Posts Tagged ‘Josh Harris’

Silver clarifies his role in Colangelo hire in Philadelphia


VIDEO: The Starters discuss Jerry Colangelo joining the Philadelphia 76ers as chairman of basketball operations

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — NBA Commissioner Adam Silver made the introduction, but contrary to rumblings making the rounds, did not influence the Philadelphia 76ers’ hiring of Jerry Colangelo this week as their chairman of basketball operations. 

Silver clarified his role in the situation today with Justin Termine and Eddie Johnson on Sirius/XM NBA Radio.

“The only role I played was making an introduction to Jerry for Josh Harris,” Silver said. “But I would say that this was something that was initiated entirely by Josh Harris and he’s the principal owner and governor of the Philadelphia 76ers. Contrary to what I’ve read in some of the reports, this was not arm-twisting from the league office telling the 76ers they had to change course or other owners calling me and saying you have to force the 76ers to do something.”

You can listen to the full interview here:

 

Sixers name Colangelo chairman



VIDEO: Colangelo joins the Sixers

For all the well-deserved accolades that have gone to Kobe Bryant, LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, Kevin Durant and the rest of the stars on the court, it was Jerry Colangelo who put the shine and sparkle back on USA Basketball.

As chairman of the board, Colangelo is the one who convinced Duke’s Mike Krzyzewski to take over the role as head coach. Colangelo revamped the team selection process, getting the top names to make multiyear commitments. Colangelo’s thumbprints were all over the gold medal Olympic runs in 2008 and 2012 and the World Cup golds in 2010 and 2014.

Now Colangelo is going to tackle some real heavy lifting — the Sixers.

Team owner Josh Harris announced Monday the naming of Colangelo as chairman of basketball operations and special advisor to the managing general partner.

Jeff Zilgitt of USA Today has the details:

The 76-year-old Colangelo, who is also the chairman of USA Basketball and longtime NBA executive, said this opportunity came together in the past week and half.

“When Josh and I started having conversations, it became evident and obvious to me that he wanted something that I might be able to offer this franchise,” Colangelo said. “Quite honestly, what that really means in my mind is, through the experiences I’ve had with franchises in basketball and baseball and USA Basketball, there’s something I can offer, which will be very helpful to the franchise.

Colangelo said he will provide mentoring for GM Sam Hinkie and will make himself available to Harris and ownership group.

“I’m excited about this. It’s nice to feel that there’s someone there who feels you have something to offer at this stage of my life,” Colangelo said.

Harris said Colangelo’s presence does not alter the Sixers’ rebuilding plan, which is centered around capitalizing on high draft picks.

“It positions our organization both short and long term to take advantage of opportunities to improve,” Harris said. “This is not a deviation from our plan, rather it is an opportunity to drive our organization forward.”

The big question is how much power Colangelo will syphon from Hinkie and how it affects “the process” of the Sixers, which has produced nothing but the bottom of the barrel in the standings for a third straight season.

Sixers’ Harris: Lottery reform could benefit us long term


VIDEO: Michael Carter-Williams is a big piece in the Sixers’ long-term plans

GALLOWAY, N.J. — The NBA Lottery may under go reform this season, a change that would be made with one specific team in mind.

Under general manager Sam Hinkie, the Philadelphia 76ers have purposely bottomed out over the last two years, trading all the veterans who pushed them to the brink of the conference finals in 2012 and compiling young players, draft picks and cap space.

Having drafted two players who won’t see the floor this season and traded Thaddeus Young, the Sixers are set to lose at least 60 games for the second straight season. But an awful record might not have the same draft-related silver lining as it has had in the past.

As outlined by Grantland’s Zach Lowe, there’s a proposal to flatten the Lottery odds and, more importantly, draw the top six picks (instead of the top three) from the Lottery machine. The first part would hurt the odds of the league’s three worst teams getting the No. 1 pick, and the second part would worsen their worst-case scenario. The worst team could fall to the seventh pick, the second worst team could fall to eighth, and the third worst team could fall to ninth.

Speaking to the media at his team’s training camp on the campus of Stockton College on Friday, Sixers managing owner Josh Harris acknowledged that the proposal, which could be voted on later this month and go into effect immediately, would be bad for his team in regard to the 2015 Draft.

But he believes it could benefit them down the line.

“A change that flattens the Lottery system would be a little bit worse for Philadelphia in the short run,” Harris said. “But long run, since we expect to be a consistent playoff or deep playoff-caliber team, it’s actually better for us.”

The thought is that the Sixers are in a large market. And most years, they have a better chance to improve their team via trades and free agency than small market teams do. Long term, teams like Milwaukee and Sacramento are more dependent on the Draft to acquire impact players. Philly is obviously very invested in the Draft at this point in time, but the Sixers believe they have the pieces – Michael Carter-Williams, Joel Embiid, Nerlens Noel and Dario Saric – that will put them in a much different position three or four years from now.

“Certainly we’re advocating for positions that benefit the Philadelphia market and the Philadelphia 76ers,” Harris said. “That’s what we should be doing. And there’s certainly other people that are advocating for their market. It’s the league’s job to sort through how to best build consensus around all those different positions.”

So the Sixers’ position on Lottery reform is probably “Great idea … for 2017.”

Harris also addressed the idea that his team’s strategy to tank (at least) two seasons away is bad for the league.

“Being a good citizen in the NBA is an important thing for us,” Harris said. “We are cognizant of being a good member of the league, but at the same time, balancing that against what’s the right thing for Philly and the Philadelphia 76ers. And we’re trying to draw that line as best we can. I feel like we’re in a good place. You’re competing, so there’s always going to be different views on different strategies that teams are taking. We certainly factor that into our thinking, but at the end the day, we try to take the whole picture to do what’s right for Philly.”

Sixers’ streak goes on and so does plan

By Fran Blinebury, NBA.com


VIDEO: Sixers suffer record-tying 26th straight loss

HOUSTON — Sam Hinkie ducked into the media dining room to grab a small plate of fajitas and headed quickly toward the door.

A friend asked him if he was hiding out.

“People want to see me either gnashing my teeth or beating my chest,” he said. “I’m not gnashing my teeth.”

Not even after 26 losses in a row.

The Sixers’ march toward both ignominious history and hopeful resurrection continued as the Rockets punched their ticket 120-98 on Thursday night.

As general manager, president of basketball operations, Hinkie is the Dr. Frankenstein who reverse-engineered this monster that is now tied with the 2010-11 Cavaliers for the longest single season losing streak in NBA history. For that, some of the town folk would like to storm his door with torches and pitchforks, because, well, they weren’t paying attention. Not to Hinkie’s clearly-drawn blueprint from the moment he was hired last May and not to the long history of the league.

It was fitting that the debate about the NBA Draft lottery should land in Houston for record-tying loss No. 26. For it was here in the land of high humidity and semi-low skullduggery that the lottery was mid-wifed after the Rockets — by virtue of the worst record in the Western Conference — won back-to-back coin flips in 1983 and ’84 to secure the rights to Ralph Sampson and Hakeem Olajuwon.

In 1986, the Rockets were playing the Celtics in the NBA Finals.

So there is really no reason for the overreactive 21st century social media world or the taking-us-all-to-the-bottom talking heads of TV to lose their already loose grip on reality. And there is no need for commissioner Adam Silver to convene a blue ribbon committee to find a new way to slice bread or disperse incoming talent.

Hinkie and the Sixers are only working within a system that has been in place for decades and, as far as anyone can tell, hasn’t jeopardized civilization or caused the ruination of the league.

The Heat have been to three straight Finals and won back-to-back championships because team president Pat Riley chose in the 2009-10 season to put a roster of expiring contracts onto the court that could finish no better than third in its division and was promptly and expectedly wiped out of the playoffs in the first round.

And by the way, as bad as the Sixers have been, streak and all, they’re still a game up on Milwaukee in the standings.

It just makes no sense to be hopelessly stuck in the middle of the pack, maybe nibbling at the No. 7 or 8 playoff spots with no real hope of ever planning a championship parade down Main St.

Which is why first-year head coach Brett Brown said he doesn’t have the inclination to feel bad for his players who haven’t won a game since Jan. 29 at Boston and could be all alone in the history books if the streak hits 27 at home on Saturday against the Pistons.

“I won’t,” Brown said. “It’s part of everybody trying to execute a way where we can rebuild our program and this is one of the unfortunate byproducts that has come our way. I think that if we had sprinkled our 15 wins in perhaps a little bit differently, where it wouldn’t have received as much attention as it seems to being receiving, well, fair enough. Everybody’s doing their job. We haven’t changed our tune or changed our message because of that.

“It goes back to what we said from Day One. We’re trying to find keepers that can move the program forward and I think we’re doing that.

“I knew what I signed up for. This is no shock. I had the opportunity to research this position for several months and I like the risk-reward. I think that if we can ever get it right in such a fantastic city, the city will come out and support us.

“I respect that the people, the fans, follow us and we want to do the right thing by our city. We want to come out and play hard and have people be proud of our efforts. This year is not about that side of the judgment. We’re judged by different measurements this year. It isn’t winning or losing. I feel like my guys come in and they bring their ‘A’ efforts.”

The trouble is those efforts are simply not good enough for the youngest team in the history of the league. The Sixers can play fast and play hard to a point. They trailed the Rockets by just four in the second quarter. But a few minutes later, Dwight Howard slipped behind the unheeding Philly defense to catch an inbound pass thrown from the opposite free-throw line by Chandler Parsons for a dunk. A few minutes later, Terrence Jones also went deep and would have had another cheap dunk, but the pass from James Harden was too long and went out of bounds.

Those are the kind of plays, the kind of lapses that build a 26-game losing streak.

“It’s pretty self-explanatory,” said rookie point guard Michael Carter-Williams. “It is what it is. I don’t really have too many thoughts about it. I’m not thinking about it. I’m just going out there and I’m trying to win a ball game. Of course, I want to win every time I step on the floor. But right now it’s about us developing and getting better each and every day.”

It was Carter-Williams not wanting this bunch falling into a pit of self-pity and despair that prompted him to address the team after the game.

“I just think during the game a couple of guys had long faces, including myself,” he said. “I found myself a little bit down. I just don’t want anyone in this locker room feeling bad for themselves.

“We’re out on the court and we’re playing. I just told them that each and every game from here on out, we’ve got to go out swinging. We can’t give up and-1s. We’ve got to put people on the floor a little bit. We’ve gotta just fight every single day, whether we’re in practice or one of the games. I think that it’s really important we don’t get down on ourselves and give up just because we have a certain amount of losses. I just felt like I needed to speak my piece and make sure our guys are upbeat at the end of the day.

“I think it was received great. I think the guys responded well. We don’t have too many long faces in this locker room right now. We all want to win a ball game. We’re itching to have that feeling of being a winner. I think the coaches appreciated it and I think it needed to be said.”

What needs to be said is that there is absolutely nothing wrong with Hinkie’s plan that has been fully endorsed by team owner Josh Harris. The challenge will be to use their draft picks wisely, sign the right free agents and make the whole experience more than just a painful limbo dance.

A short time before tip-off, Rockets coach Kevin McHale was asked if he’d ever lost so many times at anything.

“I don’t know if the sun comes up when you lose 25 in a row,” he said.

It can eventually, if you look beyond today’s bruises to the plan for tomorrow and, like Hinkie, don’t waste time gnashing your teeth.

Sixers’ Collins Out As Coach, In As Adviser



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HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — For any father or son, the reasons Doug Collins gave for leaving his coaching job with the Philadelphia 76ers for a less taxing consultant’s role make perfect sense.

Collins has grandchildren he wants to spend more time with in his golden years, he wants to watch his son, Chris Collins, now the coach at Northwestern, thrive in the family business.

After giving the last 40 years of his life to the game he loves and the merciless grind that is the pursuit of a championship ring, Collins wants his next four or five years to be on his terms.

“There’s a lot of things I want to enjoy,” Collins said. “I think it’s every man’s dream to be able to live that life that you work so hard to try to live. And that’s what I want to do.”

He knew it at Christmas, when he had to be away while “the grandkids were opening their presents,” that he was done coaching, that he didn’t have the energy to give to the profession the way he knows great coaches have to if they’re going to do the job the justice it deserves.

It wasn’t about wins and losses, Collins said this morning as he addressed the media in Philadelphia. No amount of either would have changed his mind. The sacrifices had become too great, the benefits, financial and otherwise, that come with a NBA coaching job were outweighed by the important moments a proud father and grandfather had to miss.

“I didn’t get down to a Duke game last year,” Collins said. “My son … I want to see him grow, want to see him coach. That’s important to me.”

If only Jrue Holiday, Even Turner, Thaddeus Young, Spencer Hawes and the rest of the players he coached through a tumultuous season this year in Philadelphia had been just as important. Collins never told them of the exit strategy that had been brewing for months. They were left to the rumblings that grew into rumors the past couple weeks and into full blown hysterics last week.

Collins is a brilliant basketball mind. No one disputes that. And he’s a fine coach, as passionate as he is relentless about teaching the game and as focused and fanatical as they come in his profession. Widely regarded as one of the best analysts around, Collins chose to dive back into coaching three years ago with the franchise he’s always considered home.

He was not pushed out the door. Sixers owner Josh Harris made that clear before Collins said a word this morning.

“Doug is not being pushed out,” Harris said. “I would love to have him back as my coach. This is his decision … I want to make that unequivocally clear.”

A decision that no doubt became clear to us all during that infamous February postgame rant when Collins seemed to crack under the pressure of a season gone awry. “Go back and listen to the transcript,” Collins said. “I didn’t throw anybody under the bus. I spoke the truth. We played our best basketball after that.”

Andrew Bynum, the Sixers’ prized summer acquisition from a blockbuster trade that saw Andre Iguodala, Nikola Vucevic and Moe Harkless traded away for the All-Star center, didn’t play a single second this season.

Instead of contending in the Eastern Conference a season after a surprise run to the conference semifinals, the Sixers finished ninth in the East and four games out of the eighth and final playoff spot, despite playing their “best basketball” in the six weeks after his frustrations boiled over.

I don’t care how diplomatic they try to be, the Bynum debacle stained this season for Collins, Harris and the entire organization.

“We spent $84 million and don’t have much to show for it,” said Harris, who was extremely careful when talking about Bynum and what the Sixers’ plans are regarding the soon-to-be unrestricted free-agent big man. “You look at our cost per win, and its pretty low.”

Collins plans to serve as an adviser to Harris the next five years, a time-frame both men referenced, as they work to increase that cost per win number.

His days of, as he put it, “trying to be Frederick Douglas, Dale Carnegie, Dr. Phil and then trying to draw up a play to win the game,” are over. He said he won’t get the coaching itch again.

He’ll leave that to guys like Michael Curry, the only one of his assistants to get a public endorsement for the coaching vacancy in Philadelphia during Monday’s festivities.

“Michael Curry has been a head coach before,” Collins said. “What he’s done here defensively has been remarkable. I think Michael’s ready. The thing about it is, they are going to get a great coach. This is a great city …  to me, this is a win-win. They get a great a coach and it gives me a chance to do some of the things I want to do.”

http://www.nba.com/2013/news/04/18/sixers-collins-resigns.ap/index.html