer missed.

“You give him two looks at that basket? In the corner?” Warriors forward Draymond Green said incredulously. “Oh man, I knew that was money when it left his hand.”

“To make that shot shows everything that Steph is about,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said. “On a night when he’s not even having a great shooting performance, his confidence level is just off the charts. He’s fearless.”

“It’s a long game,” Curry said of the comeback. “We just stick with it, and it’s a sweet feeling to get this win after how the whole game went.”

Davis poured in 29 points, and Ryan Anderson added 26 off the bench, but it wasn’t enough. The Warriors can sweep the series with another win in New Orleans on Saturday.

“You can’t sugarcoat it,” Pelicans coach Monty Williams said. “We’re all feeling like dirt right now, so obviously you want to build them up, but there is nothing that can build you up in a situation like that.”


VIDEO: Warriors.com recaps a thrilling Game 3 of the Golden State-New Orleans series

*** (more…)

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 198) Featuring Sam Perkins

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Sam Perkins is a pioneer.

He helped start a movement during his stellar 18-year professional career, expanding his game and his range during his NBA playing days and helping redefine the power forward position. From the low-post grunt work as the man who watches the big(ger) man’s back around the rim to 3-point shooting, floor spacing giant capable of creating space all over the floor is what Perkins took part in during his days with the Los Angeles Lakers.

He said it was a challenge from Byron Scott and Mike Dunleavy (the father, of course, not the son), then the veteran shooting guard and coach, respectively, for the Lakers. They dared him to get in on a shooting contest at practice and the result was Perkins vowing to work his tail off to become a proficient shooter from distance. The unintended consequence was Perkins the Stretch-4.

Big Smooth’s work goes beyond basketball these days. As an ambassador on behalf of the Special Olympic, Perkins is in the midst of preparations for the Special Olympic World Games, which will be hosted by the city of Los Angeles July 25 through August 2. Billed as the largest sports-and-humanitarian event in the world in 2015, and the single biggest event in Los Angeles since the 1984 Olympic Games. Some 7,000 athletes and 3,000 coaches representing 177 countries will be participating, along with 30,000 volunteers and an anticipated 500,000 spectators.

For Perkins, the connection to and participation with the Special Olympics was inspired by the late, great Dean Smith, the coaching icon, humanitarian and activist who schooled Perkins, Michael Jordan, James Worthy, our very own Rick Fox and countless others during their college days at North Carolina and beyond.

In the days, weeks and months leading up to the Special Olympics World Games Perkins will participate in the first-ever Unified Relay Across America, joining others in carrying The Flame of Hope across the country to Los Angeles beginning May 26. Perkins will be running the Dallas leg of the relay June 25. You can go to UnifiedRelay.Org to sign-up.

We talk about life after basketball and the tremendous work still to be done, the playoffs (how the Cleveland crew of LeBron James, Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love are doing in their first blush as a group), what Perkins appreciates about his time in the postseason cauldron from his own playing days and so much more on Episode 198 of the Hang Time Podcast Featuring Sam Perkins 

LISTEN HERE:

As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of NBA.com,  Lang Whitaker of NBA.com’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand and the best sound designer/engineer in the business, Andrew Merriman.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.


VIDEO: All-Star swingman Jimmy Bulter is answering any and all questions about how he and the Chicago Bulls will respond in the playoff cauldron