Posts Tagged ‘Isiah Thomas’

Generous to a fault? Paul, Wall challenging trend of assists vs. rings


VIDEO: John Wall recorded 21 points and 17 assists vs. the Wolves

John Wall has been making a case through the season’s first seven weeks to be considered the NBA’s best point guard, a title that he’d be wresting away from veteran Clippers playmaker Chris Paul. But Wall might want to heed that old saying about being careful what he wishes for, because that title might get in the way of an even greater goal the Washington Wizards’ guard has for him and his team.

Within the feature on Paul by Michael Lee, the Washington Post’s NBA writer, was some cause for pause, as far as how the league’s elite point guards have fared in their quest for championships. There’s a trend at work that doesn’t just seem at odds with Paul but with any of the players typically thought of as the game’s greatest playmakers:

Since Magic Johnson won back-to-back championships in 1987-88 and finished first and second, respectively, in assists, no player has ranked in the top five in helpers and won a title. Johnson is also the last point guard from a championship team to average at least 10 assists per game in the regular season.

[Isiah] Thomas and Jason Kidd are the only championship point guards in the past 25 years to average at least eight assists. In that time, John Stockton, Gary Payton, and Kidd held the subjective crown as the league’s best floor general, led their respective teams to the NBA Finals and failed to win it all. [Steve] Nash reached the conference finals three times but never made it to the ultimate stage. Aside from Tony Parker and Rajon Rondo, most of the championship point guards have been the non-intrusive, move-the-ball-and-get-out-of-the-way variety, such as Avery Johnson, Brian Shaw, Derek Fisher and Mario Chalmers.

Paul’s postseason record seems to support the, what should we call it, trend? Theory? Pattern? As Lee notes:

In his first nine seasons, Paul has never reached the conference finals, let alone the NBA Finals. It doesn’t matter that only Michael Jordan, George Mikan, LeBron James, Shaquille O’Neal and Hakeem Olajuwon have a higher career postseason player efficiency rating, Paul’s 22-31 postseason record diminishes his greatness in the eyes of those who value rings over everything else.

“That’s just the world we live in,” Paul said with a shrug. “It comes with it, but what can you do? Keep playing. I don’t know what else to say. We’re playing. I know I’m going to compete, day in and day out. Trying to get one.”

Heading into Wednesday night’s action, the assists leaders among point guards were Wall (10.6 apg), Rondo (10.6), Ty Lawson (10.3) and Paul (9.7) – all above that demonstrated cutoff of eight per game. Meanwhile, guys such as Kyle Lowry (7.6), Stephen Curry (7.6), Jeff Teague (7.0), Mike Conley (6.2), Damian Lillard (6.1), Tony Parker (5.3) and Kyrie Irving (5.2) are safely below it, and Russell Westbrook (6.8) and Derrick Rose (6.7) would be too if they qualified for the leaders board.

Should Wall and Paul stop passing the ball so much, in an effort to avoid the distinction? That doesn’t seem to make sense. But it is an unexpected quirk that might say a few things about defending against attacks run by elite point guards and the value of guys who seek out their own shot. That other old saying, the one about cutting off the head of a snake, might come into play.

Jump Ball: Steve Nash’s place in history


VIDEO: Steve Nash had high hopes for this season during Lakers’ training camp

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — Mention Steve Nash‘s name in the wrong way and you better get ready for a fight.

You either believe in Nash, the narrative and everything else that comes with it, or you don’t.

His supporters are passionate in defense of the two-time MVP and future Hall of Famer. They feel, perhaps rightly so, that he is often targeted unfairly by those who don’t believe he was the rightful MVP.

Now that his 2014-15 season is over because of a recurring back injury, the Los Angeles Lakers veteran will spend what could be his final season in Los Angeles and the league, at the center of yet another great debate.

Where does Nash rank all time?

His offensive numbers suggest that he belongs among the game’s titans, one of the best point guards to play the game and easily the most accomplished shooter to play the position. Magic Johnson, Oscar Robertson, Isiah Thomas and John Stockton , in whatever order you’d like, make up most people’s top four. When you get to the fifth spot is where things get tricky.

Does Nash rank ahead of guys from his own era, guys like Gary Payton and Jason Kidd, a Hall of Famer and a future Hall of Famer who have been to The Finals, and in both cases they played in multiple Finals and own rings?  And would Nash have been as effective in a different era, when the rules of the game didn’t allow offensive players, point guards in particular, the freedom of movement they enjoy now?

Nash’s offensive prowess cannot be disputed. But his defensive shortcomings and the fact that he never appeared in The Finals damage his case when you are talking about where he stacks up among the best of the very best.

Anytime there are more questions than answers my colleague and Hang Time California bureau chief Scott Howard Cooper, born and raised in Los Angeles and as knowledgeable about the Lakers and their lore as anyone in the business, finds me.

We’ve sparred about Nash before, but never in this context (with the end of his fantastic career clearly in sight). While I acknowledge he’s been one of the best of his era and a true Hall of Famer, I don’t know if I’m ready to slide him into my top 10 point guards of all time (I don’t even rank him ahead of Tony Parker, a Finals MVP and multiple time NBA champion who is destined for the Hall of Fame as well).. So we had no choice but to try to settle this debate in Jump Ball …

On Oct 24, 2014, at 2:42 PM, “Scott Howard-Cooper” wrote:

Jump Ball: Steve Nash’s place in history

Steve Nash hasn’t officially announced his retirement, but the Lakers have said he is done for the season after Nash had previously said this would be his final season. Maybe he decides he can’t go out this way and wants to make one last attempt. It sounds like he’s done, though.

Either way, it’s fair to consider his legacy, because even if he does come back in 2015-16, it won’t be for long. I have him as one of the great offensive point guards ever and in the upper-echelon at the position overall. He wasn’t a good defender, a hit when comparing Nash with star two-way PGs like John Stockton and Gary Payton. But an automatic as a first-ballot Hall of Famer. I would also say he’s in the top five of international players.

No disagreement there, right?

On Oct 24, 2014, at 12:01 PM, Smith, Sekou  wrote:

Yeah! Right …

You have to remove those Nash-colored glasses, Sir. You mention defense as an afterthought. That’s a huge part of the game, a critical part of the game that is often foolishly overlooked.

I don’t want you to go there, Hyphen, but you are scaring me. Would You take Nash take in his prime over Gary Payton or Jason Kidd? I won’t even add Magic, Isiah, Oscar, or Stockton to that mix. What about Tony Parker? Shall I go on?

I love Nash and what he brought to the game. And the MVPs … well, I shouldn’t go there.

But throwing him in the mix with the greatest point guards of all-time, the top four or five international players. I say let him officially retire first.

And let’s think long and hard about who you’d want in his prime between Nash, perhaps the greatest shooting point guard of all-time, and the other elite point guards we’ve seen who were much more complete players than Nashty!

Sent from Sekou’s iPhone

From: Scott Howard-Cooper
Date: October 24, 2014 at 3:20:41 PM EDT

I can’t take of my Nash-colored glasses. (Molson rules!)

I didn’t mention defense as an afterthought. I mentioned it front and center. He was not a good defender and it’s why he doesn’t rate with some others who played around the same time. But he was at a special level on offense. Nash could play fast or slow, distribute or shoot. He was smart and always showed up ready to play. No head games. There was a toughness.

Obviously, as you said, Magic, Oscar, Stockton and Payton are ahead in the rankings. I would say J-Kidd as well, although that’s a decent debate because Kidd was a poor shooter until late in his career and Nash was a great shooter, Kidd was a very good defender and Nash struggled, Kidd was too often accompanied by drama and Nash was the opposite.

But I don’t see Tony Parker over Nash as the easy call you seem to make it out to be. Parker is great and a Hall of Famer as well, so don’t try to turn this into me knocking Parker to get the French mad at me. (Oh, who cares. Get the French mad at me.) Nash on the Spurs instead of Parker results in championships as well. I just don’t see a single thing to knock about Nash on offense and Nash in the locker room.

On Oct 24, 2014, at 1:14 PM, Smith, Sekou  wrote:

Look at you, going all patriotic on me … Two times! Classic. Haha. I’m gonna stick to my roots and what I know.

I’d prefer we keep this debate in the realm of reality. And in what realm does a Finals MVP and four-time champion like Tony Parker take a backseat to a great player, no doubt, but one who never saw the inside of the NBA Finals?

This is not about disrespecting Nash or his legacy. We agree. He’s a Hall of Famer. A case could be made that he’s earned every bit of whatever hardware has come his way (a case you undoubtedly will try to make … haha).

I just refuse to buy into this syrup-soaked narrative of yours. I can’t do it. I won’t. “If Nash was on the Spurs” automatically squashes the whole thing.

If you have to employ the word “if” to make your case, you have no case!

Sent from Sekou’s iPhone

On Oct 25, 2014, at 4:48 PM, “Scott Howard-Cooper” wrote:

No question the lack of a Finals appearance, let alone a championship, is a big hole in the resumé. But look at what Nash did in the playoffs. Consecutive postseasons of 23.9 points/11.3 assists/52-percent shooting, 20.4/10.2/50.2 and 18.9/13.3/46.3. Another at 17.8/10.1/51.8. A career 40.9 behind the arc in the playoffs.

At some point you have to drop “Didn’t win a championship” as a tipping point. It’s obvious that shortcoming is not on Nash.

On Oct 25, 2014, at 2:25 PM, Smith, Sekou  wrote:

When discussing the best of the very best, winning a championship becomes the ultimate dividing line, or at least one of them.

You’re either a champion or not. Same rules apply for other great players at other positions.

Why would we drop it now? That’s crazy talk.

This is not about Nash’s shortcomings, the one or two you want to nit pick. This is about an age-old debate about how great players stack up in the history of the game. Nash can’t get a pass here because we loved the narrative that came with him or because he’s such a great guy (which he no doubt is and always has been).

This is about facts and not circumstances. Whatever the circumstance, Nash, as you conceded, has glaring holes I. His resume. The same holes that any all-time great and future Hall of Famer would have to own.

I can appreciate Nash’s career for what it has been, but I’m not going to elevate it to another level when the facts simply do not support such action.

Great player, great numbers and a truly great guy. We don’t need to inflate his impact or accomplishments. And there’s no shame in being a great player.

But a transcendent player … slow down buddy!

Sent from Sekou’s iPhone

On Oct 25, 2014, at 5:36 PM, “Scott Howard-Cooper” wrote:

Right. Facts and circumstances, as you say.

The only player in history to shoot at least 50 percent overall, 40 percent on threes and 90 percent from the line four different seasons. Larry Bird did it twice. No one else did it more than once.

Third in career assists.

Along with John Stockton the only players to average more than 11 assists beyond age 33. Nash did it three times.

One of five players to ever total more than 800 assists in four consecutive seasons.

First all-time in free-throw percentage.

Ninth all-time in three-point percentage (minimum 250 makes).

Along with Magic Johnson the only point guard to win multiple MVPs.

This has nothing to do with loving the narrative and respecting the person. It has everything to do with facts and circumstances.

I’m glad you agree with me. About time.

On Oct 25, 2014, at 3:09 PM, Smith, Sekou  wrote:

Yawn!

All of these statistical qualifiers wouldn’t be necessary if you could give me just one trip to The Finals on his back. Just one.

What do your eyes tell you? You’re old enough to have seen the game evolve over the past 30 years or more. You know in your heart of hearts that even with all of the pretty numbers, there’s something missing.

Mark Cuban got smoked for letting Nash go to Phoenix and breaking Dirk Nowitzki and Nash up.

History, however, will be on his side.

The Mavs won it all after Nash departed and the Suns never got over the hump with him at the helm.

Like I said before, you’re either a champion or you’re not. Facts, not circumstances.

There is no qualifier needed.


VIDEO: Steve Nash is done for the season in Los Angeles, courtesy of a back injury

 

Thomas seeks relevancy with Suns

By Jeff Caplan, NBA.com


VIDEO: Suns.com talks with Isaiah Thomas about his move to Phoenix

HANG TIME SOUTHWEST – About one month into the lockout shortened 2011-12 season, a new basketball movie trailer burned up the Internet. A documentary, it chronicled mostly unknown 5-foot-9 point guard Isaiah Thomas‘ improbable path from a junior in college all the way to the NBA.

The title of the of the film was “Mr. Irrelevant,” the name bestowed upon the last pick of the NFL Draft. Thomas, a Tacoma, Wash., product and a terrific scoring guard for the Washington Huskies, was the last pick of the 2011 NBA Draft. No. 60. The Sacramento Kings made him “Mr. Irrelevant.”

Over three seasons, Sacramento never seemed to believe he could be much more, even as Thomas’ production and tenacity became impossible to ignore — and to keep out of the starting lineup. As a rookie he badly outplayed the Kings’ No. 10 overall pick, Jimmer Fredette.

In 2012-13, the Kings tried to unseat Thomas with Aaron Brooks and Toney Douglas, not exactly Allen Iverson and Damon Stoudemire, but still, Thomas refused to be overtaken. Last summer, Sacramento traded for 6-foot-6 point guard Greivis Vasquez and immediately penciled him into the starting lineup. In December, Vasquez, a solid player to be sure, was traded to Toronto. Thomas, a pound-the-rock, take-you-off-the-dribble, finish-at-the-rim point guard went on to average 21.1 ppg and 6.5 apg (plus a career-high 1.3 steals), improving in both categories for a third consecutive season.

It is one of the greatest statistical seasons ever compiled by a player under 6-foot. His PER (player efficiency rating) checked in at 20.5, well above the league average (15.0) and again was one of the all-time best marks for a player of his stature.

Yet the Kings, even after revamping the front office, never viewed Thomas through the same prism as he viewed himself: as a 5-foot-9 playmaker, scorer, starter and leader. Sacramento, seemingly suggesting it wanted more of a facilitator at the point, signed free-agent journeyman Darren Collison to a three-year, $16 million deal on July 10. It was a hefty raise for Collison, a backup last season with the Clippers, but much less than what Thomas, 25, felt he deserved in line with his production.

“They went after Darren Collison, which they felt was a better feel for whatever direction they’re going in,” Thomas said. “I just felt like I needed to go somewhere where I was wanted and Phoenix was a place where they wanted me for who I was. They wanted me for being 5-9. They wanted me for being a scoring point guard.”

Thirteen days after signing Collison, the Kings signed Thomas to a four-year, $27-million contract and traded him to the Suns.

“I’m not surprised just because every year it was somebody new,” Thomas said. “Every year I felt like I proved to them that I was a capable starter and I proved to them I was a pretty good basketball player. More than anything I was consistent, but I wasn’t surprised.”

Thomas spoke to NBA.com about his opportunity for relevancy in Phoenix, an upstart last season that won 48 games and missed the playoffs by one game in coach Jeff Hornacek‘s first season.

NBA.com: Do you think the Kings viewed you as irrelevant, in the sense that you don’t fit into a tidy description of a point guard and therefore you never could be their answer at the position?

Thomas: I guess. I guess because I’m 5-9 and I’m not the prototypical point guard they just kept trying to find … which every year I would beat out the guy. Like I tell people, it’s a business and I know where they’re coming from, but three years in a row it happened. I mean, it’s definitely not going to happen a fourth year so I was kind of fed up with that and that’s why I wanted a little change. I wanted to be somewhere where I was wanted for, like I said, being who I am, being 5-9 and being a scoring guard.

NBA.com: To be clear, you never asked to be traded did you?

Thomas: No, I didn’t. I never asked. I was always professional about every situation. I always came in with my hard hat on willing to do whatever is best for the team. When they signed Darren Collison, I knew I was going in a different direction. (more…)

Morning Shootaround — May 17

NEWS OF THE MORNING

No Serge means Spurs surge| Lowball start cost Knicks | Wizards look to keep, lure | Watson gets in front of Jazz job

No. 1: No Serge means Spurs surge — Friday was a bad day if you were an NBA fan in general and a horrible day if you were partial to the Oklahoma City Thunder in particular. A night without playoff games – the last two conference semifinal rounds wrapped up Thursday – was bad enough for most folks. But for OKC fans, the news that power forward Serge Ibaka was done for the postseason with a Grade 2 left calf strain was a slo-mo, long-lasting gut punch. On the other hand, San Antonio couldn’t, in good form, revel in Ibaka’s discomfort and the Thunder’s misfortune. But a break’s a break, even when it’s a strain, as Jeff McDonald wrote in the San Antonio Express-News:

Nobody in San Antonio need mention Ibaka’s value as a pressure valve alongside league MVP Kevin Durant and Westbrook in the OKC offense. In Game 4 of the 2012 conference finals against the Spurs, Ibaka went 11 for 11 on his way to 26 points.

“Every time I see Ibaka or hear the name, 11 for 11 goes through my head,” Spurs coach Gregg Popovich said Friday, about four hours before the extent of Ibaka’s injury was made public.

Ibaka has provided needed offense against the Spurs while anchoring the OKC defense. In the past two seasons, his plus/minus ratings against San Antonio has leaped into the black. Here are his basic stats vs. the Spurs over the past four years:

2013-14: 14.0, 11.5, plus-9.8
2012-13: 13.3, 13.3, plus-12.4
2011-12: 10.7, 7.3, minus-10.0
2010-11: 12.3, 11.0, minus-12.4

Defensively is where Ibaka’s loss, however, will have its greatest impact. Matthew Tynan of the 48 Minutes Of Hell blog broke down some of those numbers:

In the 148 minutes the OKC shot-blocking terror has been on the floor against the Spurs this season, San Antonio managed to shoot a putrid 42.3 percent from the floor with a true-shooting mark of 49.3, nearly 8 percent worse than its regular-season average. Near the rim, where Ibaka’s presence is most noticeable, the splits are even more dramatic. The Spurs shot 48 percent at the rim when he was on the floor during the teams’ four games against one another; when he was off, that number ballooned to 61.9 percent.
Even more startling are the 3-point numbers. Ibaka’s ability to singlehandedly protect the paint allows perimeter defenders to stick with shooters, scramble aggressively and close out hard when the Spurs kick the ball out to the arc. San Antonio shot 33 percent from deep when he was on the floor against them this season; when he was off, the NBA’s top 3-point shooting team launched away at better than 54 percent.

And:

Get this: San Antonio managed only 93 points per 100 possessions in Ibaka’s shadow this season, compared to a staggering 120.8 offensive-efficiency rating in the 48 minutes his butt was on the bench*. This news isn’t Durant- or Westbrook-level devastating for OKC, but it’s damn close. He’s been so incredibly important for that team against the Spurs this season, and his absence will greatly swing the forecast of this series.

***

No. 2: Lowball start cost Knicks — Apparently, the annual salary was set: $4.4 million. The question was, over how many years? That’s where the New York Knicks allegedly bungled negotiations with Steve Kerr, their No. 1 coaching candidate who wound up agreeing to a deal with the Golden State Warriors instead.
Marc Berman, who covers the Knicks for the New York Post, related the tale of dickering gone awry:

The Post has learned [Phil] Jackson’s initial offer to Kerr was a lowball of three years, $13.2 million. That offer stuck for more than a week before the Warriors got involved Tuesday. Kerr wound up agreeing to terms with Golden State on a five-year, $22 million contract — not the $25 million that was widely reported.
Had the Knicks originally offered Kerr five years, $22 million — $4.4 million a year — he probably would have closed the deal before Golden State could reenter the fray. Jackson only bumped the offer to four years in response to Golden State’s offer.
A source said Kerr wasn’t moving across the country for less money than the Warriors were offering. The Knicks have insisted Jackson, not owner James Dolan, handled the negotiations. Kerr never spoke to Dolan during the process, meeting with general manager Steve Mills and basketball operations director Jamie Mathews.

(more…)

Morning Shootaround — May 16



VIDEO: Daily Zap for games played May 15

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Report: D-Will could be traded this summer| Report: Sterling plans to sue NBA | Kerr opens up on his plans for Warriors | Report: Knicks talk with Pippen | Report: Pistons to add Thomas as minority owner

No. 1: D-Will could be dealt this summer — It was just two offseasons ago that Nets guard Deron Williams had re-signed with the team as a free agent in a move seen by many as the one that would give Brooklyn its cornerstone player for years to come. But as the Nets try to make sense of their season and their East semifinals ousting at the hands of the Miami Heat, could Williams be on the trading block this summer? That question — and others — are addressed by Bleacher Report’s Howard Beck here:

Paul Pierce could leave as a free agent, perhaps to join old friend Doc Rivers in Los Angeles. Kevin Garnett could retire, and just might if Pierce were to leave. If the two proud former Celtics walk away, then the Nets will have broken the payroll record—and given up three first-round draft picks—for nothing.

But the fixation on the price tag, and even on the trade itself, obscures the Nets’ greatest problem—­a previous, equally costly investment that has gone bust:

You remember Deron Williams?

You could be forgiven if you didn’t. Williams was a dud in the playoffs, particularly against the Heat. He scored zero points in Game 2, nine points in Game 3 and 13 points (on 5-of-14 shooting) in a Game 4 loss that pushed the Nets to the brink of elimination. Williams’ postseason field-goal percentage: 39.5.

The Nets imported Pierce and Garnett for their wisdom and their fire, but no one expected the two aging vets to carry the offense. It is Williams who was acquired to be the face of the franchise, the engine of the Nets offense, and he has utterly failed in that role.

No matter how many tens of millions they spend, no matter how many flashy trades they make, the Nets will never be a serious contender unless Williams regains his All-Star form.

“Deron’s the X-factor,” said one Nets official. “More than anybody.”

Since Williams’ celebrated arrival in 2011, the Nets have made two trips to the playoffs, one ending in the first round and one in the second, for a postseason record of 8-11.

No one player can be blamed for the lousy late-game execution, but it is the job of the point guard (and franchise player) to maintain order and to put his teammates in the best position to succeed. Time and again, Williams has shown he is incapable of leading when the pressure is at its highest. When the Nets needed salvation this season, they turned to Joe Johnson and Pierce.

This is surely not what general manager Billy King envisioned three years ago, when he plucked Williams from Utah and made him the franchise centerpiece. That Williams was then considered the equal (or at least close rival) of Chris Paul is of little comfort now, with Williams perpetually battling ankle injuries and crises of confidence.

“I used to feel like I was the best player on the court, no matter who we were playing against,” Williams told reporters Thursday, an implicit acknowledgment of his diminished status.

Team officials were encouraged by Mirza Teletovic and see promise in Mason Plumlee. The Nets also hold the rights to Bojan Bogdanovic, a European star who could either join the Nets next season or be used in a trade.

But Pierce will be 37 next fall, Garnett 38 and Johnson 33. This team has little upside unless Williams somehow rediscovers the swagger that made him a star in Utah.

There is an alternative, sources say, the Nets will not rule out: They could look to trade Williams this summer, retool around Johnson and Brook Lopez, squeeze one more run out of Pierce and Garnett and hope for the best.

(more…)

Jump ball!!!: the Phil Jackson debate

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com


VIDEO: What does it take to make the transition from great coach to great GM and does Phil Jackson have it?

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — The debate will rage on for years, long after the results are in and a legitimate case can be made one way or the other about the job Phil Jackson will do as the boss of the New York Knicks.

The initial surge from the hire has subsided, just a bit, and as the Knicks’ last-gasp effort to unseat the Atlanta Hawks for the eighth and final playoff slot in the Eastern Conference plays out, it’s a good time to restart this conversation.

Plenty of experts have weighed in, most of them no more qualified to dish on the prospect of Front Office Phil than they claim Jackson is for a job in the front office after making his championship bones (11 times as a coach and twice as a player) on the other side of the line.

My colleague and Hang Time California bureau chief Scott Howard Cooper, born and raised in Los Angeles and as knowledgeable about the Lakers and their lore as anyone in the business, lit the flame this time, questioning Phil’s credentials (it’s blasphemy, and will get you banned from Original Tommy’s Hamburgers for life all over the Southland SHC!).

I had to come to the defense of the Zen master, anyone who has been the common thread in as many championship situations as he has shouldn’t really need defending … but I had to go there in Jump Ball!!!  …

From: Scott Howard-Cooper
Sent: Friday, March 28, 2014 3:00 PM
To: Smith, Sekou
Subject: JUMP BALL !!!

I get why Knicks fans and players are excited: because they need any reason to be excited. But all the organization did by hiring Phil Jackson was win the press conference. James Dolan did something popular for a change and brought in a superstar. But Phil is a coaching superstar, not a front-office success. He has a lot to prove to earn this attention in the new job.

On Mar 28, 2014, at 1:48 PM, Smith, Sekou

You get Knicks fans, huh? They’ll boo you at the Garden for even suggesting something like that. The Phil factor is much like the Bill Parcells factor was in the NFL, his mere presence alone signals bigger things to come for whatever franchise he is working with. Seriously, ask folks in Dallas and New England. The Knicks need someone who can be held accountable for the big picture vision of the franchise. It doesn’t take a genius to come up with a plan … but if you can get one, why not?

From: Scott Howard-Cooper
Sent: Friday, March 28, 2014 5:43 PM
To: Smith, Sekou
Subject: Re: JUMP BALL !!!

Would you like a straw or will you drink the Kool-Aid straight from the jug? His mere presence doesn’t signal anything other than the Knicks willing to spend a lot of money. “Bigger things to come” is a slogan, not based in fact. Phil is a brilliant basketball mind. I think, if anything, he is underrated as a coach. I am a fan. But they did not hire coach Phil Jackson. They put someone in charge of basketball operations who has not worked in a front office. And if it’s such a thin line from one job to the other, let’s see how people react when New York names R.C. Buford or Sam Presti or Masai Ujiri head coach. There will obviously be others handling the day-to-day work while Phil handles the big picture and deals in final rulings. But the Knicks are a tangled mess, from salary cap to the roster itself, and he has to get a lot of things right before the Knicks can say they’re at bigger things.

On Mar 28, 2014, at 2:56 PM, Smith, Sekou

Actually, I prefer one of those fancy Camelbak adult sippy cup/water bottles when drinking my Kool-Aid, Scott. You know how I do it. Seriously, though, you are selling Phil short and the job of a general manager in this league way long. I won’t run down the list of knuckle-draggers who have been general managers in this league the past 40 years or so, but there haven’t been a ton of Hall of Famers to speak of in that regard. And to suggest that anyone’s success in the NBA isn’t rooted in equal parts blind luck and superior personnel is a farce. You can’t mention R.C. Buford or Sam Presti without also mentioning Tim Duncan and Kevin Durant, the cornerstone/Hall of Fame(caliber in Durant’s case) talents that their organizations are built around. I’m not saying those guys aren’t good at what they do. I’m just saying their jobs are much more manageable because of the personnel in place. Presti was no one’s genius before Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook and James Harden came into their own. And he’d be the first one to shoot down that label. Phil deserves some time and the benefit of anyone’s doubt right now based on his Lord of the Rings status alone.


VIDEO: WRick Fox discusses the nuances of Phil Jackson’s system and how it will work in New York

From: Scott Howard-Cooper
Sent: Friday, March 28, 2014 6:10 PM
To: Smith, Sekou
Subject: Re: JUMP BALL !!!

Then let’s do it this way: What has Phil done to win you over? Are you basing his success as a GM on what he did as a coach? (And, again, I’m the last guy who sells him short. I’m the one who said he was underrated as a coach. He is an all-timer. But that’s a different job.)

On Mar 28, 2014, at 4:37 PM, Smith, Sekou

Seriously! We’re haggling over Phil’s credentials to do a job that has been bequeathed to the children of owners, former agents, guys who have graduated from the video room and folks whose credentials pale in comparison to what the Zen master has accomplished in his storied career. Coach or GM, it doesn’t make much difference to me when we’re talking about management style. Phil’s style has produced unmatched success everywhere he’s been. So he didn’t take the GM training course. Folks have to get over that and let’s see what he can do.

From: Scott Howard-Cooper
Sent: Saturday, March 29, 2014 1:08 AM
To: Smith, Sekou
Subject: Re: JUMP BALL !!!

So your argument that Phil Jackson is a good hire is centered on “There have been plenty of bad hires before”? And we’re not haggling. We’re having a discussion in the loftiest of all debate societies: the sports media.

On Mar 29, 2014, at 12:06 AM, Smith, Sekou <Sekou.Smith@turner.com> wrote:

Don’t put words in my mouth … er, on my email, or whatever. What I’m saying is this, for you or anyone else to doubt Phil Jackson’s ability to do this job is shortsighted. You clearly have not embraced the Zen! I’m simply a believer in the power of experience. And no one interested in running a franchise has more championship experience than PJax!

From: Scott Howard-Cooper
Sent: Saturday, March 29, 2014 4:19 PM
To: Smith, Sekou
Subject: Re: JUMP BALL !!!

Experience is great. And Larry Bird successfully made the transition to head of basketball operations without previously working in a front office, so it can be done. But Larry Legend had two advantages. He was very familiar with the personnel after coaching the Pacers. And, Indiana was a good team. Bird had to make adjustments to a stable situation. Jackson doesn’t need to make adjustments. He needs to marshal an overhaul. The Knicks are a mess of salaries and personnel. He will be relying heavily on others for scouting and for cap management. I don’t think I’m being shortsighted. I’m being practical. Phil was a winner like few others, but that was Zen and this is now. He has to prove he can deliver in a new job. Don’t swoon over a GM because of his coaching record.

From: Smith, Sekou
Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2014 6:51 PM
To: Scott Howard-Cooper
Subject: RE: JUMP BALL !!!

You’re making this about all of these other guys and not about Phil. Does he have to prove himself as a GM? Sure. Just as all of those other guys did. But you’re acting like all of the work he’s done in the game hasn’t prepared him for this next step and I think that’s ridiculous. I’m not saying Phil is perfect and can wave his magic Zen wand and fix all of the problems facing the Knicks. But whatever issues arise, they won’t be foreign to Phil. He’s worked in championship situations and has the benefit of that vast experience to use in his new role with the Knicks. Don’t knock a guy as a GM before we give him some time to dig in on the job.

From: Scott Howard-Cooper

Date: March 29, 2014 at 11:35:28 PM EDT
To: Sekou SMITH
Subject: Re: JUMP BALL !!!

I hope he does well. I just think it’s fair to be skeptical. If he proves it, if he delivers big results, great. But let’s let him prove it.

From: Smith, Sekou
Sent: Sunday, March 30, 2014 7:38 AM
To: Scott Howard-Cooper
Subject: RE: JUMP BALL !!!

I knew I’d get you to come around to my side. And I agree, it’s fair to be skeptical. Just as it’s fair to assume, based on his lengthy history, to give Phil the benefit of the doubt we might not give someone else who doesn’t own more championship rings than fingers!


VIDEO: Hall of Famer Isiah Thomas talks Phil, the Knicks and the fit

Hang time podcast (episode 151) featuring Tina Cervasio of MSG Network

HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS — As soon as Phil Jackson accepts the most challenging mission of his professional career, running basketball operations for the New York Knicks, the rest of us can get back to normal.

Any day now PJax, we do have a regular season to finish here Zen master.

Good luck to anyone trying to figure out how having Jackson on board helps fix a Knicks team that is saddled with bad assets through the end of the 2014-15 season, a superstar, Carmelo Anthony, some believing is eyeing his escape route and a head coach in Mike Woodson who has repeatedly been undercut?

There are, of course, some $15 million reasons for Jackson to come out of quasi-retirement to take the job. But it’s still a seemingly impossible task, fixing the Knicks.

We do our best to sort it all out on Episode 151 of the Hang Time Podcast featuring Tina Cervasio of MSG Network.

We also have the latest installment of “Are You Kidding Me?” featuring special guest debater and Hall of Famer Isiah Thomas, filling in this week for fellow Hall of Famer Reggie Miller, squaring off with the Dean of Discipline Stu Jackson. They tackle LeBron‘s black mask and the “one and done” rule and whether or not it harms the NBA game.

And someone had a perfect run in this week’s edition of Braggin’ Rights.

Check out all of that and more on Episode 151 of the Hang Time Podcast Featuring Tina Cervasio of MSG Network …

LISTEN HERE:

As always, we welcome your feedback. You can follow the entire crew, including the Hang Time Podcast, co-hosts Sekou Smith of NBA.com,  Lang Whitaker of NBA.com’s All-Ball Blog and renaissance man Rick Fox of NBA TV, as well as our new super producer Gregg (just like Popovich) Waigand and the best engineer in the business,  Jarell “I Heart Peyton Manning” Wall.

– To download the podcast, click here. To subscribe via iTunes, click here, or get the xml feed if you want to subscribe some other, less iTunes-y way.

Morning Shootaround – Jan. 1


VIDEO: The Daily Zap for games played Dec. 31

NEWS OF THE MORNING

Suns willing to pay Bledsoe | Raptors react to Gay trade | Raptors rolling | Malone tutors Thomas

No. 1: Suns willing to pay Bledsoe – The Phoenix Suns and Eric Bledsoe have a good thing going this season. With Bledsoe at the helm, Phoenix is off to a surprising 19-11 start and would be the fifth seed in the Western Conference if the playoffs started today. The Suns realize it will cost them to retain Bledsoe during free agency this offseason. But, according to Ramona Shelburne of ESPLA.com, they are willing to spend:

“What he’s done so far is what we thought he could do,” [GM Ryan] McDonough said.

But they just didn’t know for sure.

That’s why when it came time to lock Bledsoe into a contract extension, the Oct. 31 deadline passed without a resolution, making Bledsoe a restricted free agent this summer.

“Sometimes that works out and both parties think it’s a good deal for them. Other times it doesn’t,” McDonough said. “Obviously we don’t have a whole lot of money committed for the future, we don’t have a lot of long-term contracts on our books. So we’ll have no problem stepping up and paying Eric whatever it takes to keep him.”

Whatever it takes?

“Correct,” McDonough said. “Any reasonable offer.

“We have some advantages. We’re able to give him another year, five instead of four if we choose. We’re able to give him higher-percentage increases than other teams too. And then if another team does make an offer, we can always match that. So we feel like we’re holding the cards with Eric, and more importantly, I think Eric’s had a good experience here so far. He’s played well and the team has played fairly well. I think he kind of likes what we’re doing.”

For his part, Bledsoe said he’s fine with the situation.

“I was telling [my agent] over the summer, if the contract doesn’t happen I’m ready to play a full season,” Bledsoe said. “I was confident because I’d worked hard all summer, and I knew that I was going to play a lot more than I did the last three years, so I was ready.”

When that came to bear, Bledsoe said he put the situation out of his mind.

“I’ve just got to play,” he said. “I’m focused. I need to keep moving. I’m not worried about [the contract]. If I get worked up about it, I won’t be focused on the game.”

***

No. 2: Raptors React to Gay Trade — Mostly every NBA player realizes that this league is a business and trades happen. Still, this knowledge does not make receiving the news of a trade any easier for players to hear. NBA-TV Canada offers us a rare look at how the Toronto Raptors reacted to the news of a trade on a recent episode of their series Open Gym (reaction starts around the 10:00 minute mark):

***

No. 3: Raptors RollingThose same Raptors who were shocked to hear about their friends being traded have bounced back just fine. They’ve won five of their last six games and appear to be a rare team in the Eastern Conference who can actually win. And they’re doing it with toughness, a word rarely used to describe the Raptors in recent seasons, writes Doug Smith of the Toronto Star:

Once again turning up the intensity, the attention to detail, the effort and the toughness when it came down to winning time, the Raptors rolled in another excellent fourth quarter, holding the Bulls to just four field goals on 24 shots in the final 12 minutes of an 85-79 victory.

They did it in what is becoming typical Raptors fashion: Turning the screws when the game got tight.

“These are the kinds of games you have to play if you’re going to be serious about being a playoff team,” coach Dwane Casey said after the Raptors won for the fifth time in the last six games and seventh time in the last nine.

“We have to play with that kind of toughness, that physicality, if we’re serious about being a playoff team.”

Toughness was the buzzword of the night for a game that at times was barely watchable. There were no moments of sustained offensive flow, no fast breaks or transition baskets; it was tough, hard-nosed, beat-’em-up basketball and the Raptors never retreated an inch.

Digest that for a moment: A team that used to have a reputation for softness more than anything, hit first, hit often, hung around and beat a veteran team at its own game.

“You have to meet their force with force if you’re serious about winning,” said Casey. “We did that and we have to continue to do that and I’m not going to let up. I’m not going to relent from that because that’s who we are, it’s who we’ve got to be. I know, to win in this league you have to be a physical, bad-behind team.”

[Demar] DeRozan was, for one of the few times this season, a non-factor offensively because every time he got near the ball, a second or third defender was there to harass him.

“If I have to be the decoy and that helps the next person on this team get an open shot, I’m all for it,” he said. “It’s at the point now where I know I can score the ball whenever I want, but if they don’t need me to do that at that point in time, then I will do whatever I can, whether it’s rebounding, creating a shot for a teammate or whatever it is to get us a win, that’s what I’m going to have to do.”

That attitude is all-encompassing with this group right now.

“I think the guys in this locker room believe — we believe in each other, we believe in what we’re trying to do,” said Lowry. “I think we know we have a chance to do some things and we can take care of business when times are tough. We’re showing the team camaraderie and spirit that we have, we’re all happy for each other.”

.***

No. 4: Malone Tutors ThomasSacramento Kings point guard Isaiah Thomas has proven so far this year that his strong play last season was not just a fluke. He’s averaging 19.2 points, 6.1 assists and 1.4 steals per game on an impressive 46.5 percent shooting from the field and 42.5 percent from three-point. He credits a lot of his success to the relationship he’s established with new head coach Michael Malone. Jason Jones of the Sacramento Bee has the lowdown:

The partnership between Michael Malone and Isaiah Thomas continues to develop as the coach consults the point guard on the best ways to improve the Kings.Malone said fixing some of the Kings’ late-game problems comes down to him calling better plays, and that’s where his relationship with Thomas can help.

“Those things take time,” Malone said. “And one thing I like about Isaiah is we’ve had a lot of conversations, a lot of dialogue, and he’s open, wants to learn and he’s trying to figure it out. It’s not a lack of effort. It’s just a matter of going through it and picking the spots for when do I attack.”

Thomas has referenced Malone and himself more often when talking about plays the Kings should run and the best way to get the ball to players. He and Malone spend a lot of time talking about the Kings.

“On flights sitting together, before practice, after practice, we’ve had a lot of conversations,” Malone said. “Before games where we’ve sat and spent whether it’s been 20 minutes, 45 minutes just talking about the game, players, where guys are most effective, where he can pick his spots. We’ve had a number of conversations.”

Malone’s goal is to create synergy between himself and Thomas because he plays most of the minutes at point guard.

“Isaiah’s got to be an extension of me on the court,” Malone said. “He’s got to make sure he’s getting guys looks, know what plays to call, now what matchups he’s going to exploit and how to get those guys going where they’re most effective, and that’s part of his maturation of going from being a scoring guard off the bench to being a playmaking guard.”

Malone said consulting with Thomas or any other player is part of his job and he wants his players’ input.

“I preach trust a lot, and if I don’t trust my players, it’s just a hollow word,’ Malone said.

***

SOME RANDOM HEADLINES: Kyle Korver has now hit a three-point shot in 101 straight gamesKevin Garnett went without a field goal for just the second time in his careerKyrie Irving will undergo an MRI on Wednesday after feeling a ‘pop’ in his left knee

ICYMI of The Night: Paul George decided to end 2013 on a strong note with this dunk toward the conclusion of yesterday’s game against the Cavaliers:


VIDEO: Play of the Day: Paul George

One Team, One Stat: Post-All-Star Improvement From The Kings

From Media Day until opening night, NBA.com’s John Schuhmann will provide a key stat for each team in the league and show you, with film and analysis, why it matters. Up next is the Sacramento Kings, who showed some signs of life (at least on one end of the floor) in the second half of last season.

The basics
SAC Rank
W-L 28-54 25
Pace 96.3 7
OffRtg 103.0 13
DefRtg 108.6 29
NetRtg -5.6 26

The stat

6.6 - More points per 100 possessions the Kings scored after the All-Star break (107.3) than they scored before it (100.7), the biggest improvement in the league.

The context

The Kings ranked 18th offensively at the break, but were the seventh best offensive team after it, better than the Rockets, Lakers, Warriors, Spurs and six other playoff teams. They were still pretty terrible defensively, of course. That’s why they went just 9-19.

But the offense was a breath of fresh air. The offense finished the season ranked 13th, the highest ranking in seven years.

Their free-throw rate and rebounding percentage went down after the break, but they did a better job of taking care of the ball and shot better from both inside and outside the arc.

Kings’ offense, 2012-13

Timeframe 2PT% Rank 3PT% Rank OREB% Rank TmTOV% Rank FTA Rate Rank
Pre-break 46.4% 23 35.0% 17 27.4% 13 15.6% 13 .278 12
Post-break 49.4% 13 38.1% 6 25.0% 21 14.0% 5 .258 20
Total 47.4% 20 36.3% 12 26.6% 16 15.0% 9 .271 14

OREB% = Percentage of available offensive rebounds obtained
TmTOV% = Turnovers per 100 possessions
FTA Rate = FTA/FGA

Two other stats are important. First, the Kings went from 10th in pace (95.2 possessions per 48 minutes) before the break to No. 1 in pace (98.5) after it. And that increase clearly suited them better. They played better both offensively and defensively in their fastest-paced games last season.

Secondly, the Kings increased their assist rate (AST/FGM) from 54.0 percent to 57.7 percent. That’s not a huge increase and, league-wide, there’s no correlation between assist rate and offensive efficiency. But it’s certainly notable when it’s the Kings, who have ranked in the bottom five in assist rate each of the last six seasons.

The highlight of the Kings’ second half was a 116-101 win over the Clippers on March 19, in which they assisted on 25 (68 percent) of their 37 baskets. Watch how, on seven of the 14 threes they hit that night, guys made an extra pass for a better shot…


Hockey assists galore. If their uniforms were white and black instead of white and purple, you might think that was the Spurs. The Kings have had some decent offensive talent, guys that can hurt a decent defense, over the years. But they’ve never really worked together or made the most of what they had.

In that Clippers game, guys were looking for each other. The ball sought the open man and it didn’t stop until it found him.

Marcus Thornton led them with 25 points in that game and was their most improved shooter after the break. His effective field-goal percentage went from 48.3 percent before the break to 57.4 percent after it. Isiah Thomas, DeMarcus Cousins and Tyreke Evans also improved their shooting and efficiency.

Cousins went from having only 43 percent of his baskets assisted before the break to having 60 percent of them assisted after. If he can permanently cut down on the face-up isos, he might start living up to his potential.

Of course, the Kings made big changes this summer. Evans is gone and Greivis Vasquez – a real point guard – is in his place. Mike Malone is the new coach and brings with him a new system. He’d be justified to start from scratch with this team. But he also might want to show them how good they can be when the ball moves.

Effective field goal percentage = (FGM + (0.5*3PM)) / FGA

Pace = Possessions per 48 minutes
OffRtg = Points scored per 100 possessions
DefRtg = Points allowed per 100 possessions
NetRtg = Point differential per 100 possessions

Isiah On Open Court: Malone Utah’s ‘Weakest Link'; Regrets ’91 Walk-Off





HANG TIME HEADQUARTERS – When you spend the bulk of your life pursuing and achieving the excellence that Hall of Famer Isiah Thomas has, you tend to spare yourself the agony of looking back, second guessing or worrying about the sensibilities you might have offended along the way. Winning championships at every level affords you that luxury.

But Thomas, an NBA TV analyst these days, decided to look back a little anyway when he hit the couch next to TNT’s Ernie Johnson, Kenny Smith and a cast of other TNT and NBA TV personalities.

Isiah didn’t hold back during shooting for the premiere of the critically acclaimed show’s third season (it will air on Oct. 8 at 6 p.m. ET on NBA TV) . In fact, he made sure “Open Court” will get off to an explosive start when he identified his former rival and fellow Hall of Famer Karl Malone as the man who cost the Utah Jazz a title.

“I thought Utah, going back to that team, I thought they had everything it took to win a championship,” he said. “They had the system, the players, the toughness, they were defensive-minded and everything. I always thought like Malone was the weakest link because he wasn’t a good foul shooter. Had he been a good foul shooter they would have beat Chicago.”

When pressed by Johnson about using the term “weak link” in regards to Malone, Thomas didn’t flinch.

“That’s a weak link, because at the end of a game when you are playing at that level, you come down to the last 30 seconds or the last minute of the game, if that guy can’t make fouls shots then he’s the weak link. He’s the guy that you are fouling, the guy you want to put on the line. You’re not fouling [John] Stockton. You’re not putting him on the line, you’re not letting him take the shot. Everything is going to Malone. I thought Malone’s inability to hit free throws is what stopped them from winning a championship.”

Thomas expressed regret for not handling things better against Michael Jordan, Phil Jackson and the Chicago Bulls in the 1991 Eastern Conference finals. Thomas and the Bad Boy Pistons were swept at home in that series and infamously marched off the floor without shaking hands with the Bulls, a move that sparked a decades-long feud between stars on both sides — most notably Thomas and Jordan.

Ernie Johnson asked if Thomas wishes he’d have handled it differently. The response was immediate.

“Absolutely,” he said. “… looking back, we all should have taken the high road.”

But in the heat of the moment, and with what he called Chicago’s posturing in the media leading up to Game 4, Thomas said the walk-off was orchestrated because he didn’t feel the Pistons were being afforded the respect befitting two-time champions.

Don’t miss all that and more on the Oct. 8 premiere of “Open Court” on NBA TV (6 p.m. ET).