Posts Tagged ‘John Schuhmann’

2016 Olympic quarterfinals preview

RIO DE JANEIRO — The 2016 Olympic basketball tournament is wide open. Eight great teams remain and every one of them has a chance at a medal.

The United States is the only undefeated team among them and carries a 50-game winning streak in international tournaments into the quarterfinals. But, it has looked vulnerable over its last three games, allowing Australia, Serbia and France to score more than 110 points per 100 possessions. If it doesn’t get enough offense in any of its next three games, the U.S. can lose.

And every other team can win. The only team in the quarterfinals that doesn’t have a quality win in Rio is Serbia. But Serbia lost to France by one and had a wide-open three to send its game vs. the U.S. to overtime. And, oh yeah, Serbia won silver at the 2014 World Cup, having beat Greece, Brazil and France to get to the final (after, just like this year, picking up no quality wins in pool play).

Here’s a rundown of each of Wednesday’s quarterfinals…

Pace = Possessions per 40 minutes
OffRtg = Points scored per 100 possessions
DefRtg = Points allowed per 100 possessions
NetRtg = Point differential per 100 possessions

Stats are from games vs. remaining teams. For full Olympic pace & efficiency stats, go here. (more…)

Olympic quarterfinals set, USA faces Argentina on Wednesday

RIO DE JANEIRO — The quarterfinals of the Men’s Olympic basketball tournament are set after the final day of pool play. And we’re looking at what should be the best tournament we’ve ever seen.

Hosts Brazil beat Nigeria in Monday’s first game to stay alive, but didn’t get the help they needed from rival Argentina, who lost to Spain in the day’s second game. Spain’s win eliminated Brazil, but there was still some sorting out to do in the day’s final game.

And appropriately, we ended up with a four-way tie after Croatia’s win over Lithuania. Argentina, Croatia, Lithuania and Spain all finished at 3-2.

Croatia won the tiebreaker with a 2-1 record against the other three teams and a win against the other team (Spain) that went 2-1.

Here’s how the Group B seeding sorts out…

1. Croatia (2-1 vs. the other three, beat Spain)
2. Spain (2-1)
3. Lithuania (1-2, beat Argentina)
4. Argentina (1-2)

And that sets up the following quarterfinal matchups for Wednesday…

Australia (A2) vs. Lithuania (B3) – 10 a.m. ET
Spain (B2) vs. France (A3) – 1:30 p.m. ET
USA (A1) vs. Argentina (B4) – 5:45 p.m. ET
Croatia (B1) vs. Serbia (A4) – 9:15 p.m. ET

The winners of USA-Argentina and Spain-France will meet in the semifinals on Friday. The winners of Australia-Lithuania and Croatia-Serbia will meet on the other half of the bracket.

It’s truly a wide-open tournament. All eight teams have shown the ability to beat anyone, as well as the ability to lose to anyone. No result in any of the next eight games would be a shock. And with the USA and Spain on the same side of the bracket, we’ll definitely have a different gold-medal-game matchup than we did in the last two Olympics.

Morning Shootaround — Aug. 14

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Fear factor vanishing for Olympic team? | Group B gets crazy in Rio | Lebron’s new deal about more than money | Thomas convinced rest of the league knows Celtics are on the rise

No. 1: Fear factor vanishing for Olympic team? — All it takes is a couple of close calls in Olympic competition for the legion of doubters to appear for Team USA in Rio. That aura of invincibility vanishes with each and every tight game survived by this current group of All-Stars led by superstars Kevin Durant, Carmelo Anthony and Kyrie Irving. Michael Lee of The Vertical shines a light on the turning tide in Rio as Mike Krzyzewski and his coaching staff continue to search for an identity for this particular group (perhaps in time for today’s game against France, 1:15 p.m. ET):

The hilarious Snapchat prank sessions, Facebook sing-alongs and Instagram video shenanigans were much more entertaining than the actual games for the United States men’s Olympic basketball team through a barnstorming exhibition tour and two effortless but sloppy beat-downs to start these games in Brazil. But just as this group was headed toward earning the playful title of the Meme Team, the Americans have encountered some genuine adversity in their past two games that – if mistakes aren’t corrected or adjustments not made – could find them on the wrong side of the joke.

Team USA might survive these Olympics unscathed. Ten All-Stars, including a former MVP, might prove to be all that the Americans need to escape the Rio games with gold medals around their necks. Getting shoved around by Australia and gasping for air until Serbia’s Bogdan Bogdanovic’s potential tying 3-pointer drew iron, however, should give anyone pause that “the real world” – as coach Mike Krzyzewski has dubbed his team’s current predicament against superior opponents – is theirs to dominate. The Americans won’t be beatable until they actually lose, but the veil of invincibility has been exposed in too-close-for-comfort wins against Australia and Serbia.

“They are just players,” said Serbian center Nikola Jokic, the promising Denver Nugget who bludgeoned the U.S. for a game-high 25 points in a 94-91 loss. “If you think about who they are, you are not going to be good at this. Maybe Australia showed us they can get beat. They can get beat.”

Even without LeBron James, Stephen Curry, Russell Westbrook, James Harden or Chris Paul, the talent on Team USA is overwhelming in comparison to the other teams in this tournament. The performances have been extremely underwhelming, though, exposing the vulnerabilities and deficiencies without those aforementioned stars.

The off-court camaraderie that this group has developed appears authentic, as players have repeatedly discussed the bonds that have been formed in less than a month. But they are still learning to play with each other. Before confronting a fearless group from Australia, Team USA’s games were played at All-Star Game-level intensity and provided little in the form of preparation for what would be in store against legitimate competition outside the United States. The ease with which won made it easy to overlook that the team has 10 players making their Olympic debuts, including six who have never played any international competitions.

The Americans have all been asked to assume roles that are different than the ones they play on their NBA teams and the adjustment has been far from seamless. On the previous two Olympic gold medal-winning teams, Paul or James controlled the floor, Kobe Bryant embraced the role as defensive stopper, Dwyane Wade and later Westbrook came off the bench as cold-blooded assassins and Chris Bosh and later Tyson Chandler served as the defensive anchor protecting the rim and covering mistakes.

Through four games, this team is still waiting for those positions to be filled. Wins over Australia and Serbia were claimed in disjointed, grinding fashion. 

Team USA hasn’t looked sharp. Winning the past two games by a combined 13 points makes it obvious that something is amiss, but before trouncing Venezuela by 43, the Americans were tied with one of the worst teams in Group A after the first period.

“We got to expect this,” said DeMarcus Cousins. “Every time we step on the floor, guys are going to give us their best effort, everybody wants to beat Team USA. We know that coming in, but at the same time, we can’t crumble the way we’ve done the past two games. Right now, we’re hurting ourselves. Not taking away credit of how Serbia played, because they played amazing tonight. But we’ve got to be a lot stronger mentally.”

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Group B gets crazy

RIO DE JANEIRO — Group B in the Olympic Men’s Basketball tournament promised to be, with five teams with medal hopes and only four tickets to the quarterfinals, the more interesting of the two groups. And it has already been more interesting that we could have imagined. Through four days of action, every team in Group B has at least one win and one loss.

And on a day where Spain may have righted its ship and two rivals produced an instant classic, Nigeria threw another wrinkle in the standings with an upset of Croatia. And with one more day to go, every team is still alive.

Argentina wins double-OT classic

Andres Nocioni is 36 years old and hasn’t played in the NBA in four years. But put “El Chapu” in an Argentina uniform for the final time (we think), and he can do special things.

On Saturday afternoon, Nocioni played more than 47 minutes and scored 37 points (the high for the Olympics thus far) in Argentina’s 111-107, double-overtime victory over Brazil. The atmosphere, with the two South American rivals facing off in Brazil’s gym, was incredible. The stakes were high and the game delivered the goods.

“No matter what sport or whatever’s going on, if it’s Brazil against Argentina, it’s going to be a battle,” incoming Spurs rookie Patricio Garino (who had several key steals) said afterward. “The atmosphere was unbelievable. Playing in this kind of setting is going to be memories for life.”

Facundu Campazzo added 33 points and 11 assists for Argentina, but the biggest play of the game was an offensive rebound from the 5-11 point guard off a Manu Ginobili miss in the final seconds of regulation. With Argentina down three, Campazzo found Nocioni, whose step-back three tied the game with 3.9 seconds left.

Brazil couldn’t get a good shot off at the end of regulation, and Ginobili’s runner to win was off the mark at the end of the first overtime. Campazzo started the second OT off with two threes and Argentina withstood a big flurry from Leandro Barbosa to pull out the win, with Ginobili securing the game with another critical offensive rebound in the final seconds.

“What we did today was big, everybody, because we fight, we play hard, and we try to compete,” Nocioni said. “We lost control of the game sometimes, but always, we try to keep going, keep going.”

Nene (24 points, 11 rebounds) had a big game for Brazil, but the hosts are facing a disappointing scenario if they don’t qualify for the quarterfinals. They looked to be in good shape after beating Spain in their second game, but have come up just short in each of their other three, having lost them by a total of just 14 points.

Twelve years after they won it all in Athens, Argentina’s golden generation (with some help from a 25-year-old point guard) is still alive and will be in the quarterfinals on Wednesday. No matter what happens from now on, it’s already been a fun last ride … if it has indeed the last ride.

“It was the last ride four years ago,” Nocioni said with a laugh. “Maybe, you never know, maybe we’re coming back in Tokyo.”

Spain looks strong again

After losing to Croatia and Brazil and struggling to pull away against Nigeria, Spain (2-2) played its best game on Saturday night, thumping previously unbeaten Lithuania 109-59. Because they don’t have the tiebreaker vs. Brazil, Spain’s elimination games began Saturday. And they got the first one they needed to stay alive.

“We had two finals,” Ricky Rubio said afterward. “Today we came to play, and Monday, it’s another final.”

Pau Gasol (23 points, five rebounds, five assists, two blocks, 5-for-5 from 3-point range) dominated his matchup with Jonas Valanciunas (0-for-6). Rubio (3-for-4 from 3-point range) finally hit a few jumpers and kept Lithuania on its heels defensively. And Nikola Mirotic (17 points, 8-for-11 shooting) was strong inside and out.

Spain is missing Marc Gasol, but still could be the second best team in the tournament when it’s all said and done. Of course, it could also be going home early if it doesn’t beat Argentina on Monday.

“We were trying to find our DNA out there [in the first two games], and I think we found it [Saturday],” Rubio said. “We haven’t done anything special yet, but I think we’re on the right track.”

Nigeria stays alive

Nigeria was, seemingly, the one team in Group B that didn’t have a shot at advancing to the quarterfinals. But suddenly, it’s still alive with a stunning, 90-76 victory over Croatia in Saturday’s late game. The 3-point shooting tells the story. Nigeria was 17-for-36 from beyond the arc, while Croatia was 6-for-28.

Croatia has quality wins over Spain and Brazil and could have clinched a spot in the quarterfinals with a win Saturday. But it’s future is now in some doubt.

Bottom line from Group B: Argentina (3-1) and Lithuania (3-1) are in the quarterfinals, while Spain (2-2) and Croatia (2-2) control their own destiny. Brazil (1-3) and Nigeria (1-3) need help.

Big games Monday

And here’s a rundown of Monday’s slate …

  • Brazil (1-3) vs. Nigeria (1-3) – 1:15 p.m. ET – The winner of this game is still alive, while the loser is eliminated. A Brazil win also means that Croatia clinches a spot in the quarterfinals.
  • Argentina (3-1) vs. Spain (2-2) – 6 p.m. ET – If Brazil wins the first game, Spain needs to win to stay alive, because it will have lost to the two teams (Brazil and Croatia) it could possibly be tied with at 2-3.
  • Croatia (2-2) vs. Lithuania (3-1) – 9:30 p.m. ET – Lithuania clinches the top seed in Group B with a win. Croatia needs to win to stay alive if Nigeria wins the first game.

If two teams are tied, the tiebreaker is head-to-head. So Brazil and Croatia both have the tiebreaker over Spain.

If multiple teams are tied, the tiebreaker goes to the team with the best record in games between those teams. If that’s even — say Croatia, Nigeria and Spain all tie at 2-3 — it comes down to point differential in games between those teams. In the aforementioned scenario, Spain (plus-7) would finish third, Nigeria (plus-5) would finish fourth, and Croatia (minus-12) would be eliminated.

If Spain beat Argentina and Croatia beat Lithuania, we would have a four-way tie at 3-2 for first place. Stay tuned …

Group A wraps Sunday

Group A is much more easier to figure out. The U.S. needs to beat France (1:15 ET) to clinch first place, because a loss could produce (if Australia beats Venezuela) a three-way tie between Australia, France and the U.S. In that case, point differential in the games between the three teams (who would all be 1-1 within the group) would determine the seeds. Australia beat France by 21, while the U.S. only beat Australia by 10, so a France win on Sunday would put Australia in first place and drop the U.S. to second (or third if it lost by 16 or more).

If the U.S. beats France, Australia is second (no matter its result) and France is third. Venezuela, meanwhile, can stay alive with a win over Australia (6 p.m. ET), but Serbia would take fourth (and eliminate Venezuela) with a win over China in the late game (9:30 p.m. ET).

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 243) Featuring John Schuhmann

HANG TIME BIG CITY — It’s the dog days of summer here in New York City, where the thermometer is knocking on triple-digits and the humidity ain’t far behind. In fact, it’s so muggy these days that out of the entire Hang Time Crew, I was the only one to show up for work today. (Sekou Smith and Rick Fox have presumably temporarily decamped to cooler climates.)

But one place that’s been pretty nice this summer is Rio De Janeiro, where the 2016 Summer Olympic Games are taking place.podcast_logo_170

Here in the United States, the stories of these games thus far has been Katie Ledecky‘s dominance, as well as awesome showings from the Simones (Biles and Manuel) and the #FinalFive. Oh, and Michael Phelps continuing to rack up gold medals.

And as the Rio Olympics finish up week one, one team that is still finding their footing is the USA Men’s Basketball team. After beginning with a couple of blowout wins against China and Venezuela, Team USA had to overcome a halftime deficit to beat a fired up Australia on Wednesday night.

It doesn’t get much easier. Tonight Team USA will take on Serbia, then they play France over the weekend, and then the medal rounds begin.

Some things we’ve seen haven’t come as a huge surprise. Carmelo Anthony, for instance, continues to prove just how well-suited his game is for international play. Some other things, like Team USA’s defense, may not be living up to their billing. And we know he can knock down big shots, but is Kyrie Irving the right man to run the point for this squad?

To get an inside look at Team USA’s performance thus far in these games, we dialed up our man in Rio, NBA.com’s John Schuhmann, who has been on the ground for every game and practice, to get a total picture of what’s gone right and what’s gone wrong for Team USA.

We will talk rings (Olympic and NBA) plus so much more this week with Schuhmann on Episode 243 of The Hang Time Podcast.

LISTEN HERE:

As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of NBA.com, Lang Whitaker of NBA.com’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.

***

Parker sits and then hits big shot for France

RIO DE JANEIRO — Things were getting anxious for France against Serbia in Group A pool play on Wednesday. What was once a 16-point lead was gone by the end of the third quarter and Serbia led by as many as seven early in the fourth.

But as the game went back and forth, Tony Parker remained on the bench for most of the final period. A Miroslav Raduljica three-point play put Serbia up six with 4:46 left and still, France coach Vincent Collet didn’t go to Parker, who had played just 18:15 up until that point.

Finally, with 3:25 left, Parker checked in. France closed the gap and Parker hit the game-winner, a contested, step-back jumper from the left wing with 31 seconds left.

Parker finished with just six points and two assists in less than 22 minutes. But he was a plus-13 in that limited time.

France’s win puts them in position to finish third — behind the United States and Australia — in Group A. That would put them on the same side of the medal-round bracket with the U.S., who they would face in the semifinals (though they’ll have a tough matchup in the quarters before that). Serbia, meanwhile, would be on the opposite side of the bracket if they finish fourth in Group A (which they most certainly will).

That scenario had reporters asking postgame questions about the possibility of the teams not trying to win Wednesday’s contest. But Parker’s playing time wasn’t about any kind of subtle tank-job, but rather him trying to ease his way back into playing shape after taking four weeks off.

France earned its trip to Rio by winning a qualifying tournament in the Philippines, beating Canada in the final game on July 10. At that point, Parker went back to San Antonio for the birth of his child. And he didn’t join his team again until the day after the rest of the squad arrived in Brazil, missing three warm-up games in Argentina.

So Parker asked Collet to keep his minutes limited in pool play.

“I talked with coach,” Parker said. “The first three games, four games, try to stay at 20, 22 [minutes], and try to go forward and be my best for the quarterfinals.”

And he wasn’t going to check himself in with the game in the balance in the fourth quarter.

“I just waiting for my moment,” Parker said. “I trust coach. I have confidence in him. He’s controlling my minutes and I’m fine. I’m ready to go.”

For Collet, it’s about more than Parker’s minutes. It’s also about building his bench up. Back-up point guard Thomas Heurtel had some good moments in the fourth, hitting a 3-pointer and finding Joffrey Lauvergne for a dunk in a stretch that cut Serbia’s lead from six to one.

Collet believes that he’ll need Heurtel again in this tournament. He also believes that more guys contributing equals better team “spirit.”

“You can’t win with seven players, eight players,” Collet said.

France has its stars, but doesn’t want to lean too heavily on them. Parker’s minutes will increase, but not by a lot.

Blogtable: Thoughts on Kevin Durant as a villain?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: FIBA rule you’d like to see in NBA? | Should teams pursue Ray Allen? |
Thoughts on Kevin Durant as a villain?


> Steve Kerr said it’s “absurd” to label Kevin Durant a villain just because he opted to sign with another team. Agree? Disagree?

David Aldridge, TNT analyst: Completely agree. I understand Oklahoma City fans, perhaps, feeling that way, but no one without a dog in the hunt should categorize KD that way because he made a decision about where he wanted to work. And, really, that’s all he did. He didn’t do anything to you or me. He decided he wanted to work in Oakland instead of OKC. People do that every day of their lives. No one is considered villainous for doing so.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Of course, agree. It’s silly to think otherwise. He changed teams, didn’t rob a bank.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: Agree, agree, agree with Steve Kerr. First of all, who gets to determine who’s a “villain?” Jealous couch potatoes? Bored and lazy media types? Durant owes nobody anything. He gave 9 of the best years of his career to OKC. He helped the community. He raised the profile of the franchise (and the value). Why have free agency if certain players — superstars — aren’t “allowed” to be free agents according to the public? Or that there are certain teams (contenders) they aren’t allowed to join? Durant is getting more grief than athletes who, you know, commit actual crimes. Felt the same way about the over-the-top treatment of LeBron for a silly TV show.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: I agree and I don’t see him as one. But others will and if they enjoy watching the Warriors in that way, that’s their right. I guess it might be too much to ask for them to just keep it civil on Twitter, though.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: I want to agree with Kerr on this one, on principle alone, but I know better than to think Durant or any star of his ilk could make a move like this and not instantly become the villain to a large segment of the sports-loving public. Like it or not, wearing the villain tag after you bolt Oklahoma City for Oakland the way Durant did and you have to own the foolishness that comes with that move. I agree, Durant has not done anything to be labeled a “villain” in the darkest sense of the word. He did what was in his heart. I’ll never condemn someone for doing that. But he also crossed that imaginary line that revisionist historians love to cite as the point of no return for superstar athletes where loyalty is concerned. Free agency provides a freedom of choice for the player, it does not guarantee that he’ll be free of the consequences of his choice, intended or otherwise.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: Agreed. This is not going to be a simple transition for him and his teammates. Durant is going to have to earn his success by adapting his style to fit with the Warriors, and every setback along the way will be exaggerated and celebrated. Accusations of his villainy are based on the premise that Durant has taken the easy path to the championship. And so fans by the millions are going to make sure that it won’t be easy for him, in the same way that they made it difficult on LeBron James when he moved to the Miami Heat. By next June everyone is going to be reminded that winning the NBA championship is almost never easy. Someday we’ll look back and recognize that Durant was no villain based on the hard decision he made.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogIf we’re really going to parse it, my favorite part of Kerr’s quote was how he tried to stretch it to apply to any person on the Warriors, along with Durant: “To think of Kevin Durant or Steph Curry or any of our guys as villains, it’s kind of absurd.” Any of our guys? Hey, you know who probably doesn’t think terming Kevin Durant a villain is all that absurd? How about a kid in Oklahoma City who had a Durant jersey and poster and was a huge Thunder fan? Or how about a fan of the Cleveland Cavaliers, the team the Warriors were doing their best to eliminate in the NBA Finals? Look, I fully support KD’s ability to choose his own adventure. But there are consequences to our decisions and choices. And to be honest, all in all, enduring a few boos might be worth getting a ring.

Blogtable: Should teams pursue Ray Allen?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: FIBA rule you’d like to see in NBA? | Should teams pursue Ray Allen? |
Thoughts on Kevin Durant as a villain?


> Ray Allen says he’s fit, healthy and interested in playing in the NBA this season. Should any teams be interested in him?

David Aldridge, TNT analyst: In a league that has fallen head over heels with the three, how can I say teams shouldn’t take a look at Jesus Shuttlesworth? He keeps himself in ridiculous shape and is as smart as they come. I’m not sure how much he could have left in the tank, though; he was not quite the same in his last season with Miami, and that was two years ago. But, it’s his life. Fire away.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Sure. If he can put the ball in the basket that is the object of the game. Cavs? Spurs? Clippers?

Shaun Powell, NBA.comHe’s 41 and years removed from being a significant role player. It’s true that Allen takes great care of his body and that shooters are always the last to leave. Could he play 10-15 minutes for a contender? Perhaps. But I suspect most contenders are not a “Ray Allen away” from winning it all; they already have such a player in the rotation. I suspect his comeback window closed a year ago. I’d love for him to prove me wrong, though.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Yes. Even if he only played 10-15 minutes per game, he would be a threat that defenses would have to respect on any key offensive possession. Run him off a screen and he’s going to bend the defense and give your team a better chance to score, whether he touches the ball or not.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Absolutely, teams should be interested in Ray Allen. In a league where shooting is at a premium, perhaps moreso now than it has ever been, one of the all-time great marksman (even at his advanced age) should at least draw some interest. If nothing else, you find a gym and a ball rack and see how much Ray has left in his tank. If he’s as fit, healthy and interested as he says he is about lacing his Jordans up one more time, it’s worth investigating.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comLet’s see: You can offer your 15th roster spot to someone who might (or might not) play in garbage time; or you can invest in the most prolific 3-point shooter of all time with the potential of turning losses into wins. Allen sounds like a good gamble to me.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: Every team. The man is arguably the best three-point shooter to ever play the game, and he famously keeps himself in tip-top shape. So to me, if Ray Allen wants to play basketball, I’d be happy to have him. Especially with the way the NBA is today, with three-point shots carrying so much value. There’s been a lot of money floating around this offseason. If I was an NBA team, I’d have no problem giving a fat slice of that to Jesus Shuttlesworth.

Blogtable: FIBA rule you’d like to see in NBA?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


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BLOGTABLE: FIBA rule you’d like to see in NBA? | Should teams pursue Ray Allen? |
Thoughts on Kevin Durant as a villain?


> We’re getting a good look at international (FIBA) basketball rules during these Summer Olympics. Which, if any, FIBA rules would you like to see implemented in the NBA?

David Aldridge, TNT analyst: Shouldn’t this be reversed? FIBA is coming a lot more toward the NBA’s style of play and rules in recent years than vice versa. But, to the question: I don’t like the closer three-point line in Olympic/FIBA competition; God knows we don’t need to encourage the world to shoot more threes. I could be persuaded to think about the 10-minute quarters as opposed to the 12-minute ones in the NBA, if only to make the games a little more compact for fans both in the arena and watching at home. And I’d like to hear smart people make an argument about the efficacy of being able to touch the ball while it’s still on the rim, as FIBA rules allow. But there is one FIBA rule I would instantly implement in the NBA: so-called “unsportsmanlike fouls,” which include fouling players away from the ball, are penalized by two free throws and possession for the fouled team/player. The NBA is the only basketball league in the world that doesn’t penalize “Hack-A” fouls this way. Insanity.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Allow shots on the rim or over the cylinder to be swatted away by defenders. All recent rule changes have favored the offense. Let’s give defenders a break. Also, on offensive rebounds reset shot clock to 14 seconds instead of 24. Speed up the game.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: How about “none?” I love the differences between international and NBA play. And besides, the players adapt quickly to the international and NBA rules. I see no reason to have a one-size-fits-all rulebook for basketball.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: I love the rule that you can’t call a timeout when the ball is live. A timeout can only be called with a dead ball or after a made basket. Adopting that rule would reduce the number of timeouts called late in the fourth quarter or overtime and shorten the length of games, which would be a great thing. I’m also in favor of adopting the FIBA rule that there’s no basket interference once a shot has hit the rim, mostly because that’s a difficult call to make in the NBA. It would make officials’ jobs easier if they didn’t have to try to figure out from 30 feet away if the ball was or wasn’t in the cylinder. And I wouldn’t be opposed to the league adopting the rule that there’s only 14 seconds on the shot clock after an offensive rebound, because it would increase pace a little bit.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: The FIBA rule that allows players to touch the ball on and above the cylinder is the one I’ve always wanted to see in the NBA. It would make things extremely interesting around the basket, particularly on free throws. It would mean no more relaxing and catching a breath while someone is shooting free throws. And it would also change the way goaltending is called. But those are things I could live with in the name of seeing the world’s most graceful large athletes being able to use their gifts on and above the rim on both ends of the floor.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: I’d love to get rid of the NBA rule that prohibits goaltending on rebounds above the cylinder. Let both teams fight over that airspace in the final seconds of a 1-point game. The potential setbacks in terms of scoring and efficiency would be offset by excitement and unpredictability. Free throws would be more volatile than ever.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogDid you see the clip of Paul George sitting on a bench during a timeout, drinking from a cup of water, and then handing the cup over his head to … nobody? George is used to existing in an NBA world where there are dozens of people jammed around the benches, taking care of everything, and he suddenly found himself in an entirely unpopulated area. And I know that in the NBA there will never be that much empty space so close to the court, but it made me wonder if there weren’t some ways we could make things at NBA games a little more minimalist?

Calderon takes back seat as Spain falls to 0-2

RIO DE JANEIRO — Spain, the nation that has won the last two silver medals at the Olympics and three of the last four European championships, is now 0-2 in Rio.

For the second straight game, Spain went down to the wire with its opponent and couldn’t get the bucket it needed to tie or win the game. On Sunday, Pau Gasol was blocked by Croatia’s Dario Saric at the buzzer. On Tuesday, Sergio Llull‘s wild runner was well short. The difference in Brazil’s 66-65 victory was Marcus Vinicius’ tip-in with 5.5 seconds left, as well as a pair of free throws that Gasol missed with 24 seconds on the clock.

It was a huge victory for Brazil, which improved to 1-1 in the competitive Group B. The question is whether it was just another bump in the road for Spain or a sign of the national team’s decline.

Spain’s starting point guard for the last two Olympics (though he missed the last two games in 2008 with an injury), Jose Calderon, has spent almost all of the first two games here on the bench. Calderon was a DNP against Croatia and played less than two minutes against Brazil.

Calderon, now 34 years old, playing behind Ricky Rubio, Sergio Rodriguez and Sergio Llull is a clear indication that the national team is in a period of transition. Calderon’s generation, which includes Pau Gasol (36), Juan Carlos Navarro (36) and Felipe Reyes (36), is on its way out.

And with the younger talent that Spain has in the backcourt, Calderon is the first to really take a back seat. He spoke with NBA.com about that topic after Tuesday’s loss.

NBA.com: Has it been tough to sit and watch these games?

Calderon: It’s always tough when your team loses. It’s about us. We got three more games and we can make it happen or not. Hopefully, it can get better.

NBA.com: But you’ve always had a bigger role for this team.

Calderon: Yeah, but you know, it’s always changing. Everything is changing, but always the team first. I know my role. I know why I’m here. I’m happy to be here. I’m happy to help my team.

NBA.com: You’re healthy?

Calderon: 100 percent. I’m ready to help when my name is called and ready, as well, for next season with the Lakers. I think it’s going to be an exciting one and I’m happy to be there as well.

NBA.com: Spain has lost games early in the tournament before and come back to medal. Does this feel any different?

Calderon: It’s different. You always want to get a win as soon as possible and the difference is we [almost] got them. It was right there for us. We didn’t finish and we have to be better with that. Hopefully, we can change this around. If we get these [next] three wins, we’ll be in [the quarterfinals]. That’s how we got to think.

NBA.com: How much is Marc Gasol missed?

Calderon: I’ll be lying if I say the team doesn’t miss somebody like Marc Gasol. He’s a great player, but health is always first. He’s got to be ready for training camp.

NBA.com: Is this national team in transition?

Calderon: It’s been like that for a while. If you take out the four or five guys that have been together for so long, the young guys come in. They’re going to be here for a while.

In my position, there are so many guys. Ricky, Chacho (Rodriguez), or even [Guillem] Vives was there last year [at Eurobasket].

NBA.com: It seems like other European teams are up there with you, that Spain isn’t as clearly second best basketball team in the world as it was four or eight years ago.

Calderon: I think we won a lot because of our experience, because we knew how to play in those moments, not because we were much, much better than the other teams. I think, right now, everybody’s getting better. Everybody’s getting used to playing these kinds of tournaments. It’s a long tournament and it doesn’t matter what happens at the beginning. You just got to keep going.

NBA.com: But Group B here is tough, and at least one good team isn’t going to make the quarterfinals.

Calderon: I don’t feel like anybody [in the group] going to go 5-0. It would be a surprise if somebody wins every game. That’s how equal it is. That’s good for us and hopefully, it will work out.