Posts Tagged ‘Jason Kidd’

Bucks expect Kidd back next week


VIDEO: Jason Kidd talks about his recovery from hip surgery

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The Milwaukee Bucks’ time without Jason Kidd on the bench is nearing its end. Kidd, who has been away from the team since December hip surgery is scheduled to return to his regular coaching duties next week, when the Bucks return from their current four-game road trip and host the Orlando Magic on Jan. 26.

The Bucks updated Kidd’s status this evening, detailing the timetable for Kidd’s return from his Dec. 21 surgery. His recovery and ability travel will continue to be monitored by his medical team, according to the Bucks. Joe Prunty has led the Bucks in Kidd’s absence, compiling an 8-7 record (heading into Friday’s game at Houston) without him.

“I feel great after surgery and am looking forward to getting back on the sidelines full-time next week,” Kidd said in the statement released by the team. “I received a good report from my doctor last week in New York and I am ahead of schedule on my recovery. Provided everything continues to go well this week, I plan on being back to my normal duties on Monday.

“Joe (Prunty) and the rest of the coaching staff along with the players have done a very good job in my absence and I’m grateful for all of their efforts. We’re all looking forward to continued improvement during the second half of our season.”

The Bucks are 19-25 and currently 3.5 games behind the Boston Celtics for the eighth spot in the Eastern Conference standings.

Hang Time Podcast (Episode 223) Featuring Dominique Wilkins

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Comparing NBA eras, be it individuals or teams, is often a painstaking process that relies more on your intuition and sharp eye than it does any real science.

That’s one reason why Hall of Famers like Dominique Wilkins, do their best to stay away from the ghost chasing many of us do when we try to rate the basketball legends of the past and present. So when Larry Bird is asked to assess his vaunted 1986 Boston Celtics and the reigning NBA champion Golden State Warriors, there’s really not a right or wrong answer.

There is only his perception of what those teams accomplish in their respective eras and the fantasy of what it would be like to see Bird, Kevin McHale and Dennis Johnson match up against Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson and Draymond Green.

Same goes for any glorified rankings of the top players in league history at any position (#ESPNrank is stirring up fantastic debates these days) or any other attempt to reflect the current crop of superstars and teams against their historical counterparts. Too many of the dynamics have changed from say 30 or 40 years ago to now. There are fare too many variables to get a handle on anything other than a theory about who would come out on top in any hypothetical equation.

None of that stopped us from quizzing Wilkins about these very topics, and so much more, Episode 223 of The Hang Time Podcast. Just because there are very few easy answers doesn’t mean you don’t ask the question.

So see if you can make sense of it all on this week’s episode.

LISTEN HERE:

As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of NBA.com, Lang Whitaker of NBA.com’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.

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VIDEO: Dominique Wilkins talks about competing with Larry Bird in their collective primes

Nets remove King, Hollins, have long way to go


VIDEO: What’s next for Nets in wake of recent moves?

HANG TIME NEW YORK CITY — When Mikhail Prokhorov purchased the Brooklyn Nets in 2010, he promised fans that the team would win an NBA title within five years. Six years later, the Nets have collected no titles, and are currently floundering at 10-27.

And as of about an hour ago, the Brooklyn Nets no longer have a coach or general manager, either.

The Nets announced today that the team had “parted ways” with head coach Lionel Hollins and “reassigned” general manager Billy King. The interim head coach will be Tony Brown, who played a season for the Nets in ’86-87, and has been an NBA assistant coach for almost two decades. Brown becomes the Nets’ fifth coach in the last five seasons.

The Nets have been good over the last five seasons, making three consecutive playoff appearances, but they just weren’t good enough. During King’s tenure, the Nets never made it as far as the Eastern Conference finals, much less the NBA Finals. And that clearly wasn’t good enough for an owner with big-time aspirations.

“After careful consideration, I’ve concluded that it’s time for a fresh start and a new vision for the direction of the team,” Prokhorov said in a statement. “By making this decision now, it enables our organization to use the rest of the season to diligently evaluate candidates with proven track records. It’s clear from our current state of affairs that we need new leadership. With the right basketball management and coach in place, we are going to create a winning culture and identity and give Brooklyn a team that it can be proud of and enjoy watching.”

King was Prokhorov’s first significant hire, and he aggressively attempted to fashion the Nets into a team capable of winning immediately and meeting Prokhorov’s championship edict. He traded valuable combinations of draft picks and players to bring in Joe Johnson, Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett. After Avery Johnson presided over the team’s move from New Jersey to Brooklyn, King surprisingly hired Jason Kidd, who had no head coaching experience, but led the team to the 2014 Eastern Conference semifinals. When Kidd departed following one season, King went pragmatic and brought in Lionel Hollins.

In his only other head coaching job, with the Memphis Grizzlies, Hollins established a reputation for connecting with veteran players. In nearly one and a half seasons with the Nets, Hollins compiled a 48-71 record. The veteran-heavy Nets roster seemed to be a logical landing spot for Hollins, and he guided last year’s team to a 38-44 regular season record and playoff berth, where the Nets pushed the Atlanta Hawks to six games before a first round exit. This season, without veterans such as Garnett and Deron Williams, the Nets attempted to get younger and more athletic, although a recent season-ending injury to Jarrett Jack seemed to curb whatever enthusiasm remained in the borough.

One thing about the Nets is certain: Whoever replaces King has their work cut out for them. Thanks to the Garnett/Pierce trade, the Nets don’t control their own first round pick until 2019, which would seem to make rebuilding through the draft nearly impossible. The Nets also don’t have much of trade value on their current roster, other than perhaps Brook Lopez or the injured rookie Rondae Hollis-Jefferson, making it difficult to acquire other first round picks.

With the luxury tax figure rising the next two seasons, the Nets will have cap space to sign free agents, although almost every team in the NBA will also be able to exploit the cap space bonanza. The Nets have trumpeted their new practice facility, opening along the Brooklyn waterfront in February, as a positive for a franchise in need of good energy.

The Nets may have started from the bottom, and now they’re here. And while ownership tries to figure out a new route to relevance, only one thing is certain: For all of their sound and fury, the Nets still have a long way to go.

Morning Shootaround — Dec. 21


VIDEO: The Fast Break — Dec. 20

NEWS OF THE MORNING
Warriors’ Thompson: We’re the best backcourt in NBA | Kyrie’s comeback and LeBron’s promise to Love | Butler finding his voice … time for Hoiberg to do the same? | Bucks turn to Prunty in Kidd’s absence

No. 1: Warriors’ Thompson: We’re the best backcourt in NBA — Ask Klay Thompson a question and prepare for the Golden State Warriors All-Star to tell you the truth, his truth. When asked to identify the best point guard and shooting guard in the NBA, Thompson picked his Splash Brother counterpart and reigning KIA MVP Stephen Curry and himself, without hesitation. It’s hard to argue against one half of the league’s most dynamic shooting/scoring duo. Diamond Leung of the Bay Area News Group asked the questions and explains Thompson’s answer:

Asked to name the best player at each position in the NBA, Klay Thompson picked Warriors teammate Stephen Curry as the point guard and then paused.

“I’m going to go with myself,” Thompson said of his pick for the top shooting guard, throwing up his hands. “We’re 26-1.”

He noted that the Chicago Bulls’ Jimmy Butler and Houston Rockets’ James Harden were among the candidates in his mind before reiterating his choice.

“I have confidence in myself,” Thompson said Saturday.

Thompson projected plenty of confidence this week, scoring more points than any player on the floor with his 43-point game against the Phoenix Suns and 27-point outing in a win over the Milwaukee Bucks.

Thompson, after a slow start to the season while dealing with back and ankle injuries, is shooting a career-best 47.3 percent from the field.

“When you play with a free mind and you play thinking you’re not hurt and you’re healthy, that’s when you’re playing your best,” Thompson said. “I want to continue playing like this, get better every month.

“I know I’ll have a great year.”

Curry’s exploits might have taken away from some of Thompson’s numbers during the Warriors’ historic start. The shooting guard is averaging 19.3 points after averaging 21.7 during an All-Star campaign last season.

With 80 made 3-pointers, Thompson is still tied for second in the league. Curry is first with a whopping 131.

“Right now, Steph’s a better shooter,” Thompson said. “I’m trying to catch him. Just by a little, though. Not by a lot. I can’t say he’s way better than me. He is one of the greatest, and it’s an honor to be in the same backcourt with him.”

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No. 2: Kyrie’s comeback and LeBron’s promise to Love — Now that the Cleveland Cavaliers have Kyrie Irving back in the lineup and the roster is at full strength, we’re going to see just how effective this team is playing up to the promise LeBron James made earlier this season. He vowed that he would do everything in his power to keep Kevin Love more involved in the offense and to share the (ball and the) load equally between the three of them, something that didn’t appear to be the case in Kyrie’s season debut and first game since he fractured his knee cap in Game of The Finals against the Golden State Warriors. Joe Vardon of Cleveland.com examines the performance of Cleveland’s refreshed Big 3 after Sunday’s blowout win over the Philadelphia 76ers:

Cleveland wasn’t threatened after the second period and Irving played nearly five of his 17 total minutes in the fourth while James and Love rested comfortably. James was easily the leader of the bunch with 23 points in a season-low 25 minutes; Irving added 12 after missing his first five shots and Love contributed 10 despite missing much of the first half in foul trouble.

But the truth is James and Irving iso’d their way to a dominant second half last season while Love was visibly frustrated as a distant third wheel. The Cavs were the NBA’s best team during that stretch and of course reached the Finals, so it’s not as though there was a demand for change.

Rather, there was a promisemostly by James on the former, more an urging from coach David Blatt with the latter — to keep Love more involved and to better move the ball as a team than the Cavs did in stretches last year. Love signed his five-year, $113 million deal to return to Cleveland last summer knowing that James and Blatt were dedicated to more utilizing his lost-post skills, which should make it easier on him to get more open threes.

James is still third in the NBA in isolation scoring and his team is 10th, but last season he and Irving were second and third in the league in running isolation and the team scored more points that way than anyone else.

This season, Cleveland’s total assists (23.0 per game, 7th in NBA) and assist ratio (17.6 assists per 100 possessions, 5th in NBA) are both up. And Love’s numbers (17.3 points per game, 13.4 shots per game) are better.

One notable difference: until Sunday, Irving hadn’t been on the floor. With him back in the fold, the question remains whether Irving’s presence will allow James to keep his promise to Love?

“We just made the change from me and ‘Bron being ball dominant last year to us having a lot more options on our offense and utilizing our weapons,” Irving said.

Only James Harden and Carmelo Anthony have scored more than James’ 134 points in isolation this season. James runs an iso play on 21 percent of the Cavs’ possessions. And yet he’s clearly ceded some of the ball-handling duties he assumed last season with Irving on the floor to Mo Williams and Matthew Dellavedova.

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No. 3:Butler finding his voice, time for Hoiberg to do the same? — Much was made of Jimmy Butler‘s comments about the Chicago Bulls, himself included, needing to be “coached harder” this season. It seemed like a shot at Bulls coach Fred Hoiberg, whose style differs dramatically from the man he replaced, Tom Thibodeau. There’s another way to look at it, though. Butler is clearly finding his way as a leader and potential superstar and in finding his voice in that Bulls locker room he’s sure to endure a few missteps. But perhaps it’s time for Hoiberg to do the same, in terms of finding his voice with his team. Bulls Insider Vince Goodwill of CSNChicago.com tries to make some sense of the fallout:

Butler isn’t a player who’s been coddled or someone who was projected as a star at every turn. He’s turned into a max player because he poked and prodded at his limits while being poked and prodded by influential figures who brought out the best in him at that time (Buzz Williams at Marquette, Thibodeau in Chicago).

He’s a worker, a grinder in every sense.

Butler is a great player, and great players at every level of sport want to be coached. They know they don’t know everything, and there are times when the effort or concentration isn’t up to par.

Great players don’t mind being held to that standard, even through gritted teeth and rolled eyes, because of what’s waiting on the back end of that foul language.

This doesn’t look like a max player who’s now feeling himself deciding to make it known he’s the new sheriff in town, as some will make it appear to be.

Fans have longed for a player of his caliber to show the emotional investment to the results in the way they do with their pocketbook and their voices on various mediums.

Being upset that it comes from Butler dilutes that thought, or believing this hasn’t been simmering for quite some time. One can probably surmise Butler has been holding this frustration in for quite awhile, and that he’s so invested in the franchise he could no longer find it tolerable.

Butler has entered the strata where he’s put in the work to make his voice heard, and shouldn’t apologize for it, no matter what he says Monday before the Bulls’ next game against the Brooklyn Nets.

For all the personnel changes that will likely take place over the next couple of years, Butler will be the constant, a rock of consistency whose thoughts will matter at all levels of hierarchy.

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No. 4:Bucks turn to Prunty in Kidd’s absence — The news that Milwaukee Bucks coach Jason Kidd would be sidelined indefinitely after hip surgery came as a surprise. It also puts Joe Prunty in the middle of the mix as Kidd’s replacement until he recovers and is able to return. The “interim” coach thing worked wonders for Luke Walton, Steve Kerr and the Golden State Warriors this season (a record 24-0 start and a 26-1 mark to this day). Now the Bucks, the team that provided the only stain on the Warriors’ record, have to navigate a similar path. Charles F. Gardner of the Journal Sentinel has more:

The pain in Kidd’s hip stems from his time with the Dallas Mavericks late in his playing career. He said he has controlled it with cortisone shots and other measures, but he said the pain has become too much and caused him to be unable to sleep at night.

“It’s been chronic for the last three to four years, since I was in Dallas the last time,” Kidd said. “The pain has been to the point where I can’t function.

“I’ve taken all the medicine I can do. Talking to the doctors, there’s really no good time to do the surgery. I have to fix myself and then we move on and get back to work.”

Kidd said assistant Joe Prunty will lead the Bucks in his absence and keep his responsibilities for the offense while Sean Sweeney will continue in his role as the team’s defensive guru.

“We’re all set,” Kidd said. “Joe Prunty will take over and he will run the team. But nobody gets out of their lane. Joe will still be offense and Sweeney will still be defense.

“The guys have to continue to develop. It’s in good hands with the coaching staff. We’re built as a roundtable. Joe is well-qualified to keep these guys going in the right direction.”

Kidd said the surgery will be performed by Edwin Su, one of the leading hip specialists in the country, at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York.

“Some would say it’s the 55,000 minutes that I tried to play,” Kidd said. “A lot of wear and tear on my body. I’ve been blessed not to have too many surgeries. This is just one that has taken away from me being able to sleep and function.

“Especially when I’m trying to help these guys be the best they can be.”

Kidd said when he played with the Mavericks he was able to control the pain with medicine.

“I’ve taken enough of the cortisone shots that they don’t work,” he said. “We put it off as long as we could.”

Kidd, 42, ended his 19-year NBA career with the New York Knicks after the 2012-’13 season and played with the Mavericks, the team that drafted him in 1994, for a second time from 2008-’12. He won an NBA championship with Dallas in 2011.

Kidd said he won’t know when he can return to coaching until after the surgery.

He joked that Prunty should model himself after Luke Walton, who has posted a 26-1 record with Golden State while coach Steve Kerr recovers from off-season back surgery.

“It wouldn’t be bad for Joe to take what Luke has done,” Kidd said. “I wouldn’t be mad.

“No pressure for Joe.”


VIDEO: The GameTime crew discusses Jason Kidd’s situation in Milwaukee

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SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Billy Donovan might roll out the Hack-a-Jordan strategy tonight when the Oklahoma City Thunder and Los Angeles Clippers square off … Indiana’s Paul George misses the guidance he could always count on from David WestKevin Garnett says Boston fans are better than New York fans … Hawks officials are touring other arenas this season to gather ideas for their own arena renovation projectCaron Butler and the Sacramento Kings are prepared to part ways … The Utah Jazz are finally playing a game at home before Christmas

Kidd to have hip surgery, miss time for Bucks


VIDEO: GameTime: Kidd Out Indefinitely

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — The Milwaukee Bucks announced late Sunday that head coach Jason Kidd will undergo hip surgery on Monday, taking him off the bench indefinitely.

Assistant coach Joe Prunty will take over the Bucks, who have struggled to match their surprising success in Kidd’s first season, especially on defense.

“It’s been chronic for the last 3-4 years, since I was in Dallas the last time,” Kidd said. “And the pain is to the point where I can’t function.”

Prunty has already coached the Bucks once this season, a loss in Orlando when Kidd was suspended for slapping the ball out of referee Zach Zarba‘s hands in a loss to Sacreamento.

Kidd joins Warriors coach Steve Kerr (recovering from back surgery) on the sideline, and Prunty becomes the league’s fourth interim coach, joining Golden State’s Luke Walton, Houston’s J.B. Bickerstaff and Minnesota’s Sam Mitchell.

“We’ll know more after the surgery,” Kidd said. “But hopefully, [in] two weeks, I can be back at the office.”

The Bucks salvaged a four-game trip with a win in Phoenix on Sunday and host the 1-28 Sixers on Wednesday, but they face a tough stretch of schedule after that. Seven of their first eight games after Christmas are against teams currently over .500.

Morning shootaround – Dec. 5


VIDEO: Top 10 Plays from Friday’s action

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Steve Nash might be Steph Curry’s biggest fan | Byron Scott heard about Kobe’s retirement in unconventional way | Jason Kidd is starting to get concerned in Milwaukee

No. 1: Steve Nash might be Steph Curry’s biggest fan Steve Nash is an advisor with the Warriors and therefore has a point-blank view of one of the greatest shot artists of this generation, and maybe ever. That would be Steph Curry, who once again is proving that he belongs among the NBA’s elite shooters, both active and retired. Nash belongs in such company, too, and recently he discussed Curry with Bruce Arthur of the Toronto Star:

Steve Nash wonders, in both senses of the word. He has spent some time around the Golden State Warriors this season as an instructor, but he hasn’t spent a lot of time with Stephen Curry. They’ve spoken, talked about a few things, on and off the court, but Nash doesn’t want there to be any mistake.

“I would cringe if I got any credit for what he’s doing,” says the two-time MVP, on the phone from Los Angeles.
But the Victoria, B.C. native watches Curry play and, like the rest of us, has difficulty finding words to describe what’s happening. Curry is doing more than lighting up highlight shows, animating Vines and laying waste to the NBA one year after winning a title and the MVP as a significantly lesser player. Curry is going places no basketball player has ever gone, and it almost looks inevitable.

“It looks easy, but the shots he takes are insane,” says Nash. “The speed, range, dexterity, going left, going right, leaning, fading. It feels like the possibilities are limitless. I feel like I could shoot the ball in as wide an array of ways as anybody, but he’s been able to do it with more range and more speed. It’s remarkable. It’s the evolution of the game. I don’t think we’ve ever seen anybody be able to do this.”

Curry comes to Toronto Saturday as a circus. The seventh-year point guard has become the best show in sports, the most joyful player since Magic Johnson, and it starts with his peerless ability to shoot the basketball. His own league record for three-pointers in a season is 286. That broke his own record, set two years ago, of 272. He is on pace for 418.

Just eight players have shot .500 from the field, .400 from three-point range, and .900 from the line in a season; Nash and Larry Bird did it twice. Curry is shooting .524/.459/.943 while taking more shots, harder shots, longer shots. He is letting three-pointers fly through closing subway doors, over flailing giants, from the outer reaches of the NBA galaxy. Sometimes he, or a teammate, is walking back before the ball lands. Basketball is, as much as any sport, an evolutionary game.

“It’s a leap,” says Nash. “When you take all factors in, even without the accuracy, just to be able to take those shots at an acceptable rate is itself an evolution. We’ve had a lot of gunslingers, a lot of volume shooters. but to take the shots he takes, even without the accuracy, is a revolution. And then, the accuracy: it’s remarkable.”

 

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No. 2: Byron Scott heard about Kobe Bryant’s retirement in an unconventional way — You would think the first person, or among the first, to hear from Kobe Bryant about the star’s retirement would be the coach, and such was the case recently. But the way Kobe broke the news to Byron Scott was, well, probably an NBA first. Kobe and Scott go way back and their relationship is solid. Yet, did Kobe pull Scott aside in his office or after a practice or maybe on the team charter? not quite. We’ll let Baxter Holmes of ESPN tell all about it:

In an interview with ESPN on Friday, Scott revealed the details of that exchange, which he said occurred at the start of the third quarter of the Lakers’ 108-96 loss to the Trail Blazers on Saturday.

“I said, ‘KB, I played you 20 minutes in the first half. I’m going to cut those minutes down. I’ve got to cut them down,'” Scott said after his team’s morning shootaround ahead of their game against the Atlanta Hawks at Philips Arena. “He said, ‘That’s good, coach. That’s all right. I’m going to announce my retirement after the game.'”

Scott said he was stunned.

“I said, ‘What?!'” Scott recalled. “That was the shock part. I was in that state for the rest of the game. Even when I was watching him play [and] I was watching him running up and down, I’m going, ‘Did he just tell me [that]?'”

Scott said he had no idea Bryant was going to give him that news, much less at that time.

“I told him the next day, ‘You know you shocked the s— out of me when you told me that,'” Scott said. “He just started laughing. I said, ‘You really did.’ He said, ‘I know. I could see it on your face.'”

What was most striking to Scott was Bryant’s demeanor in the moment.

“It was so casual. It was kind of cool,” Scott said. “[As a] matter [of] fact, he said, ‘You’re the first to know.’ He said, ‘Coach, you’re the first to know that I’m going to announce my retirement.’

“He was at peace when he told me,” Scott added. “That’s the only thing I could say. During that game, when I was watching him and putting him [in the game] and taking him out, that’s the most relaxed and at peace that I’ve ever seen him.”

 

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No. 3: Jason Kidd is starting to get concerned in Milwaukee — Admit it, you figured the Bucks would be lurking around the top 4 or 5 in the East right now, but they appear miles away at the moment, struggling during a season in which was designed for the young team to take the next step in its development. And maybe that happens soon. Just the same, coach Jason Kidd is concerned enough to lean more on his veterans and prod them for leadership, both on and off the court. Here is Ananth Pandian of CBS Sports on the issue:

After such a strong season, the Bucks were, seemingly, able to build on that success in the offseason by signing Greg Monroe to a long-term deal. Monroe had several suitors including big market teams like the Los Angeles Lakers and New York Knicks but he picked Milwaukee because he wanted to be part of the team’s burgeoning success.

However, the Bucks have started the season 7-12 and look nothing like a perennial playoff team. So what happened?

Well, Milwaukee was limited by injuries at the start of the season as Jabari Parker was still rehabbing from an ACL injury, O.J. Mayo was nursing a strained hamstring, John Henson was limited by an Achilles strain and Michael Carter-Williams had a sprained ankle. Monroe and Parker are also, at this point in their careers, liabilities on the defensive end contributing to Milwaukee’s status as one of the worst defensive teams in the league, giving up 102.8 points a game.

But perhaps the biggest issue for the Bucks, as head coach Jason Kidd repeatedly said at the team’s shootaround in San Antonio on Wednesday morning, is that Milwaukee is the second youngest team in the league and is still learning how to play together. With the Bucks overachieving last year, this may have gone overlooked, but this is an inexperienced team in many ways. Monroe, Parker, Giannis Antetokounmpo, Carter-Williams and Khris Middleton are all under the age of 26 and, on average, have only been in the league for under three years.

Carter-Williams also joined the team at last season’s trade deadline and is still figuring out how to run the team from the point guard spot. The same can be said for Monroe, who is averaging roughly the same numbers (15.7 points and 9.4 rebounds) he was putting up in Detroit over the last couple of seasons but is now back to playing center, a role he wasn’t primarily playing with the Pistons.

“It takes time,” Kidd said when asked about Milwaukee’s early season struggles. “There is a process we have to go through, we are the second youngest team in the league and it’s going to take a little time. We have our good and bad but as long as we keep learning and understanding that it’s not easy to win in this league, no matter how good you are.”

The Bucks definitely had a bit of luck last year, surprising teams and playing with a tenacity that seems to be lacking now. The trade of Brandon Knight for Carter-Williams could be pointed at as one reason Milwaukee has taken a step back. But also last season Milwaukee had excellent veteran role players in Zaza Pachulia and Jared Dudley. In order to clear up the roster logjam, both players were traded in the offseason for second-round draft picks. In a separate earlier move, Milwaukee traded Ersan Ilyasova to clear up cap space to sign Monroe.

Now the only true veterans on the team are Mayo and Jerryd Bayless — who have each played eight seasons in the league. This has given Mayo and Bayless more responsibility on the team as Kidd is counting on both of them to help guide the young Bucks on and off the court.

“When you look at Bayless and Juice (Mayo),” Kidd said, “those guys have been in the league for a little bit and understand what we are trying to do. This is a situation where we are extremely young and we have to have our veterans be leaders and also be guys on the floor that the young guys can look at. They both are working at it. We ask them to do a lot and they’ve responded in a positive way. We are the second youngest team so our vets have to be responsible and also I think for them, they like this opportunity.”

 

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SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Bulls forward Mike Dunleavy has suffered a setback to his back injury. Looks like he’ll return sometime in January at the earliest … Roy Hibbert‘s fortunes haven’t changed, just because he was traded from the Pacers to the Lakers … Look at the bright side, Sixers: Dario Saric is coming to the rescue, according to his father … Did Kobe Bryant come close to playing for the Bulls?Zach LaVine is thrilled to get tutoring from his childhood hero, none other than Gary Payton.

Bucks’ Kidd sits Carter-Williams, Parker, tries Bayless, Mayo for spark

The cloak-and-dagger of NBA starting lineups seldom has been more intense, and one example of that played out in Charlotte Sunday afternoon with the Milwaukee Bucks.

In what increasingly is becoming standard operating procedure around the league, Bucks coach Jason Kidd opted not to share his starting lineup with reporters during his pregame interview period about 90 minutes before tipoff. But word that he would be sitting point guard Michael Carter-Williams and forward Jabari Parker leaked out between then and required official announcement for lineups (one hour before tipoff) prior to Milwaukee’s road matinee against the Hornets. That turned, for a brief time, the process into a part of the story almost equal to the move itself.

Longtime Milwaukee beat writer Charles Gardner did a little forensic investigating to track the source of the info:

Not that long ago, it only occasionally happened that a coach might turn cagey when asked about his starting five. Almost all of them did it from time to time, a few of them did it frequently – think former Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau – but now many of them do it almost as part of their pregame routine. Maybe technology has changed things, with the speed with which opponents can react – with streamed video breakdowns, for instance – turning those 30 minutes or so into a competitive edge.

Regardless, the meat of the move was Kidd changing up 40 percent of his starting lineup in response to the Bucks’ miserable recent play. Milwaukee had dropped five of six games and seven of nine heading into Charlotte, giving up more than 100 points seven times in those nine games. After riding an improved defense to a 26-victory improvement last spring (from 15-67 to 41-41) and a playoff berth, the Bucks rank 26th in effective field-goal percentage (.521), last in DRtg (113.0) and 29th in pace (92.7).

Carter-Williams, in his past seven performances, has averaged 3.6 turnovers to 3.7 assists and 9.1 points, while shooting 43.1 percent from the floor and 63.2 percent from the foul line. Jerryd Bayless, who started in MCW’s place Sunday, has been better both individually and in running the Bucks’ attack.

Parker, in his comeback from last December’s torn ACL injury, actually had perked up a little statistically: 10.3 points in 25.0 minutes while shooting 53.8 percent in his last eight appearances. The No. 2 draft pick from 2014 – whose starting spot was filled by O.J. Mayo – also was playing his way back on monitored minutes. That had some wondering if Kidd was providing Carter-Williams a little cover, rather than singling him out for a solo benching.

But it sounded as if Kidd’s decision involved more than just stats:

Bucks coach Kidd will serve 1-game suspension tonight at Orlando


VIDEO: Jason Kidd was suspended 1 game for this sequence in Wednesday’s game

Milwaukee coach Jason Kidd will not work the Bucks game at Orlando Friday night while serving a one-game suspension for “aggressively pursuing and confronting a game official,” the league announced.

Kidd’s penalty, meted out by NBA executive VP of basketball operations Kiki Vandeweghe, resulted from his technical foul and ejection at 1:49 of the fourth quarter of the Bucks’ home loss to Sacramento Wednesday. Kidd angrily confronted referee Zach Zarba and slapped the basketball out of Zarba’s hands. The play at the BMO Harris Bank Bradley Center can be viewed here.

Vandeweghe’s rationale wasn’t provided with the penalty, but Kidd probably didn’t help his case by stepping toward Zarba and being restrained by Bucks players after the technical and ejection. And the Milwaukee coach likely didn’t do himself any favors, either, by having his incident just four days after Atlanta coach Mike Budenholzer was ejected for incidental contact on the court in Cleveland with referee Ben Taylor.

Budenholzer was ejected on the spot, and the NBA followed up Monday by fining him $25,000. The National Basketball Referees Association criticized the lack of a suspension, with NBRA general counsel Lee Seham‘s amping up rhetoric that prompted veteran NBA coaches Gregg Popovich and Rick Carlisle to fire back in a brief war of words.

But given past punishment of coaches who came into physical contact with referees – from Popovich’s one-game suspension for bumping Bob Delaney in 1993 to Jerry Sloan‘s seven-game suspension for a run-in with Courtney Kirkland in 2003 – many NBA referees were bothered by Budenholzer’s money-only penalty.

“They’re backing their fraternity, we’re backing ours,” one veteran official told NBA.com. “Our guys are [ticked] off. But we’re going to do our jobs.”

So whether Kidd’s suspension moves the bar for subsequent coach-referee contact on Vadeweghe’s watch or simply sets the standard for ball swatting, the league’s game officials might be more satisfied with this decision. Vandeweghe, a former All-Star forward and team executive moved up the ranks at league HQ to take over this season for longtime exec Rod Thorn as the NBA’s “top cop.” Thorn coincidentally has been serving as a consultant to the Bucks for the past two months.

Jason Kidd ejected for slapping ball from referee

VIDEO: Bucks coach Jason Kidd’s ejection on Wednesday night.

Bucks coach Jason Kidd was ejected from Wednesday night’s game against the Kings and faces a likely discipline from the league, including the possibility of a suspension, after angrily slapping the ball out of the hands of a referee.

Kidd could be seen arguing with Zach Zarba and then, with a swing of his right arm, knocking the ball from Zarba with 1:49 left in the fourth quarter and the Bucks trailing 120-109 in Milwaukee. Kidd had to be restrained by players and assistant coaches before leaving the court.

The Kings won 129-113.

The incident comes two days after Hawks coach Mike Budenholzer was fined $25,000 for what the league ruled was incidental contact in bumping referee Ben Taylor.

 

Back and Forth with Bones: Some Growing Pains in Milwaukee


VIDEO: LeBron James’ 27 points lead the Cavs over the Bucks

HANG TIME NEW JERSEY — The Cleveland Cavaliers ended a two-game losing streak, avenged a weekend loss, and improved to 9-3 with a 115-100 victory over the Milwaukee Bucks on Thursday.

The Cavs shot 56 percent and scored 115 points on just 86 possessions, which says a lot about both their offense and Milwaukee’s defense. The Bucks (5-7) went from 29th in defensive efficiency in 2013-14 to second in Jason Kidd‘s first season, but are right back where they started after 11 games.

NBA.com’s John Schuhmann and NBA TV’s Brent “Bones” Barry, who called the game for TNT, went back and forth afterward, discussing the Bucks’ issues on both ends of the floor and where they are in their development.

Schuhmann: So what’s the difference between last season’s Milwaukee defense and this season’s Milwaukee defense?

Barry: Some tell-tale signs have to do with some basic fundamentals of a very good NBA defense. And that’s one, communication and, two, trust in one another that guys are going to be in the right spots at the right times.

Talking to Jason Kidd, in the early part of this season, the Bucks are doing A decently and doing B decently, but when they get to C, there’s nobody home. There’s missing the last step to finish off a possession.

Some of that has to do with a variety of lineups. They’ve had seven different starting lineups to start the season. They’ve had key pieces out of games. Giannis Antetokounmpo, Michael Carter-Williams, Jabari Parker, John Henson and O.J. Mayo have all missed games. Greg Monroe is a new addition.

So there’s so much disconnect in terms of who’s playing that it’s affected how much they trust one another to begin the year. They’re not playing as hard on that end as they’re capable of, and they know it.

The main thing that Jason kept talking about was “We’re young. We miss Zaza [Pachulia] and we miss Jared Dudley and we miss Ersan [Ilyasova], because those guys have experience. We have no veteran players.”

So there’s nobody but the coaching staff to talk about what it’s like to come in every day to work and what your role is.

Schuhmann: Going back to their defense, their scheme puts so much pressure on those second and third rotations. They load up the strong side and when the ball is swung, the pressure is on the weak-side guys to close out, contest and contain.

Barry: They have to close out properly. Great defenses close out on shooters to direct the ball to a certain area of the floor, because you trust that the next guy in the rotation is there.

Last night, there were glaring examples of how ineffective and how inactive the Bucks’ hands are, in terms of deflections and denials. I’ve looked at some numbers on their pressure rate, and it’s way down.

They had so many miscommunications on switches. That’s something that they absolutely can do, but they don’t communicate well. When they give space, they’re going to get beat. Especially in the first half against Cleveland, they had no awareness of where shooters were. They were much better in the second half, but that cost them and gave them such a deficit that their offense is incapable of having bursts to catch up to teams, especially Cleveland.

Schuhmann: That Milwaukee offense is very slow and deliberate. The Bucks rank 30th in pace and they’ve attempted just 10.8 percent of their shots in the first six seconds of the shot clock, the sixth lowest rate in the league.

Barry: They run corner series. They don’t run a lot of pick-and-rolls. Maybe other than Jerryd Bayless, they don’t have effective pick-and-roll players. And they don’t go in transition.

They’re trying to get better ball movement, but better slashing. But when you have combinations of players who haven’t played with one another, it’s very difficult to read your teammates if you don’t know what they like to do and when they like to do it. And that’s costing them a lot of possessions on offense, where they just aren’t in synch.

Schuhmann: They did have a relatively efficient offensive game on Thursday and had some success in the third quarter with Greivis Vasquez and Khris Middleton running side pick-and-roll to get a switch against Middleton in the post.

Barry: The 1-2. But that was against Matthew Dellavedova and Richard Jefferson. I don’t know if it’s that effective against a quicker, better defensive backcourt.

Jason went to that several times and it helped them get some shots, but that’s a single-option thing. If you score a couple of times and then they double you, what’s next? Right now, there’s no next on the offensive end of the floor.

Schuhmann: A similar thing that they do is set a back-screen to get the opposing point guard switching onto Middleton in the post. It gets them some good looks, but like you said, opponents are going to adjust to it pretty quickly.

Barry: I don’t know how much more effective that is late in the shot clock. It’s probably better to get side-to-side movement and then that action late, rather than broadcast it with the post-up on the first pass, where the defense can load up and be in good rebounding position.

One thing that bothered me is that they’re getting pushed up so high on the initial catch in the corner series. When Monroe sets up at the elbow and a guy like Tristan Thompson pushes him from the elbow to the 3-point line, the corner series doesn’t work.

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You can’t make passes to back-door cutters from the 3-point line. A dribble hand-off is too far away to create a good angle for the offense.

Schuhmann: When Kidd was coaching in Brooklyn, I covered a Knicks-Nets game where the Nets didn’t run pick-and-roll for most of the first half against an opponent that was just dreadful at defending pick-and-rolls (and coincidentally employed Andrea Bargnani and Amar’e Stoudemire).

That Nets team did have some good pick-and-roll guards, but just kept running the offense through the bigs at the elbow, which was often a struggle. You have to have a pick-and-roll game to take advantage of the Bargnanis and Enes Kanters of the world.

Barry: Now, there was some signs tonight. Giannis was spectacular. He showed so much versatility in his game and did a decent job on LeBron James.


VIDEO: Giannis’ 33 points

When you play Giannis and Parker together, you can pick and choose weaker defenders at the three and four spots to take advantage of their quickness and what they can do handling the ball. Jason explored that in the second half to the Bucks’ advantage. They picked on Kevin Love a little bit, on Thompson a little bit, with those guys playing off the elbow to create some offense.

But until they’re complete and until they do some growing up… It just sounds like where they want to go is three or four years down the road.

Schuhmann: It was kind of fun to see the Bucks’ elicit some Spurs-esque ball movement (Example 1, Example 2) from Cleveland last night.

Barry: The Cavs did do a nice job. And with Mo Williams out, Dellavedova had 13 assists, doing a nice job of taking what the defense was going to give him. He penetrated and drew two guys…

And that’s part of the learning process for the Bucks. What’s the point in going over to double-team Dellavedova? Why would you step over the median line and commit to the strong side, when that’s the guy you’d rather have try and score on you?

But yeah, that was encouraging for the Cavs to move the ball like they did and not have LeBron need to take over multiple possessions in a row to make things happen. They had other guys making things happen.

Schuhmann: I can’t remember a single possession where LeBron stopped the ball, backed out to the 3-point line and killed clock with his isolation dance.

Barry: We flashed a graphic with a little over a minute to go in the fourth quarter that LeBron had 19 passes and zero field goal attempts in the period. That was probably the least amount of energy he’s had to expend in the fourth quarter to help the Cavs secure a win.

Schuhmann: And their shot chart – minimal mid-range shots, mostly layups and threes – was what you’d want.

20151119_cle_shot_chart

You mentioned in the broadcast how they also took advantage of the Bucks’ weak-side guards having to defend duck-ins from the Cleveland bigs.

Barry: When the ball was on the wing, the Bucks’ brought a second defender over, where they weren’t coming to double-team, but just coming over and squatting on the box. I understand the strategy, but you’re committing a guy to space and not to double the ball, which is [expletive].

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So they got caught on that a lot.

Schuhmann: The Bucks’ defense, even when it’s playing well, is banking on the fact that they can recover to the weak side before you get the ball there. But there’s no skip-passer in the league better than LeBron.

Barry: J-Kidd said before the game, “We can not allow fastballs.” I hadn’t heard that term before, but I knew what he was talking about. He said, “You let LeBron throw fastballs for threes, we’re never going to get to the shooters.”

If you don’t get into his body, you’re going to get killed.