Posts Tagged ‘John Schuhmann’

Blogtable: Second- or third-year player ready to rise the ranks?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Rising second- or third-year player? | Playoff teams set to stumble? | Your all-lefty team



VIDEOOtto Porter talks about his expanded role in the 2015 playoffs

> Last week we asked for your early Rookie of the Year candidate. This week we want you to name a second- or third-year player who’s primed for a breakout season.

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Magic forward Aaron Gordon generated some buzz with his improved play, particularly his shooting range, in the Orlando summer league. But I’m going with Washington’s Otto Porter. Heading into his third season, Porter is a strong candidate to more than double his averages so far – 4.7 ppg, 2.5 rpg, 15.8 mpg – because he did it in the Wizards’ small, 10-playoff-game sample size in spring. In a significant turnaround, the slender forward averaged 10.8 points and 8.0 rebounds in the postseason. And Washington was 10.7 points per 100 possessions better than the opposition with Porter on the floor vs. 8.7 worse when he was off. His opportunities will only increase with Paul Pierce‘s departure and frankly, it’s time.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.comOtto Porter. He came up strong when coach Randy Wittman finally let him off the leash in the playoffs. With more minutes next season, he’s ready to shine.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com There are some rather obvious candidates such as Portland Trail Blazers guard CJ McCollum, the “Greek Freak”, Giannis Antetokounmpo of the Milwaukee Bucks, as well as Los Angeles Lakers guard Jordan Clarkson. But I’m going with Aaron Gordon of the Magic. He was never really healthy for much of his rookie season and then dealt with inconsistency when he healed. But there’s no doubt he’s an amazing athlete in the mold of Blake Griffin and he has skills, which he showed during a terrific effort in summer league, flashing an improved mid-range jumper. I hope new coach Scott Skiles is the right coach for him.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Otto Porter was out of the Wizards’ rotation in late March, but played a big role in the Wizards’ offensive reinvention in the playoffs, while also slowing down DeMar DeRozan on the other end of the floor. Porter should be Washington’s starting small forward and part of a more dynamic offense this season. If he can shoot 3-pointers, John Wall can turn him into the next Trevor Ariza.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Based on all of the chatter coming from Summer League, coupled with the new regime in place in Chicago, Doug McDermott should have the stage to break out with the Bulls. I don’t know exactly what his role will be, but the opportunity for a floor-spacer with his skill set on a what should be one of the better teams in the Eastern Conference, is there. Like Jimmy Butler and Nikola Mirotic before him, “McBuckets” has a flag to carry in this department. There is a similar opportunity awaiting Mitch McGary in Oklahoma City and Aaron Gordon in Orlando.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.com: CJ McCollum broke out in the final month of last season with four games of 26 points or more, including three concluding playoff performances against Memphis in which he produced 26, 18 and 33 points. The Blazers will give him every opportunity to become one of the NBA’s top sixth men, based on their need for scoring in the absence of LaMarcus Aldridge.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog It seems like people maybe sort of forgot about him, after he suffered a season-ending knee injury, but I think Jabari Parker is going to have a big year once he gets completely healthy. With a big man (Greg Monroe) behind him, Parker’s defensive deficiencies will matter less, and his ability to score isn’t going anywhere. And coach Jason Kidd has shown time and again an ability to put players in positions to be most successful.

Blogtable: Your all-time, all-lefty team

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Rising second- or third-year player? | Playoff teams set to stumble? | Your all-lefty team



VIDEODavid Robinson’s career milestones

> Hall of Famer David Robinson turns 50 on Thursday. Perfect opportunity for us to ask you to name your all-time, All NBA Lefty Team (you can go as deep as you wish).

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comAs a lefty myself, this was a gratifying exercise, so I took my roster to the current NBA limit of 15 deep. A pretty impressive and, in my view, pretty unassailable list.

Guards: Lenny Wilkens, Nate Archibald, Manu Ginobili, Gail Goodrich, Michael Redd.
Forwards: Chris Mullin, Chris Bosh, Toni Kukoc, Billy Cunningham, Lamar Odom.
Centers: Bill Russell, David Robinson, Artis Gilmore, Bob Lanier, Dave Cowens.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: When you say lefty — and I am one — I think of shooters. So let’s begin with my apology to Bill Russell.

Forward — Billy Cunningham: The athleticism and scoring ability of the “Kangaroo Kid” gets lost in the fog of time.
Forward — Chris Mullin: Oh, what a sweet, sweet stroke.
Center — Willis Reed: The jumper on those great Knicks teams was automatic.
Guard — Gail Goodrich: Lived in the shadows of Jerry West and Elgin Baylor, but attacked the rim and could fill up the hoop on his way to the Hall of Fame.
Guard — Nate Archibald: Nothing “Tiny” about leading the league in scoring and assists in the one season.

Shaun Powell, NBA.com: David Robinson at center, Gail Goodrich and Lenny Wilkens in the backcourt, Chris Mullin and Chris Bosh at the forwards. My first big man off the bench is Dave Cowens (over Artis Gilmore and Billy Cunningham) and my sixth man is Nate Archibald. They’re coached by Phil Jackson and the First Fan is President Barack Obama.

John Schuhmann, NBA.comIn researching this answer, I realized that the top 35 scorers in NBA history are all righties. David Robinson is the first lefty on the list at No. 36, and Bob Lanier (46) and Gail Goodrich (48) are the only other lefties in the top 50. Of course, Bill Russell should be on everybody’s NBA Mt. Rushmore. Here’s my rotation…

Point guards: Tiny Archibald and Lenny Wilkins
Wings: Manu Ginobili, Gail Goodrich, James Harden and Chris Mullin
Bigs: Chris Bosh, David Robinson and Bill Russell

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: You start with a first five of Bill Russell, David Robinson and Chris Mullin in the frontcourt and Tiny Archibald and James Harden in the backcourt. My second unit is Dave Cowens, Willis Reed and Chris Bosh in the frontcourt and Manu Ginobili and Lenny Wilkens in the backcourt. Bob Lanier, Gail Goodrich and Artis Gilmore are getting jerseys, too. And we’ll figure out a way to get minutes for all of these stellar bigs. This group is a blend of old and new and I’m all about historical perspective, so I can see where Harden and even Ginobili might not make the cut for some people. But I’m a realist, they’d be monsters in any era. Manu’s a future Hall of Famer and if it weren’t for Steph Curry, Harden would be the reigning KIA MVP.

Ian Thomsen, NBA.comHere are my picks …

Center: Bill Russell
Forward: Billy Cunningham
Forward: Chris Mullin
Guard: Manu Ginobili
Guard: Tiny Archibald

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogDo we count LeBron James, who writes left-handed? Leaving the King aside, here’s my squad: My all-time favorite lefty point guard has always been Kenny Anderson, throwing those one-handed dart passes off the dribble. At the two, I’ll go with Manu Ginobili, who should combine with “Mr. Chibbs” to form a dynamic backcourt. And for a lefty frontcourt, how about Chris Mullin at the 3, David Robinson at the 4, and Bill Russell at the 5? Off the bench, in no particular order or attention to position, but just southpaws I’ve enjoyed watching: Tiny Archibald, Stacey Augmon, Zach Randolph, Derrick Coleman, Mike Conley, Josh Smith and James Harden.

Report: Cavs deal Haywood, Miller to Portland

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — The Cleveland Cavaliers have reportedly found a landing place for the $10.5 million, non-guaranteed contract of Brendan Haywood, according to Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports. The Cavs won’t be getting a player back in return, however.

The Blazers are able to absorb the contracts of Haywood and Miller, because they have about $25 million of cap space, thanks to the departures of four starters. Haywood’s contract would have become guaranteed on Aug. 1, so the Cavs had to get rid of it (via trade or by waiving him) by then.

The Cavs will get two trade exceptions in the deal, one worth $10.52 million and another worth $2.85 million (Miller’s salary). Miller exercised his player option in June, but won’t be making another run at a championship with his close friend, LeBron James. Even if the Blazers waive Miller (like they’ll do with Haywood), the Cavs can’t re-sign him for a year.

As the Cavs’ roster now stands (with qualifying offers for Matthew Dellavedova and Tristan Thompson on the books), the trade takes their 2015-16 luxury tax bill from $58.1 million to just $16.5 million, but with just 10 players under contract.

Re-signing Thompson and Dellavedova to starting salaries greater than their qualifying offers will take that tax bill higher. So will filling out the rest of the roster. There’s still a need for another wing (either J.R. Smith or his replacement), and Sasha Kaun could be added to the frontline.

The trade exceptions are good for a year and could be used to add more talent, either during the season or in free agency next summer. But for every additional dollar of salary they add with a future trade, the Cavs would be paying $3.25 or more in luxury tax.

Rookie Booker could have edge up on Suns’ vets for playing time


VIDEO: Video: Suns head coach Jeff Hornacek joins NBA TV

LAS VEGAS — The San Antonio Spurs won the Summer League with just two guys – Kyle Anderson and Jonathan Simmons – with contracts for the coming season. The team they beat had twice as many.

The Phoenix Suns had three young vets and the only 2015 Lottery pick in the final eight of the Summer League. Three of those guys – Devin Booker (the No. 13 pick this year), Archie Goodwin (the No. 29 pick in 2013) and T.J. Warren (the No. 14 pick in 2014) – could be competing for minutes off the bench at the wing positions come October.

Both Goodwin (15.9 points per game on 47 percent shooting) and Warren (18.7, 54 percent) were more consistent offensively than Booker (15.3, 40 percent). But if you listen to Suns coach Jeff Hornacek, you conclude that the rookie will have the edge over the two vets when training camp opens.

Hornacek watched Summer League hoping to see Goodwin and Warren show that they can be trusted defensively. Neither has had a big role yet with the Suns, and it sounds like their coach didn’t see enough to guarantee one this season.

“As coaches,” Hornacek told NBA.com at halftime of the Summer League final, “we always say you’re more likely to stay on the court if you’re just playing good defense and not scoring more than if you’re scoring a couple of times and giving up a lot of points. We want to see both sides of that. We got some guys who can put the ball in the hole, but we got to see them play some defense.

“They’re making some improvements. We want to see it on a more consistent basis. With T.J. and Archie, what I’m looking at is their team defense. Are they on the nail? Are they helping out? Are they getting back? Are they closing out hard? I’ve seen spurts of it, but we want to get that up to 95 percent of the time, not just 20 percent of the time.”

Booker got a more positive review from his new coach.

“He’s pretty solid all around,” Hornacek said of the rookie. “Obviously, he can stroke it. And defensively, when I look at him, most of the time he’s in the right position.”

Hornacek is likely to start Brandon Knight and Eric Bledsoe together in the backcourt, believing that the Suns can be dynamic offensively with dual ball-handlers. Knight was acquired at the trade deadline and missed 16 of the final 17 games of the season, so he played just 11 games (235 minutes) with Bledsoe. P.J. Tucker and Markieff Morris are back at the forward positions, but the 6-foot-6 Booker could be the first wing off the bench.

Opening night is still more than three months away, but the rookie is off to a good start in the eyes of his coach.

Hammon, Simmons highlight Spurs’ Summer League title


VIDEO: Video: Summer League championship game highlights

LAS VEGAS — At Summer League, you don’t always get good basketball. But you always get good stories. And the San Antonio Spurs’ Summer League championship was about good stories.

First, there was Becky Hammon, the first ever female Summer League head coach, leading her team to a 6-1 record and the title her in Las Vegas. A year ago, she was playing for the San Antonio Stars. And already, she’s got some head coaching experience.

“I’m just trying to progress as a coach,” Hammon said about her 10 days in Las Vegas. “It was eye-opening in a lot of different areas for me, just how much my mind was reeling during timeouts.”

But Hammon clearly wasn’t reserved in her new role. She took charge in the huddles and gave the refs the business when a call didn’t go her way.

“It was just a great learning process for me,” she said. “And the guys had to take my mistakes – and I made plenty – and we just kept hanging together as a group.”

A big part of that group and another great story was Jonathon Simmons, who was voted the championship game MVP after scoring 23 points on 7-for-14 shooting.

Simmons played at two different junior colleges before finishing his college career at the University of Houston. He played a season in the ABL and then made the Spurs’ D-League team through an open tryout two years ago.

After playing three games for the Brooklyn Nets’ Summer League team, the Spurs gave Simmons an NBA contract. He came to Las Vegas and averaged 17.0 points, 4.0 rebounds, 3.0 assists and 1.7 steals for the Summer Spurs.

“It’s just a blessing,” Simmons told The Starters after the game on Monday. “I didn’t see it coming. I’m still kind of shocked right now. But I’m just ready to get to work.”

Simmons is a 6-6 shooting guard who can jump out of the gym and had multiple highlight dunks over the last few days of Summer League. He was voted third team All-Defense in the D-League last season.

“I just played to my strengths,” he said. “You give me the drive, I’m going to take the drive. If you give me the jumper, I’m going to take the jumper.”

Down the stretch of the title game, Hammon put the ball in his hands and had him running the offense, even with Spurs vet Kyle Anderson on the floor. Simmons had earned the coach’s trust. And when the championship had been won, one good story had great things to say about the other.

“I already love her,” Simmons said of Hammon, “and I’ve barely [known] here a couple of days. She’s a real cool coach. She’s a player coach. We like that.”

Hammon takes Spurs to title game


VIDEO: Video: Anderson scores 22 points in the Spurs’ win over the Hawks.

LAS VEGAS — Becky Hammon has already made history as the first female Summer League head coach in NBA history. Now she can add to that by bringing another championship to San Antonio.

Hammon’s Spurs will face the Phoenix Suns in the third annual Summer League championship game on Monday (9 p.m. ET, NBA TV). In the semifinals on Sunday, San Antonio came back from 15 points down to beat the Atlanta Hawks, while Phoenix knocked off the previously undefeated New Orleans Pelicans thanks to a 10-1 run to start the fourth quarter.

The Spurs are led by Summer League MVP Kyle Anderson, the second year player who played in just 33 games as a rookie. They’ve also gotten key contributions from fringe NBA’ers Jarrell Eddie, who shot 3-for-5 from 3-point range on Sunday, and Jonathan Simmons, who threw down two of the tournament’s best dunks (one, two) on the Hawks.

“I’ve learned a lot,” Hammon said of her first head coaching experience. “Your mind is constantly moving and thinking about different scenarios, not only your team but on their team, trying to figure out things that maybe you can exploit. I’ve learned it’s more challenging than being a player on multiple levels. That’s an eye-opening thing for me.”

The Summer League tournament has lacked some of the top talent from the 2015 Draft. Only three ’15 lottery picks were left by the round of 16 and only one was left in the quarterfinals. The Suns’ Devin Booker was that one, and he had his best game in Sunday’s win over the Pelicans, scoring 31 points on 10-for-17 shooting and looking like a guy who will do well playing off Phoenix guards Brandon Knight and Eric Bledsoe.

While Anderson and Simmons are the only Summer League Spurs who have a contract for next season, the Suns’ Summer League squad includes roster vets Archie Goodwin, Alex Len (who didn’t play on Sunday) and T.J. Warren. Those three, along with Booker, will be part of a revamped Suns roster this fall.

Before they do that, they’ll compete for a Summer League championship.

Report: Rockets acquire Ty Lawson from Denver

VIDEO: The Starters discuss Ty Lawson trade from Denver to Houston.

LAS VEGAS — The Houston Rockets are trying to keep up in the Western Conference arms race, trading for Denver Nuggets point guard Ty Lawson, according to Yahoo’s Adrian Wojnarowski

The Denver Nuggets have reached agreement to trade guard Ty Lawson to the Houston Rockets, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

Houston will send Kostas Papanikolaou, Pablo Prigioni, Joey Dorsey, Nick Johnson and a protected first-round draft pick to Denver, sources said. Along with Lawson, the Nuggets will send a future second-round pick to Houston.

Lawson, 27, entered treatment for alcohol abuse last week after he was arrested on DUI charges for the second time in six months.

If Lawson can resolve his off-court issues, he’s an obvious upgrade at point guard, with Patrick Beverley likely moving back to the bench after two seasons as the starter. Lawson also relieves James Harden of some of the ball-handling and play-making duties. And he will certainly help the Rockets play with pace.

The deal puts the Rockets right at the luxury tax line with 12 guaranteed contracts on their roster (once they sign first round pick Sam Dekker. But they were in the conference finals less than two months ago, could be healthier this season, and just upgraded their weakest position.

Lawson’s departure allows No. 7 pick Emmanuel Mudiay to run the show in Denver, with the re-signed Jameer Nelson as his veteran back-up and mentor.

Sixers still lacking at the point


VIDEO: Video: Jahlil Okafor joins The Starters at Summer League

LAS VEGAS — The Philadelphia 76ers have reportedly reached an agreement with point guard Scottie Wilbekin on a contract. Four days ago, they signed point guard Pierre Jackson.

Neither has any NBA experience. In fact, the Sixers are the only team this summer that hasn’t signed a free agent that has played in NBA before. They haven’t even signed any of their own free agents. And with all due respect to the 6-foot-2 Wilbekin and the 5-foot-10 Jackson, there’s still a big hole at point guard in Philly.

Sixers general manager Sam Hinkie isn’t desperate and, in year three of his tenure, is obviously still taking the long view. Philly went into free agency with the most cap space and is now only challenged by the Portland Trail Blazers (who lost four starters) in that department. The Sixers used some of their cap space to steal Draft picks from the Sacramento Kings, but the three players they got in that deal – Carl Landry, Nik Stauskas and Jason Thompson – won’t move the needle much on either end of the floor.

They don’t play point guard either. And though the position is important across the league, it’s particularly critical in Philadelphia, for a number of reasons…

  1. The Sixers like to play at a fast pace. They led the league in possessions per 48 minutes two seasons ago and ranked seventh last season. A good point guard pushes the pace while minimizing mistakes.
  2. The Sixers just traded their starting point guard, the reigning Rookie of the Year at the time, five months ago. Michael Carter-Williams had offensive issues and the trade wasn’t necessarily a bad one, but Carter-Williams did help their defense and it would be nice if Philly had a decent replacement.
  3. The Sixers’ two healthy building blocks are big men who can’t dribble the ball up the floor themselves. Nerlens Noel and Jahlil Okafor will develop faster if they have a a competent, pass-first point guard to get them the ball where and when they need it.

At this point, that point guard isn’t on the Sixers’ roster. Tony Wroten is a talented player who can get to the basket, but is looking to score more than run the offense. Isaiah Canaan gave the offense a little bit of a boost when he arrived at the trade deadline last season, but had a lower assist rate than Wroten. Ish Smith, who started at point for the Sixers in the last month of the season, is one of those free agents they haven’t re-signed.

If the Draft had gone differently and D’Angelo Russell was available when the Sixers picked at No. 3, we wouldn’t be having this discussion. But the Lakers took Russell, the Sixers took Okafor, and they still need a point guard.

The free agent market is pretty thin at this point, not that there were many great point guard options out there on July 1. Eighteen days later, the two best available point guards are restricted free agents Norris Cole and Matthew Dellavedova. They both have their strengths, but neither of those guys is ideal in regard to what the Sixers need.

Philly could absorb another contract into cap space, and there are a couple of teams with extra point guards. But Ty Lawson has off-the-court issues and Mario Chalmers has been better off the ball than on it.

One out-of-the-box option: Marcelo Huertas, a 32-year-old Brazilian point guard whose strength is running the pick-and-roll and who is reportedly looking to make the move to the NBA. While the idea of playing for a team that’s not ready to win more than 25 games may not appeal to Huertas, the Sixers can offer him both more money and more playing time than every other team out there. A short-term deal would make sense for both parties.

And Huertas would give the Sixers an upgrade at the position where they need one most.

Kaun could be Cavs newest big man


VIDEO: LeBron James hits a shot from his seat at Summer League

LAS VEGAS — LeBron James made an appearance at Summer League on Friday, watching his Cleveland Cavaliers play Karl-Anthony Towns and the Minnesota Timberwolves. James sat courtside with Cavs GM David Griffin, head coach David Blatt, assistants Tyronn Lue and Larry Drew, as well as a seven-footer who could be the next member of Cleveland’s frontline.

His name is Sasha Kaun. He’s a 30-year old center from Russia, who played at Kansas and was selected in the second round of the 2008 Draft. The Cavs acquired his rights that night from the Seattle SuperSonics, but Kaun has played the last seven seasons for CSKA Moscow.

Kaun averaged 10.2 points and 3.9 rebounds in 67 games with CSKA last season, shooting 68 percent from the field. Kaun recently told the Lawrence Journal-World that “as of now, I’m done playing in Russia and pretty sure I’m done in Europe.”

That would point to a possible contract with the Cavs, and all indications are that the team would like to have him on its roster come fall. Cleveland will be getting Anderson Varejao back from a torn Achilles this season, but Varejao has played just 126 (32 percent) of a possible 394 games over the last five years. And Cleveland could upgrade Kendrick Perkins‘ spot as the team’s third center by signing Kaun. Perkins is a free agent.

The issue is that the Cavs are limited in what they can pay Kaun. With only nine players signed (not including Brendan Haywood‘s $10.5 million, non-guaranteed contract), they’re already over the luxury tax line. They still have to pay restricted free agents Tristan Thompson and Matthew Dellavedova, and whomever they might trade Haywood for. It’s very likely that owner Dan Gilbert will be paying $200 million (salary + luxury tax) for his roster in 2015-16.

As taxpayers, the Cavs only have the taxpayer’s mid-level exception (which starts at a little less than $3.4 million) and minimum contracts to spend on new free agents or Kaun. And they’ve already used most of that tax MLE on Mo Williams. All that’s left is about $1.3 million (as a starting salary). So the biggest contract that could give Kaun is a three-year deal worth about $4.0 million.

If Kaun didn’t want to accept that, the Cavs could trade his rights to a team that could (and would be willing to) pay him more. Sports Illustrated’s Chris Mannix wrote last week that the Brooklyn Nets have talked to the Cavs about Kaun, though Brooklyn’s ill-advised addition of Andrea Bargnani may be an indication that they’ve moved on.

Kaun’s presence with the Cavs’ contingent on Friday is obviously a sign that he may be willing to make the financial sacrifice. And he has a history with Blatt. Along with current Cavs center Timofey Mozgov, Kaun played on the Russian National Team, coached by Blatt, at the 2010 World Championship and the 2012 Olympics, where the Russians won the bronze medal.

Andrea Bargnani is still in the NBA


VIDEO: Video: Nets coach Lionel Hollins discusses this year’s team

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — The Brooklyn Nets announced Sunday evening that they have agreed to terms with free agent Andrea Bargnani on a contract. Multiple reports say that the deal was for the veteran’s minimum (about $1.4 million for a player with nine years of experience), with a player option for 2016-17.

It seems like a low-risk move by the Nets, who apparently stole Bargnani from the Sacramento Kings, who had offered him more than the minimum. But at this point in his career, it’s unclear what Bargnani has to offer any team who dares to pay him anything.

Bargnani has long been a bad defender. Of 386 players who have logged at least 5,000 minutes in the nine years since Bargnani came into the league, only three – Ryan Gomes (108.9), Hakim Warrick (108.9) and Charlie Villanueva (109.5) – have had a higher on-court DefRtg (the number of points a player’s team allows per 100 possessions) than Bargnani (108.8).

He’s not a good (or willing) passer; His assist rate (7.4 assists per 100 possessions used) ranks 351st among those 386 players. And he’s a terrible rebounder for his size; he’s grabbed less than 10 percent of available rebounds when he’s been on the floor.

Bargnani is supposed to be a shooter and a floor spacer. But he has shot just 30 percent from 3-point range over the last four seasons.

He did shoot 37 percent from beyond the arc with the Knicks last season, but that was on just 41 attempts. And that’s the real issue. Bargnani doesn’t shoot many threes (or really space the floor) anymore.

In his first four seasons in the league, Bargnani took about one mid-range shot (between the paint and the 3-point line) for every 3-pointer. But over the last five seasons, his mid-range-to-threes rate has doubled.

20150712_bargnani_mr3

Bargnani is a decent mid-range shooter. But even over the last five years, his mid-range shots (43.3 percent, 0.87 points per shot) haven’t been worth as much as his threes (31.8 percent, 0.95 points per shot).

Bargnani doesn’t shoot well or often in the paint. And if he fancies himself a shooter and/or a floor spacer, he can’t be taking twice as many mid-range shots as 3-pointers. Last year’s rate of more than 4-to-1 is just awful.

Speaking of awful, last year’s Knicks went 17-65. And they were at their worst, getting outscored by 17.5 points per 100 possessions (16.5 points per 48 minutes), when Bargnani was on the floor.

The Nets needed another big to back up Thaddeus Young and Brook Lopez. Before Sunday, their only centers were Lopez and Willie Reed, who has never played in a NBA game.

But there were better options out there than Bargnani, who hasn’t been good at his one good skill in several years. It’s especially strange that a team looking to make moves with cap space next summer would dedicate any 2016-17 money (even if it’s a player option for the minimum) to a player like Bargnani. And my goodness, his relationship with an old-school, defense-first coach like Lionel Hollins will be fascinating to watch.

The good news for the Nets is that they didn’t give up three draft picks to get him.