Posts Tagged ‘John Schuhmann’

Hornets looking to match Heat’s “purpose of play” in Game 2


VIDEO: Hornets-Heat Game 2 Preview

MIAMI — The Charlotte Hornets had a lot to think about after getting thumped, 123-91, in Game 1 of their first round series with the Miami Heat on Sunday. And, with Game 2 on Wednesday night (7 p.m. ET, NBA TV), they’ve had two full days off to think about it.

Most of the thinking and adjusting has been about the defensive end of the floor.

“Our offense isn’t the problem at all,” Hornets coach Steve Clifford said at shootaround Wednesday morning. “We’re a top-10 defensive team and we got rocked. We weren’t just bad … rocked. They were great and we were terrible. They’re very tough to guard, but from a coverage standpoint, that was as bad as we were all year, and they took full advantage of everything. They’re going to get that ball in the paint, and if you can’t stop them, you’re not going to beat them.”

The Hornets’ pick-and-roll coverage has to be better. And they have to figure out how to handle it when the Heat send a guard to the baseline to throw their normal weak-side rotations out of whack.

“They play guys down along the baseline,” Clifford said Tuesday, “which is pretty conventional in our league. But they do it with perimeter guys, post guys, which is not done a lot. They do it randomly. So it’s not always at the start of a possession where you can be organized whereas it becomes a read. It totally changes your pick and roll coverages.”

(more…)

Blogtable: Your All-Defensive team picks?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: How long to rest Steph? | Your All-Defensive team picks? |
Most attractive coaching vacancy?



VIDEOKawhi Leonard receives his Kia NBA Defensive Player of the Year award

> Kawhi Leonard is the Kia NBA Defensive Player of the Year for the second year in a row. Who should join him on the NBA’s All-Defensive first team?

David Aldridge, TNT analyst:

Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs
Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors
DeAndre Jordan, Los Angeles Clippers
Avery Bradley, Boston Celtics
Danny Green, San Antonio Spurs

Pretty sure that’s who I voted for.

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com

Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs
Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors
DeAndre Jordan, Los Angeles Clippers
Chris Paul, Los Angeles Clippers
Tony Allen, Memphis Grizzlies

Since I voted for this honor among the NBA’s slate of annual awards, I’m just retyping my ballot here. Leonard, Green and Jordan, in order, were my first, second and third selections for Kia Defensive Player of the Year, too. Leonard is the best on-ball defender in the NBA, Green’s versatility and want-to is unsurpassed and Jordan alters whole game plans. (Just for the record, here’s my second team: Jae Crowder, Paul Millsap, Hassan Whiteside, Jimmy Butler and Klay Thompson.)

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com

Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs
Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors
Tim Duncan, San Antonio Spurs
Chris Paul, Los Angeles Clippers
Tony Allen, Memphis Grizzlies

 

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com

Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs
Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors
Hassan Whiteside, Miami Heat
Avery Bradley, Boston Celtics
Tony Allen, Memphis Grizzlies

There are several deserving candidates at center, among Whiteside, DeAndre Jordan, Rudy Gobert, Andre Drummond, Tim Duncan and others. It’s easy to imagine votes firing out on every direction for center when the actual balloting is released. Bradley may have been the third-best defender this season regardless of position.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com

Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs
Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors
Hassan Whiteside, Miami Heat
DeAndre Jordan, Los Angeles Clippers
Tony Allen, Memphis Grizzlies

They’re easily the gold standard right now. Leonard is young enough to pull a Jamal Crawford and be a multiple winner of a performance award.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com

Chris Paul, Los Angeles Clippers
Ricky Rubio, Minnesota Timberwolves
Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs
Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors
Rudy Gobert, Utah Jazz

The forward spots are easy. It’s tempting to put Green at center and replace Gobert with Paul George (watch this guy fight through screens in the Toronto series), Paul Millsap or Andre Iguodala, but Green played about 2/3 of his minutes at the four. Gobert missed 21 games, but was the league’s best rim protector. It’s hard to keep Avery Bradley off the list, but Paul and Rubio are two point guards that make a big impact with their ball pressure and ability to stay in front of their man.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com:

Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs
Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors
DeAndre Jordan, Los Angeles Clippers
Chris Paul, Los Angeles Clippers
Tony Allen, Memphis Grizzlies

And Hassan Whiteside would be the sixth man on this team.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com

Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs
Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors
Hassan Whiteside, Miami Heat

Tony Allen, Memphis Grizzlies
Avery Bradley, Boston Celtics

The theme of this all-defensive team is its phenomenal versatility. All of these players can guard multiple situations. Bradley has taken over for Allen as the NBA’s top backcourt defender.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog

Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs
Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors
DeAndre Jordan, Los Angeles Clippers
Chris Paul, Los Angeles Clippers
Tony Allen, Memphis Grizzlies

Well, first of all, my Defensive Player of the Year ballot had Kawhi, Green and Jordan in that order. Because while I appreciate Draymond’s versatility, I don’t know that I’ve ever seen a player as aggressive and ravenous as Leonard is when playing on-ball defense. That was my front line. In the back court, I went with Paul, who plays at such a consistently high level play after play, game after game, and I went with Allen, because I didn’t want him getting mad at me on Twitter like last year.

Blogtable: How long should the Warriors rest Stephen Curry?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: How long to rest Steph? | Your All-Defensive team picks? |
Most attractive coaching vacancy?



VIDEOShould the Warriors rest Curry the rest of the series?

> With a 2-0 series lead over the Rockets, should the Warriors continue to rest a hobbled Stephen Curry? And if so, for how long?

David Aldridge, TNT analyst: Yes. Until they lose a game. Simple. No reason to chance Curry figuratively stepping on a banana peel with a sprained ankle/foot/whatever it is and turning an aggravating injury into something chronic or worse. (By the way, Inside the NBA was cold. And, funny. Better hope the Dubs finish up their business, though.)

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com The Warriors should rest Curry until they lose a game or until the Western Conference semifinals begin, whichever comes first. Both of these options assume that he actually will be capable of playing before one or the other kicks in. A little extra rest for the reigning-slash-presumptive MVP that doesn’t jeopardize Golden State’s quest to repeat as champs can’t possibly be a bad thing. Of course, if Curry remains hobbled, the Warriors should rest him until he’s not. We saw what happened last spring when Kyrie Irving kept trying to play through mid-level injury that became playoff-ending.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Yes. With an eye on the long run to the NBA Finals, I’d sit him out of Game 3, giving Curry at least a full week of rest and rehab. Then only bring him back for Game 4 if he’s 100 percent. It’s about the big picture.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Rest him. Sit him in Game 3 even if the medical staff and Curry all say he is good to go. The closer he gets to 100 percent, the better the Warriors’ chances of a repeat. As strange as it is to say it in the playoffs, get Curry the R&R he, and others on the team, missed late in the regular season as the chase for 73 wins remained a goal. But rest him only Game 3. If Golden State wins Thursday — and, again, if the ankle is doing well — play the MVP as the Warriors go for the sweep. The idea is to get him healthy, not get him out of rhythm. If Curry does not play in 2, 3 or 4 and the series ends then, that could be a very long layoff between getting on the court, depending when the second round would begin.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: Rest, for as long as necessary. It really isn’t a debate, in my mind, and hopefully not in Steve Kerr‘s mind, either. The dysfunctional Rockets are giving Kerr the luxury of being as careful with Curry as possible. And even if the Warriors were playing the Spurs or Thunder, I’d still be cautious with Curry, given his history, given what he means to the franchise, now and for years to come.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: None of us can know just how Curry feels, but we do know that ankle injuries aren’t always 100 percent healed when you start feeling better. And until they are 100 percent healed, it takes just the slightest tweak (which can happen with a simple change of direction) for there to be a re-sprain. This was Curry’s issue earlier in his career and the issue with Deron Williams for a couple of years in Brooklyn. So I would keep him out for this entire series, unless the Rockets somehow win a game.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Steph should sit for as long as needed, into the next round if need be. The Rockets are no threat, not even with the series shifting to Houston for Games 3 and 4. Steph’s importance to the Warriors now and for the foreseeable future is galactic. There is no reason, none at all, to put him in any sort of danger for the sake of beating up on the Rockets. Steve Kerr knows this and that’s why I’m sure he’ll be as cautious as necessary in his handling of this situation.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: Keep it simple. When Curry can play, play him. If there are any doubts, then rest him. A reasonable ambition is to protect Curry’s health for the next three rounds while finishing off the Rockets within five games. Right now there appears to be little cause for anxiety.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: What’s the rush? I’d sit Curry either until I lost a game or he was 100 percent healthy, whichever happens first. And considering that the Warriors are playing the Rockets, Curry might get to be 100 percent before they lose a game. Still, with Curry you want to play the long game here, especially with his history of ankle injuries. Of course, knock on wood, he’s been pretty healthy for a while, and there’s no need to rush him back and get him on the floor and risk any longer-term injuries. The Warriors are playing for June, not today. Or at least they should be.

Blogtable: Most attractive coaching vacancy in NBA is …?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: How long to rest Steph? | Your All-Defensive team picks? |
Most attractive coaching vacancy?



VIDEOThe Washington Wizards fired Randy Wittman on April 14

> You’re a head coach looking for a job in the NBA. Which vacancy is more attractive: Minnesota, Sacramento or Washington?

David Aldridge, TNT analyst: This is a serious question? Only one of those teams has the combo platter of Karl-Anthony Towns, aged 20, and Andrew Wiggins, aged 21, along with side dishes Ricky Rubio, Zach LaVine, Gorgui Dieng, Shabazz Muhammad and Nemanja Bjelica. That’s in Mary Richards’s town, Minneapolis. You do notice that just about everyone who’s ever picked up a clipboard is angling for the Wolves’ gig, don’t you?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: Minnesota is the winner here by a considerable margin, on par with how easily Andrew Wiggins and Karl-Anthony Towns won (or will win) their Kia Rookie of the Year awards last season and this. Those two, along with Zach LaVine, Gorgui Dieng, Ricky Rubio, Shabazz Muhammad and the lottery pick they add this June are gems in various stages of being cut. Flip Saunders in 2014-15 and Sam Mitchell this season handled some of the dirty work, while the next head coach will end the Timberwolves’ playoff drought at 12 or 13 seasons (they last qualified in 2004). That will end my claim as the only Minneapolis beat writer to cover that franchise in the postseason, but it’s a streak I’ll be happy to see end.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comDo well really have to ask this question? It’s Minnesota by a mile. Karl-Anthony Towns, Andrew Wiggins, Zach LaVine to start. There’s a reason why the Timberwolves got the choosy veterans Tom Thibodeau and Jeff Van Gundy to sit down with them first. It’s a solid foundation that could become a contender for a decade.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.comI know which is the least attractive: Sacramento. That leaves us with Minnesota and Washington. Tough call. Based on current rosters, the Wizards have a better chance to win now, led by John Wall and Bradley Beal. But the young Timberwolves have a higher ceiling projecting to the future, and probably much higher. The Wolves also have a big chip the Wiz will not be offering for a top candidate: the chance to also run basketball operations. That won’t be offered to everyone, but for someone like Tom Thibodeau it could be the ultimate selling point between Minnesota and somewhere else.

Shaun Powell, NBA.comThis is like saying who should be MVP, Steph Curry or the field? Minnesota by far is the more attractive opening because of a combination of young talent, a lottery pick on the way and lots of salary cap space. The only hazard is Minneapolis’ winter. The Wizards are next because if nothing else, they have John Wall. Then there’s Sacramento, and the best you can say about the Kings’ job is that it’s one of 30, at least you’re in the NBA.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Minnesota, for sure. Karl-Anthony Towns, a perennial MVP candidate in time if he has the right supporting cast, is reasons Nos. 1, 2 and 3 for his ability to make an impact on offense, defense and in the locker room. Andrew Wiggins has a world of talent, Zach LaVine was much improved after moving to shooting guard in the second half of the season, and Ricky Rubio is a point guard you can trust to run your offense and stay in front of his man on defense. Sacramento is obviously last on the list. Your reputation might take a hit for just accepting that job.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Minnesota has the highest ceiling, when you factor in the quality of the young talent already in place, the assets (Draft and otherwise) available and the non-existent expectations that are in place right now. A program-builder could come in there and mold talents like Karl-Anthony Towns, Andrew Wiggins and Zach LaVine into the pillars of a playoff team for years to come. Sacramento and Washington have All-Stars in place, but the outlook for the immediate future isn’t nearly as promising.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog

Numbers preview: Clippers-Trail Blazers


VIDEO: Clippers vs. Trail Blazers: By the Numbers

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — If you like great playmaking from points and great shooting on the wing, Clippers-Blazers is the series for you.

Chris Paul vs. Damian Lillard is the best individual matchup in the first round. And J.J. Redick vs. C.J. McCollum is a pretty good sideshow. It will take a five-man defense to slow down these two top-10 offenses and L.A. has playmaking on its frontline, but the focus will be on the guards and any one of the four can catch fire at any time.

These two teams had polar opposite expectations before the season started. Some believed that the addition of some veteran role players would make the Clippers stronger title contenders, while nobody outside Portland thought the Blazers would even make the playoffs after saying goodbye to four starters. But they’ve met in the middle, in what should be one of the more entertaining series in the entire postseason.

Here are some statistical notes to get you ready for the 4-5 series in the West, with links to let you dive in and explore more.

Pace = Possessions per 48 minutes
OffRtg = Points scored per 100 possessions
DefRtg = Points allowed per 100 possessions
NetRtg = Point differential per 100 possessions

Los Angeles Clippers (53-29)

Pace: 98.0 (17)
OffRtg: 106.5 (6)
DefRtg: 100.9 (6)
NetRtg: +5.5 (5)

Regular season: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups
vs. Portland: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups

20160414_lac_shooting

Clippers notes:

  • Only team other than Golden State and San Antonio to rank in the top six in both offensive and defensive efficiency. Also, one of two teams (the Spurs are the other) to rank in the top 10 in offensive efficiency each of the last five seasons.
  • Shot 58.2 percent in the paint, the highest mark in the league. But they took only 39.3 percent of their total shots from the paint, the lowest rate in the league.
  • Were the best team in the first six minutes of the first quarter, outscoring their opponents by 14.4 points per 100 possessions.
  • Starting lineup – Chris Paul, J.J. Redick, Luc Mbah a Moute, Blake Griffin and DeAndre Jordan – outscored opponents by 19.4 points per 100 possessions, the best mark among lineups that played at least 200 minutes together.
  • Scored 111.7 points per 100 possessions (a number which would rank second in the league) with Paul on the floor and just 98.1 (a number which would rank 29th) with him on the bench.
  • Scored 104.4 points per 100 possessions in 35 games with Griffin and 108.0 in 47 games without him.
  • Redick shot 48 percent on catch-and-shoot 3-pointers, the best mark among 118 players who attempted at least 150.
  • Both Paul and Griffin had a higher effective field goal percentage in losses than they did in wins.

Portland Trail Blazers (44-38)

Pace: 98.3 (12)
OffRtg: 106.1 (7)
DefRtg: 105.6 (20)
NetRtg: +0.6 (13)

Regular season: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups
vs. Clippers: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups

20160414_por_shooting

Blazers notes:

The matchup

Season series: Clippers won, 3-1 (2-0 in L.A.).
Nov. 20 – Blazers 102, Clippers 91
Nov. 30 – Clippers 102, Blazers 87
Jan. 6 – Clippers 109, Blazers 98
Mar. 24 – Clippers 96, Blazers 94

Pace: 98.5
LAC OffRtg: 102.2 (20th vs. POR)
POR OffRtg: 95.6 (22nd vs. LAC)

Matchup notes:

Numbers preview: Spurs-Grizzlies


VIDEO: Spurs vs. Grizzlies: By The Numbers

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — The San Antonio Spurs had the best season in franchise history. They’ve made 39 trips to the playoffs in their 43 seasons in the NBA and they had never won more than 63 games before.

No team had ever won 67 games and not been the No. 1 overall seed in the league … until this year. The Spurs fell short of the No. 1 seed in the Western Conference by six games. As good as they were, they weren’t close to being the best.

The playoffs are a new season, but the Spurs are 4 1/2 weeks from seeing the Warriors again. And if the higher seeds win out in the first round, they’ve got a tough matchup in the conference semifinals. Before they get there, they have to take care of business against a depleted Grizzlies team that somehow held on to its playoff spot despite season-ending injuries to its two best players and a never-ending series of roster changes.

Here are some statistical notes to get you ready for the 2-7 series in the West, with links to let you dive in and explore more.

Pace = Possessions per 48 minutes
OffRtg = Points scored per 100 possessions
DefRtg = Points allowed per 100 possessions
NetRtg = Point differential per 100 possessions

San Antonio Spurs (67-15)

Pace: 95.7 (26)
OffRtg: 108.4 (3)
DefRtg: 96.6 (1)
NetRtg: +11.8 (1)

Regular season: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups
vs. Memphis: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups

20160414_sas_shooting

Spurs notes:

Memphis Grizzlies (42-40)

Pace: 95.7 (27)
OffRtg: 102.6 (22)
DefRtg: 105.4 (19)
NetRtg: -2.9 (22)

Regular season: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups
vs. San Antonio: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups

20160414_mem_shooting

Grizzlies notes:

The matchup

Season series: Spurs won, 4-0.
Nov. 21 – Spurs 92, Grizzlies 82
Dec. 3 – Spurs 103, Grizzlies 83
Mar. 25 – Spurs 110, Grizzlies 104
Mar. 28 – Spurs 101, Grizzlies 87

Pace: 92.2
SAS OffRtg: 110.7 (7th vs. MEM)
MEM OffRtg: 96.0 (16th vs. SAS)

Matchup notes:

Numbers preview: Heat-Hornets


VIDEO: Heat vs. Hornets: By the Numbers

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — The Eastern Conference took a step forward this season. It won 48 percent of its games against the West, its second best mark in the last 17 seasons.

Most of the improvement came in the middle of the conference, where teams 5-10 were all at .500 or above, with better records than their Western Conference counterparts.

The Miami Heat and Charlotte Hornets were two of the league’s most improved teams. Miami improved on both ends of the floor and was 5.0 points per 100 possessions better than they were last season, while Charlotte took a huge jump on offense and was 6.6 points per 100 possessions better than they were in 2014-15.

Appropriately, the Heat and Hornets finished with the same record and will face each other in the postseason. Statistically, it’s the most evenly-matched series of the first round.

Here are some statistical notes to get you ready for the 3-6 series in the East, with links to let you dive in and explore more.

Pace = Possessions per 48 minutes
OffRtg = Points scored per 100 possessions
DefRtg = Points allowed per 100 possessions
NetRtg = Point differential per 100 possessions

Miami Heat (48-34)

Pace: 95.7 (25)
OffRtg: 104.2 (12)
DefRtg: 101.5 (7)
NetRtg: +2.6 (10)

Regular season: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups
vs. Charlotte: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups

20160414_mia_shooting

Heat notes:

20160414_post-break_offrtg

Charlotte Hornets (48-34)

Pace: 97.8 (18)
OffRtg: 105.1 (9)
DefRtg: 101.8 (9)
NetRtg: +3.3 (8)

Regular season: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups
vs. Miami: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups

20160414_cha_shooting

Hornets notes:

20160414_offrtg_impr

The matchup

Season series: Tied 2-2 (1-1 in both cities)
Oct. 28 – Heat 104, Hornets 94
Dec. 9 – Hornets 99, Heat 81
Feb. 5 – Heat 98, Hornets 95
Mar. 17 – Hornets 109, Heat 106

Pace: 96.2
MIA OffRtg: 100.7 (17th vs. CHA)
CHA OffRtg: 103.6 (14th vs. MIA)

Matchup notes:

  • Three of the four games were within five points in the last five minutes.
  • Joe Johnson and Courtney Lee were only with their current teams for the final meeting, while Al Jefferson missed the December and February games for Charlotte. Both teams only had their current starting lineups for the March 17 meeting in Miami, and the Hornets’ starters played just eight minutes together in that game (because Zeller left with a knee issue).
  • Whiteside had one of his three triple-doubles – 10 points, 10 rebounds and 10 blocks – in the Feb. 5 meeting in Charlotte.
  • The Hornets were a plus-38 in 138 minutes with Batum on the floor and a minus-30 in 54 minutes with him on the bench. Wade was a minus-17 and minus-16 in the Heat’s two losses.
  • The Heat grabbed just 14.4 percent of available offensive rebounds, while the Hornets grabbed just 14.9 percent of available offensive rebounds. For both teams, that was their lowest offensive rebounding percentage against Eastern Conference opponents.

Numbers preview: Cavs-Pistons


VIDEO: Cavaliers-Pistons: By the Numbers

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — While the Golden State Warriors and San Antonio Spurs have been making history out West, the Cleveland Cavaliers have put themselves in position to take on the winner of what should be a dogfight in the Western Conference finals.

Of course, the Cavs’ season hasn’t exactly gone by quietly. There was a coaching change (with a 30-11 record) in January and a bit of strife (whether real or manufactured) in and out of the locker room.

The Cavs did address their biggest area of need after last season. They jumped from 20th to 10th in defensive efficiency, though they did take a step backward on that end of the floor after Tyronn Lue took over for David Blatt.

Cleveland’s roster still has its flaws, but it also has the best talent in the East and an ability to flip the switch like no other team in the conference. The Cavs’ path back to The Finals begins with a series against the Detroit Pistons, who are making their first trip to the postseason since 2009, when they were swept out of the first round by LeBron James and the Cavs.

Here are some statistical notes to get you ready for the 1-8 series in the East, with links to let you dive in and explore more.

Pace = Possessions per 48 minutes
OffRtg = Points scored per 100 possessions
DefRtg = Points allowed per 100 possessions
NetRtg = Point differential per 100 possessions

Cleveland Cavaliers (57-25)

Pace: 95.5 (28)
OffRtg: 108.1 (4)
DefRtg: 102.3 (10)
NetRtg: +5.8 (4)

Regular season: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups
vs. Detroit: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups

20160414_cle_shooting

Cavs notes:

Detroit Pistons (44-38)

Pace: 97.4 (20)
OffRtg: 103.3 (15)
DefRtg: 103.4 (13)
NetRtg: -0.2 (16)

Regular season: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups
vs. Cleveland: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups

20160414_det_shooting

Pistons notes:

The matchup

Season series: Pistons won 3-1 (2-0 in Cleveland)
Nov. 17 – Pistons 104, Cavs 99
Jan. 29 – Cavs 114, Pistons 106
Feb. 22 – Pistons 96, Cavs 88
Apr. 13 – Pistons 112, Cavs 110 (OT)

Pace: 96.3
CLE OffRtg: 103.6 (16th vs. DET)
DET OffRtg: 106.2 (12th vs. CLE)

Matchup notes:

Numbers preview: Thunder-Mavs


VIDEO: Thunder vs. Mavericks: By the Numbers

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — When the Oklahoma City Thunder made The Finals in 2012 with their four best players all under the age of 24, we thought they’d return every year.

But the Thunder have yet to make it back and failed to make the playoffs entirely last year. And now, with Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook hitting free agency in the next two summers, Oklahoma City may be running out of time.

Both Durant and Westbrook are healthy this year, but the Thunder have been somewhat of an afterthought with two historically great teams ahead of them in the Western Conference standings. Of course, the postseason is an opportunity for the Thunder to prove that they can compete with the Spurs and Warriors.

Before they can do that, though, they’ll need to get through the Dallas Mavericks, a veteran squad that made a late-season push to get into the playoffs an earn the 6 seed in the West.

Here are some statistical notes to get you ready for the 3-6 series in the West, with links to let you dive in and explore more.

Pace = Possessions per 48 minutes
OffRtg = Points scored per 100 possessions
DefRtg = Points allowed per 100 possessions
NetRtg = Point differential per 100 possessions

Oklahoma City Thunder (55-27)

Pace: 99.4 (9)
OffRtg: 109.9 (2)
DefRtg: 103.0 (12)
NetRtg: +6.9 (3)

Regular season: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups
vs. Dallas Team stats | Player stats | Lineups

20160414_okc_shooting

Thunder notes:

20160414_4th_post-break

Dallas Mavericks (42-40)

Pace: 96.4 (23)
OffRtg: 104.8 (10)
DefRtg: 104.3 (16)
NetRtg: +0.6 (14)

Regular season: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups
vs. Oklahoma City: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups

20160414_dal_shooting

Mavs notes:

The matchup

Season series: Thunder won 4-0
Nov. 22 – Thunder 117, Mavs 114
Jan. 13 – Thunder 108, Mavs 89
Jan. 22 – Thunder 109, Mavs 106
Feb. 24 – Thunder 116, Mavs 103

Pace: 98.7
OKC OffRtg: 114.5 (2nd vs. DAL)
DAL OffRtg: 103.9 (15th vs. OKC)

Matchup notes:

Numbers preview: Hawks-Celtics


VIDEO: Hawks vs. Celtics: By the Numbers

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — The Atlanta Hawks took a step backward this season. After leading the Eastern Conference with a franchise-record 60 wins last season, they were unable to recapture the magic they had on the offensive end of the floor.

But while Atlanta isn’t the offensive team that it was a year ago, it has become an elite team defensively. The Hawks ranked second in defensive efficiency, and first since late December. And because they’re healthier this year, they may be a better playoff team than they were in 2015.

You can say the same thing about the Boston Celtics, who, like the Hawks, got swept out of the 2015 playoffs by the Cleveland Cavaliers. The Celtics made one key addition (Amir Johnson) this year, but also got better with internal improvement. And like the Hawks, they’ve done their best work on the defensive end of the floor.

The Hawks are making their ninth straight playoff appearance, a streak that began with a first-round loss to Boston in 2008. This is a much different Celtics team, one that seemingly has more steps to take in the future. Atlanta has home-court advantage and won the season series, but these teams were even in the Eastern Conference standings.

Here are some statistical notes to get you ready for the 4-5 series in the East, with links to let you dive in and explore more.

Pace = Possessions per 48 minutes
OffRtg = Points scored per 100 possessions
DefRtg = Points allowed per 100 possessions
NetRtg = Point differential per 100 possessions

Atlanta Hawks (48-34)

Pace: 99.4 (8)
OffRtg: 103.0 (18)
DefRtg: 98.8 (2)
NetRtg: +4.1 (7)

Regular season: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups
vs. Boston: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups

20160414_atl_shooting

Hawks notes:

20160414_efg_decline

Boston Celtics (48-34)

Pace: 101.1 (3)
OffRtg: 103.9 (13)
DefRtg: 100.9 (5)
NetRtg: +3.0 (9)

Regular season: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups
vs. Atlanta: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups

20160414_bos_shooting

Celtics notes:

20160414_efg_outside

The matchup

Season series: Hawks won 3-1 (2-0 in Atlanta)
Nov. 13 – Celtics 106, Hawks 93
Nov. 24 – Hawks 121, Celtics 97
Dec. 18 – Hawks 109, Celtics 101
Apr. 9 – Hawks 118, Celtics 107

Pace: 103.3
ATL OffRtg: 107.0 (4th vs. BOS)
BOS OffRtg: 99.3 (15th vs. ATL)

Matchup notes: