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Posts Tagged ‘Joakim Noah’

Morning shootaround — Oct. 31

VIDEO: Top plays from Friday’s action


Joakim Noah said he never asked to come off the bench | Brook Lopez is strictly a post player but an all-around person | Billy Donovan finds the right fit in OKC | A Q and A with Gordon Hayward

No. 1: Joakim Noah said he never asked to come off the bench — The Bulls are looking a bit different under new coach Fred Hoiberg than they did under Tom Thibodeau. Specifically, Joakim Noah isn’t starting. As the Bulls try something new, there was a bit of a mixup. Did Hoiberg tell Noah to be a sixth man, or did Noah volunteer? The center set the record straight, when asked if he took himself out of the starting lineup: “No.” Nick Friedell of ESPN Chicago has further details:

The topic has been hovering around the Bulls since training camp, as Hoiberg explored all his options and ultimately decided to insert second-year big man Nikola Mirotic into the starting lineup on opening night instead of Noah. The story line came back to light on Thursday when a Hoiberg Q-and-A with Grantland’s Zach Lowe was posted. In the exchange, Hoiberg said Noah was the one who started the conversation about coming off the bench this season.

“Jo actually came to me and talked to me about that,” Hoiberg told Lowe. “He said, basically, ‘I’ve always played well with Taj [Gibson].’ He said he thought Niko and Pau played very well together, so let’s go that route. It was actually Jo that started the whole conversation. He came to me. That says a lot about him.”

Before the Bulls’ 98-94 overtime loss at Detroit on Friday, Hoiberg said he didn’t feel a need to clear the air with Noah.

“Did he specifically say I want to come off the bench? No. Nobody wants to come off the bench, but it’s the decision that we came up with,” Hoiberg said. “He’s been great. He’s been as enthusiastic as anybody over there on the bench when he’s not in the game, and he’s always going to bring it when he’s on the floor, so no, things are fine.”

For his part, Noah has never seemed outwardly angry about what’s going on and doesn’t want to rock the boat as a team leader.

He has struggled in his first two games off the bench to find his rhythm, though, failing to register a point. Noah does have 15 rebounds and six assists in his first two games and appears to be feeling good after struggling with the effects of offseason left knee surgery a year ago.

“I just want to do what’s best for the team,” Noah said. “I think we’re 2-0 right now. We still have a lot of room for improvement. What I said doesn’t matter. I think right now we’re doing what’s best for the team, and we just got to keep building off that.”


No. 2: Brook Lopez is an all-around person — The Renaissance man of New York works in Brooklyn and stands over seven feet tall. They don’t come more educated or diverse than Brook Lopez, the Nets’ center who might be one of the bright spots for the rebuilding team this season. The former All-Star opened up recently about his upbringing, his twin brother Robin (who plays across town with the Knicks) and his passion for many things. Mike Mazzeo of ESPN New York was there to write it all down:

He reads. He writes. He sketches. He loves Batman comic books, Disney movies and Michael Jackson’s music.

He already has pitched an animated television pilot, politicked to play a Wookiee in a future Star Wars picture and hopes to pen an action-adventure novel someday.

Oh, and you likely didn’t know, Brooklyn Nets center Brook Lopez is also learning to play the piano and speak Japanese.

Yes, Japanese.

“I always go to Japan in the offseason, so I’m trying to get better at it,” Lopez told recently, noting that he’s also working on learning “the Kanji,” Chinese characters that are used in the modern Japanese writing system.

“I know some words. I’m getting there.”

Basically, if Lopez isn’t the most fascinating man in the NBA, he’s certainly up there. His best competition might be his own 7-foot twin brother Robin, who now plays for the rival New York Knicks.

Brook Lopez made up his mind pretty early on — he was going to follow in his mother’s footsteps.

“I can remember in second grade coming back from school and telling my mom, ‘You know what, before I play in the NBA, I want to go to Stanford,'” Lopez said. “Because of her, I had everything figured out.”

To her comic book aficionado sons, Deborah Ledford might as well have been Wonder Woman, raising the four of them — Alex, Chris, Brook and Robin — as a single mother on a high school mathematics teacher’s salary.

“She sacrificed so much for us,” Brook said. “She’d always be driving Alex and Chris around, getting them to basketball practice, and then she’d go pick them up and get Robin and me to wherever we needed to be. She was constantly chaffeuring us around. And then she’d get groceries for us and come back with bags upon bags upon bags, just loads and loads, and they’d last for like…two days.”

At 6-feet, Ledford had flirted with swimming in the 1968 Olympics before not making the squad and eventually attending Stanford herself.

“Our mom used to read to us every night,” said Chris, who has lived with Brook in New Jersey ever since he was selected by the Nets with the No. 10 overall pick in the first round of the 2008 NBA draft.

“And she just went through a plethora of children’s books and stories, so that was instilled in us from an early age.”

The Lopez’s maternal grandmother, Inky Ledford, had a massive library of children’s books at her Fresno, California, home — and the boys were frequent visitors.


No. 3: Billy Donovan finds the right fit in OKC — Well, here we are, one week into the NBA season and Billy Donovan hasn’t changed his mind and gone back to the University of Florida. That’s what happened years ago when he took the Orlando Magic job and then called it quits just, oh, 10 seconds later. Anyway, you can hardly blame Donovan for waiting until the right gig opened up. And when you have the chance to coach Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook in their primes, that qualifies as the right gig. Brian Schmitz of the Orlando Sentinel has more:

 He was hired to lead an even stronger NBA club — the Oklahoma City Thunder. This time, he’ll coach three players with All-Star Game credentials: Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook and Serge Ibaka.

“This opportunity came across that was very unique in my opinion,” he said. “If it didn’t, I’d still be at Florida.”

Donovan, who won back-to-back national championships at UF, said other NBA teams had reached out in the ensuing years. Reportedly, Cleveland (pre-LeBron’s return), Minnesota and Detroit were among the suitors.

He insists that there was no grand plan to leave the Gators for the pros.

“I’ve always believed you wake up and where you are that day, you do the best job you can,” he said. “Then if opportunities open up, they open up. It wasn’t anything about having a plan.”

The OKC job surprisingly opened after Scott Brooks was fired with another year on his contract.

Donovan was lucky because a lot of terrific college coaches – from Rick Pitino to John Calipari – usually are stuck with bad teams.

“The one thing for me..I knew it was a good team, but you have to feel good about it. Happiness inside a job has to do with the people you work with everyday,” Donovan said.

Especially if those people are named Durant, Westbrook and Ibaka.

Donovan’s no dummy. He’s also aware of the pressure coaching the contending Thunder, particularly since Durant can become a free agent this summer.

Durant says he “enjoys” being around Donovan, who seems to be adjusting well to life as an NBA coach.

“I’m working equally as hard or harder as I was in college,” he said. “It’s just things are a little bit different.”


No. 4: Gordon Hayward opens up with Q and A — The Utah Jazz are off to a decent start, which includes a blowout victory in Philadelphia, and one of the intriguing players is Gordon Hayward, naturally. After having his big contract matched by the Jazz two summers ago, Hayward was a borderline All-Star last season and hopes to take the next step this season. He discussed that and more when he sat for a quick interview with Scoop Jackson of ESPN:

Scoop: How big of an adjustment can it be to inherit that “No. 1 option” role for a franchise?

Hayward: It’s just a learning curve, honestly. I think it’s one of those things where, you know, if you play one way probably the first three years in the league and then you are asked it do something different. It’s just a role change, something you have to get adjusted to. You know, defenses are now keying on you and playing things differently to where you are at all of the time. That’s a huge step and something, like I said, that I was able to kind of learn and do for two years.

Scoop: Have you ever walked into an opponent’s locker room before a game and seen your name at the top of the white board just to see their defensive strategies they have planned for you?

Hayward: I have not [laughing]. I’ve never seen that. Or a scouting report on me or on our team.

Scoop: You have to sneak and do that. It’s one of those “No. 1 option” things.

Hayward: I should definitely do that.

Scoop: Do the media and other players underestimate you?

Hayward: I don’t think they do anymore. I think they probably did when I first came in the league — 100 percent did. But this is my sixth year, and I think they definitely respect me as a player now.

Scoop: I’ve heard you referred to you as “the Jazz’s version of LeBron James” in that you do everything for the team. When you hear that, how does it make you feel?

Hayward: It’s definitely pretty humbling to think that someone would say that, but I think it’s just something where I just try to be an all-around player and try to do a lot for the team. And yeah, I think LeBron’s a guy that obviously does that for his team no matter which team he’s on, and he’s probably one of the best ever to do that. So, but for me, if I’m not scoring I need to be assisting or making plays for other people or rebounding or just doing whatever I can to get guys in position where they can be successful.

Scoop: Do you think of yourself in that vein? In that, you “have to be LeBron” for this franchise?

Hayward: I think so. I think that it is a lot of responsibility but something that they have trusted me with and I definitely have to be active and have to affect all parts of the game in order for us to be a successful team. I’ve never been a guy that’s going to go out and just affect one part of the game. I think that I’ve always been somebody that tries to affect multiple parts of the game, and I think we have a lot of guys that can do a lot of different things, so it’s not just me. We’re a versatile team. I’m excited about where we can go.

Scoop: Utah went 19-10 after the All-Star break while holding opponents to a league-low 94.8 points per 100 possessions. Was that just a good two months or was that indicative of what this team had become?

Hayward: Yeah, I think that’s definitely our identity and definitely what’s going to have to be our identity moving forward if we want to be successful, especially in the West. Defense is something that can go with us wherever we are at. We are going to have times when people’s shots are off and we’re just not feeling it offensively, but if we continue to play defense like we did at the end of the year — something that I think we are very capable of doing — we can always stay in games and give ourselves a chance.


SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Jodie Meeks will be out for a while in DetroitSteph Curry is about to be immortalized in wax … The Suns were “equipped” to show their respect for Steve Nash, whose jersey has been retired … There was a Mother Nature problem in San Antonio so Tony Parker had an excuse to miss practice.

Morning shootaround — Oct. 23

VIDEO: Highlights from games played Oct. 22


Clarkson injured in finale | Noah OK with bench role | Johnson unlikely to start for Pistons | Why ‘Jimmer Mania’ never caught on in NBA

No. 1: Clarkson injured in preseason finale; Scott expects Bryant to go in opener — The Los Angeles Lakers are just days away from a fresh season that, hopefully, can help them erase last season’s disastrous campaign. One of the few bright spots from last season was point guard Jordan Clarkson, an eventual All-Rookie First Team performer. Clarkson will be counted on heavily this season, which made last night concerning for the Lakers. He left the team’s preseason finale against the Golden State Warriors with a right shoulder sprain that will require an MRI today. Lakers stalwart Kobe Bryant missed the preseason close-out game, but on a bright note, he’s expected to go in the season-opener.

Here’s a look at how/when Clarkson’s injury occurred …

VIDEO: Jordan Clarkson injures his shoulder vs. Warriors’s Baxter Holmes has more on what’s next for Clarkson and Bryant:

Lakers coach Byron Scott said he still expects the 37-year-old Bryant, who is in his 20th season with the Lakers, to play in the team’s regular-season opener Oct. 28 against the Minnesota Timberwolves at Staples Center.

“There’s no doubt in my mind [that he’ll play in that game],” Scott said before his team faced the Warriors on Thursday. “Talking to him [Thursday], he said he’s just gearing up for Wednesday. I said, ‘Good, because that’s what I’m gearing up for as well.’ There’s no doubt in my mind. It will take a whole lot to keep him out of that game.”

However, starting guard Jordan Clarkson’s status for the opener is now in question after he left Thursday’s game in the second quarter with what the team called a sprained right shoulder. Clarkson did not return to the game and was scheduled to receive an MRI on Friday.

“We’ll just have to wait and see,” Scott said, although Clarkson said he expects to play Wednesday.

Scott said he first noticed Clarkson was favoring his shoulder early in the game, and so Scott asked Lakers trainer Gary Vitti to examine Clarkson.

“[Vitti] basically told me [Clarkson’s shoulder] came out and went back in, whatever that means,” Scott said.

VIDEO: Jordan Clarkson talks about his shoulder injury after Thursday’s game

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Morning shootaround — Oct. 21

VIDEO: Highlights from games played Oct. 20


Buss defends Bryant extension | Aldridge: Kobe was bright spot in Lakers’ pitch | Drummond passes on extension | Noah a sixth man in 2015-16?

No. 1: Buss defends Bryant extension, fires back at Johnson — Los Angeles Lakers executive Jim Buss has not lacked in the critics department. From analysts to ex-Lakers players to fans, many have questioned the moves Buss has made in steering the Lakers back into relevance, let alone NBA title contention. One such move that is questioned was Buss giving Kobe Bryant a two-year, $45.8 million extension in 2013. Since then, injuries have limited Bryant to 41 games (out of a possible 164). But Buss stands by his move and explains why in an interview with USA Today‘s Sam Amick:

The Lakers executive vice president of basketball operations made it clear that he has no regrets about the controversial contract.

“You give Kobe Bryant $50 million for two years,” Buss told USA TODAY Sports in a wide-ranging interview. “Are you kidding me? What did he bring us? In this day and age, what did he bring us, for 20 years? And if that isn’t what you’re supposed to do, then I have no idea what life is all about.

“You pay the guy. You believe in the guy. If he ends up (staying healthy), that’s fantastic. Well everybody (in the media) cut me up for that, but I’d say over 200 fans have come up to me and said, ‘Thank you so much for letting my kid see Kobe Bryant for two more years.’ And I’m like, ‘You know what? I’m glad I can see him for two more years.’ ”

Even now, as the Lakers approach the start of their latest regular season, Bryant is missing preseason games because of a left leg contusion suffered against the Sacramento Kings on Tuesday.

Give Buss credit for this much: He’s transparent about how he sees the Bryant deal. Yes, there was a lifetime achievement factor, with the Buss family deciding not only to pay Bryant in the future but to honor him for his past. And to anyone who dares bring up the piece from a year ago that so strongly suggested Buss was eager for Bryant to head for the exits so the Lakers’ rebuild could begin in earnest, he is quick to condemn the concept.

“It’s (BS), that’s exactly what that was,” he fired back when asked about the ESPN the Magazine article. “The organization absolutely loves him. You know why? Because he has made a living, as we (have) with the Lakers for the last 20 years, because of this man. Magic Johnson carried us (to) this part (of their history) … and Kobe Bryant has carried us for 20 years. So every person that works in that organization, why would they hate him? Why would they want him out of there? There’s only a basketball or a Kobe hater that would want that. There’s no other reason.”

He laughs.

“You can’t justify (being anti-Bryant),” Buss continued. “If you’re a secretary or a mail room executive or whatever, you can’t justify saying you don’t want Kobe there. He gets a thousand pieces of mail a day, so that keeps your job.”

Additionally, Buss took on one of his biggest critics, former Lakers star Magic Johnson, and had this to say:

“Magic Johnson going nuts on me?” Buss said with a laugh. “It’s like, ‘Really, dude? My dad made you a billionaire almost. Really? Where are you coming from?’ ”

Johnson — who sold his share of the Lakers in 2010 and two years later led the ownership group that paid $2 billion for the Los Angeles Dodgers — earned approximately $43 million during his playing days and has been wildly successful in the business sector ever since (a 2011 Forbes report estimated his net worth at $525 million). In the grander sense, though, it’s well-chronicled that late owner Jerry Buss‘ impact on Johnson went well beyond basketball.

“Dr. Buss gave me the platform to be Magic,” Johnson told the Los Angeles Times in Feb. 2013 after Buss’ death. “He gave me the knowledge to be Magic.”

When asked about Buss’ comment, Johnson issued a statement to USA TODAY Sports in response.

“It’s all about winning, Jim,” Johnson said.

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Blogtable: Is it time for Bulls to trade Rose?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: Paul George the PF? | Do you believe Carmelo? | Is it time to deal D-Rose?

VIDEOHow will Derrick Rose’s latest injury affect the Bulls?

> In light of recent events, the emergence of Jimmy Butler and a new coach, should the Bulls begin the to process of seeking a trade for point guard Derrick Rose? Where would you ship Rose or would he stay and why?

Steve Aschburner, At $20 million this season and $21 million next season, given his injury history, I’m not sure there’s a trade market for Rose. Chicago would have to take back so much junk in matching salary, there’d be no likely gain other than excising a possible poor fit next to Butler. And frankly, that’s a lousy reason – for years, the storyline was all about Rose’s need of a “sidekick,” an All Star-capable companion who would lighten his workload and keep defenses more honest. It’s on the two of them to figure out their “alpha dog” issue, especially Rose. But he has enough to do just to get back on, and stay on, the court.

Fran Blinebury, Jimmy Butler got his payday and I’m happy for him. But let’s not confuse his overall talent with a healthy Derrick Rose. The operative word, of course, being healthy. New coach Fred Holberg knows that. It’s not fair to toss in an elbow to the eye at practice and an orbital fracture as further evidence of being injury prone. Rose has said things and is acting out, at least in part, due to his frustration from spending so much time not playing over the last three seasons. Here in early October, it’s time for everyone to take a deep breath and relax. If I’m the Bulls, I don’t want to send Rose anyplace except back out onto the court at the United Center.

Scott Howard-Cooper, This is not the time to trade Derrick Rose. I certainly understand the part about needing dependability at point guard of all positions, and Rose’s knees are not dependable, but this would be selling very low. Dealing from a position of weakness is not the way to go unless it’s a last resort, and this is not. Let him get back on the court, and then everyone can get a better read. Two things to remember, though. The latest setback was a freak injury that could have happened to anyone, not the continuation of a problem. And, good luck solving the Rose dilemma without creating a new one at point guard.

Shaun Powell, I’d give Rose another year to reinvent himself into more of a passing point guard and swallow his pride and learn to yield to Butler and Pau Gasol more often in tight games. If he resisted, I’d explore trades but only if I could get his replacement in return. Otherwise, why bother?

John Schuhmann, First of all, good luck finding a team that’s willing to take on the $41.4 million left on Rose’s contract, given his injury history. His deal will be more palatable after this season, which is when the Bulls should reevaluate. Jimmy Butler is a terrific player, but he’s not James Harden (not yet, at least). Every team needs multiple ball-handlers and Rose still has a key role to play in Fred Hoiberg‘s offense. If things go right, this team could be a legit challenger to the Cavs in the Eastern Conference.

Sekou Smith, The Bulls and Derrick Rose both need to take a step back and see where this season takes them before worrying about a potential split. He’s under contract for two more years and the window to do huge things with a healthy Rose and Butler comprising one of the best backcourts in the league. So much of what comes out of Rose’s mouth these days makes me cringe, so I get why Bulls fans and observers are entertaining thoughts of a future that does not include their once-universally beloved native son. Times change. Circumstances, too. But talent, true superstar talent, is hard to come by. And the Bulls can’t make any premature decisions about Rose and the future based on what’s transpired the first few weeks of the season. No trade!

Ian Thomsen, Why trade him? The Bulls won’t get close to an equal return, especially given Rose’s ongoing history of injuries. This latest event for Rose was a freak accident, so don’t overreact to it. Keep him and see how he performs in Fred Hoiberg’s promising offense.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blog: If I was Chicago, I’d be willing to move Rose, but I just don’t know who you get back who can match what Rose brings. Last year, when he was returning from injuries and fighting other injuries, Rose still averaged almost 18 ppg, which is no small feat. The other issue in trading Rose would be finding a team willing to take on the remaining two years and $40+ million on his contract. But even if Rose is never the again the same player that won the MVP, Derrick Rose is still a marquee name and top talent. And there are a few teams in major markets — Brooklyn, Boston, New York, the Lakers — who probably wouldn’t mind adding another superstar to their mix.

Morning shootaround — Oct. 6

VIDEO: Highlights from games played Oct. 5


George gets ‘clarification’ on role | Bucks’ Parker to miss preseason opener | Beal seeks to tweak his game | Bulls’ Gasol ages like a fine wine

No. 1: George gets ‘clarification’ on power forward role — Indiana Pacers small forward Paul George wasn’t a fan of moving to the power forward spot when the idea was first breached. He wasn’t a fan of it after scoring 18 points in the Pacers’ first preseason game (a loss to the New Orleans Pelicans). Yet after a talk with the team’s brass, it seems George has reversed field on his feeling on the switch and is more open to it, writes Candace Buckner of the Indianapolis Star:

Paul George drew national attention by making comments about his new role as the Indiana Pacers starting power forward after the first exhibition game. George matched up against New Orleans Pelicans All-Star Anthony Davis – either a welcomed introductory challenge or a complete nightmare depending on your view – and later opined: “I don’t know if I’m cut out for a 4 spot. I don’t know if this is my position.”

Then, George said he would seek input from coach Frank Vogel and team president of basketball operations Larry Bird into how he performed at the position. By Monday afternoon, George had spoken to them and found more interpretation.

“Yeah, we talked about it,” George said after Monday’s practice. “Just going over what was the plan going forward.

“I mean, there was clarification on what we’re (doing) going forward,” George added later. “That’s what it was, just clarification.”

When asked if the “clarification” meant changes to his role, George said: “We’re going to still stick with it, see how it works.”

Then, when quizzed if he’s OK with that, George responded: “I’m a part of this team.”

Though George offered few specifics of this meeting, the “clarification” appears to be more like repetition.

“Nothing we haven’t said in the past,” Vogel responded when asked about the conversation with George. “We’re going to continue to evaluate and get his feedback and what he’s comfortable with and what he’s not comfortable with. We’re not going to put him in a position where he’s not comfortable with his role. We’re just not going to do that. But we’re going to play both small lineups and big lineups, and he understands that.”

However after one preseason game – in fact, a loss in which Davis produced 18 points and eight rebounds without playing through the second half – George felt the matchup did not go well.

“We took it way left field. It’s Game 1 of the preseason, and we’re playing against arguably one of the best, if not the best, power forwards in this league,” George said on Monday. “So it was an adjustment. And (Davis) kicked my (butt). He kicked my (butt) Game 1.”

George and the Pacers will get a more moderate test in Detroit (7:30 p.m., Tuesday) against Ersan Ilyasova (who was 12-of-14 for 34 points in a game against Indiana last season). Ilyasova might be 6-10, 235, 15 pounds heavier than George, but he relies more on a perimeter game. Players such as Ilyasova are the reason the Pacers remain committed to playing with a smaller lineup.

“You can’t make small reactions. It’s going to be a big picture thing, and we’re going to do what’s best to win basketball games,” Vogel said. “Winning is more important than style of play, but this style of play, I think, gives us, this group, the best chance to win basketball games.”

VIDEO: Paul George talks about the discussion he had with the team’s brass

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Morning shootaround — Oct. 3



‘Holdout’ turns screws on Thompson, Cavs | Cuban ‘gets’ Chandler’s barbs | Greater Heat depth brings minutes challenge | Clippers still counting on Wes

No. 1: ‘Holdout’ turns screws on Thompson, Cavs — If there’d been a statue of Tristan Thompson outside of Quicken Loans Arena, it would have been lassoed and pulled to the ground as happens when banana republics undergo regime change. Instead, the Cleveland Cavaliers had to settle for scrubbing their backup power forward/center’s likeness from signage around the Q and purging any merchandise specific to Thompson from the team’s arena and online stores. Why? Thompson officially is a “holdout,” now that the deadline for him to sign either the Cavs’ one-year qualifying offer or a long-term deal passed at the end of Thursday. Thus the dicey business situation moved into a new phase Friday, as detailed by’s Dave McMenamin:

The Cleveland Cavaliers’ message on Friday, considered the first official day that Tristan Thompson’s contract standoff with the team escalated to a “holdout” situation, was loud and clear:

If you are not going to be present for training camp, you are not going to be weighing on our minds.

“Right now, my thoughts are just about the guys that are here and how hard and how well they are working and no specific expectation otherwise,” said Cavs coach David Blatt when asked for his reaction to Thompson letting the Cavs’ one-year, $6.8 million qualifying offer for this season expire at 11:59 p.m. ET on Thursday without accepting it. “Just happy to see our guys working as well as they are.”

With the qualifying offer off the table, negotiations will shift to both sides focusing on a multi-year agreement. Thompson’s agent, Rich Paul, recently vacated a five-year, $94 million max contract demand for his client in favor of a preferred three-year, $53 million deal, per league sources. The Cavs have already tendered a five-year, $80 million offer to Thompson, according to sources.

Friday was the fourth consecutive day of camp that Thompson missed, however Blatt was adamant that the big man’s absence has not caused a distraction as his team readies itself for the regular season.

“We got a veteran group,” Blatt said. “We got a very professional group of guys going about their business and going about their jobs the way that they should. The team is working and we are going to continue to do so.”


No. 2: Cuban ‘gets’ Chandler’s barbs — When Clippers center DeAndre Jordan reneged on his agreement to sign as a free agent with Dallas, Mavericks owner Mark Cuban chose some of his words carefully but didn’t exactly hide his displeasure. More recently, it was Tyson Chandler‘s turn to vent about the turn of events and Chandler – the former Mavs center who kind of got squeezed to Phoenix when Dallas targeted Jordan at the start of free agency this summer – came out strong in support of his fellow big man re-upping with L.A. Well, Cuban didn’t bristle at Chandler’s human, understandable reaction, writes Tim McMahon of

“He does have the right to be salty,” Cuban said during an appearance on 103.3 FM ESPN’s “Dennis and Friedo” on Friday.

Chandler, a hero during Dallas’ 2011 title run, has now twice been given second-fiddle treatment by the Mavs’ front office in free agency. The big man was blunt when asked this week about DeAndre Jordan’s decision to renege on his verbal commitment to replace Chandler as Dallas’ starting center. Chandler considers Jordan’s choice to stay with the Los Angeles Clippers a better-late-than-never, wise decision.

“I thought it was crazy,” Chandler told reporters during media day with the Phoenix Suns, his new team. “I never thought that DeAndre was going to sign with the Mavs, to be honest. I thought he was leaving a great situation back in L.A. Clearly, their roster is very talented and they have an opportunity to contend, so I didn’t understand it to begin with. Him going back on it, I actually thought that he got a good look at the picture.”

It’s not the first indication that Chandler — who informed the Mavs that he was heading to Phoenix minutes before their July 1 meeting with Jordan started — is a bit miffed about being disrespected by Dallas. His peace sign/sun combo was an underrated tweet during the comical emoji battle that unfolded while Jordan snacked on chicken with his Clippers pals and ignored Cuban’s phone calls while waiting to officially sign his deal with L.A.

Cuban said a year ago that he had “learned his lesson” from letting Chandler leave and intended all along to keep him … until he learned that the Mavs had a legitimate shot to add an NBA rebounding leader who was just entering his prime.

“I didn’t think it would get to that point,” Cuban said of the 33-year-old Chandler’s departure from Dallas. “We actually tried to have discussions right at the start of the year about an extension and it kind of just died on the vine. His agent didn’t really take it anywhere, and I was the first to say ‘If you don’t want to take it right now, we’ll try to figure something out at the end of the year,’ because I realized that by waiting that gave Tyson an extra year.

“Then the opportunity for DeAndre came along and we were pretty straightforward. Tyson or his agent gave us the ultimatum before the decision was made. He said he wouldn’t wait. That’s his decision. It is what it is. He does have a right to be salty, because I really did suggest to him — and it’s exactly the way I thought — that he’d be here for a long time.”



No. 3: Greater Heat depth brings minutes challenge — The deeper the NBA roster, the greater its flexibility and the more varied its looks in butting heads with the league’s 29 other teams. But “deep depth” brings with it some hard math for a lot of players: Divvying up the 240 minutes of a typical game by 10 or 12 players means less playing time than a guy could expect in a tighter rotation of eight (assuming he’s one of the eight). That’s what the Miami Heat will face this season and that’s what the Miami Herald’s Barry Jackson wrote about:

The upshot of adding skilled veterans Gerald Green and Amar’e Stoudemire and 10th overall draft pick Justise Winslow, along with the return of Josh McRoberts from knee surgery, means the Heat’s second unit — which could potentially include those four and Mario Chalmers — is “obviously a big upgrade from what we had last season coming off the bench,” [Dwyane] Wade said.

But Wade also cited this potentially uncomfortable flip side of adding depth: fewer minutes for players unaccustomed to that.

“Everyone talks about how excited we are about our depth, but you’ve got to understand at times the depth will get in the way of your playing time,” Wade said. “How are we going to get past that? Those are the things people don’t look at that affect teams. We’ve got to be able to get over that hump.”

Two players who stand to be most affected by that: Chris Andersen, who played in 60 of the 65 games he suited up for last season, and Udonis Haslem, who played in 46 of the 77 that he was available for.

“It takes a special person to do that,” Haslem said. “When it takes a hit on playing time, it takes a hit on your ego. My job is to walk guys through who haven’t experienced it. I can instill a positive influence, keeping guys engaged in practice.”

Erik Spoelstra said the Heat does research to make sure it doesn’t sign players who are likely to complain about playing time. Asked about the six power rotation players, Spoelstra said all are selfless.

“This type of situation might not be for every veteran player,” Spoelstra said. “We try to over-communicate that early in the process of recruitment. When we sign them, we over-communicate the role. With any great team, it’s necessary you have talent and depth.

“But you have to be willing to sacrifice to leverage all of that depth. We haven’t gotten to that point yet with [defining] roles. It’s not about minutes, it’s not about shots, it’s not about opportunities. It’s about an opportunity to come together and do something special.”


No. 4: Clippers still counting on Wes — Hey, there was an NBA preseason game Friday night! The Clippers led by as much as 21 points en route to beating Denver at Staples Center, with Cuban’s pal Jordan contributing 15 points, 12 rebounds and three blocked shots in 26 minutes. But much of the focus for the Clippers was on the small forward spot, where Matt Barnes is the only starter missing from last season and where veteran All-Star Paul Pierce and underachieving Wes Johnson figure to time-share. Beat writer Dan Woike of the Orange County Register stayed up late in filing this roster update:

Barnes, one of the faces on the banners last season, is now with Clippers rival Memphis, and while the team feels it has upgraded on the wing, there’s still a loss to be dealt with.

“There’s no question we’re going to miss Matt,” Chris Paul said. “Matt brought a lot to our team – leadership, toughness. I don’t know; Matt was one of a kind. Replacing Matt, it’ll be a lot of different guys.”

It was never going to be one guy; at least that wasn’t the plan for Coach Doc Rivers and the Clippers over the summer.

“I just think the guy in that spot is going to have success because those other four guys are really good, so he’s going to get shots that you don’t get on other teams because of that,” Rivers said. “One of the things I really wanted was an athlete in that spot, a guy that could make shots and finish at the rim.

“From afar, Wes (Johnson) has the ability to do that. He has not done it yet really in his career, but you know he can, or at least you believe he can. And then you want a veteran as well, and so that’s where Paul (Pierce) came in.

“We went into this with a plan.”

They had a plan for who they would sign. But who will start [in the regular season]? That’s still up in the air.


SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Boston’s Isaiah Thomas hasn’t been jacking up shots with his usual carefree frequency lately – but he’s quick to assure Celtics fans it’s not a permanent alteration in his game. … The Chicago Bulls still seem committed to a Twin Tower lineup using Joakim Noah and Pau Gasol in a league going smaller and smaller. … The better your team, the easier its schedule – because it doesn’t have to play itself, right? breaks down some of the schedule disparity on tap for 2015-16. … In case you missed it, National Basketball Players Association executive director Michele Roberts gets the Q&A treatment in Cosmopolitan magazine. … LeBron James voiced his displeasure with the too-many recent shootings across the land and has his foundation working on getting kids away from the guns-and-violence culture.

Surgery done, Bulls’ Rose will reacquaint with rehab process

VIDEO: Rose out 2 weeks with facial fracture

CHICAGO – No rhyme, no reason. Could be that Derrick Rose is snake-bit, whatever that is. Could be karma or kismet or some other form of lousy luck. Could be that one of his luxury residences is built on a sacred burial ground and the payback stinks.

But the “why him?” of Rose’s litany of injuries, even if it was a part of the Chicago Bulls’ locker room dismay, wasn’t a topic of conversation during the second workout of training camp Wednesday or in their public comments afterward.

The half-empty view of Rose – the Bulls’ oft-injured point guard who suffered a facial fracture in the first practice of 2015-16 a day earlier and underwent surgery Wednesday morning – was that this team is locked in a gauze-wrapped “Groundhog Day,” unable to get and keep Rose healthy to seriously contend for the NBA championship.

The half-full view was, who knows rehab better than Rose and the Bulls?

Coach Fred Hoiberg said Rose’s surgery went as expected and revealed no structural damage beyond the left orbital fracture initially diagnosed. A timetable for his return to workouts and, presumably with a protective mask, his availability to practice and eventually play still was being determined by the team’s medical staff.

“He’s still in great spirits,” said Hoiberg, who said he texted with Rose Tuesday evening but had not spoken with him after surgery. “It’s not a structural injury. When he comes back ready to go, he should be able to go right back into 100 percent. Where if you have something going on with one of your other body parts, it’s going to be gradually [getting] back.”

Rose, who turns 27 Sunday, was running along the baseline early in practice Tuesday when he accidentally got struck by an elbow from one of the Bulls’ big men. Just like that, Hoiberg – who had gotten a taste of Chicago’s injury misfortunes last week when veteran forward Mike Dunleavy underwent back surgery – found himself in Tom Thibodeau‘s coaching sneakers.

Veterans Aaron Brooks and Kirk Hinrich are the backups at point guard, with E’Twaun Moore and even Jimmy Butler available for playmaking minutes. But while Thibodeau had familiarity and continuity on his staff’s side, able to keep Rose’s spot warm with the likes of Nate Robinson, D.J. Augustin, John Lucas III, Brooks and Hinrich through the former MVP’s previous absences, Hoiberg has new strategies and a new style. Rose is missing the early classes now, with the Bulls hoping that doesn’t mess up their whole semester.

“He’s a tough kid,” center Pau Gasol said. “Hopefully he’ll heal well and he’ll be ready to go [by opening night vs. Cleveland Oct. 27]. But it’s unfortunate he won’t be able to be a part of most of training camp or the preseason because it’s a useful time for any team to get things on track. Set the foundation for the season, especially with a new system, new philosophy, a new coach. But no excuses – life works out that way some times and you’ve just got to keep working.”

Said Hoiberg: “He’s still going to be here. He’s still going to be at practice. He’ll still be learning. … He’s in great shape. We don’t know how much he’ll be able to do while he’s in recovery mode. But he still will be here learning.”

Facial injuries similar to Rose’s are not uncommon in the NBA, with LeBron James, Russell Westbrook, Joe Johnson, Chris Paul, Jason Terry and others suffering various hits and returning to action in a few weeks or less. Rose’s multiple knee injuries have forced longer layoffs and more time away from the team, so that is a relative bright side to this trauma.

No one among the Bulls had even a theory, other than rotten probability, why Rose would be the franchise’s limping medical chart. Since the start of the 2011-12 season, he has missed 212 of 312 possible regular season games, playing in 340 of 558 in his seven-year NBA career.

Hoiberg shrugged off the suggestion of a woe-is-me attitude, though certainly this is an old issue bleeding into a new era.

“We’ve still got a job to do,” he said. “We can’t hang our heads or feel sorry for ourselves. It’s about getting these guys prepared to go out and play. You’re right, injuries are a part of this. Guys have stepped in in the past with this team and given great minutes when key guys have been sidelined.”

The Bulls play their first preseason game Tuesday against Milwaukee at United Center.

Center Joakim Noah, a close to Rose as any of the Bulls players, said both his sidelined pal and his other teammates are staying chins-up.

“We’ve got to stay positive,” Noah said. “We’re living out our dreams. We play for the Chicago Bulls for a living. Things could be a lot worse.”

Blogtable: NBA’s best international player?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.

BLOGTABLE: New coach with toughest gig? | Best international player today? | Mozgov or Thompson?

VIDEOTop 10 plays from Grizzlies center Marc Gasol

> The NBA had 101 international players on its opening-day rosters last season, and could add another 10-12 this season. Who is the best international player in the NBA right now, today?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comWe’re not talking lifetime achievement (Dirk Nowitzki), right? Nor are we going with the foreign-born guy we’d draft No. 1 for the career he’ll put together (possibly Andrew Wiggins)?  Fine. For today and this season, give me Marc Gasol, the first-team All-NBA center and a top-10 finisher in Kia MVP balloting last season. At 30, he’s at the peak of his power and in his best physical shape ever. He’s got size, he boasts multiple skills and he’s a tremendous teammate and individual.

Scott Howard-Cooper, Marc Gasol. Tony Parker is still in the conversation with his overall shooting and 3-point range plus the intangibles as one of the centerpieces of all that is right in San Antonio (the underwhelming per-game numbers in other categories are misleading because the Spurs don’t assign him a heavy workload). And there were times in the past it seemed that Joakim Noah was ready to make a push up the ranking. Gasol’s 2014-15 earned the top spot, though. Offense, defense, professionalism. That’s deserving of No. 1.

Shaun Powell, Marc Gasol at one point wasn’t even the best foreign-born player in his own family. But now he has squeezed ahead of not only Pau Gasol but Dirk Nowitzki (on the downside of a great career), Tony Parker, Serge Ibaka, etc. In a few years he may pass the baton to Andrew Wiggins. We’ll see.

John Schuhmann, If Tim Duncan counts as an international player, he’s still No. 1, with Marc Gasol a close second. Duncan is still an impact player on both ends of the floor, and his leadership and coachability can’t be discounted. Tony Parker is more important to the Spurs’ offense than Duncan is at this point, but isn’t the two-way player that his teammate is. Dirk Nowitzki, meanwhile, has become a real liability on defense.

Sekou Smith, This is Marc Gasol’s honor and mantle to carry until someone else from the international pool takes it. A physical brute and an absolute technician as the backbone of the Memphis Grizzlies, Marc is no longer playing in the shadow of big brother Pau. The ultimate testament to Marc’s journey is that you don’t have to make a case for him by pointing out the strengths and weaknesses of any of the other candidates. He’s earned his spot at the top of the international heap by working his tail off and becoming an All-Star and All-NBA player without any glaring flaws in his game.

Ian Thomsen, Tony Parker is the best today, and right beside him is teammate Tim Duncan (born and raised in the Virgin Islands) in the present day – in addition to being the undisputed best international NBA player of all time.

Lang Whitaker,’s All Ball blogThe first player to come to mind was Dirk Nowitzki, because he’s been the best international player in the NBA for so long. But with Dirk aging and playing less of a role with the Mavericks, perhaps it’s time to look elsewhere. Al Horford? Andrew Wiggins? Pau Gasol? (Does Kyrie Irving count, since he was born in Australia?) But even considering all of those guys, I think I might have to go with Marc Gasol. It’s easy to forget about him because while he was one of the top free agents this summer, he stayed below the radar and re-signed with the Grizzlies. But at just 30 years old, Marc Gasol is still one of the top centers in the NBA, with one of the most diverse skillsets in the league.

Morning shootaround — August 3

VIDEO: Steve Smith shines a light on the offseason winners and losers


Noah active, energized this summer | Thunder coach Donovan tough as they come | Okafor has great expectations for Sixers

No. 1: Noah active, energized this summer — Change has been good for Joakim Noah. The Chicago Bulls’ All-Star big man has been active this summer and energized this summer, both in the community and where basketball is concerned. Noah feels good. His mind is clear and his focus is sharp. And as far as his new coach, Fred Hoiberg, is concerned, the vibes are good. K.C. Johnson from the Chicago Tribune has more on Noah’s big summer:

Given that Joakim Noah spoke Saturday at an anti-violence community event his foundation organized, the Bulls’ big man placed last season’s personal struggles in perspective.

“Last year was a tough year for me. I feel it was very humbling,” Noah said. “We went through a lot. Right now, I’m feeling healthy both physically and mentally. I’m really excited about our upcoming opportunity. I never take anything for granted.”

Noah, who attended Saturday’s ONE CITY youth basketball tournament at the Major Adams Community Center near the United Center with his mother and sister, has been working out this offseason in California. Recently, new coach Fred Hoiberg visited.

He’s confident his summer at a sports science academy has put the health issues he experienced last season after May 2014 left knee surgery behind him.

“I feel great,” Noah said. “This is the first time I’ve taken a lot of time for myself to just focus on what I need to get done. Sometimes when you go through humbling experiences, (you) hungrier than ever. And I feel ready to prove I can help this team win big.”

Noah said he enjoyed “vibing” with Hoiberg.

“We got to break bread together,” he said. “I’ve enjoyed talking to the coaching staff, spending time with Fred. I think it’s going to be very different.”

Asked to elaborate, Noah smiled.

“Time will tell,” he said. “But it will definitely be different. We had a lot great times with Tom Thibodeau. He’s a great coach. I learned a lot from him. I’ve experienced a lot with him. I only have good things to say about him. I’m looking forward to this new chapter in my career.”

Before the tournament, Noah and his mother, Cecilia Rodhe, unveiled his Noah’s Arc Foundation’s latest public service announcement centered on its “Rock Your Drop” movement. It’s centered on peace, unity and positive change in the face of Chicago’s rampant gun violence.

Spike Lee, Bears running back Matt Forte, “Chicago Fire” actor David Eichenberg and St. Sabina’s Rev. Michael Pfleger are some of the spot’s prominent cameos.

“‘Rock Your Drop’ is a movement that started with my mother. It has been part of my vision as a basketball player since I was a kid,” Noah said. “For it to be finally here and feel this love really means so much to me and to my family. To launch this PSA is huge. To be able to play for the Chicago Bulls is something other than just basketball. When I see people wearing their drops, it means the world to me and my mom.”

Rodhe, an artist, chiseled the small drop out of stone 18 years ago. Noah wore one on a necklace.

“We’re all one. We’ve all been given life,” Rodhe said. “It doesn’t matter where we’re from. I’m from Sweden. You may say, ‘What are you doing here, blonde lady, on the South Side of Chicago? This isn’t your problem.’ I say no. When something is as strong as gun violence and you see the pain of moms, that’s all of ours problem.”

Noah is very hands-on with his foundation. He joked about converting now-teenage kids who razzed him about Kevin Durant fans five or six years ago.

“This will be my ninth season here and I don’t take that for granted,” Noah said. “Guys move around in my profession. They get traded. To be with a team for that long is special.

“I’m working as hard as I can on the court and this is a part of what I wanted to do since I started playing basketball. This is like home. We’ve been putting in a lot of work here. This is not a gimmick. It’s for the right reasons. To be able to do all this work makes me happy.”


No. 2: Thunder coach Donovan tough as they come — Anybody wondering what kind of transition Billy Donovan will make to the NBA after years as one of the nation’s elite college coaches need only peek into his past. Donovan is as tough as they come, having honed his game and his basketball sensibilities in Queens and, later, the Big East. If Donovan’s pedigree is any indication, Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook, Serge Ibaka and the Co. are in good hands. Anthony Slater of The Oklahoman explains:

After the Big East formed in 1979, basketball interest in the northeast spiked. The early ‘80s produced a golden age for high school point guards in NYC, meaning the 1983 Wheelchair event, the 10th annual, was a must-see edition.

That graduating class had Dwayne “Pearl” Washington, the playground legend and soon-to-be Syracuse star, and future NBA starters Kenny Smith and Mark Jackson.

But it was a sub 6-foot white kid from an affluent area of Long Island who stole the show in that showcase game. His name was Billy Donovan.

“Oh, Billy went off,” said his high school teammate, Frank Williams.

Donovan’s Queens team faced the Brooklyn squad led by Pearl Washington, the game’s headliner. Months earlier, Donovan battled Washington’s in a six-quarter high school scrimmage. Pearl had 82 points.

“We pressed the whole game and he just weaved in and out,” Donovan said. “I learned a lot.”

Donovan was a game-control point guard. Slick ball-handling was his greatest strength. Pearl was a wizard with the ball, his moves legendary. At the Wheelchair Classic, Donovan put his mental notes from the scrimmage to use.

“I don’t think Pearl was ready for it,” Williams laughed.

In the highlight play of his highlight day, Donovan sent Pearl sprawling on a left-handed, inside-out crossover dribble, cruising past him for a layup.

“Pearl nearly fell down,” said Billy’s childhood best friend Kevin Quigley. “The crowd went nuts. Just hooting and hollering. The little white boy just juked Pearl out of his shoes.”

Billy Donovan made a career out of willing himself to success. Too small and athletically limited to compete against premiere athletes? He molded himself into a player and led Providence to an unlikely Final Four run. Florida is a second-tier hoops program at a football school? He quickly turned them into a national powerhouse. Too inexperienced to coach in the NBA? Sam Presti just handed him the keys to the most important season in the Thunder’s brief franchise history.

But before there was Billy Donovan the iconic coach or Billy The Kid bombing 3s at Providence College there was Billy the kid, a Long Island youth addicted to basketball.

“It was almost an obsession,” Quigley said.


No. 3: Okafor has great expectations for Sixers — Philadelphia 76ers rookie Jahlil Okafor is well aware of the struggles that have gone on prior to his arrival in the City of Brotherly Love. But that has not soured him on what could be. He has great expectations for what he and the Sixers will get done in his rookie season. Marc Narducci of the Philadelphia Inquirer has the details:

Okafor averaged 18.5 points and 8.5 rebounds in two Las Vegas Summer League games. Before that, he averaged 14.0 points and 8.3 rebounds in three summer league games in Utah.

“I was satisfied,” Okafor said of his summer performance. “I got better every game and worked on everything.”

Covington said Okafor has already made an impact.

“He has brought a whole lot of excitement to this team,” Covington said. “He is a big man who has made his presence known already.”

Another big man, Joel Embiid, will miss a second straight season because of another procedure on his foot.

“It is hard to do, but he is doing well, and he is keeping his head high,” Covington said.

Just as the focus last season was on Nerlens Noel, this season it will be on Okafor. He said he can’t wait to get settled in the Philadelphia area and is looking for a place to live.

Okafor won’t lack confidence. He expects a lot from a Sixers team coming off an 18-64 season. He knows the expectations will again be low, but he doesn’t care.

“Everybody knows we have expectations, and the fans have expectations, and that is all that matters,” he said.

Okafor will be a trendy choice for rookie of the year because he is expected to play major minutes.

“It’s definitely a possible goal,” he said about earning the award. “Definitely.”


SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Michael Jordan is still the G.O.A.T., just ask Jimmy ButlerNancy Lieberman called Muhammad Ali after joining the Sacramento Kings as an assistant coach … Got cash? You’ll need plenty of it to buy the New York penthouse of former Brooklyn star Deron Williams

Bulls shift focus to frontcourt when Portis falls to them

VIDEO: Instant analysis on Bulls’ draft pick Bobby Portis

CHICAGO – The Bulls went shopping for a point guard and came home with a power forward.

Landing Bobby Portis, a jack-of-all-trades forward from Arkansas, was too good, and too unexpected, to pass up, which is why Chicago grabbed him at No. 22 in the first round of Thursday’s NBA Draft. But most of the Bulls’ focus had been on point guards, both as backups to Derrick Rose and – given that it is Rose we’re talking about – injury insurance.

Anyone who fills that role next season, however, will come via trade or free agency, much the way the Bulls have plugged the spot before (Aaron Brooks, D.J. Augustin, Nate Robinson). Portis brings a bundle of skills, but he’s more likely to be the picker and the roller than the ball handler.

“I can do a lot of different things,” Portis told reporters late Thursday. “I don’t have to have the basketball to score. I’m a guy who moves well without the basketball. I’m a guy that picks and pops, picks and rolls.”

Various scouting reports cast Portis as a big man skilled in multiple areas, without being dominant in any one. He’s 6-foot-11 with a 7-2 wingspan, the Bulls said. Multiple mock drafts penciled him in for Milwaukee at No. 17, with most projecting him to go between Nos. 13-20. With veteran Taj Gibson recently undergoing ankle surgery and center Joakim Noah coming off a down season limited by knee trouble, Portis brings depth the Bulls would rather not need.

Fred Hoiberg, the Bulls’ new head coach, faced Portis last season when his Iowa State team hosted the Razorbacks. He recalled Portis hitting six of seven shots in the first half, “all from the perimeter,” and finished with 19 points and eight rebounds.

“They play a different system at Arkansas – it’s a lot of pressure,” Hoiberg said. “It’s the ’40 minutes of hell,’ with a lot of pressing and he was in the back of that press quite a bit. With the turnovers they created, he probably wasn’t able to show his full package.

“The thing I’m excited about is his ability to play all over the floor,” Hoiberg added. “He was a guy who can hurt you from inside and out. … He moves very well for a kid that size, which is very important for the pace we’re going to want to play with.”

Portis also plays with an edge, Bulls GM Gar Forman said, that his employers welcome. An admirer of Kevin Garnett, Portis – who will have to lose his college headband, given Bulls tradition – said he tries to play as angry as that NBA veteran. “I envision that the player on the [other] team slapped my Mom,” he has said.

Speaking of edge, Forman addressed reports circulating after the Bulls were eliminated by Cleveland in the Eastern Conference semifinals that Rose and Jimmy Butler – the 2015 Most Improved Player and his team’s No. 1 priority to re-sign when he hits unrestricted free agency July 1 – chafed in the playoffs as competing alpha dogs.

“I’ve read about the friction,” Forman said. “I haven’t seen it. I think in all of our minds, you’ve got two guys who can attack, that want to run, that can play off the dribble, can play-make for themselves and for others. They haven’t had a chance to do it a whole lot because of injuries, but there’s no reason those two shouldn’t be able to play at a high level and, in our opinion, be one of the best backcourts in the league.”