Posts Tagged ‘John Schuhmann’

Wolves get another No. 1 to team with Wiggins, learn from KG


VIDEO: 2015 Draft Lottery Drawing

NEW YORK — There will likely be three straight No. 1 picks on the same roster next season.

The Minnesota Timberwolves won the No. 1 pick of the 2015 Draft at Tuesday’s Lottery, less than nine months after acquiring the No. 1 picks from 2013 (Anthony Bennett) and 2014 (Andrew Wiggins) in a trade with Cleveland for Kevin Love.

Minnesota is the first team to finish with the league’s worst record and win the Lottery since the Orlando Magic did it in 2004. They had a 25 percent chance to win it.

“I didn’t anticipate that it would go this way,” Wolves owner Glen Taylor said afterward, noting that it was far more likely that his team didn’t win the No. 1 pick. “I just feel really honored that we have a chance to be in this position.”

While Bennett is possibly a bust, Wiggins looks like a two-way star. And the Wolves have three more former Lottery picks under the age of 25 – Zach LaVine (No. 13 in 2014), Shabazz Muhammad (No. 14 in 2013) and Ricky Rubio (No. 5 in 2009) – on the roster as well.

They’ll likely add a big man – Duke’s Jahlil Okafor or Kentucky’s Karl-Anthony Towns – to that young core. And that young big could have Kevin Garnett as a mentor. Taylor said he expects Garnett, a free agent this summer, to be back, saying that Garnett has already been working out.

“I see that he’s out working really hard to get his knees into shape,” Taylor said. “So I anticipate that he’s interested in coming back. I can’t say that for sure, but I don’t know why he would be out there doing what he’s doing if he didn’t want to come back.”

Taylor also believes that Flip Saunders, currently the Wolves’ president and head coach, will remain on the bench for another year.

“It’s not definite,” Taylor said, “but I think with the effort that he put in this year to bring this team along that it’s probably 90 percent, unless he sees somebody and he changes his mind and he can convince me.

“I think eventually I want a different coach. I want him to be the GM. My guess is that he’ll go another year.”

The New York Knicks, who were the worst team in the league (the spot that won the Lottery) with just five days left in the season, were the only team to move down from their spot on Tuesday. They fell from second to fourth, swapping spots with the Los Angeles Lakers.

“Obviously, we would have liked to have a higher pick,” Knicks general manager Steve Mills said, “but we went into this knowing that, anywhere from 1-5, we were going to get a good player. And as we look at this, this is a player that’s complementary to a player that we have in place in Carmelo and what we’re going to do in free agency.”

At No. 2, the Lakers could add the big man that the Wolves don’t pick, teaming him with last year’s No. 7 pick Julius Randle for the post-Kobe-Bryant era, which will begin after next season.

At No. 3, the Philadelphia 76ers should get a guard to feed Joel Embiid and Nerlens Noel. But GM Sam Hinkie certainly isn’t going to say that he wouldn’t draft one of the bigs if he was available.

“History’s not so kind to drafting for need,” Hinkie said. “I think, wherever we are, we’ll pay a lot of attention to who we think is the best player and how that looks. Sometimes, it’s close, and that moves some things. And sometimes, it’s not close.

“A year ago, people would have reasonably said we don’t need Joel Embiid. I think we need Joel Embiid and I think what he’ll provide for us will be useful.”

Numbers preview: Warriors-Rockets


VIDEO: GameTime: A look ahead to the West finals

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — The Houston Rockets are seemingly facing long odds in the Western Conference finals. Their opponent — the Golden State Warriors — was the league’s best team in the regular season by a wide margin, has home-court advantage and a 43-3 record at home, and swept the season series.

But the Rockets faced long odds in the conference semifinals, as well. And they became the ninth team in NBA history to come back from a 3-1 deficit to win a series, coming back from 19 points down late in the third quarter of Game 6 along the way.

This is a matchup between the MVP and the guy who finished second. Both averaged between 25 and 26 points in those four regular-season meetings, but Stephen Curry did so much more efficiently than James Harden.

With a healthy Dwight Howard, Harden will have more help than he did earlier in the season. Still, the Warriors look to have a good shot of reaching The Finals for the first time in 40 years.

Here are some statistical notes to get you ready for the Western Conference finals, with links to let you dive in and explore more.

Pace = Possessions per 48 minutes
OffRtg = Points scored per 100 possessions
DefRtg = Points allowed per 100 possessions
NetRtg = Point differential per 100 possessions

Golden State Warriors (67-15)

Beat New Orleans in four games.
Beat Memphis in six games.
Pace: 94.3 (14)
OffRtg: 107.4 (2)
DefRtg: 98.8 (5)
NetRtg: +8.6 (2)

Regular season: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups
vs. Houston: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups
Playoffs: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups

Warriors playoff notes:

Houston Rockets (56-26)

Beat Dallas in five games.
Beat L.A. Clippers in seven games.
Pace: 104.8 (1)
OffRtg: 105.9 (6)
DefRtg: 106.8 (12)
NetRtg: -0.9 (8)

Overall: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups
vs. Golden State: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups
Playoffs: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups

Rockets playoff notes:

The matchup

Season series: Warriors won 4-0
Pace: 104.5
GSW OffRtg: 109.6 (2nd vs. HOU)
HOU OffRtg: 95.8 (22nd vs. GSW)

Matchup notes:

Numbers preview: Hawks-Cavaliers


VIDEO: All-access: The top-seeded Hawks and Warriors advance

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — Though they both looked vulnerable at times, the Atlanta Hawks and Cleveland Cavaliers took care of business to give us the conference finals matchup we’ve been anticipating since the Hawks went on a 33-2 run after Thanksgiving.

This series is a contrast of styles. The Cavs are a team that relies heavily on LeBron James, especially with Kevin Love out for the postseason and Kyrie Irving dealing with leg injuries. The Hawks, meanwhile, like to share the wealth.

While James has been to the conference finals seven times in his 12-year career, this is the first trip there for the Hawks since 1970. Kyle Korver (in 2011 with Chicago) and Paul Millsap (in 2007 with Utah) are their only rotation players who have been here before.

But the Hawks have the knowledge that they tore up what had been an improved Cleveland defense in the final regular-season meeting between the two teams. In the regular season, only one team — New Orleans — scored more efficiently against the Cavs than Atlanta did.

The Cavs scored pretty efficiently against the Hawks too. And the conference finals promises to bring new wrinkles to this matchup. James faced the San Antonio Spurs in the last two Finals. To get there again, he’ll have to get through the Spurs of the East.

Here are some statistical notes to get you ready for the Eastern Conference finals, with links to let you dive in and explore more.

Pace = Possessions per 48 minutes
OffRtg = Points scored per 100 possessions
DefRtg = Points allowed per 100 possessions
NetRtg = Point differential per 100 possessions

Atlanta Hawks (60-22)

Beat Brooklyn in six games.
Beat Washington in six games.
Pace: 96.8 (6)
OffRtg: 102.0 (9)
DefRtg: 98.2 (2)
NetRtg: +3.9 (4)

Regular season: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups
vs. Cleveland: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups
Playoffs: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups

Hawks playoff notes:

Cleveland Cavaliers (53-29)

Beat Boston in four games.
Beat Chicago in six games.
Pace: 92.9 (16)
OffRtg: 108.2 (1)
DefRtg: 98.8 (4)
NetRtg: +9.5 (1)

Overall: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups
vs. Atlanta: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups
Playoffs: Team stats | Player stats | Lineups

Cavs playoff notes:

The matchup

Season series: Hawks won 3-1 (2-0 in Atlanta)
Pace: 95.4
ATL OffRtg: 114.2 (2nd vs. CLE)
CLE OffRtg: 110.8 (4th vs. ATL)

Matchup notes:

For Warriors, 15 is the magic number


VIDEO: The Warriors talk about their Game 5 win.

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — Note to the Memphis Grizzlies and any other team that may cross paths with the Golden State Warriors this postseason: Don’t get down by 15.

After Wednesday’s Game 5 victory over the Grizzlies, the Warriors are 52-0 in games they’ve led by 15 or more at any point. They went 47-0 in the regular season and are 5-0 in the playoffs after leading by 15-plus.

Three other teams never blew a 15-point lead in the regular season, but none of them were perfect in half as many games as the Warriors. The Utah Jazz were 22-0, the Indiana Pacers were 16-0, and the Minnesota Timberwolves were 6-0 after leading by 15 or more points. In total, the league was 734-72 (.911) after leading by 15-plus.

The biggest lead the Warriors had in a game they lost was 14 points. They led an April 7 game in New Orleans by 14 late in the second quarter, but lost it by the middle of the third and eventually lost the game.

They got their revenge in the playoffs, coming back from 18 points down in the fourth quarter of Game 3 of the first round on their way to a sweep. That was one of just two playoff games in which a team blew a lead of 15 or more points and lost. The other team to do it was the Milwaukee Bucks, who led Game 3 of the first round by 18 points, before losing in double-overtime.

The Atlanta Hawks have led nearly as many games by 15-plus as the Warriors have. But they’ve blown three of those leads: in Boston on Feb. 11, in Philadelphia on March 7, and in Chicago on the last night of the regular season.

The Clippers were 38-0 after leading by 15-plus in the regular season last year, but blew two leads of 15-plus in the playoffs.

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Budenholzer faces second-guessing after decision to sit Carroll


VIDEO: Play of the Day: Pierce wins Game 3 at the buzzer

WASHINGTON — Frank Vogel can probably empathize with Mike Budenholzer.

In Game 1 of the 2013 Eastern Conference finals, Vogel took Roy Hibbert — the league’s best rim protector — off the floor for the Indiana Pacers’ final defensive possession, only to watch LeBron James drive for the game-winning layup at the buzzer. Vogel’s decision, of course, was second-guessed for the next couple of days.

Budenholzer, the 2014-15 Coach of the Year, is now in a similar position after leaving DeMarre Carroll off the floor for the final possession of Game 3 of the conference semifinals on Saturday. The 6-8 Carroll, the Hawks’ best perimeter defender, was on the bench as Paul Pierce hit the game-winner over 6-1 Dennis Schroder.

After the game, Carroll seemed to insinuate that it was his call to keep him on the bench, saying that Budenholzer did put him in the game, but “I didn’t feel comfortable, as far as physically.”

After practice on Sunday, though, Carroll changed his tune.

“Me and coach, we discussed the situation,” Carroll said, “we discussed the sub, and we felt that was the best group at the time, because they had come all the way back. And due that I didn’t play in a quarter and a half, we felt that was the best group to give us the best shot to get that stop.”

The group that was on the floor:

  • Schroder, who was initially guarding Will Bynum.
  • Shelvin Mack, guarding Ramon Sessions.
  • Kent Bazemore, guarding Bradley Beal.
  • Kyle Korver, initially guarding Pierce.
  • Mike Muscala, guarding Marcin Gortat.

That was the group (for the most part) that brought the Hawks back from 21 points down to tie the game with 14.1 seconds on the clock. But that wasn’t necessarily the best group to defend the Wizards for those final 14.1 seconds.

Budenholzer confirmed Sunday that Carroll is the Hawks’ best wing defender.

“But considering he hadn’t played the entire fourth quarter,” Budenholzer said, “then there’s lots of things that go into making decisions. So you evaluate, you listen, and you make a decision. That’s what coaches do.”

Carroll was, basically, out of the game since the 1:57 mark of the third quarter. But the strange thing is that he was on the floor for the Wizards’ previous possession.

After Schroder hit two free throws to pull the Hawks within a point with 23.8 seconds left, the Wizards called timeout and Budenholzer put Carroll in the game against a small Wizards lineup (Otto Porter in Gortat’s place).

That possession lasted less than two seconds, as Schroder immediately fouled Bynum. And after Muscala tied the game, it was Carroll that Budenholzer chose to sit when he needed a bigger guy to defend Gortat.

Seemingly, Carroll could have been out there instead of Mack or Korver, or even Schroder for that matter, because Carroll has the ability to stay in front of the Washington guards.

As for how his team – the unit he had out there – defended the final possession, Budenholzer has no complaints. When Bynum set a screen for Pierce, Schroder switched onto the ball. Though Pierce needed help from the glass, it didn’t hurt that he was shooting over a guy that’s six inches shorter than he is.

“There was a very good screen set,” Budenholzer said. “Considering the screen and the separation, it was a good read and a good decision. And I thought the individual defense was good. The help, the contest from Kent Bazemore was good. And Paul Pierce hit a tough shot.”

Asked if, given another chance, he would have fought harder for the opportunity to be on the floor, Carroll answered, “no comment.”

While the Wizards might have another big, last-minute offensive possession in this series, it probably won’t come with the same circumstances, where the Hawks’ third string was responsible for giving their team a chance to win. So Budenholzer probably won’t face the same decision he faced on Saturday.

That doesn’t mean he’ll escape the second-guessing.

Wall officially out for Game 3


VIDEO: GameTime: How the John Wall injury will affect the Wizards

WASHINGTON — To no one’s surprise, the Washington Wizards will be without point guard John Wall in Game 3 of their conference semifinals series against the Atlanta Hawks on Saturday (5 p.m. ET, ESPN). Wizards coach Randy Wittman did not elaborate on Wall’s condition or his status for the rest of the series.

Wall injured his left hand and wrist in the second quarter of Game 1 on Sunday. He finished that game, but missed Game 2 on Tuesday, because of the swelling and pain. A day later, further exams revealed five non-displaced fractures.

On Friday, Wall said that he’d need to be able to dribble with his left hand to be able to play again. Ramon Sessions (21 points and four assists in Game 2) will start in his place again.

Including Tuesday’s loss, the Wizards are 1-3 without Wall this season. In the playoffs, they’ve scored 115.7 points per 100 possessions with him on the floor and just 95.5 with him off the floor.

“I’m not going to put somebody on the floor that’s John,” Wittman said. “We just got to be who we are. We got to play within ourselves. We got to all play aggressive. We [need] ball movement more.

“John makes a lot of plays. The ball’s in his hands a lot. Now, the ball can’t stick. We got to either attack, [take a] shot, or the ball’s got to move.”

Wizards will wait and see with Wall


VIDEO: GameTime: Latest on John Wall’s health status

WASHINGTON — Though it seems doubtful he will play, neither John Wall nor his coach would rule the point guard out of Game 3 of the Washington Wizards’ conference semifinals series against the Atlanta Hawks on Saturday (5 p.m. ET, ESPN).

Wall did not practice on Friday and hasn’t tried dribbling with his fractured left hand since before Game 2 in Atlanta on Tuesday. The swelling in his hand has gone down some, but it’s still a long way from looking normal.

“It’s moving better,” Wall said, “but there’s still pain there.”

So Wall and Wizards coach Randy Wittman will wait and see if anything is different on Saturday. And they seem to be keeping the door open for Wall to return at any point. Wall doesn’t want to hear anything that says, “7-10 days” or “2-4 weeks.”

“I don’t want no timetable, he said. “I’m just taking it day by day.”

And Wall couldn’t even tell you where the five fractures are in his hand and wrist.

“When [the doctor] started talking about that, I just put my head down,” he said. “I didn’t want to hear no more, to be honest with you.”

The Hawks and Wizards have had three days off since Game 2, but now play every other day through Game 6 (if necessary), with Game 7 in Atlanta scheduled for May 18.

“We just got to go, basically, 24 hours at a time here,” Wittman said.

The five fractures are in Wall’s non-shooting hand, but Wall needs that hand to get where he needs to go and make plays.

“I can’t do anything if I can’t dribble,” he said. “You got to be able to dribble. If not, it’s basically just taping my hand behind my back and saying, ‘play with one hand.’ It’s not happening in this league.”

Even if the swelling and pain go away, the Wizards will have to determine if Wall is risking more damage to his hand and wrist if he plays. The point guard believes that decision would be up to him.

“If the pain goes away and I can dribble and do those things again,” Wall said, “it’s all up to me. Do I feel like it’s a risk to hurt my hand even more down the road, or do I feel like I can take the risk to play? … and how competitive I am. If I’m able to do those things, dribble, do what I want to do, and be myself, then there’s a great percentage I will play. But if I can’t be myself, there’s no point in going out there.”

Wittman, who took umbrage with a Washington Post report that said Wall clashed with team doctors about the initial diagnosis of no fractures, doesn’t want his player sacrificing his future for this series.

“The doctors make that decision if there’s a risk,” Wittman said. “We’re not going to put the kid at risk. That won’t happen. I guarantee you that. If the doctor says there’s a risk of hurting it worse, then he’s not playing. I won’t let that happen.”

The Wizards will cross that bridge if they come to it. For now, they’re preparing to play Game 3 without their best player, though there won’t be any final decision on that until Saturday.

Wizards’ Wall may be done for playoffs


VIDEO: NBA TV Update: John Wall injury news

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — The Washington Wizards announced Thursday afternoon that point guard John Wall has “five non-displaced fractures in his left wrist and hand.” The team didn’t give an update on Wall’s status for the rest of the conference semifinals, but it’s hard to imagine that he’ll be able to play.

Wall injured his wrist late in the second quarter of the Wizards’ Game 1 victory in Atlanta on Sunday, trying to break his fall after missing a fast-break layup. He stayed in the game and finished with 18 points, seven rebounds and 13 assists, but his hand swelled up after that, and he didn’t play in Atlanta’s Game 2 win on Tuesday.

Wall has been one of the best player’s of the postseason thus far, averaging 17.4 points and 12.6 assists. With the Wizards playing small more than they did in the regular season, Wall has taken advantage of the extra space and sliced up the Toronto and Atlanta defenses. Though they scored less than a point per possession on Tuesday, the Wizards have been the most improved offensive team from the regular season to the playoffs by a wide margin.

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In five playoff games, Wall has created 30.8 points per game via assists, 12 more than any other player in the postseason. His teammates have an effective field goal percentage of 60.5 percent off his passes.

Having earned a split in Atlanta, a healthy Wizards team would have a good shot at getting to the conference finals for the first time since 1979. But assuming Wall is out, they’re in trouble.

In the regular season, Washington was 12.5 points per 100 possessions better with Wall on the floor than with him off. In the playoffs, the offense has scored 115.7 points per 100 possessions in 191 minutes with Wall on the floor and just 96.0 in 102 minutes with him off the floor.

Ramon Sessions is a decent back-up and helped narrow that on-off gap after arriving in a deadline-day trade. But he doesn’t have the quickness, size or decision-making skills that Wall does. And he’s not nearly as good a defender either.

The Wizards will likely have to make due without their most important player, asking more of Bradley Beal offensively. They couldn’t get the stops they needed down the stretch, but they were within five points of the Hawks with less than six minutes to go in Game 2. And they’re not about to say that their season is over.

“All of us have to step up a little bit more,” Wizards coach Randy Wittman said after practice Thursday. “John’s, no question, a big part of our team. But that doesn’t limit what this team can continue to do.”

“By no means do we feel like this series is over or our goals change,” Paul Pierce added. “We’re going to continue to go out there, reach for our goals, and continue to fight each and every night. We did a good job at cutting this series to 1-1, to get home-court advantage. So it’s up to everybody to rally around one another, use some motivation, and try to win these games, especially for John.”

Still, it seems the playoffs have become a battle of attrition, and the Wizards have lost their general.

Blogtable: Your advice for LaMarcus Aldridge?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: How many MVPs for Curry? | Best bench in playoffs? | Aldridge’s next move?



VIDEOLaMarcus Aldridge says he loves being in Portland

> You’re LaMarcus Aldridge’s closest friend, his confidant. When he asks you what he should do this summer as an unrestricted free agent, what do you tell him?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comI tell him the same thing I tell all my friends who are contemplating big life decisions (job changes, marriage, etc.): Make a list of pros and cons, rank them in importance to you and, once you make your decision, don’t second-guess it. Yeah, I try to stay above the fray so I’m still their friend and confidant after they mess up the decision. Not specific enough for blogtable? Fine. I tell Aldridge, if he wants to win, win soon and possibly win multiple times, he heeds what the Spurs have to say when they woo him. But if he wants winning to mean the most, he stays right where he is in Portland, hitches up his big-boy pants and gets ‘er done there.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Buy a ticket to S-A-N A-N-T-O-N-I-O. Tim Duncan and Tony Parker aren’t done. Kawhi Leonard is the real deal as a viable elite level partner for years. You can be playing in The 2016 Finals.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: That friendship doesn’t come cheap. I could use a really nice vacation or a new car. After that, I tell him not to move just for the sake of moving. “It has run it’s course” is not a good reason to leave a team and a city that has treated him well and still has the chance to win big in the future. If getting back home to Texas is a priority, that’s one thing. If he sees another situation that will definitely be better, fine. But it is hard to see many places that would top the one he has now.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: I’d tell him to follow his happiness, not the paycheck. He’s already banked roughly $90 million for his career and unless he’s a fool, he still has a good chunk of that. At this point his priorities should be chasing a title, making money and living where he feels comfortable, in that order. I’d end our conversation with this: Tim Duncan thinks you’d be a good successor in San Antonio.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: It’s his decision and I’m not going to try to change his mind, but I’d remind him that he’s got a pretty good thing going in Portland. Most importantly, the Blazers are a stable organization with a good owner. Terry Stotts is a very good coach and at the time of Wesley Matthews‘ injury, Portland was one of only three teams that ranked in the top 10 in both offensive and defensive efficiency. If they can keep the band together and Matthews is healthy by next March, they can be a contender again. Of course, the change to play for the Spurs and alongside Kawhi Leonard for the next four years is probably tempting. And while I have LaMarcus’ ear, I’d tell him to cut down on the mid-range jumpers and get to the basket more often.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Play the field to your advantage big fella. Entertain all legitimate opportunities to chase a championship, wherever that might lead. I understand you have an allegiance to the organization and the fans in Portland. They’ve been great to you and you have emerged as one of the elite players in the league during your time there. And as your best friend, I love it there as well. But you owe it yourself, particularly at this stage of your career, to explore all of your options and decide what’s best for you, and only you, at this juncture. Don’t worry about anyone else’s feelings or wishes. For once, this is all about you and what you want out of the rest of your career.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: I’m reminding him that he’ll never be appreciated by any other city as much as he will be adored by Portland if he chooses to stay. I’m also urging him to exercise marketplace wisdom: The TV money of 2016 is going to create a huge flurry of player movement and a lot of bad decisions – which will leave the stable franchises standing stronger than ever.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: I don’t tell him anything in particular, so much as I ask him some questions. What is he looking for? Does he want to be more famous? Is he looking to make themost money that’s available to him, or is he OK with taking a little less? Does he have to be the best player on the team he plays for, or could he take a secondary role? Is winning a title the most important thing at this stage in his career? Has he talked to the Blazers and have they explained to him their plans going forward in terms of continuing to strengthen the roster? Does he want to play his entire career in the same city? LaMarcus Aldridge has to decide what he wants to do next. The answers to all these questions should lead him closer to making a decision about his future.

Blogtable: Best bench in playoffs?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: How many MVPs for Curry? | Best bench in playoffs? | Aldridge’s next move?



VIDEOThe close-knit Warriors have perhaps the NBA’s best bench

> Of the eight playoff teams still standing, who has the best bench? And who’s the most important player off that bench?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: Golden State has the best bench of the teams still playing and Andre Iguodala is the most important guy coming off it. Iguodala is battle-tested as a veteran and he’s the right combination of size and quickness to help out in multiple ways, making him more than a situational guy.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Warriors. The best team in the league has the best bench and plenty of depth that can hit you from so many different direction. But if I’m singling one player out it’s Andre Iguodala, who can do damage at both ends of the floor.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: The Warriors. Andre Iguodala and David Lee would start at forward for a lot of teams. And if Leandro Barbosa is making a few baskets a game, that’s a lift for the backcourt. Iguodala is the most important of the reserves. If he’s not hitting shots, and he definitely is not these days, he is still the guy able to defend multiple positions and provide the versatility for Golden State to play big or small, a component of their success. If Iguodala does start connecting, the Warriors are even better.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: My choice is the Warriors, who can put five reserves on the floor for extended minutes and really not suffer much. Andre Iguodala would appear to be the logical “most important” reserve, because he gets the most minutes and started last season and is valued for his defense against high-scoring wing players. But I might hedge and suggest Marreese Speights, not because he’s the best player coming off the bench, but brings the level of toughness the Warriors lack overall in their starting lineup.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: I dug into the numbers, because that’s what I do. I looked at who’s been coming off the bench for all eight teams in the playoffs, and calculated the team’s NetRtg (point differential per 100 possessions), in the regular season and playoffs, when at least two of those guys have been on the floor. Here they are, from best to worst…

  1. Houston: +7.6
  2. Golden State: +5.0
  3. Chicago: +4.2
  4. Cleveland: +1.7
  5. Washington: -0.7
  6. Atlanta: -0.9
  7. Memphis: -1.1
  8. L.A. Clippers: -4.2

I was a little surprised to see Houston at the top, but they’ve been great with Corey Brewer, Pablo Prigioni and Josh Smith on the floor. Brewer’s relentless pursuit of easy baskets on the break is important, but Smith is the most important of that group, because of his size and versatility. All that being said, Andre Iguodala is the best and most important reserve left in the playoffs.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: The Warriors have the kind of bench that you see on championship teams. They haven’t needed them to save the day or anything yet, but you figure they will at some point throughout the process. I’m going with co-MIPs off that bench: Shaun Livingston and Leandro Barbosa will have moments, and perhaps an entire half or even a game, where they are needed to help change the situation for the Warriors. I’m not sure when or where, but I feel it deep down. At some point, the backcups to the best backcourt in the game will be called upon to help save the day.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: The Bulls have the best bench in the East, but I’m giving the league-wide advantage to the Warriors because of Andre Iguodala – an Olympic and World champion, NBA All-Star and All-Defensive teamer with more big-game potential than anyone at both ends of the floor.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: Golden State, by a mile. if I had to pick a runner-up I might go with Cleveland, where they’ve got a lot of experience and options accumulated, but I don’t think any team remaining can compete with the Warriors’ bench. Actually, I think Golden State’s second team could have won a first-round series in the Eastern Conference, that’s how strong they are. And for me their MIP is Andre Iguodala, a guy who can play multiple positions, can defend multiple positions, and is a leader even without being in the starting lineup.

NBA-Blogtable-Playoffs-Best-Bench-Team-BannerFor more debates, go to #AmexNBA or www.nba.com/homecourtadvantage.