Posts Tagged ‘Jeff Caplan’

Blogtable: Take a minute (or four)

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Darkhorse MVP | Best backcourt | Speeding up the game


> What are your initial thoughts on a 44-minute game? What’s good? What’s bad? And what do you think of the chances of this ever being adopted?

Shorter quarters might do it, but what about fewer timeouts? (Alissa Hollimon/NBAE)

Shorter quarters might do it, but what about fewer timeouts? (Alissa Hollimon/NBAE)

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: My first thought on the 44-minute game was, if the NBA sheds four minutes per game, how will MLB manage to add it to its average running time per nine innings? That’s the sport with the real too-long problem. As for this league, while I’m not persuaded that shaving four minutes of game action would matter much, I do think cutting the number of timeouts would help. Eleven-minute quarters won’t change the way teams coach or play the final two minutes, where most of the critics lob their complaints. Call me skeptical, too, that an 8.3 percent reduction would be applied across the board. To the 24-second clock? To the players’ salaries (they’d be working shorter shifts, especially bench guys)? To the owners’ TV revenue (fewer timeouts mean fewer cash-friendly commercial breaks)? And, ahem, to the ticket prices paid by fans?

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: I’m all for doing anything that will stop regulation time games from dragging on interminably past 2 1/2 hours and toward the 3-hour mark.  Frankly, I think that could be accomplished more effectively — and making the product better to view — by eliminating two timeouts per team, especially at the end of games.  If the NBA wants to make a move to shorten the overall time of play, I’d make the bigger cut to 10-minute quarters, bringing the game in line with FIBA rules so that game is uniform all over the world.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: There’s no need to go from 48 minutes to 44 minutes in the name of shortening the game. If this is really about player health, then find a way to shorten the season. If owners want the players they pay millions of dollars to each season to remain on the floor and not in the training room then they’ll accept a few less home gates for the good of their players and the game. There are too many back-to-backs, too many stretches of four games in five nights when it is really unnecessary. Not only does it put players at great risk of injury, it diminishes the product. In short, don’t shorten the game, shorten the season.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Will teams be cutting ticket prices the same percentage on nights the clock is reduced? Otherwise, I’m not moved either way. On the overall list of things of issues worth a strong stand, I’d put it just in front of advertising on uniforms. There’s nothing wrong with giving a look during one or a few exhibition games or taking a test drive through the D-League a few times. That’s a long way from the NBA making the change during its own regular season. I don’t think it happens soon, if at all.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: It would make games shorter and reduce injuries over the course of the season, but would also reduce the value of players 6-15 on every roster. I think the Players Association would have a problem with that. To reduce the time of games, I’d leave them at 48 minutes, reduce the number of timeouts (as they have in the 44-minute scenario) and adopt the FIBA rule that timeouts can only be called on dead balls or after a made basket. And to reduce injures, wear and tear and back-to-backs, I’d go to a 72-game season.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: After watching game after game during the FIBA World Cup (where the games are just 40 minutes long) I gained a new appreciation for the 48-minute NBA game. This 44-minute experiment splits the difference. I’m not sure there is a discernible good or bad to identify in this experimental game until I actually see the game played on the 19th. Whatever the reasons are for messing with this, and I’m sure the competition committee has plenty, I don’t know that it will dramatically impact the game the way people think in the short term. The chance of this being adopted anytime soon would appear to be slim. But if they are experimenting in exhibition games, it’s at least on the radar.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: Initially, I like the concept of NBA games taking less time to play. But I really don’t like the idea of playing shorter games, particularly when you’re shortening game times by all of four minutes. What bothers me is that NBA games have always been 48 minutes long, which makes comparing stats across decades so easy to do — you always know that someone averaged however many points or rebounds per game in a 48 minute game. If the NBA is really serious about shortening game times, it’s very simple: Have fewer timeouts, fewer commercial breaks, and enforce the actual timeout lengths. Losing a minute of actual game time seems like cutting off the nose to spite the face.

Simon Legg, NBA Australia: I’m for these types of changes being trialed during the preseason, there’s no better format for it to take place but I don’t think I want it introduced. Fewer timeouts is probably a positive but I’m not for it actually coming in. Does the NBA need to be closer to the length of a college game or an international game? How long would it take for coaches to adapt tactically to the changes? Credit to Adam Silver for actively looking to try new things and deliver on proposals he has brought up but I’m not so sure this will ever come into fruition.

Akshay Manwani, NBA India: I’m not a fan of the suggestion to be honest.  I can see the positives that come with it, namely fewer minutes per game translate into shorter playing time, which would in some way reduce the workload for players in what is a long NBA season. Also, I see this as the NBA willing to bridge the gap towards FIBA’s playing time which stands at 40 minutes. However, the not-so-good part is that fewer minutes may not necessarily translate into more rest time for key players. Instead, reserve players might see their minutes drop. And then there is the whole stats issue — how do you make comparisons between players who play 44 minutes against those who played 48 minutes? I wouldn’t know the chances of something like this being adopted, but I hope this never comes to pass.

Takuma Oikawa, NBA Japan: This is very interesting. I love NBA’s such unique and flexible idea. If the system is adopted, reducing many top players’ playing time, and they may show higher quality play. But the NBA’s 48-minute game has a long history: the 48-minute frame is not too long and not too short. So I think the game time format should not change. If the NBA wants to adopt short game time anyway, I’d rather it be the 40-minute length, like the FIBA game.

Davide Chinellato, NBA Italy: It’s great to see the NBA taking care of issues and making experiments to solve what is perceived as a problem. But I don’t see a 44-minute game happening for real. Regular season games aren’t too long. Playoffs games are, but not in terms of playing time. Fans want less ads when watching a game on TV, not less time of their favorite star on the court. Plus, a 48-minute game is part of what makes the NBA different from FIBA basketball and its 40-minute game.

Stefanos Triantafyllos, NBA Greece: I am not a big fan of changes, despite the fact that after some years I often admit that they were for the best. The 44-minute idea is very close to the FIBA playing time (40 minutes) and the plus-8 minutes was something that always held the two worlds apart, in a more distinguished way than the Atlantic ocean. Now the trend goes somethink like “less is more,” but I don’t like that minimal aspect when we are talking about the NBA. We want more!

Abraham Romero, NBA Spain : The players will be happy about the rest, but worried about the stats. Less minutes, less points. My thoughts are they are going to have to find a way to make the game faster without reducing the total time of play.

Pacers need Hill to attack leading role

DALLAS – It remains a mutually beneficial trade for both sides, yet it could have been just a bit awkward for Indiana Pacers guard George Hill to watch his old team pulverize the one team his never could, and then see the player he was traded for, Kawhi Leonard, celebrated as the Finals MVP.

Hill, however, said nothing could be further from the truth.

“Kawhi is a good friend of mine,” Hill said Sunday as the Pacers’ preseason trek brought them to Dallas. “I’m happy for his success. I’m happy for the Spurs’ success. If we’re not winning, you know, I root for them. I’m still good friends with everyone in that organization and with everyone on that team. All of them are like my brothers.”

Which is as good a segue as any when talking about these Pacers, because they’re using training camp to try to bond like brothers following a summer — and really starting from the second half of last season — of tumult. Shooting guard and the NBA’s surprising triple-double leader, Lance Stephenson, departed for Charlotte as a free agent. All-Star forward Paul George, the emerging star who allowed the Pacers to deal Leonard for point guard help in 2011, emotionally shook the franchise, and the league, when he broke his leg during the Team USA scrimmage in Las Vegas.

And just like that, the Pacers are a much different team, and one that will be asking Hill to bring a much different game than he really ever has, either with the Spurs where he was mostly a reserve surrounded by the Big Three, or in Indiana, where its two no-longer-available wings were so often the point of attack.

“He’s just going to have the ball in his hands more, have his number called a lot more,” Pacers coach Frank Vogel said. “We’ve always wanted him to be aggressive, but I think he understands that that’s needed more than ever. Years past he would be aggressive at times, but the ball would be in Lance and Paul’s hands a lot.  So a lot of times he was the secondary option; most times he was the secondary option. He’s going to be more of a primary option this year.”

Vogel compared it back to when Hill first arrived.

“Before Danny Granger got hurt and Paul George and Lance Stephenson exploded, our go-to guys were David West and George Hill, and it’s just going to return to that,” Vogel said. “And they did that on a team that in the lockout season won at a 50-win pace as the two late-game go-to guys.”

That team turned a 37-45 record in 2010-11 to 42-24 with Hill backing up Darren Collison before taking over as the starter late in the season. The Pacers advanced to the East semifinals. And maybe they can again this season in an unpredictable Eastern Conference.

The reorganizing Heat and Pacers have been replaced by LeBron James‘ new team, the Cavaliers, and the Bulls as conference favorites. Washington, Toronto, Brooklyn and Stephenson’s Charlotte Hornets could all make some noise.

“Defense wins games, so as long as we continue to play defense the right way, I think we’re going to win a lot of games,” Hill said. “We’re going to have to use our defense as our offense.”

Even so, there’s little doubt that Hill will need to boost his scoring and playmaking for the Pacers not to drop to the lower rungs of the playoff chase. Hill averaged 10.3 points and 3.5 assists while logging 32 minutes a game last season. He shot 44.2 percent from the floor and 36.5 percent from beyond the arc. He ranked 96th in the league, according to NBA.com’s player tracking data, in number of drives to the basket. To put that low number in some perspective, Oklahoma City’s Russell Westbrook registered 99 more drives to the basket even though he played in 30 fewer games.

“Obviously he’s going to have to play a bigger role for us. He’s got to be aggressive,” West said. “It’s going to be a different role and adjustment for him, but he’s going to work himself into it, get comfortable with it. The last couple of years we’ve attacked from the wings. He’s going to have to be the point of attack for us, to really look to take his game to another level.”

‘Jones fracture’ can be tricky, but odds are Durant heals just fine


VIDEO: OKC GM Sam Presti says it’s impossible to replace Durant

HANG TIME SOUTHWEST – The “Jones fracture” Kevin Durant sustained to his right foot is hardly unique to basketball players. However the bone in question — the fifth metatarsal — is unique, which is why pinpointing Durant’s return, plus potential complications, is met by sports medicine professionals with a certain level of caution.

“We don’t worry about this if it was, for example, the bone to the middle toe, because 100 percent of the time those heal. You never have the remote chance of nonunion when you’re considering the third or fourth metatarsals,” said renowned orthopedic surgeon Dr. T.O. Souryal, the Dallas Mavericks team physician and president of the NBA Team Physicians Association. “The fifth [metatarsal] is very unique and it’s unique because there are tendons that attach there that are constantly pulling in the opposite direction that you want the healing to take place. None of the other metatarsal bones have that stress on them. Because of the mechanics, because of the blood supply, there is that little shadow of uncertainty.

“Those of us who do sports medicine on a regular basis have a tremendous respect for Jones fracture because it looks relatively innocuous, and 95 percent of them heal uneventfully, relatively quickly. But there are a few tricky ones that don’t heal uneventfully and don’t heal very quickly.”

Thunder general manager Sam Presti said on Sunday that Durant will likely undergo surgery, and he estimated the NBA’s reigning MVP will be sidelined six to eight weeks. Souryal said surgery is the most common treatment for athletes with a “Jones fracture,” and that Presti’s timeframe is on target for this type of injury.

The fifth metatarsal bone is the long bone on the outside of the foot that connects to the little toe. A “Jones fracture” occurs toward the back end of the bone in an area that receives less blood and therefore can be more prone to difficulties in healing. For most athletes, the “Jones fracture” is caused by overuse, repetitive stress or trauma. Presti said Durant alerted the Thunder’s medical staff to discomfort in his foot following Saturday’s practice.

Because of the tricky nature of the bone, Souryal said the actual time an athlete misses can vary, sometimes healing before the six-week timetable, but also sometimes taking longer than eight weeks.

“There are some [Jones fractures] that heal in four to five weeks, absolutely, but there are some that take three, four months,” Souryal said. “And it’s difficult to tell which is which in the beginning. It’s just difficult to tell. As a result, we all have a healthy respect for this injury. In Oklahoma City, they have an excellent medical staff and I will give them tremendous credit for making the diagnosis early, and I am sure that they are in deliberations right now trying to decide what is the best course of action.”

Once the bone heals, Souryal said it will be as good as new. That’s not a guarantee that Durant can’t re-injure the foot, but odds are in his favor that he will continue on with his career with no further difficulties.

Mavs fans remember up-and-coming guard Rodrigue Beaubois, who fractured the same bone while working out with the French national team several summers ago. Beaubois underwent surgery and was on the comeback trail, but he re-fractured the bone during a workout as his return date neared and missed another significant chunk of time.

“He was one of the few percentages that did not heal fully and re-broke,” Souryal said.

The fact that basketball players are constantly running and jumping, the factors that likely led to Durant’s injury in the first place, means there is always a risk of re-injury. However, most athletes returning from the fracture, Souryal said, do not experience a setback.

“The positive spin is that the vast majority heal this fracture uneventfully and come back on time,” Souryal said. “It’s only those tricky ones, those few percentage points, that don’t. So if you play the odds, I think six to eight weeks is exactly right.”

‘Chubbygate’ ends with chuckle in Dallas


VIDEO: Parsons says he’s pleased that coach Rick Carlisle apologized for his comments

DALLAS – When Mark Cuban was asked to weigh in on what has become a sensitive issue around here, the Dallas Mavericks owner peered down from his step machine, sweat beading on his forehead and said: “I have to talk about Chubbygate?”

The hubbub started in the early stages of training camp when Mavs coach Rick Carlisle called out prized new acquisition Chandler Parsons for being out of shape. Carlisle suggested that Chandler was a bit too paunchy around the mid-section.

It’s quite the accusation against a heartthrob and bona fide blue-jeans model.

The 6-foot-9 small forward has said he wanted to bulk up some above the waist to help him better guard power forwards when needed. Still, Carlisle shoved on with his ill-fated motivational tactic following Friday night’s preseason game.

“An increase of 18 to 20 pounds is just too much,” Carlisle said. “We talked about it today. We talk about it a lot. He’ll get there, but he looked tired out there and a little heavy-legged, and the extra seven or eight pounds aren’t helping.

“I don’t mean to call him out in public or ridicule him, but it’s just a fact. He’s an important guy for us. We just need him to get to his right conditioning and weight level so he can play his best because we’re going to need him to play a lot of minutes over the course of 82 games.”

Chandler, who signed a $46 million offer sheet from the Mavs in July and officially joined the franchise when the Houston Rockets decided not to match, wasn’t appreciative of such motivation. He could have just rolled his eyes understanding that in years past Carlisle had called out Lamar Odom a few seasons ago and Samuel Dalembert last season.

Of course, neither of those players had instantaneously become the franchise’s second-highest-paid player in a very public courting, and is arguably the Mavs’ most important player for title contention.

Over the weekend, Chandler wanted the world to see just how “overweight” he is, so he snapped a shot of his bare washboard torso while standing on a balcony of a Dallas high-rise and posted it on Instagram. It made the social media rounds, quickly. A lot of people took notice, including, Carlisle said, his wife and daughter.

“I received my punishment,” Carlisle said. “My wife and daughter became full-time Chandler Parsons Twitter and Instagram followers.”

At that point, Carlisle must have felt he was seeing a different body image than everybody else, so he felt compelled to apologize? Carlisle issued a statement Sunday prior to the Mavs’ preseason game against Indiana:

“It was unfair and inappropriate to single out Chandler Parsons after the game Friday night. I have apologized to him and the entire team for this error in judgment. Not only is Chandler Parsons one of our best players, he is also one of our hardest working players and the kind of high-character person we strive to bring to our city and franchise.

I also made it clear to our players and staff this morning that this type of bad example is not acceptable and beneath the dignity of a championship organization like the Dallas Mavericks.”

Well then.

The apology was well-received by Parsons.

“It just shows what kind of guy he is,” Parsons said after Sunday’s game. “We’re in this together. Everybody makes mistakes and he came to me as a man. We have a great relationship. It’s in the past, and we’re going to move forward. It’s over with.”

Thank goodness.

But was Carlisle really wrong for publicly airing his concerns? Or was it bad judgement to take such a tact? Was Parsons, 25, just overly sensitive? And either way, was an apology of such conviction truly warranted from one of the league’s most successful coaches?

Cuban, known at times to fuel his own headlines by speaking out to the media, called “Chubbygate” a non-event and said he doesn’t know if it was necessary for Carlisle to apologize. But, he’s glad Carlisle did.

“Rick’s smart,” Cuban said. “When he feels like somebody’s sensitive about something or he touched a nerve, he deals with it. He doesn’t run away from it. He doesn’t pretend it didn’t happen. It was no big deal. It’s a non-event.”

We now return your regularly scheduled programming.

Jackson’s dreams await with patience

By Jeff Caplan, NBA.com

reggie-jackson

Reggie Jackson averaged 13.1 points and 4.1 assists last season in 28.5 minutes. (NBAE via Getty Images)

HANG TIME SOUTHWEST – Reggie Jackson didn’t start the Oklahoma City Thunder’s preseason opener Wednesday night at Denver, and that’s not likely to change regardless of how many impassioned pleas he makes.

“I want it. I feel strong about it. I want to be the starter,” Jackson said a couple of weeks ago during Media Day, delivering a rambling and emotional speech that spilled over the 10 minutes allotted for each player. “What I have always grown up just believing, I want a majority of my time to be spent playing against other starters. I want to play against the best, I want to play against Chris Paul, I want to play against Kyrie Irving, I want to be mentioned on the highest of levels.”

It’s certainly admirable. It’s just not practical. Three-time All-Star Russell Westbrook is the Thunder’s starting point guard, and coach Scott Brooks just anointed him best in the business.

But that’s not the point here. Oklahoma City has a starting job open at shooting guard, not point guard. Jackson, a quick, 6-foot-3 point guard, filled the 2-guard spot well several times during the second round and the West finals when Brooks benched longtime starter Thabo Sefolosha. Sefolosha moved on to Atlanta and OKC will replace him in-house. Just not with Jackson.

The overriding issue is — and this should make Jackson feel all warm and fuzzy — he’s too valuable right where he is. It’s more ideal for OKC to fill in the starting 2-guard spot (second-year player Andre Roberson, a defensive-minded two-guard with little offensive upside, and erratic Jeremy Lamb, a natural for the position as a lanky 6-foot-5 shooter if he can ever harness consistency, are the top options) than to replace Jackson’s critical production off the bench.

It’s unfortunate really. Here’s a young player so determined to make a name for himself but is convinced being a reserve is taking a back seat. Brooks and others try to tell him it’s more impressive to be a “finisher,” which he is, that he’ll log as many minutes as a sub and he’ll play many, many minutes alongside Westbrook and Kevin Durant.

The decision to not start Jackson isn’t a personal one, or one made because there’s somebody better to do it. As shown above, there’s not. Keeping Jackson on the bench is purely strategic. OKC needs his aggression, penetration and scoring to lead the second unit. As they realized last season, the Thunder bench is compromised without him.

“For some people [starting is] important. To others it’s not,” Jackson said. “It’s very prideful for me. I feel like I’m very talented. I feel like I can lead a team. That’s just how I’ve been raised and that’s just how I’ve always felt. I want to be the guy in charge. I want to be the guy leading the team, the head of the snake.”

Again, admirable, but not realistic. Intertwined in all this is Jackson’s eligibility for an extension by the end of the month as he enters his fourth season. If one doesn’t get done he’ll enter next summer as a restricted free agent, which seems the likely path, where other teams can set his value.

Comparisons have been made to James Harden‘s situation a couple of years ago when OKC stunned everybody and traded him to Houston before the start of the 2012-13 season. But lets not confuse Jackson for Harden, a No. 3 overall pick and an emerging star when he was dealt. Jackson, the 24th pick, barely got off the bench as a rookie. He averaged 14.2 minutes the next season before being thrust into the starting lineup in the first round of the playoffs after Westbrook injured his knee. He started 36 games last season when Westbrook was out and staked himself as key contributor. His 32 points in 37 brilliant minutes off the bench in Game 4 at Memphis, all but saved an embarrassing first-round exit.

A more accurate comparison is Eric Bledsoe, the 18th pick in 2010 (actually drafted by the Thunder and traded to the Clippers) who spent three seasons backing up CP3. He got his break last season after being traded to Phoenix. He played great in a two point-guard backcourt with Goran Dragic and the Suns made fast strides. Although Bledsoe missed half the season with a knee injury, he cashed in as a restricted free agent with the Suns — albeit rather contentiously — on a five-year, $70 million contract.

Jackson won’t get that chance to start, but what he has that Bledsoe did not is the opportunity to win a championship. If he does that, or even gets close, while being perceived as a selfless, super sixth man, all of Jackson’s boyhood dreams will be in front of him starting next summer.

Just not likely with the Oklahoma City Thunder.

McHale counts ways he’ll miss Parsons


VIDEO: How will the Mavs benefit with the addition of Chandler Parsons?

DALLAS – While Dwight Howard and James Harden have suggested the Houston Rockets will be just fine without Chandler Parsons because, well, they’re the best center and two-guard in the game, thank you, at least one member in red might just miss the small forward now playing in Dallas: Kevin McHale.

Parsons had been the sole survivor off McHale’s first team in Houston in 2011-12. The coach grew fond of the rapidly ascending second-round pick who, under McHale, emerged as a fringe All-Star candidate and a final cut this summer for Team USA.

McHale brought his Rockets to Dallas on Tuesday night to open the preseason. The 6-foot-9 Parsons led the Mavs with 14 points, all coming in the first half when he played a game-high 16 minutes, as if Dallas coach Rick Carlisle wanted to immediately show the Rockets exactly what they’ll miss.

“I talked to Rick about him. I told Rick he’ll do well for him,” McHale said. “I thought he was a good glue guy for the team. I think he’s in a good spot right now. Rick will do a good job with him. As with all young guys, he talked to me about it multiple times, he wanted to get a contract, he wanted to get all this stuff. Everybody, when you come into the league, you want a lot of stuff, and then when you get it, you realize it’s basketball and basketball is the most important thing. But I’m glad he’s got it. I’m sure he’ll settle down now and not be talking about money all the time. He’s killing me with talking about money all the time. He’s got enough of it now.”

McHale, of course, was grinning, if not aching inside. And Parsons, who has acknowledged that he never believed he’d be leaving Houston, is all smiles, too. Rockets general manager Daryl Morey passed on matching the three-year, $46 million offer sheet that Mavs owner Mark Cuban hand-delivered to Parsons at an Orlando, Fla., bar in early July.

Chandler scored with relative ease on his old mates and in a variety of ways, sinking two of his three 3-point attempts, splashing a mid-range jumper, slashing to the basket and going 6-for-6 from the free-throw line. The Mavs are anticipating a big year for their new acquisition playing off Dirk Nowitzki, the league’s 10th all-time leading scorer, and Monta Ellis, a super penetrator. The 3-ball, which Parsons shot at a 37 percent clip last season, should be readily available to him on the weak side.

“I thought Chandler got better every year,” McHale said. “He’s a good playmaker, good off the dribble, shoots that line-drive jumper just good enough it goes in every once in a while. He’ll make 3s even though you wouldn’t probably look at his shot and think he’s a 3-point [shooter], but he makes a high percentage of them. He’s a big guy, you can switch stuff with him defensively, so I mean he gave us a lot. He was a very good player for us and he’ll be a very good player for Dallas.”

McHale couldn’t stop.

“I just think he had a good all-around game, his ability to drive-and-kick, likes taking big shots,” he said. “There’s a lot of stuff we’re going to miss. We’re just going to have to fill in around him and find players that can come in and do some of the stuff he did.”

Houston signed veteran two-way forward and former Rocket Trevor Ariza to replace the 25-year-old Parsons in the starting lineup.

“Trevor’s got really good instincts defensively, he’s long, shoots the ball real well … so he’ll help,” McHale said. “Of course, he’ll have to help us a lot. He’ll have to have a big year for us like Dwight and James has to also.”

Houston believes Donatas Motiejunas is ready to make an impact. The skilled, 7-foot power forward had a game-high 18 points to lead the Rockets to the 111-108 victory in a strange exhibition that included 81 fouls and 109 free throws. The Rockets are hopeful Greek import Kostas Papanikolaou can contribute and that former Mavs guard Jason Terry has some 3-ball magic left in his game.

It’s certainly a reshuffled roster from the team that won 54 games in the first year of the Harden-Howard pairing. After flirting with Carmelo Anthony, it seemed Houston’s big-game hunting GM was on the cusp of signing Chris Bosh and bringing back Parsons to form a true heavyweight. But Bosh took Miami’s money and Houston was left empty-handed.

So now it’s up to McHale to figure out how to mold a handful of new role players, most unaccomplished in the league. And it’s up to Howard and Harden, the self-anointed best center and two-guard in the NBA, to lead and keep the Rockets in the Western Conference title conversation.

“Just play basketball,” Howard said after getting six points, six rebounds and six fouls in 15 minutes of game time. “I let the people up top do their job. I can’t focus on nothing but what I can do to help this team win. We got some pretty good pieces on this team and I think we’re going to continue to get better as the season goes on.”

Blogtable: The summer of ’14

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Sophomore strength | Best new fit | A memorable summer



VIDEO: After a terrible summer, Paul George already is working toward his return.

> Outside of LeBron going home, what will you remember most about the NBA’s Summer of ’14?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: Even though I only watched one replay, it’s going to be hard to forget Paul George’s shattered right leg, both because of how gruesome the injury was and what it instantly meant to the Indiana Pacers’ season and the Eastern Conference standings. It also re-opened a legitimate debate about the risks NBA players and their teams assume to prop up someone else’s money-making tournament. My runner-up? Waking up to Klay Thompson‘s remarkable importance to the Golden State Warriors — they refused to part with him for Kevin Love, after all! — or seeing that a lot of solid basketball people have overvalued him.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: The big swing and miss by the Rockets, who believed they were going to land free agent Chris Bosh only to be left at the altar when he chose to re-sign with Miami.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: Honestly, the image that sticks with me most is the giant-sized poster of Carmelo Anthony wearing Jeremy Lin’s No. 7 plastered all over the Toyota Center. Lin, mind you, was still a member of the Rockets, and a pretty productive member, too. He had to go to make the money right if the Rockets were to sign ‘Melo, which obviously didn’t happen, and Lin ended up leaving anyway for the Lakers. It wasn’t the classiest of moves by the Rockets organization, but Lin’s subsequent outrage, real or not, also provided me with a good chuckle.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: The rookie infusion. Maybe I’m too close because I cover the Draft, but the newcomers felt like a real burst of energy. Andrew Wiggins, Jabari Parker, Julius Randle, Doug McDermott, Marcus Smart, carryovers Nerlens Noel and Nikola Mirotic, and others. There was a buzz that didn’t exist the year before. Summer-league games in Vegas were crowded. Fans seemed interested.

Kevin Love (David Liam Kyle/NBAE)

Kevin Love (David Liam Kyle/NBAE)

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Unfortunately, it will be Paul George’s injury, and not just because I was 30 feet away. It was gruesome and it was on national TV. It took away a season from one of the league’s best young stars and it probably knocked the Pacers out of the playoffs. It was random and George got immediate medical attention, but even if the rules regarding National Team participation stay the same, it will be be on players’ minds whenever they’re asked to make that summer commitment.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: I wasn’t sure the Kevin Love deal was going to happen over the summer, despite the constant discussion about it happening sooner rather than later. If the Cavaliers cash in and win a title anytime in the next five years the LeBron and Love moves combined will have been the touchstones for the summer of 2014,

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: Perhaps this is a bit self-serving, but the new TV deals signed by the NBA with ABC and our parent company Turner have the potential to be significant. With the television contract revenue almost tripling, the luxury tax number should skyrocket. While this could also mean labor issues down the road, it definitely means the upper limit of the luxury tax should skyrocket. Yes, this means teams will have more room to spend more money, but it doesn’t guarantee instant success for capped out teams — teams struggling financially got into that position for a reason, after all.

Adriano Albuquerque, NBA Brasil: The Andrew Wiggins saga. When the summer started, he wasn’t even assured the first pick, as his performance in the NCAA tourney had some people doubting him. He ended up back to the top of the Draft, but then, after LeBron announced his return, immediately got thrown into a wild discussion about whether or not the Cavs should trade him for Kevin Love. Then he gets signed, then the rumours about the deal being done started spreading, then he finally gets traded. Five years from now, we might look at that trade a number of different ways — it could be the start of a dynasty for the Cavs, it could be the play that brought Minnesota back to life, it could be both, it could be neither. Also, there will forever be “what ifs” about what could have been if they never had traded Wiggins, if the Wolves had accepted Golden State’s offer, or Phoenix’s offer. Just a fascinating trade.

Takuma Oikawa, NBA Japan: Yuki Togashi. The Japanese young point guard played four games in Las Vegas Summer League for the Dallas Mavericks. It’s the best topic in the summer of ’14 for NBA fan in Japan.

Stefanos Triantafyllos, NBA Greece: David Blatt going to the Cavs (before LeBron), Gasol heading to the Bulls, Giannis Antetokounmpo playing as a point guard for the Bucks summer league team and of course, Kostas Papanikolaou signing with the Rockets! It was a full summer after all.

Blogtable: Second-year leaps

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Sophomore strength | Best new fit | A memorable summer


> Which of these second-year players do you expect to take the biggest leap forward this season: Trey Burke, Tim Hardaway Jr. or Gorgui Dieng? Why?

Gorgui Dieng (David Sherman/NBAE)

Gorgui Dieng (David Sherman/NBAE)

Steve Aschburner, NBA.comGive me Gorgui Dieng. The lively, defensive-minded center from Senegal by way of Louisville was a second-half revelation last season after spending the first four months of 2013-14 buried on Minnesota’s bench. He started 15 games late in the season, averaging 12.2 points, 12.0 rebounds and 1.7 blocks, while turning his plus/minus from minus-14.0 to plus-4.5. Chicago already admits privately that passing on Dieng to take Tony Snell one spot earlier in the 2013 draft was a mistake — he would be a perfect complement to Joakim Noah and replacement for Omer Asik in Tom Thibodeau‘s defense. Timberwolves coach Flip Saunders knows what he has in Dieng, who mitigates the disappointing work so far by same-first-rounder Shabazz Muhammad. So Dieng will get a big minutes boost whether Nikola Pekovic stays healthy or, more likely, not.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Trey Burke is in a good position to make the leap, but I’m not sure he’s good the right passing instincts for a point guard yet. Gorgui Deng will get minutes as Nikola Pekovic’s backup, but the Wolves are a team starting over. So I’ll go with Tim Hardaway Jr., who can do one thing — shoot — very well.  If he gets better on defense, he could push for a spot in the starting lineup. Or he lights it up for Derek Fisher and Phil Jackson as a sixth man.

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: I really like Gorgui Dieng and how strong he came on last season, but since he’s playing behind Nikola Pekovic, I’m just not sure he’s necessarily going to get the impact minutes of the other two guys. Tim Hardaway Jr. should be an exciting player in New York, but my money’s on Trey Burke. First off all, he’s got the ball in his hands so he has an opportunity every time down the floor to make something happen. I think the Jazz will have a fun team under Quin Snyder. Also, he’ll be pushed by rookie Dante Exum, and that kind of competition will drive to Burke to really hone his game.

Trey Burke (Melissa Majchrzak/NBAE)

Trey Burke (Melissa Majchrzak/NBAE)

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: All good candidates for forward progress. I’ll go with Dieng because I have been on the bandwagon since he as drafted and, and plus, he followed that up with a very good second half to the rookie season. That momentum could carry over, giving him a chance to play a big role in Minnesota. Burke will definitely have a big role in Utah, but also the most challenging situation of the three because he will be adjusting to the arrival of Dante Exum, who will have the ball in his hands a lot. Burke was smart, mature and made good decisions his first season, so he can contribute in a lot of ways, but  his path is subject to change.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Burke has the biggest opportunity of the three to build on his rookie year. He was handed the keys to the Utah offense as soon as he made his late-November debut last season, and Dante Exum probably won’t take too many point-guard minutes from him this year. Hardaway can be an explosive scorer, but is still in a mix with Iman Shumpert and J.R. Smith on the wing in New York, where it will be especially crowded if Carmelo Anthony plays most of his minutes at the three. Dieng isn’t talked about enough when discussing the young Wolves, but is still playing behind Thaddeus Young and Nikola Pekovic.

Tim Hardaway Jr. (Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE)

Tim Hardaway Jr. (Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE)

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: This is a trick question, right? You stick two Michigan guys in here and think I’m going to ignore my guys. I think Tim Hardaway Jr. has the highest ceiling of the three and the great opportunity in front of him in terms of what role he could potentially play this season. The new system and coach in New York will be an ideal fit for young Hardaway, whose ability to score in bunches and from deep, gives him the edge over two other guys who have a chance to have huge seasons of their own. But Hardaway Jr. is my pick to take flight this year.

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: I really like Dieng, and he looked great at Summer League in Vegas. But to me the easier transition path belongs to Burke. After a season of going up against NBA competition at an unfamiliar position, he can build on that experience and move forward. Equally important, the other young Jazz players can take from last year’s rough experience and move forward. And don’t forget Utah has new coach Quin Snyder in place, presumably running some version of the offense used in his previous stops, San Antonio and Atlanta, where point guards Tony Parker and Jeff Teague had plenty of opportunities to flourish.

Aldo Avinante, NBA Philippines: Logically, I think Trey Burke will have the biggest leap because the point guard position has been generally successful the past few years. Burke has all the tools to succeed in his position, although they have the highly touted Dante Exum on their squad, he’s still a raw project compared to Burke. With already one year under his belt, Burke has nowhere to go but up.

Akshay Manwani, NBA India: Tim Hardarway Jr. The New York Knicks guard has potential and was one of the bright sparks from the Knicks’ rough showing last season. Hardaway Jr. has shown that he can create his own shot, shoot on the first touch, moves well without the ball in his hand and can get open while eluding the defense. Then with the changes made by the Knicks, with Phil Jackson and Derek Fisher now around at MSG, Hardaway Jr. will have the right mentoring to help him reach his ceiling.

Davide Chinellato, NBA Italia: I say Gorgui Dieng. He had a very interesting second part of the season, a fantastic World Cup and plays for a rebuilding team in which everybody will get his chance. He’s going to be a double-double machine pretty soon, even coming off the bench behind Pekovic.

Blogtable: Pierce, Gasol, Parsons?

Each week, we’ll ask our stable of scribes across the globe to weigh in on the most important NBA topics of the day — and then give you a chance to step on the scale, too, in the comments below.


BLOGTABLE: Sophomore strength | Best new fit | A memorable summer


Long-time Lakers center Pau Gasol bolted for Chicago over the summer. (Randy Belice/NBAE)

Long-time Lakers center Pau Gasol bolted for Chicago over the summer. (Randy Belice/NBAE)

> Which of these players will fit in best with his new team: Paul Pierce, Pau Gasol or Chandler Parsons? Why?

Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: I like them all in their new surroundings. Pierce seems energized by Washington’s youth and up-and-coming attitude, and he’s willing to be more old head than focal point. Parsons is versatile enough to fill different needs for Dallas on different nights. Gasol opens up new vistas for Chicago’s offense, especially in tandem with Derrick Rose, and is eager to put the past two sour Lakers years behind him. Forced to choose? I’ll go with Parsons because of his age, because of the opportunities he’ll get with the Mavericks and because he’s the least likely of the three to battle injuries.

Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: From the day he chose Chicago, I’ve thought Pau Gasol is the perfect complement to Joakim Noah. He’s a solid frontline scorer and rebounder, excellent passer and should give a Bulls offense that struggles to score points another option and big boost.

Paul Pierce (Chris Covatta/Getty Images)

Paul Pierce (Chris Covatta/Getty Images)

Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: Well, look, Paul Pierce is such a veteran that he’s going to walk into that locker room with some up-and-coming young dudes and just own it. Pau Gasol is a gentleman and so easy to get along with that he’ll fit in quickly in Chicago. But, Chandler Parsons is going to be a tremendous fit with the Dallas Mavericks. Playing off Dirk Nowitzki and Monta Ellis, and with Rick Carlisle figuring out the best ways to put him in a position to be successful, I really think Parsons is going to show a lot of versatility in Dallas and is headed for a big year.

Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Gasol, because he can fit in most any situation. While I like the other two additions, especially Parsons in Dallas, Gasol is the perfect complementary player for a lot of teams. The Bulls can be one of those teams as long as Tom Thibodeau doesn’t go Tom Thibodeau on him and play Gasol into the ground. Gasol will pass at a level that will create opportunities for Derrick Rose and the wing shooters.

John Schuhmann, NBA.com: Parsons fits best as a secondary playmaker in a Mavs’ offense that already features the impossible-to-guard Ellis/Nowitzki pick-and-roll. If the ball is swung to Parsons on the weak side, he’ll get open threes or be able to attack close-outs with the dribble, more effectively than Shawn Marion in both cases. He’ll need to be a better defender, but the Mavs have Tyson Chandler to help on that end. Gasol will be have more of Tom Thibodeau’s trust than Carlos Boozer did, but there’s some overlap with his skill set and that of Joakim Noah. I’d put Pierce last because I think he’s a more effective four than three these days and, while he gives the Wizards an offensive boost, he can’t replace Trevor Ariza‘s defense.

Sekou Smith, NBA.com: After watching Pierce set the tone for the Wizards’ season by getting in the face of Joakim Noah and the Chicago Bulls in the exhibition opener, I’m even more convinced that he’ll slide into the perfect role in Washington. The Wizards are not going to ask Pierce to be the player he was five or six years ago, when he was still an All-Star caliber player. This team needs an edge, an agitator and a veteran player who can push the youngsters to go to that next level. Pierce is that guy.

Chandler Parsons (Glenn James/NBAE)

Chandler Parsons (Glenn James/NBAE)

Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blog: I saw Pierce and Gasol go against each other last night in Chicago, and they both looked good. Pierce in particular gave Washington an aggressive edge, getting mixed up with Joakim Noah minutes into the preseason opener. But I’ve said all summer long that Pau Gasol will have a significant impact for Chicago, and I stand by that thought. Pau will unlock their offense — the other night I saw him attempt a few passes I’m not sure a Bulls center has even thought of in a decade. Most impressive to me was Pau’s demeanor. He made a reasoned and considered decision and truly believes he can affect change we can believe in for these Bulls.

Stefanos Triantafyllos, NBA Greece: Paul Pierce seems the right piece for the Wizards puzzle. A good veteran player than can be the glue that connects the yound and talented back-court (John Wall, Bradley Beal, Otto Porter, Jr.) and the experienced front-line (Nene, Marcin Gortat, DeJuan Blair, Drew Gooden). Playing at the 3-spot and having that kind of experienced, means that he can fill all the dots and take his new team to the next level.

Guillermo García, NBA Mexico: It is a difficult question, but it seems to me that Pau Gasol’s the right answer, because the Bulls are a team where a full, well-rounded game is essential. Which Pau certainly does. Plus, he’ll have the help of a great post player in Joakim Noah.

Aldo Avinante, NBA Philippines: Chandler Parsons will benefit the most in his new role. He is firmly entrenched in the starting small forward position that was vacated by Shawn Marion and Vince Carter, with Dirk Nowitzki spacing the floor and Monta Ellis driving inside the lane attracting the defense, look for Parsons to take advantage and perform well from the very start.

Juan Carlos Campos Rodriguez, NBA.com Mexico: Pau Gasol will be the player who excels most on a new team, as he’ll have a system where he won’t be the one who has to do the dirty work under the table, something which was questioned during his tenure with the Lakers. He’ll also be able to play power forward, which brought him to the NBA, and be that dominant player with the mid-range shot that opens up spaces so that Rose and company could penetrate the paint more easily.

Cuban: Ending max contracts would come with a price

By Jeff Caplan, NBA.com

Mark Cuban says if players want to nix max deals, they're going to have to give up guaranteed contracts.

Mark Cuban says if players want to nix max deals, they’re going to have to give up guaranteed contracts.

DALLAS – Could the days of the max contract be coming to an end? Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban said he and the league would be willing to listen, but it would come with a price.

“If you give up guarantees,” Cuban said. “It’s a trade-off.”

Oklahoma City Thunder star Kevin Durant suggested there should no longer be a restriction on how much the league’s top talent can earn because those players generate significant revenue and can’t be paid what they’re worth under the current collective bargaining agreement.

Durant, who can become a free agent in 2016, made the suggestion to do away with max deals in the wake of the NBA announcing a nine-year TV and digital rights extension that the New York Times reported is worth $2.66 billion annually.

Cuban said owners discussed doing away with max contracts during labor negotiations in 2011 and would be willing to do so again, but players would have to be willing to give up fully guaranteed contracts. When an NBA player signs their contract, he is guaranteed the full amount even if he is eventually cut by the team or injured.

Doing away with guaranteed contracts would move the NBA to more of an NFL model where guaranteed money is only a portion of the total stated value of the contract.

“It was discussed during the lockout time among owners, but never got anywhere. So it was just one of those trial balloons,” Cuban said. “I’m not offering this as a negotiation, I’m not suggesting it, all I’m saying is that was something we discussed before, and max contracts are always big question, guarantees are always a big question. But we have two years before that’s even an issue, so no point discussing it now.”

Players, however, are talking about what they don’t want to hear from owners when the two sides approach the next labor negotiation which can come as soon as the end of the 2016-17 season when both sides can opt out of the current deal.

Durant, LeBron James and Kobe Bryant have been quick to point to the new TV deal, plus unprecedented sale prices of several franchises including the Los Angeles Clippers for $2 billion, as further evidence that team owners can no longer claim they’re losing money.

During the last negotiations, the league said 22 of the 30 teams were operating at a loss. The players eventually agreed to a CBA in which their take of the league’s annual basketball-related income (BRI) was cut from 57 percent to 50 percent.

Cuban, however, essentially told the players to slow down.

“It’ll be the first time our TV money comes in above our ticket revenue,” Cuban said of the new deal. “It’s a lot of money, don’t get me wrong, and I’m grateful, but it’s not going to create so much incremental revenue after you pay out the percentages to the players that it’s going to be a shocking windfall. It’ll be good, but not shocking.”

The new TV deal virtually triples the $930 million per year the league takes in from its current TV deal. It takes effect for the 2016-17 season, and the salary cap is expected to rise with it to unprecedented levels, which will also raise player salaries across the board.

“Our net effect of impact per team is significant, but it’s not like, ‘Oh my gosh, we’re just going to be making $50 million apiece,” Cuban said. “We haven’t gotten NFL money.”

Cuban wouldn’t discuss how the new TV deal might affect the next round of negotiations and if it could steer the league clear of another work stoppage.

“I have no idea, it’s too early,” Cuban sad. “Who knows? Things change so rapidly in business that you can’t predict two years from now.”

As for owners crying poverty, Cuban, a willing luxury-tax payer during his entire ownership under the previous CBA, said he’s never cried poor, even when “I was losing $40 million. I’m not going to cry poor now.”

As for the owners who did, Cuban said “most of those guys are gone.”

Asked if he expects players entering free agency next summer to seek one-year deals so they can become free agents in the summer of 2016 when the salary cap is expected to go way up, Cuban said, “That would be suggesting they don’t like guarantees in contracts and they’d be willing to do year-to-year.

“Maybe that happens with a couple guys, but I don’t see it.”