Posts Tagged ‘Joe Johnson’

24-Second thoughts — May 10

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com


VIDEO: First and foremost, Happy Mother’s Day to all the Moms out there

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — It’s all about you, tonight, Deron Williams.

Someone has to be in the eye of the 2014 playoffs storm every night and since Roy Hibbert is off, it’s most definitely your turn.

World’s watching.

Brooklyn is definitely watching!

What’s it gonna be?

Heat @ Nets … #nosleeptilbrooklyn

24 – A quick Schuhbie Stat you can dip in ranch or blue cheese to get us ready …

And a little mood setter, too …

This is even better …

23 – I wonder if it bothers opponents to see LeBron James run through them in the lane like Godzilla through the middle of the city? #freighttrainjames

And he does it on both ends …

22 – The #NBAStyle Police have an APB out for Dwyane Wade

21 – Shaun Livingston from deep to end the first …(#freighttrainjames with 16 points in 12 minutes for the Heat)

20 – It should be bonkers at the Moda Center in Portland tonight for Game 3 of this playoff double-header (#RipCity) …

– #RedOut

19 – The D. Will-Hibbert connection strikes again …

18 – “Hey, I’m trying to watch the game people!”

17 – Another coaching vacancy coming?


VIDEO: Joe Johnson was hotter than fish grease in the first half

16 – The Barclays Bounce has the Nets playing with a wicked flow tonight. They’ve got it rocking. Ball is rotating like crazy on offense. The energy on both ends is high. They’ve got their largest lead of the series, 68-56 inside of five minutes to play in the third quarter.

It also helps when the elders move like they did years ago …

15 – There’s a Teletovic Outbreak in Brooklyn right now!

“Brooklyn” chants cranking up with the Nets blowing the game open in the third quarter. D. Will even hit a 3!

14 – Dust up time. Ray Allen vs Alan Anderson (I’m predicting double techs, nothing more … this game is over, btw! Nets raining 3s all night. It’s a wrap.)

13 – From the “What in the name of Naismith?” files …


VIDEO: Trail Blazers coach Terry Stotts checks in before tip-off

12 – We get Jay, Bey and Jake in Brooklyn. But they’ve got stars in Portland, too!

Jimmy Goldstein, too!

11 – A staggering 15-for-25 from deep for the Nets in a 14-point win to make things interesting …

But …

10 – Hey Underdog, “put that on a T-shirt!”

9 – Portland, we have a problem!

https://twitter.com/ChrisBHaynes/status/465333661265457153

8 – This look sums it all up for the home crowd in Portland …

7 – Bow down to Timmy, passing Karl Malone for 5th place on the career playoff scoring list …

6 – You don’t need advanced stats, analytics or any other tools when you have just plain math …

5 – I’ve been in the Moda Center (it was the Rose Garden then) when the home made runs like these. It can go from  zero to nuclear in a matter of seconds …

4 – That’s the idea #edgeofyourseat …

3 – Gregg Popovich spares no one!

And the results can be, in a word, breathtaking …

They’ve got this basketball thing down, too!

2 – Hard to argue with this at the moment, but we know where to find you when the season is done if your crystal ball has a crack in it  …

1 – Spurs fans don’t need to hang their heads. Your team just ran into a machine. Spurs have been at this, at this level, for nearly tw decades. #SpursWayDon’tPlay

#thenightdalightswentoutinripcity


VIDEO: Tim Duncan joins the playoff Fab Five!

Teletovic, Nets punish Heat ‘D’ in Game 3

By John Schuhmann, NBA.com


VIDEO: Heat vs. Nets: Game 3

NEW YORK – As the Chicago Bulls didn’t bother to defend Gerald Wallace and Reggie Evans in the first round of last year’s playoffs, Brooklyn Nets forward Mirza Teletovic sat.

Though his team was suffering from a lack of floor spacing, the floor-spacing big played just one garbage-time minute as the Nets got bounced in seven games. Teletovic, a 27-year-old rookie, had never gained the trust of coaches Avery Johnson and P.J. Carlesimo. He got a shot at the rotation for a few weeks after the All-Star break, shot decently, and then rode the pine the rest of the way.

This season, Teletovic had the trust of coach Jason Kidd from the start. His been in the rotation from Day 1 and has had a consistent role. Kidd has never been afraid use his bench for heavy minutes or in key situations.

His trust and his team’s depth paid off in Game 3 of the conference semifinals, a 104-90 victory over the Miami Heat in which Andray Blatche paced the Nets in the first half and in which Teletovic sparked the Nets’ game-deciding third-quarter run with three of his four 3-pointers.

After struggling offensively in the first two games of the series, Brooklyn broke out on Saturday, hitting a franchise-playoff-record 15 treys on 25 attempts and scoring 104 points on just 84 possessions. The passes were a notch crisper than they were in Game 2, and the Heat defense was punished for the attention it put on the ball.

“The thing that was great about it was the ball movement,” Joe Johnson, who shot 5-for-7 from beyond the arc, said, “us getting into the teeth of the defense and kicking out for wide open shots.”

Teletovic’s shots weren’t all wide open, but once he sees one go in, how open he is doesn’t seem to matter. He’s now 11-for-19 from beyond the arc in the series and 17-for-34 in six games against the Heat this season.

His defense has always been a question and is the biggest reason he never earned Carlesimo’s trust last year. But Kidd had him defending LeBron James for a stretch of the third, a period in which the Heat scored just 14 points.

As Miami struggled, Brooklyn found some separation by spreading the floor and moving the ball.

The Heat’s defense can be suffocating, but open shots can be had if the ball moves quickly. Teletovic’s first 3-pointer (video) was an open look from the right corner on a possession in which the Nets passed the ball eight times, including three times in the four seconds before Teletovic’s shot.

Other 3s were just one pass away, as Deron Williams took advantage of the attention he was getting from the Heat defense.

“Some of it came off our defensive schemes,” James said of the Nets’ 3-point shooting, “Shrink the floor on their perimeter guys and close out on their shooters.”

After missing all nine of his shots in Game 2 on Thursday, Williams shot just 3-for-11 in Game 3. The Heat haven’t given him anything easy all series.

But the reason why Williams has struggled to score is the same reason why he dished out 11 assists on Saturday. Because the Heat are showing him so many bodies when he has the ball, his teammates have some space. And Williams maximized his team’s opportunities by pushing the ball up the floor early and often.

“D-Will set the tone,” Kidd said, “by being aggressive and attacking.”

Three of Johnson’s 3s came on transition assists from Williams. Even in the half-court, Williams was at the center of Brooklyn’s ball movement, moving the ball from side to side and making the Miami defense work.

“The way they are playing me with two on the ball and coming up at me,” Williams said, “I need to make the right plays and get people the ball.”

The Nets probably aren’t going to shoot 60 percent from 3-point range again. Some of those 15 treys on Saturday were pretty well contested. They’re still down 2-1 in the series and have a smaller margin for error in every game than their opponent.

But they can continue to take advantage of the Miami defense and give themselves a chance to win with the same offensive mentality that they brought to Game 3.

“If we continue to share the ball, we’ll be successful,” Williams said. “The ball has to be faster than their rotations.”

It helps to have guys who can make shots. You just have to give them the playing time.

24-Second thoughts — May 8

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com


VIDEO: HT fave Jamal Crawford collects another KIA Sixth Man of the Year trophy

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — While NFL fans wait around for the start of their beloved draft, we hoops lovers are already engrossed in Game 2 of the Miami Heat and Brooklyn Nets.

You can have Johnny Football, that Jadeveon Clowney fella and the draft that never ends (in the NBA we go 60-men deep, that’s it). I’m rocking with the round ball tonight.

Give me LeBron James and Paul Piece, Kevin Garnett and Dwyane Wade and Tim Duncan and LaMarcus Aldridge, Tony Parker and Damian Lillard in the nightcap when the Spurs and Trail Blazers get it on in Game 2 of their conference semifinal showdown.

I don’t care how choppy it is early, still waiting for someone to knock down a shot here, I’m sticking to NBA basketball tonight …

(I’d be lying if I told you I wasn’t intrigued by this one wrinkle, though. The prospects choosing their walk-up song is a splendid idea. The fact that we already know which song each guy has chosen steals just a little bit of the thunder. But I love the idea and wouldn’t mind if the NBA poached it come Draft night next month.)

Oh and big ups to my main man Jamal Crawford of the Los Angeles Clippers on winning KIA Sixth Man of the Year honors for the second time in his career. Well deserved honor for one of our faves around here.

24 – For all of my anti-NFL draft hype, this one didn’t exactly start with fireworks. Brutal start for both teams in the early going. no one wanted to score, or even hold on to the ball, for that matter.

23 – We’re two hours from tip in San Antonio and already there is more action than we’ve seen from the Heat offense, which has produced just 15 points on 6-for-18 shooting (1-for-8 from deep) after the first 12 minutes.

22 – Nets guard Shaun Livingston slipped on a wet spot under the basket early and I missed the replay. He kept playing, so I didn’t think it was that serious. It didn’t hit me until a few minutes later that when you hear the words “Shaun Livingston” and “slipped under the basket” you can’t help but freak out. Glad it wasn’t anything serious. He’s one of my favorite players. Loved his game coming out of high school. He’s the embodiment of the power of perseverance. We were all robbed of what he might have been …

21 – Why don’t we just let Rashard Lewis and Mirza Teletovic play a game of H-O-R-S-E  to decide this thing …

20 – Sorry LeBron, but we don’t always get what we want …

But you did get it cranked up the closer we got to halftime …

19 – Joe Johnson scores on an isolation play and ESPN’s Mike Tirico talks about his nickname in Atlanta being “Iso Joe.” My memory could be a bit shaky, but I swear I coined that nickname when I was the beat writer for the Hawks. Seriously, I think that’s one of mine. I wonder if the url is already taken?


VIDEO: Who’s hotter than Teletovic in the first half? 

There are other Nets stars in the crosshairs at halftime, though, K.G. and D-Will in particular …

18 – Welcome to San Antonio folks …

17 – The battle of the role players continues with Teletovic ballin’ out for the Nets and Ray Shuttlesworth doing the honors for the Heat. We can watch this all night …

16 – There has been a breakout of happy feet in these playoffs. I was going to refrain from bringing it up, until my favorite WNBA player went and did this …

This is a nutty game. Watching some of these elder statesmen battle each other as much as they’re battling Father Time can be painful at times. KG missing wide open jump hooks and D.Wade walking the ball up the court and passing up open shots repeatedly …

Too bad the game isn’t the story of the night. The NFL draft is a role player, too. This is the night of the snake …

14 – BALLGAME!!!! The Heat just finished off a 100-second possession (they got three offensive rebounds) with a LeBron layup to push the lead to 89-79. Nets vets moving like those zombies on the Walking Dead …

13 – Ray Ray was fabulous. And the Heat did what you expect a championship team to do. But D-Will’s 0-for-everything shooting night sticks out to me as the most glaring item of the night.


VIDEO: Some sounds of the game for you from these #NBAPlayoffs

12 – Always figured TP for more of a win guy, being from France and all …

11 – Still no sign of the team willing to take the leap and pick Johnny Manziel. #struggleface …

10 – What is it with Lillard and these buzzer beaters?


VIDEO: Dame Lillard loves to beat the buzzer!

Portland faring much better tonight and they’re still down after the first 12 minutes. Thanks to Kawhi Leonard’s relentless assault. Don’t let the #tbt cornrows fool you, KLeonard is the future of the San Antonio Spurs  …

9 – Crusty old Spurs, huh?

8 – I love the fight in these Trail Blazers. They’re getting cracked in the face and still pressing the action. #betterbasketballclinicfromthespurs …

#nosleeptilbrooklyn for the Heat and Nets

7 – The Spurs’ second quarter burst was a thing of beauty, coordinated chaos and fury from the crew that’s supposed to be boring but has been anything but so far …

– #nomorejohnnyfootballjokes

Johnny Football is a Cleveland Brown with the 22nd pick, joining Kyrie Irving as one of the professional sports saviors of Northeast Ohio!

6 – The KLeonard walk off interview at halftime was quality stuff. He’s every bit as no-frills as his coaches and teammates insist. And the #tbt cornrows got some prime time love. That’s always a good thing …

5 – The power of the #NBAPlayoffs … you’re welcome Pit Bull!

4 –  See Roy Hibbert prior to Game 2 of Pacers-Wizards series …

3 – Young fella is 4-for-4 from deep and helping maintain control at a time when there is. Big 3!

2 – There’s a first time for everything …. especially in the playoffs!

1 – A fitting nugget to end with on “draft night” …


VIDEO: Kawhi Leonard delivers the dagger that all but clinched Game 2 for the Spurs

Allen shows he still got game

By Lang Whitaker, NBA.com

VIDEO: Ray Allen sparks Miami to a 2-0 lead over Brooklyn

MIAMI Chris Bosh stepped out of the Miami Heat shower room and stopped short with one glance at the crowd of media assembling in front of one locker. It wasn’t the stall of LeBron James or Dwyane Wade or even Bosh himself, the cogs of Miami’s big three. On this night, after the Miami Heat beat the Brooklyn Nets 94-82 to take a 2-0 lead in the Eastern Conference Semifinals, the player the assembled media couldn’t wait to hear from was… Ray Allen? “

Damn, Ray!” said Bosh, in mock amazement. We can safely assume Bosh was putting on a bit, because Allen’s contributions were obvious. Coming off the bench, Allen logged 28 minutes and scored 13 points, including shooting 3-for-5 on 3-pointers. He also finished with eight rebounds, good enough to lead the Heat in the category, including a crucial offensive rebound to prolong a possession and basically seal the game. Add that to Allen’s 19 points in Game 1, and it’s safe to say Allen has been one of Miami’s biggest performers in the Conference semifinals.

“A veteran guy who has been in these moments — he had a sense for it, a feel for it, what we needed,” said Heat coach Erik Spoelstra. A bit more succinctly, Wade noted: “Ray does what Ray do.” “You have to read situations, and you have to be patient and let the game develop,” Allen explained. “For me, I just move around, and defensively, try to have an impact and create offense from there. On the offensive end I try not to stand. My guy is watching me, he doesn’t want to leave me, so I just keep moving and you get the easy one.”

Allen’s endurance gave him the motor to keep moving throughout the game. But what was it that made Allen so elusive along the baseline and allowed him to grab so many boards throughout the night? “Because I’m elusive,” he joked. “You’re watching LeBron and D-Wade so much when they’re driving to the basket. I had an opportunity to get behind the defense, when I get the offensive rebounds.

“Then defensively, really I’m the low guy under the basket the majority of the time. The way their offense is set up, I’m the guy that’s down there, so I have to make sure that nobody crashes. They got a lot of second-chance opportunities tonight that we have to clean up for next game, but it was my night to get those rebounds.”

While Allen’s terrific shooting touch is well documented — Nets coach Jason Kidd said after that game that Allen should be considered “one of the best shooters of all-time” — it was an offensive rebound with 3:07 left that might have been Allen’s biggest contribution. The Nets had cut Miami’s lead to 87-79, with 3:39 left in the game. The Heat ended up getting the ball to LeBron for an emergency three-pointer as the shot clock was running down.

“Bron, I knew he was going to have to get up a 9-1-1 shot,” Allen recalled. “And everybody was watching him. And you figure, ‘Hey, he’s not gonna make that,’ if you’re on the other team. But I said, ‘Hey, let me get under the basket and try and make something happen.’ A lot of times I run, and I was just fortunate it fell in my hands. If I was taller I would have dunked it back in.”

Allen did not, however, dunk it back in, and instead the Heat re-set for another possession. After two more James misses and two more Heat offensive rebounds (these by Wade and Bosh), James finally got a lay-up after slipping a screen-roll with Wade with 1:09 left to play. All told, the entire possession took 100 seconds, and the Heat went from an eight-point lead with 3:09 left to a 10-point lead with 1:59 to play, leaving the game effectively out of reach for Brooklyn.

“That was a killer,” said Nets guard Joe Johnson. “We couldn’t come up with the rebound. It was almost as if we didn’t have the energy or effort down the stretch. I thought we fought so hard to stay within reach, to stay within the game. Those last few possessions killed us.”

Looking forward to Games 3 and 4 in Brooklyn, Allen pointed to getting off to faster starts and better finishes in each quarter as keys for the Heat. Although it’s probably worth noting that in franchise history, the Heat have held a 2-0 playoff series lead a dozen different times. They have gone on to win all twelve of those series.

The Heat’s deep bench has been terrific for them throughout the postseason, getting big performances from different players on an almost night-by-night basis. But through two games against Brooklyn, the 38-year-old Ray Allen has shown that he still got game.

“Ray’s amazing,” said Bosh. “He’s awesome. I want to be like him when I grow up.”

Following Game 1 loss, Nets look to get defensive

By Lang Whitaker, NBA.com


VIDEO: Recap of Game 1 and a lookahead to Game 2 between the Heat and Nets

MIAMI — After last night’s Game 1 loss at the hands of the Miami Heat, the general feeling in the Brooklyn Nets’ losing locker room was muted. Were they angry? Were they sad?

“Can’t be angry, can’t be frustrated,” said Andray Blatche. “It’s one game. It’s one game of seven.”

The Nets came into the series against the Heat having won all four regular season meetings, and surely they felt as though they were a team to be reckoned in Game 1.

The Heat apparently didn’t get the memo. The Nets were beaten in nearly every important statistical category — rebounds, assists, turnovers, points in the paint, attempts in the restricted area, and, of course, total points, as Miami won 107-86.

Twelve hours later, the Nets took the court at the American Airlines Arena for practice, and if there was one thing they agreed upon, it was that their defense needed a lift in Game 2 if they hoped to get back to their winning ways. Their offense? Sure, it wasn’t perfect, particularly the way they seemed fine with settling for jump shots. But as Deron Williams noted, their offense doesn’t matter if they can’t stop the Heat.

“Our defense wasn’t where it needed to be, that’s the first thing,” Williams said. “You can talk about the offense all you want, but defense is why we lost that game. A lot of mistakes. We need to play better offense, as well, but if we play defense like that we have no shot.”

The Nets need to complement an uptick in aggression with better defense positioning. The Heat seemed to be running layup lines throughout Game 1, getting to the rim at will.

“We have to protect the paint,” said coach Jason Kidd. “We gave up too many paint touches and too many layups. We have to make them a perimeter team and put pressure on them to shoot jump shots and not layups.”

As dominant as Miami was, the Nets were still in the game much of the way. Miami’s lead was just 3 with 8:39 to play in the third before the Heat went on an 18-5 run that broke the game open for good. And it wasn’t even that the Heat were getting and compiling paint appearances on fast breaks — they finished with just 4 fast break points. Miami’s success was fueled by ball movement and player movement, and the Nets just never matched their level of activity.

“We had too many lanes for them,” Blatche said. “We let them do pretty much what they wanted to do. Tomorrow we’ve got to step up to the challenge and be super aggressive on defense.”

“You can’t let the other guys around LeBron and Wade have 15, 17 points,” added Joe Johnson, referencing the performance of Miami players like Ray Allen (19 points), Chris Bosh (15) and Mario Chalmers (12). “To beat this team, you can’t allow that, you can’t have that.”

Being down in a playoff series is nothing knew to most of these Nets players, and not even to this Nets team — they were down 3-2 in the first round to the Toronto Raptors before winning the final two games and the series.

For a team that has been through as many high-profile situations as the Nets have over the past year, one loss does not end a season. Not yet, anyway.

“That’s why we have a Game 2,” Kidd said. “Another opportunity to go at it, and hopefully we can limit those mistakes.”

Desperation may yet make an appearance in this series. But if so, it’s not hanging around the Brooklyn Nets just yet.

Film Study: Heat beat Nets at the basket

By John Schuhmann, NBA.com


VIDEO: Best of Inside: Nets and Heat

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY – Jason Kidd made the right decision to rest most of his starters at the start of the fourth quarter of Game 1 of the conference semifinals. The Brooklyn Nets were down only 13 points, but there was no way they were winning that game.

First of all, the game — like the regular-season meetings between these two teams — was played at a very slow pace. So that 13-point deficit was much tougher to overcome than it would have been in a Western Conference game. Both teams finished the night with just 84 possessions (compared to about 100 apiece in Blazers-Spurs later on).

Secondly, given the shots each team was getting, there was little chance the Nets would get the consistent stops or consistent scores they needed to make it interesting. This game was layups on one end of the floor against contested jump shots on the other. And you could just see the blowout coming when the Nets weren’t able to turn that trend around after halftime.

It was just a three-point game at the half, but Miami had already attempted 15 shots in the restricted area. Brooklyn? Five. By the end of the third quarter, those numbers were 22 and seven. The Heat train was traveling downhill, and Brooklyn wasn’t stopping it. Miami scored 61 points on just 41 possessions in the second half, a ridiculous rate of 149 points per 100 possessions.

The Nets’ defensive issues started early. And there were lots of them.

There was Deron Williams getting caught in no-man’s land as LeBron James posted up …

20140507_chalmers_cut

… a play that resulted in an easy layup for Mario Chalmers, the guy Williams was defending.

There was Mirza Teletovic slow to help on a Chris Andersen roll to the basket…

20140507_andersen_roll

… a play that resulted in free throws for Birdman.

The Nets offered little resistance to James and Dwyane Wade in the low post. Results: A layup and the shortest of jump hooks.

They fell asleep in transition. They had some miscommunication in transition. And they got caught ball watching (Ball-you-man, Mirza).

Layup, layup, layup.

The Nets also didn’t know how to defend the James-as-a-screener plays. Chalmers got two more layups late in the second quarter (here and here) when Alan Anderson stayed attached to James, Williams trailed the play, and no one else came to help.

All of the above came in the first half, when the Heat scored just 46 points on 43 possessions. The second half, when they got going from 3-point range, was much worse for the Nets.

The Heat finished with 29 shots in the restricted area, which was only a tick above their average (28.8) in their four regular-season games against the Nets.

Brooklyn, meanwhile, got just 12 shots at the basket, down from an average of 21.5 in the four regular-season meetings. Defense is where the Heat can really flip the switch, as they did Tuesday.

In fact, Miami forced a 24-second violation on Brooklyn’s first possession, doing a nice job of helping and recovering. The Heat took away the Nets’ primary options, like Shane Battier denying Joe Johnson here …

20140507_battier_deny

… a play that resulted in another 24-second violation.

Their rotations were on point. They took away the paint and contested on the perimeter. In the end, these two facts spell out the difference between the Brooklyn offense in the first round and the Brooklyn offense on Tuesday …

  • Against Toronto, 28 percent of the Nets’ shots came from the restricted area. In Game 1 on Tuesday, that number was 17%.
  • Against Toronto, 64 percent of the Nets’ jump shots were uncontested, according to SportVU. In Game 1 on Tuesday, that number was 51 percent.

Now the Nets have to ask themselves if their defensive mistakes and lack of good shots were more about the Heat or more about their own energy level, coming off a grueling, seven-game series with the Raptors.

There’s certainly evidence that the latter played a part.

Go back to that first Chalmers/James pick-and-roll late in the second quarter. Brooklyn’s Anderson has to stay attached to James, but look at where the other defenders are when Chalmers comes off the screen.

20140507_chalmers_layup

You’d think they’d be able to prevent a layup there. They didn’t.

Offensively, the Nets were weak inside. Miami’s hedge-hard-and-deny defense produced some mismatches down low. But three times in the first half, Brooklyn’s bigs couldn’t score in the paint against Heat wings.

The Nets couldn’t finish. Their ball movement wasn’t very crisp. And some of those contested jumpers were a result of them settling.

On both ends of the floor, the Nets believe that they’ll play better with more energy and focus. But there are no two-day breaks in this round. In fact, because Game 7 in Toronto was a day game on Sunday, they’ve already had the longest break they’ll get before any game in this series.

24-Second thoughts — May 6

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com


VIDEO: Kevin Durant’s emotional MVP nod to his mother

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — What a day!

Kevin Durant wins his first KIA MVP, dethroning the two-time defending champion LeBron James just hours before his Heat hit the floor against the Brooklyn Nets in their eastern conference semifinal.

The Golden State Warriors sever ties with Mark Jackson after three seasons, firing him after three straight seasons that saw the Warriors finally claw their way into the consistent playoff mix in the Western Conference.

And the NBA announced that Los Angeles Clippers President Andy Roeser would take an indefinite leave of absence, effective immediately.  “This will provide an opportunity for a new CEO to begin on a clean slate and for the team to stabilize under difficult circumstances,” NBA VP of Communications Mike Bass said in a statement released by the league.

We got all of this before Ray Allen showed up to America Airlines Arena for his early afternoon shooting workout, so you had to know it was going to be a wild night …

24 – Oh and before we get started, big ups to CJ Paul for his Happy Birthday shout out to his baby brother Chris Paul. #TaurusPower #brotherskeeper

23 – When you have two teams like Miami and Brooklyn, teams with, ahem, elder statesmen galore, you should expect the rotations to run deep for both Heat coach Erik Spoelstra and Nets coach Jason Kidd

22 – Perhaps the most underrated story of the late regular season and the start of the playoffs is that Dwyane Wade seems to have gotten his old bones healthy enough to be, well, Dwyane Wade …

https://twitter.com/EthanJSkolnick/status/463825355862573057


VIDEO: Check out Kevin Durant accepting his KIA MVP award


21 – Magic Johnson playing agent for Mark Jackson, you know this has been an upside-down day …

20 – Joe Johnson and Deron Williams doing it like you’re supposed to on the road. The pace of this one is exactly what the Nets are looking for. And LeBron’s playing well but he’s not nearly as dominant as you’d like to see him if you’re a Heat fan. Very reminiscent of some of his previous battles against Paul Pierce-Kevin Garnett-led teams …

19 – Pacers big man Roy Hibbert should thank his lucky stars for teammates like Paul George and George Hill. They’re holding him down at a time when plenty of folks would run for the hills, if they had hills in Indianapolis. Do them a favor big fella and show up tomorrow night in Game 2 against the Wizards …

18 – I knew the pace of this game wasn’t going to be Clippers-Thunder, or anything close to it, but wow! Only one fast-break bucket in 24 minutes?

17 – Heat playing bully ball. LeBron getting whatever he wants in the paint. Shaun Livingston, as much as I love him and his comeback, is locked in an unfair fight.

16 – Did someone say Billy Knight?

15 – We need LeBron mic’d up more often …

14 – No more Birdman tonight. Right knee contusion. Heat will be fine without him. They’re rolling the Nets right now.

13 — This wasn’t a contest. The Heat were the far superior team. Rest worked just fine for the Heat. #NoRust And LeBron had an easy time of it, way too easy, if the Nets are going to make this series interesting. KG being held scoreless for the first time in 139 career playoff games … wow!


VIDEO: LeBron James keeps it classy after the Heat’s Game 1 rout of the Brooklyn Nets

12 – Spurs start 8-0 and remind us all that they’ve been doing this longer than half the Trail Blazers’ roster has been alive … not really, but it always feels that way when you see the Spurs schooling some upstart squad.

11 – Gone but not forgotten Dr. Jack Ramsay

10 – Euro step my … foot! Calling Manu Ginobili for traveling is like a holding call on an offensive lineman in football. You could blow that whistle on just about every snap if you wanted to. But you don’t, because it’s Manu!!!!!!

9 – Welcome to Role Player Tuesday, when guys like Shane Battier, Marco Belinelli and Aron Baynes — yes Aron Baynes — move into the spotlight after not being heard from in the first round. #baynesanymeansnecessary …

8 – The Conference Semifinals would like to apologize to the basketball world for not being nearly as intriguing and flat-out wacky, so far, as our wild and crazy cousin, the First Round!

7 – This is what they call Night School where I’m from. The Blazers are finding out the hard way … you don’t take any of the same mojo from one series to the next. Treat it like it’s brand new or you’ll get popped. Youngsters take notes for Game 2!

6 – Sure, it looks ugly now. Really ugly. Bubba Sparxxx Ugly! But I don’t think there is any need to overreact to the first half of the first game of a series, any series …

5 – Spurs are not messing around tonight. They’ve never made back-to-back trips to The Finals in the Duncan-Pop era. Would be an accomplishment this year, even for an outfit that has done just about everything else imaginable when it comes to winning …

4 – Reasons, the reasons that we hear, The reasons that we fear, Our feelings a-won’t disappear

3 – Game recognize game. And truly elite players know the MVP when they see him …

2 – Great point … even though I think the circumstances are dramatically different. But great point …

Because …

1 – These three words …


VIDEO: Kawhi Leonard and the Spurs got in a flow early and never let up on the Trail Blazers

After break, Heat avoid rust and find rhythm in Game 1

By Lang Whitaker, NBA.com


VIDEO: Heat cruise to 107-86 rout of Nets in opener

MIAMI — Heat coach Erik Spoelstra entered the American Airlines Arena interview room 90 minutes before tipoff of Game 1 of the Eastern Conference Semifinals and plopped down at the table.

“All of our guys are available,” Spoelstra said, by way of a pre-empting any questions about injuries.

The floor was then opened for questions, and for 14 seconds the room was as silent as a wake. Finally, with no queries coming, Spoelstra gave a fist pump as he hopped up and walked out of the room.

Honestly, what was left to be said? The Heat had been doing nothing but talking and tuning into other games on TV for the last week since eliminating the Charlotte Bobcats in four games back on April 28. (The monitors flanking Spoelstra in the interview room still displayed the box score from the Heat’s last home game, Game 2 against the Bobcats played way back on April 23.)

Back in live action, the Heat were happy to let their play do the talking, as they put together a dominant performance, winning Game 1 of the Eastern Conference Semis against the Brooklyn Nets going away, 107-86.

If they needed a cautionary tale, they didn’t have far to look: Just one season ago, the Heat also had an eight-day break between the first and second rounds. They took on a Bulls team coming off a draining seven-game series, then lost at home to Chicago, 93-86. If the Heat had had any rust from the layoff, they scraped it away well before tipoff and played Game 1 like they were on the second half of a back-to-back.

“It wasn’t easy,” said Chris Bosh, who finished with 15 points and 11 boards. “I was surprised that we did have good rhythm after such a long break. We did not have that last year. I kept saying all week that we felt that we were going to attack this situation better this time. And I think we did.”

“I think the most important thing was the rhythm that we were in,” said LeBron James, who led the Heat with 22 points. “It seemed like we didn’t take much time off at all as far as our rhythm. Ten turnovers, 22 assists, 52 points in the paint — that’s us playing basketball. We didn’t get to the free throw line a lot, but we got to the paint. After eight days off of not playing a game, I feared the rhythm, but now I don’t have to fear it anymore. After the way we played tonight, that’s a step in the direction we want to keep going in.”

“You could see the ball movement on most possessions — moving it two or three passes to find a better shot,” Spoelstra said. “It’s a little bit more to our rhythm and our momentum on how we like to play.”

The Heat talked about their performance like they were speaking of a percussion concert — rhythm, rhythm, rhythm. To make sure the Heat came out on fire, the Heat players credited the coaching staff for keeping them focused throughout the break by mostly pitting them against each other.

“The coaching staff made sure we … went at it in practice,” Rashard Lewis said with a smile. “We got a lot of conditioning in the first few practices, but the last couple of practices we started scrimmaging, we played up and down. And we’re a competitive bunch. We was going at it. Both teams wanted to win, we did a two-minutes drill a couple of times. As teammates, we went at each other and it was almost like a game atmosphere in the practice gym.”

The Heat played a complete game against Brooklyn. Not only did they make nine 3s, but they dominated the interior. In each of the first two quarters, the Heat attempted 10 shots in the paint, building a 26-10 lead in the stat by halftime. They finished with 52 points in the paint, which accounted for 26 field goals made, two less makes than the Nets attempted in the paint.

“We couldn’t protect the paint there to start the game,” said Nets coach Jason Kidd. “Well … during the whole game, we couldn’t keep them out of the paint. That’s something we have to look at and get better at.”

“Just mistakes,” explained Kevin Garnett, who finished with no points and four rebounds in just 16 minutes. “When we made mistakes, they made us pay for it. Back-cuts, coming to the basket, being very aggressive. We need to tear a page out of their book and be as aggressive next game.”

“I think it started on defense,” said Rashard Lewis. “We get stops and we get out, and we spread the court with our shooters, and it gives those lanes for LeBron and Dwyane [Wade] to drive. I thought early in the game we made sure that guys like LeBron and D-Wade were posting up, and we tried to take advantage of different matchups.

“It helps up get into a good rhythm on the offensive end,” Lewis continued. “Instead of just catching and launching 3s, we attacked their defense, make their defense collapse, and throw it out for open shots or for another drive.”

Not everything was rosy for the Heat. For a team that loves to play with pace, the Heat finished with just four fast-break points, as well as a season-low four steals. But they also finished with just 10 turnovers, three fewer than the Nets. And the Nets got worthy performances from Deron Williams and Joe Johnson, who each finished with 17 points. But they were the only Brooklyn starters to crack double-digits.

Sure, the Nets won four straight against the Heat in the regular season, but after one game in the postseason, the Heat go to sleep Tuesday night holding a one-game lead in their series.

And right now, that’s the only streak that matters.

Nets get past Raptors by thinnest of margins in Game 7

By John Schuhmann, NBA.com


VIDEO: Nets hang on against Raptors in Game 7

TORONTO – Basketball can be a game of inches too.

The difference in the first round series between the Brooklyn Nets and Toronto Raptors was the length of Paul Pierce‘s fingers, which reached up and blocked Kyle Lowry‘s shot as time expired in Game 7, sending Brooklyn to the conference semifinals with a nail-biting 104-103 victory.

Lowry had somehow squeezed between Deron Williams, Alan Anderson and Kevin Garnett, losing the ball on one side of the triple-team and recovering it on the other. With all the defense’s attention on him, he had somehow willed his way to the basket one final time.

“That young man,” Raptors coach Dwane Casey said, “did everything he could to get to the basket.”

But …

“Sometimes, it’s about being at the right place,” Pierce said afterward, “at the right time.”

The cumulative score in 11 total games (regular season and playoffs) between these two teams was 1,070-1,070. It really doesn’t get any closer than that. Eight of the 11 games were within three points in the final three minutes. And the team that got its first Game 7 win since the Nets came to the NBA in 1976 was the team that barely hung on.

The Nets’ offense had been rolling through the Raptors over the last 2 1/2 games. They led by 11 early in the fourth quarter and by nine with less that four minutes to go. But they couldn’t stop the Raptors’ offense, which scored 30 points in the final period.

“We were right there,” Casey said.

Lowry was attacking. DeMar DeRozan was making something out of nothing. Patrick Patterson was rolling to the basket. The Nets committed a couple of dumb fouls and just couldn’t get a stop … until they absolutely had to.

“We might have bent a little bit,” Nets coach Jason Kidd said, “but we didn’t break.”

It took every last inch for the veteran team with the big names and the largest payroll in NBA history to get past the young guns who had never been here before. The Nets knew how hard it was and how good the Raptors are. Toronto’s division title was no fluke.

“This was a very difficult series,” Garnett said. “It tested everybody’s will here. If anything, I think we grew up a bit during this series.”

That says a lot about the Raptors, who face some questions this summer. The contracts of their coach (Casey) and best player (Lowry) expire at the end of June. But if those two guys are back, Toronto will be back in the playoffs, with an incredible crowd on their side again.

“This is one of the best environments in basketball,” Pierce said of the Air Canada Centre, “as far as the road crowd, the noise, the enthusiasm. This is as tough as it’s going to get. And to come in here in this type of building, the way they play and the way the crowd is, it’s so gratifying.”

The Raptors had the crowd, but the Nets had the matchups. And that’s more important in a playoff series. The Raptors just had no answer for Joe Johnson, who scored 26 points in the deciding game, half of them in the fourth quarter, repeatedly going one-on-one with whomever the Raptors threw at him.

In the fourth, that list included point guards (Greivis Vasquez) and big men (Patterson). Brooklyn’s final field goal of the series was a ridiculously tough runner by Johnson (against Terrence Ross) that gave them a seven-point lead with just over two minutes to go. Johnson played more than 45 minutes (a season-high for a regulation game) on Sunday, and the Nets needed all of it.

“For us to post him every time down, get him the ball where he’s the focal point, for him to make plays,” Kidd said, “he’s as good as they come down the stretch.”

The Nets played through Johnson all series, something that will be more difficult to do against the Miami Heat, who are bigger on the wings, in the conference semifinals, which begin Tuesday in Miami.

After grinding through a series that went down to the final play of Game 7, Brooklyn has just 48 hours to prepare for the defending champs. The Nets went 4-0 against the Heat in the regular season, but know that doesn’t matter now.

“We know we can beat them,” Johnson said. “But it’s going to be a lot different from the regular season.”

The Nets can take something on these last seven games, where it took every basket and every stop to separate them from the Raptors by the thinnest of margins. But it’s already time to move on.

The champs are waiting.

Showdown Sunday for final four first-rounders

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com


VIDEO: The first round’s final four teams are doing whatever they can to avoid going fishing

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Four quarters.

That’s it!

Four quarters.

It all comes down to this.

Four quarters, or more if need be, for the final four teams still alive on the most epic weekend ever in the first round of the NBA playoffs. From the emotional roller coaster of Saturday’s wild, three-game ride to — the Indiana Pacers, Oklahoma City Thunder and Los Angeles Clippers, all three higher seeds — we finish with today’s two-part saga.

The Brooklyn Nets and Toronto Raptors finish what they started in the Eastern Conference while the defending Western Conference champion and No. 1 seed San Antonio Spurs defend the Alamo against those pesky No. 8-seeded Dallas Mavericks.

It goes without saying, no one wants to Go Fishing!

So the time for posturing is over. All that’s left is this double-header for all the marbles.

The final four must deliver on the promise of what we’ve already seen from this historic weekend of Game 7s. No pressure fellas, just epic finishes to epic series on an epic weekend …

NETS @RAPTORS, 1 p.m. ET (ABC) 

It has to be a comforting feeling for both of these teams knowing that a rested and focused Miami Heat team, the two-time defending champions, await the winner in the conference semifinals.

Either way, the Nets and Raptors couldn’t be better suited for one last battle.

As NBA.com’s John Schuhmann points out, just one point (967-966) separates them in the 10 games they’ve played this season, with each of them winning five times. This is a much-needed rubber match that pits one of the most well-seasoned teams in the Nets against a Raptors crew that is swimming in the deep end of the playoff pool for the first time.

But there are more than just numbers at stake today at the Air Canada Centre. There are legacies on the line for the likes of Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett, who were brought to Brooklyn for moments like this, and for Deron Williams and Joe Johnson, whose careers will continue to be built on defining moments like this one.

As a group those four stars have a combined 23 Game 7 starts under their belts … so at least one advantage, the experience edge, goes to the visitors from Brooklyn. Just don’t tell the Raptors, who have the sensational and dynamic DeMar DeRozan-Kyle Lowry duo (they are averaging a combined 44.8 points in this series) on their side.

***

MAVERICKS @ SPURS, 3:30 p.m. ET (ABC)

No one loves Game 7 like the Mavericks’ Dirk Nowitzki.

No one.

His spotless 4-0 record in Game 7s — that’s right, spotless — no doubt makes him love this big stage even more. All he’s ever known in Game 7 is success, as Tim MacMahon of ESPNDallas.com points out:

He knows nothing but the thrill of victory in the winner-takes-all series finales. Nowitzki is 4-0 in Game 7 action throughout his career, and his numbers in those games border on ridiculous.

You think joining a trio of Hall of Famers – Elgin Baylor, Bob Pettit and Hakeem Olajuwon – in the exclusive career 25-point, 10-rebound club is impressive? Nowitzki has averaged 28 points and 14.8 rebounds in Game 7s, with all of that experience coming between 2003 and ’06.

How silly is it that the big German was stereotyped as a “soft Euro” until he led the Mavs on a 2011 championship march without a series going seven games?

Dirk registered a points-rebound double-double in each of his four swings at a Game 7. The only other active players with four such Game 7 double-doubles in their career are Kevin Garnett and Tim Duncan.

Nowitzki has three 30-10 Game 7 lines. He’s the only guy who can make that claim in the basketball-reference.com database, which dates to 1986. The only two-timers in that time span: LeBron James and Karl Malone.

Of course, Duncan is mentioned among those Game 7 greats. The Spurs superstar big man has been at this so long that you knew he’d have this on his resume, too.

You know Duncan remembers well that Game 7 loss to the Mavericks from May 2006 in the Western Conference semifinals, an overtime defeat that saw Duncan torch the Mavericks for 41 points, 15 rebounds and 3 blocks in a failed effort. The Spurs are 3-5 all-time in Game 7s, boasting a rich history of highs and lows in those games, 2-2 record under the watch of Duncan and Spurs coach Gregg Popovich.

A new chapter in this storied rivalry will be written later today.

It’s Showdown time for all involved in the final four of the best first round of the NBA playoffs we’ve ever seen!


VIDEO: The Game Time crew discusses the battle for Texas between the Spurs and Mavericks